21 Burst results for "Polin"

"polin" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:18 min | 7 months ago

"polin" Discussed on Conversations

"And was you know doing the act. But was squeezing money of the manager to to do the cause so my theory is and i can't prove it but i'm sure that ida went as many times as she could afford and watched and saw her stomping. And maybe what one whole show just watching what the fabric did and maybe another whole show watched what lowest face and fate. We're doing. that's how i imagine at happened. And then so eight ahead. She would have had someone. Mike the costume with one hundred twenty five yards of silk and then she and the bill family troupe and the ball professor baldwin and his wife one of his wife's there were three or more an assortment all the same time. Wonder mrs polin coming on stage. And i think it would be funny to say. I'm sure it was a surprise. Sometimes that was off they went to vancouver and then straight to the north of england and they were the first idea was the first to the north of england basically her hometown with this act that no one had ever seen before so that would just money was pouring too and that was the time at which i did was reach and bought all these sparkly broaches and things. And that's why when you look at that photo that i originally found her. I was looking at it and thinking. Why does she have six branches. That are all butterflies and it was because she was when at the time she was rich. She was in baldwin's butterflies. Saw and. Of course i looked at that age that in victorian state often have broaches with their names on it. I any big slack wearing a t-shirt with your name on it. Almost i remember. Of course i went for the cartoonist joke and thought well lucky for her. She's not called. Because that would have been much more expensive to have the broach may alexandria something like that would have been tribute to so those were the up times when she she'd i need all the dancers and they were making. Thousands of pounds are not in a world where really earning two pounds and not an two pounds. A week would have been fine. So she is finance. I did and she turned it into. She was inspired by the h rider haggard book. She was yes yes so so. I took this this finance self. And how would it end once. She caught fire. It was. it wasn't just the she didn't just stand still. Some some of the dances to stood still and head had the pictures displayed upon them. Basically but ida was a dance as she was a good dancer and she did this extraordinary build up of this character from the novel shae appearing and then catching fire and then writhing and and being consumed by the fire while the audience gasp and sometimes called the fiber guys in a country town too. Because they'd never seen anything like it into them. It was so realistic and terrifying. And then at an an twelve and twelve and and the the The pictures would change and she would slowly sink towards the floor and they'd be real smoke and And they and there would be people off stage making the crackling noises and so that would be great poignancy and then suddenly all of the lots would go ash.

mrs polin baldwin ida england Mike vancouver alexandria
Is This the End of Facial Recognition?

Slate's If Then

06:34 min | 1 year ago

Is This the End of Facial Recognition?

"Back in the summer of two thousand seventeen before she her research on Algorithm. Bias, Deborah she was working at a company called, clarify a computer vision startup, and that's where I got introduced till machine learning, and Ai, and I kind of entered the research world, and I remember the first time I saw my first face data set. Noticing right away that there was a lack of diversity in representation in the data sets, and I was trying to have this conversation with people in my office, but also just more broadly. I was trying to say like. Hey, I think this is the problem, but the response is always like it's so hard to collect data. Why would we think about this extra dimension of representations like this is so hard to do what you're asking for is something that? Is so difficult and like this is the way it's done in. Everyone's accepted. That was sort of the response. I was getting. At the same time, the dead was noticing this lack of representation in the data set. Another computer scientists had noticed it, too. Hello I'm joy. Appoint of Code on a mission to stop an unseen force that's rising a force that I called the coded gays. My term for Algorithm make bias joy. Polin Weenie is a researcher at the MIT Media Lab. And back in two thousand sixteen. She gave a Ted talk about her work. Algorithm MIC bias like human bias results in unfairness. How? Are you like viruses can spread bias on a massive scale at a rapid pace, so yeah finding Joyce Ted Talk. Was this important moment of like all my gosh. There's another person that cares about this I reached out to her sort of exactly. Not Moment and ended up working with her after it's the project they worked on along with Timmy Gebru. is called gender shades. And we talk about how it's probably not a coincidence that her me to make a brute where like all black women were like I, don't think. We're we're all the people that notice this. At the time. The researchers knew that these facial recognition programs with limited data sets were being used by law enforcement agencies around the country. So inaccurate results could have real world consequences. Can you describe? The work you did and what it showed. JANNASCHII is a blocks audit of commercial AI products, so these are tools that companies today, so and clients currently use so nothing that was audited. Experimental everything was in the wild in us. This is mass market stuff. Yeah, exactly what if he just tested these products on a benchmark that was representative with respect to gender and race? What would happen? What would we discover and what we discovered was that when you test these products on darker females, it performs thirty percent worse than it did on on ladder males. And that was the really big discovery was that these products were not actually things that worked well for everybody that they were saying it to, and that coupled with the reality that they were selling this technology or pitching this technology to ice at the time on two different intelligence agencies to local police departments was really alarming. It was something that demonstrated the fact that. Facial recognition at this point is disproportionately being used to sort of monitor and severe minority communities. That's part of this law enforcement pitch, but also not performing as well on those two meetings, which is obviously scary, alarming safety risk. What do these companies do with the police? What are these contracts for? In some cases, it's something reasonable such as attempting to shortlist a group of suspects for crime, so they might have security footage, and a budget faces in the security footage and try to identify who was in their mugshot. Database fits or lines with the faces that they see in the video, so that's a lot of what they do. Is this idea of face verification? Verification or matching a base that I have in my data set to face I know is from a suspect in a crime, and if I have a huge data, said how do I do that quickly and efficiently, so in the case of shortlisting suspects, it feels not as bad, but in a lot of cases they might also use it on sketch photos where. Think don't have a picture of the suspect. They'll ask you know victims to describe it to someone that will sketch it out, and then they'll. They'll put in the sketched photo and use that to search through the list of their database of mugshots. Yeah, and you can imagine just how many false arrest happened as a result of that. Even though there was research from people like deb that showed major flaws with the technology. All the big players in the field kept their products on the market the continued until Monday. When IBM announced, they were stopping their program entirely. So this week. IBM says they're no longer are going to offer or developed facial recognition technology, and I wonder as someone who is immersed in this and studies it. If you look at this announcement differently than a regular person reading the headlines. So since we've been watching these companies effectively for a while, I know a lot more of the backstory leading up to that announcement. It's not a spontaneous decision. I don't think it's as bold as IBM. said out to work right now so right now it's Berber. Are just kind of like wow IBM abandoned all of these important big contracts, and just spontaneously made his decision, and because it's happening at a moment of high racial tension, the mistakes, but also just a lot of reckoning with respect to the racial history of states, it seems as if like Oh, ibm you know, had this realization in light of protests and everything that's happening but the reality is about you've been working towards this position for a long time, and this is the most financially beneficial position for them to take at this moment. How so so IBM was called in gender shades, and they were quick to respond within four. Four months they had released a new product in response to the the revelation that there was this huge disparity in the performance on different demographics. Some tried this idea of. Let's build a big data set to fix it. Following that exposed because they had to use flicker images without any consent in order to collect that many faces, and ended up sort of being this embarrassing situation where the conversation around privacy consent was completely neglected

IBM Joyce Ted Talk Researcher Deborah AI Mit Media Lab Timmy Gebru. Representative Ibm. DEB
"polin" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"polin" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"No delays either not going to happen this morning northbound seventy five you're under ten minutes out over a longer into downtown chucking removes radio seven hundred WLW I will start all sunny clouds moving in an eventual but a late day rain fifty five was the high today tonight scattered rain hangs around one forty three and then Wednesday partly cloudy these button in but a cloud a high of sixty and the I. because mark is there yeah hi tell us what was due to forecast what else going on I mean tomorrow's highs sixty which is awesome and just a little bit above average but thirsty so my pick of the week seventy partly cloudy I guess the other forecast things Polin is technically low right now which is hard to believe everything budding but I think although over in a day a week and rain we had helped scrub it out of the year yes things should start budding pretty fast yeah like so many trees in my neighborhood already flowering we have typically because my family is on the east coast typically our spring is a little bit ahead of heirs for some reason they got everything out well ahead of us yeah this year alone I need your explanation for that because you are a meteorologist because I know everything right as opposed to you know they always seems like like the cherry blossoms out in DC typically bloom a little bit earlier than we see things pop up here it probably just runs another degrees warmer and they have enough growing degree days to tip them over the scale just a little bit before us mmhm growing the camera you can watch the cherry blossoms on the webcam hopefully to keep people from going out there in that too yes yes mingling.

mark Polin
Why Does Hand Washing Beat Hand Sanitizer Hands Down?

BrainStuff

06:23 min | 1 year ago

Why Does Hand Washing Beat Hand Sanitizer Hands Down?

"This episode is part of the miniseries. We're doing on some health and safety topics surrounding the novel type of coronavirus identified in two thousand nineteen which causes what is therefore being called covert nineteen because everything is a little less scary when you understand it better so you're probably aware that with the novel. Virus outbreak hand sanitizer has gotten very hard to find however soap seems to still be in good supply. This is a little counter intuitive given that to keep yourself safe from this virus the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend handwashing. I and using hand sanitizer only as a backup. If you don't have access to running water we spoke with Dr Greg Poland a representative for the Infectious Diseases site of America and professor of Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota. He said proper hand washing is the safest most efficacious least expensive and readily available method to prevent disease. So why would plain old soap and water be more effective against germs than alcohol based hand sanitizer? Poland explained when you're physically washing your hands. You're doing three things. You're removing visible dirt and Mucus. You're using a soap that decreases surface tension. And you're physically by friction loosening removing and washing away. Whatever is on your hand. This includes germs that you can't see and is perhaps particularly effective at stopping the spread of some germs like Corona viruses because the outer casing of these germs is made up of Lipids. Which are fats just as soap can wedge itself down between particles of Greece on a dirty pan and help break it up? Molecules of soap can elbow into that lipid envelope around a microbe and break it apart. Thus rendering the microbe unable to attack and infect cells studies have shown that soap and water is more effective than hand sanitizer it removing certain viruses and bacteria that attack the intestines and respiratory tract corona viruses included and handwashing is especially effective for very dirty hands. Such as those. You get from gardening playing sports or wiping the runny nose with the back of your hand. Poland said if your hands are visibly soiled hand sanitizer can't get all the skins surfaces and if your hands have mucus on them hand sanitizer cannot penetrate remember. If you have the flu. For example influenza viruses will be present in your mucus. Several studies have shown that handwashing got rid of the flu virus from hands. Much faster than hand. Sanitizer did okay. So we've gone over why handwashing trump's hand sanitizing but in order for handwashing to work. You have to do it properly. You've probably seen a billion memes this week about how to do it but let's review the steps for everyone's sake. There are a whole bunch of times that people should be washing their hands but probably the most important are before you prepare or eat food after using the bathroom. And before you touch your face. Here's the protocol according to the CDC. I WHAT HANDS CLEAN RUNNING? Water warm or cold will do then turn off the tap and apply soap lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Any soap will work. It doesn't have to be antibacterial and remember antibacterial. Soap will help. Keep you safer from viruses than regular soap. Because they're different critters as you lather and rub make sure to get all the parts of your hands. The backs palms between the fingers and under fingernails. Start at your fingertips and work backward. Rub Your hands for at least twenty seconds. You Can Hummer Sing. Happy Birthday twice or some other diddy. If counting doesn't do it for you. The five seconds that most people take to wash their hands doesn't get as many microbes afterwards. Rinse your hands. Well under running water and dry them using a clean towel or with an air dryer. If you're in a public restroom it helps to use a paper towel to turn the faucet off and to open the bathroom door. A lot of publicity has gone into educating people that they're not washing for long enough but many are also missing the mark by not thoroughly rubbing all parts of the hand Polin said think of how we viruses bacteria etc into our body. It's with the area of the hand that nobody washes properly. That is the fingertips people. Wash the palm. They washed the back of their hands. They washed the bottom third of the fingers. But have you ever seen someone wash fingernails or tips so the next time you're washing up? Make a point to pay extra attention to these oft neglected appendages. There will be times though when hand? Sanitizer just makes more sense than handwashing. Let's say you were in the bathroom at your office. Followed all the steps outlined above. So now you have perfectly clean hands but wait. You need to open the door that leads from the hallway where the bathroom is back to your office. Dozens of people opening and closing that door all day. Applying dollop of hand sanitizer might be easier than washing your hands again. So here's the correct way to do that. I make sure you're applying enough about a quarter to a half dollar sized amount of him. Sanitizer is necessary. Rub It all the parts of your hand starting from the fingertips and working your way. Back to disinfect. And don't forget in between your fingers. Polin said keep doing that until it's dry that way you know you've had an exposure time for that disinfectant to kill resist the urge to wipe your hands on a paper towel or your pants to speed up the drying process since hand sanitizer and washing can be very drying. You might want to keep some hand lotion or cream nearby to apply once your hands are dry and just one more thing. Dr Poland has fielded questions from people who asked about using disinfecting wipes like those made by clorox or Lysol on their skin. As an added layer of protection he strongly advises people against this quote. Do not wipe your face clorox wipes do not clean your nose with it and do not suck on it. It DOES NOT HELP. It will harm you and it hurts. It offers no benefit

Dr Greg Poland CDC Poland Polin Clorox Professor Of Medicine And Infe FLU Rochester Minnesota Respiratory Tract Mayo Clinic America Representative Greece
"polin" Discussed on How Did This Get Made?

How Did This Get Made?

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"polin" Discussed on How Did This Get Made?

"You burned <music> seven hundred calories jumping up and down to ask that question even when policy walking toward you. You didn't stop jody question. The question is would you be with her. There are twins. Did we think part of the reveal would be another set of twins now. I feel comfortable saying no. I did not know it wasn't even that she asked if we would be down with that. Would we be down with. I feel already made up to say no. I would not like it. I I would be down with it sure well because of time we weren't able to go to the audience licensing. Let's get right down to second opinions. That's right. We have been about this movie with their people out there. The different opinion is now time for second opinions. You got a second opinion. I am so glad that you're hearing that I just finished this movie and that was touching my spirit so much had to hop on Amazon Dot Com just to let you people know that this movie is the bomb I watched this movie every day with my family and friends and then a wish for them to leave and then I'll watch it again top to bottom crazy. Movies are fun but I I think that thought was lost on everyone. Ignored the reviews movie critics are ruthless were slim all June Polin Zukas to stop it looking for logic characters and plot men all of its toxic. I'm hyping them because the split the movie five stars that if I could give it six Tony Always said that was the movie L._A.. May Not be the place where questions but it is the place for song here we go now. It's time for second opinions. That is his mom and his car complex. Why is the land? Why did they have slow second opinions? I don't know why you'd have them. The blood kin three Topa does their dad in his law. Find your mom com together. I'm Becky Dole is bad guy. You may ask me is not aww monkey fall on thank you tell uh spidey sense genevieve that was fantastic. Okay forty two reviews for dead fall on on in total very low number. It averages three point six out of five stars. They're thirty percent thirty six percent five-star reviews. I'll say this much. The five star reviews are in on it for the most part in these <hes> so this one is written by pro Israel and pro is all right in December seventeenth two thousand sixteen dude. This movie is so entertaining not for those easily insulted five stars insulted insulted by bad filmmaking Michelle Hus in February Twenty fifteen said to give the story the right number of stars for the cheesy feel to the movie minus two stars..

Becky Dole Polin Zukas jody Amazon Michelle Hus Tony Always Israel seven hundred calories thirty six percent thirty percent
Russell Westbrook, Wilt Chamberlain And Steph Curry discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Russell Westbrook, Wilt Chamberlain And Steph Curry discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"NBA homestretch Steph curry has been on fire as of late will have some stats to back that up. Golden State beat Denver looks like Golden State is going to be the number one seed in the west Russell Westbrook went for twenty twenty and twenty one last night in a game against the artist. Formerly known as the Lakers. The only other player to be able to do a twenty twenty twenty Wilt Chamberlain back in nineteen sixty eight. He had twenty two points twenty five rebounds Twenty-one assist. You you have to active players who've done a twenty twenty game. Chris Polin, Reggie Jackson. But neither had more than five rebounds in those games. So incredible. Performance last night. Why Russell Westbrook.

Russell Westbrook Wilt Chamberlain Steph Curry Chris Polin NBA Lakers Reggie Jackson Denver Twenty Twenty
"polin" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

13:27 min | 2 years ago

"polin" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"An additional one point zero five trillion dollars to be able to get to that. Almost three trillion dollar number to pay for it. Per year. How do you raise that one point zero five trillion dollars per year? First of all the press that you are you are there clearly citing accurately citing down to two decimal points. So that's ahead. A little time last night. Yes. Nothing else to do. Okay. Yes. Riveting really almost like reading novel. Yes. Okay. Okay. I wonder which Donald. Anyway. So yes, exactly what you said is what's in their report? So right. We have to raise two point nine three trillion. We already have one point eight trillion. So we've got to raise another one point five trillion. So what are the things that we wanted to do was try to make absolutely blindingly clear how this system was going to entail lower costs than our existing system because I've done discussions and interviews and so forth where people simply don't believe it. No matter what I say. They haven't read the study is carefully as you. So the first thing is we say, look, let's keep the transition as simple as possible at half of the country is covered by employer based insurance. And we're going to just say. Let's keep the not you. It's not going to be tied to your employ employment. But let's turn that into. Let's call it business premiums in general. And so to start the system we're going to say, whatever businesses are paying right now and healthcare, let's cut it by eight percent. So if you're paying a million dollars right now in healthcare the day Medicare for all is enacted, you pay nine hundred twenty thousand so you saved eight percent. And and if you do that, plus there are a lot of businesses, of course, that don't pay at all that don't cover their workers. So those we say per worker you have to pay five hundred dollars. If you're not a small business, a very small businesses will we exempt from the tax to give them an opportunity to get started to maintain themselves as small operations, but the larger businesses will either pay five hundred dollars a worker or they will cut their current health insurance spending by eight percent that will raise about six hundred twenty billion dollars right there. So that's we've already got sixty percent of the system the additional spending already covered, then we have to taxes on individuals or families that would get us most of the rest of the. Way there and one way propose a sales tax of three point seven five percent. But only on non. So people who how large share of their income goes to buy food housing. They those forms of spending will be exempt. So it's only on NANDA subsidies by a baseball cap. If you buy a baseball cap or if I buy a new car. Yeah. Those would be have the three point seven five percent tax on them from point seven five percent. Yeah. Yeah. It is. But remember, you're you're not paying health insurance anymore. So the the middle class families actually do the best the best the people that come out financially. The best hard middle class families that are, you know, paying individual healthcare now 'cause that's much more expensive than getting it through your employer. And what we estimate is that they're going to save about fourteen percent of their income. So this is a mass. This is a massive windfall. To increase your income by fourteen percent. What about people who aren't paying for healthcare? Maybe people, and you actually you could say you are paying for healthcare. If you're getting it from your employer, but maybe you're not paying you're not buying into it. Maybe the employer is part of your compensation. Right. No. So now what what I say fourteen percent. That's fourteen percent. Relative to what's coming out of your pocket. Not whether or not you're in whether you're in fact, the fourteen percent income is individually purchased insurance. So for families that do get the healthcare from their business from their employer, the savings are not as high because. Yes, their employers covering more. So it's it's more like between. I would say let's say more like four point four five percent savings relative to what those people are paying. Out of pocket right now. So. So yeah. So that three point seven five percent on non assesses. And it includes we do include and they've a tax credit for people who were right now on Medicaid. So yes, if you go out if you're a person who qualifies for Medicaid, you're going to go out. And if you buy baseball cap, you will pay the three point seven five percent tax, but you will get credit that credited back to you. So that there would be no no net cost to people that are already on Medicaid because they're not paying anything right now for healthcare, right? Yeah. So in the and you also won't pay anything you will pay the sales tax. But then you won't you will get it credited back to you. So the other big source of income. Here is a is a wealth tax. And that is we would be exempted the first billion dollars of people's wealth had then we would impose tax of zero point three eight percent, and that would raise roughly another two hundred billion so between the sales tax and the wealth tax. We're getting four hundred billion. And so that's basically when you add to that to the the business tax with the eight percent reduction relative to existing spending. That's basically how you raise the money to finance Medicare for all. And there's other ways to do it. I mean, the point is we have to get one point five trillion dollars and to the pot to finance better care for all. You could think of other ways to do it. These were ways that we thought were reasonable. Yeah. Reasonable. I I think reasonable at the end. Of course, you're going to come out. And and put the best report of the system that you think will work best. So ideally, this is if we had Medicare for all perhaps this is what we get the final product that gets through congress that would have to get through congress rarely ever an ideal piece of legislation. People might be where they may say. Professor polling. You're absolutely right. I liked this proposal, I doubted. This is what we're gonna end up. Getting I fear. I'm still gonna end up paying a lot more than I already. Am. Well, the the basic idea is that what one of the cornerstones of Medicare for all is the system will cost less. So if we're paying three point three trillion now, and we can succeeded paying two point nine trillion roughly under Medicare for all, you know, that's nine and a half percent less. So somebody is going to be paying less. So you know, if you averaged it out, so that whatever every single person in the country is paying now for medical care is going to pay nine and a half percent less. So I mean that was the principal around, which we propose these these tax ideas. So rather than focus on the fact that people will pay taxes, which they will let's focus on the idea that people will spend less than they do now through private health insurance, and they will spend less because the system is. Is way more efficient. We able to look at other countries that did transition into some kind of a single pair, or at least universal health care and that included increased taxes and how it affects folks who are at the lower end of of the of of earnings. Yeah. Well, there are of course, a lot of examples because other countries most other countries have variations on this already. What I thought was one of the most interesting examples because it was one of the more recent ones was actually Taiwan, and okay, you could say well Taiwan is isn't that comparable to the United States? That's true. But it is meet meaning in size. Yeah. Meaning it's is in the there's twenty one billion people, and and when they transitioned twenty years ago, the average income was about twenty thousand dollars a year, and we are roughly at sixty thousand dollars a year. So you could say, well, then, you know, why bother thinking about Taiwan? Well, here's a couple of interesting things. Taiwan had a multiple payer system. They transitioned and they had a over forty percent of the people were uninsured and they transitioned in less than one year. And they did it without benefit of the information technologies that we have now that would certainly facilitate a transition, and they did it in a way that, you know, the satisfaction polls and so forth in the first few months. People were confused, but by the end of the year the approval for Medicare. For all was in the seventy percent or about and subsequently. There is no politician whichever party, whether it's more conservative party or the more Progressive Party. They won't touch Medicare for all because people like it. It works. It delivers universal care and the healthcare outcomes have improved. So that's a relatively recent. You know, the the Canada would be a good case except and Canada the transition really went province-by-province rather than on in one fell swoop private insurers in Canada too. Don't you? Yes. To a very limited extent, and we could still have private insurance. I mean, the law the Medicare for all Bill that Bernie Sanders and John Paul have proposed says that are public system. These are the basic things that are public system is going to cover if there is something above and beyond that some people want with respect to health care, then a private insurance could provide that, but it's would be a dramatically more constricted narrower types of offerings because all basic health provisioning would be covered through Medicare for all. Rubber Polin is our guest rubber pollens distinguished professor of economics and co-director of the political economy research institute at the university of Massachusetts Amherst, here's the co author of a report that we were talking about which is called economic analysis of Medicare for all, okay? Professor, Paul inlets. Now dive into the economic aspects of how this will affect the economy as a whole, and maybe even some individuals that may lose their jobs who work in the insurance industry, but before we get to the insurance industry and actually this doesn't include the insurance industry, but I want to begin this part of the conversation by talking about the macro economics, healthcare and the healthcare insurance industry in this country make up about a sixth or I've heard a fifth of the economy somewhere around there that that is a major portion of the economy of this country. If we were to go to Medicare for all, and even if we were to keep a small portion. Shrink the size of the insurance industry. If you want something beyond what Medicare for all would offer as you mentioned earlier, it's hard to imagine this winning be a dramatic shift to the economy as a whole. Troubling shift? May maybe we could cause a recession. Yeah. So that's a very real concern. And we deal with it at length in our study..

Medicare baseball Professor Medicaid Taiwan Donald Progressive Party Rubber Polin university of Massachusetts Am Bernie Sanders Canada principal United States congress
Novak Djokovic Suffers Stunning Upset to Philipp Kohlschreiber at Indian Wells

City Arts and Lectures

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Novak Djokovic Suffers Stunning Upset to Philipp Kohlschreiber at Indian Wells

"Tennis upsets of the Indian Wells masters world. Number one. Novak Djokovic was beaten in straight-sets by Philip Cole Shriver caney. She Corey also losing in three sets to Polin shoe, but her catch comfortable wins though for Roger Federer, Rafael, the Dr John is now in the women's singles the top two seeds of both that Namias soccer was beaten in straight-sets by Belinda bench. Simona Hallett lost in three sets to Marquette vendors Sova wins for industry, Selena and got opinion. Muka reuther. Meanwhile, arena sub Alenka and Angelique Kerber have gone into a third set. Their is a break-up

Novak Djokovic Philip Cole Shriver Angelique Kerber Simona Hallett Indian Wells Masters Roger Federer Belinda Bench Alenka Namias Polin Selena Tennis Corey Dr John Rafael
"polin" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"polin" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Buzzing sensation my body throwing with energy stuck in a rhythm after years of overwork. My body was continuing to release the excess amount of adrenaline that. They had previously needed to get through the day. It became clear that I needed to do more than just work less head. To rehabilitate, my mind and body and shed years of bullshit and bad habits. So take you thirty months to get over this at which point you went to an acupuncturist, you saw therapist a trainer a life. Coach osaman Iraqi Hiller. From all the things that you did to try to get back to yourself, can you identify one that you feel was the most crucial. Yeah. Well, so I I went to see the shaman. It was two thousand fourteen and I went on. And I want us good journey, but just in like a one on one setting and this was a little bit before it's become increasingly popular, Michael Polin room. You know bestselling book about that'll do it. Right. But so it was a little bit more. Like, what am I getting into you know, at that? At that point. Because I didn't know I there was one person who I had met who had recommended this person to me and said, okay. This is a good person. Like, I had great experienced. You know, go do this. I went to see her. And the interesting thing was, you know, many people go journeys many people have different experiences. People envisions, you know, some people go flying through space my experience was that afterwards. I didn't have any anxiety for about three weeks. It was just like what is that? Like, it's mazing. I can't imagine. It's absolutely incredible. And. What? And so it came back. I'd like to have an anxiety free. Our right. It's it's amazing. And so it came back eventually three weeks later. But what was so transformative about that experience was it? It just allowed me to recognize that the exile was something separate for me that wasn't part of my identity. Like, I thought that I was an anxious person. Like, I thought that was part of my dentistry. And so I realized that it wasn't part of my done at it was a layer that I myself was adding, you know, like an ingredient that I was adding into the recipe or maybe a byproduct of the ingredients that I was like stirring into my life. Then, you know, the kind of subsequent time after that just became a, you know, in it's something I'm still doing kind of thinking about okay? How can I get back to that place and a new, but knowing that it is possible to get back to that place? You know, and. Yeah. I mean, I think just having really incredible to have those moments where you know, you just it's not that you like don't have worries, but it's just that they sort of pop up and you're like, well, you know, I can't do anything about that. Or you know, we'll do this about that. And then you just kind of move on, you know, and you're not cycling. Well, worry is such an interesting thing because it really doesn't do anything other than distract you from what you can't control. We're when you quit this big job where you doing so much the books the conference, the website, the magazine, we you scare did you think who am I without this work? I wasn't scared. I'm always like excited to do the next thing. Like, I'm always very like no regrets. Let's move forward. But what was really challenging? And I think this is challenging anytime. You move on from any, you know, it was very deeply identified with that job. You know, I got to do a lot of incredible things got to create a lot of incredible things. I worked with an amazing group of people. Right. And so all of that was all that structure was gone. All this relationships were gone early. You know, still know some of those people that you know, what I'm saying. But I think what is so hard is figuring out. It takes a while to separate what you want from what that old you wanted. You know? So I would say it took me at least a year or two to kind of pull apart those threads into say, oh, this is part of me that still has this..

Iraqi Hiller Michael Polin three weeks thirty months
"polin" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"polin" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"You can now play your apple music on your Amazon echo. How did that happen? There's something going on between those two. That's that's all. Pod sales. Right. It's. Also. I'm sorry. Go ahead. I think I was just gonna say that apple music has a very different mandate. It's been available on Android since day one and apple could have very easily cancelled the Android app when they took over, but they want the they prioritize family plans, and they realize that not everyone in the family has an iphone and not everyone in the family has a home pot, and it provides greater value to the families. If they if you can buy this corruption, and then played on anything you happen to have just this. We just responded to that by saying Alexander, I give everybody iphone my family that way it all works. But but this is a paid service. This is not like money those things are free. This is a paid service, and that's very easy business model that just and right now, I mean, I haven't I haven't. You know in the in the kitchen, we have an echo show, or whatever, and my wife, and my kids use it almost constantly, and we use I have Amazon music because I have prime or whatever that that's why pay for that just go because. Amazon I haven't Amazon lemon because of our echoes daughter when we make breakfast, my come home and said play Pearl Jam and plays Polin. So so who gave in on this one Amazon deal or selling Amazon? Well is both. They got a deal Amazon is selling apple stuff again and apple gets to push apple music more which is for some sometimes you it's like sometimes you wanna have services that help you lock people to your hardware, and sometimes you wanna have services that.

Amazon apple Polin Alexander
"polin" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"polin" Discussed on WCPT 820

"This is Richard J s cow. We talk a lot about Medicare for all on this program. And I'm constantly making the case feels like his constant that we can't afford not to switch to Medicare for all. But of course, I don't have any hard data or economic research to back that up. Fortunately, our next guest dodge. He's just co authored a major study any economic impact Medicare for all. And I think it's good news. I think, but he'll tell us Robert Polin is distinguished professor v comics and co-director of the political economy research institute or Perry at the university of Massachusetts in Amherst, he is also the founder and president of PA are Paul Polin energy, and retrofits and urged and he's written a number of books on economics. We could list them. But I want to get. The core of the argument. He is lead article lead author of this new article economic analysis of Medicare fraud to study or a white paper, but hotels, first of all Bob pollen. Thanks for coming on the program. Well, thanks very much for having me on. And I guess is this a white paper or it's a study. I want to use the right here. At this point. It's two hundred more more. Kind of like a book on its book length. Yeah. So we put it up Perry online, and he put it can get whatever we want to call it. Yeah. It's a pretty in depth analysis better care for all. And I think given the length and I have it in front of me. We will stick to the highlights. But the highlights are good basically has I understand it. You took the basic contours of of previous Medicare for all act. Along with some illustrative examples of where the revenue might come from to look at the macro or the overall impact of Medicare for all in the health economy, right? Yeah. I mean, this thing obviously the question that we want to answer is Medicare for all exceed could achieve what if. Aims to achieve and equality institute is to provide everybody with high quality health insurance..

Medicare Robert Polin founder and president Paul Polin Richard J Amherst Perry university of Massachusetts research institute distinguished professor fraud co-director
"polin" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"polin" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"So those that as well, which is the magazine. Yes. Juice. So you know, he had his magazine they had film production. He had his office. He had his office, which was full of boxes and books, and magazines which wasn't even a chair and his full, you know, he had no he didn't office unusable. Basically, it was it was office of a relaxed office environment. I would say that makes sense some stuffed animals around pretty Polin was on the desk. But you know, you with you in that place. It was very exciting. Did that Mark that moment when he made that shift you'll studying history, and you make that shift into thinking there's a possibility of being an artist possibility is a good word because it's just showed what was possible. What was actually possible in the world as an artist you, basically, did whatever you wanted and heated every wanted as they seemed like it complete freedom. It wasn't actually the case when you eat the diaries and find out what was going on at that time. He's quite frustrated butts just like he could do he wanted. And. Yes, dismayed the world of baroque Altarpieces much love them, just not particularly become really compete with that with with contemporary life. And so I took about to finish my degree. Nobody knew what to do with the experience of being there. Really? I didn't even know what. It took some time to process in a way. But I just knew I'd been ruined by in terms of history. My life in our history had just been destroyed by guide same and one of the striking connections. I think between your work and Andy Warhol's life from work is is this connection with with music and particularly comportment Warhol's famous Cavs for the velvet underground, yes. And Rolling Stone, sticky, fingers, etc. Yes. Yes. But also just that sort of spiritual connection between art and music, and it seems to me that's right at the heart of what you do. Yes. Yes. It is. That existed before I really. The music my connection to music and pop music was. About four or five. So that was what he there. But then seeing an artist it was seemed to be part of that was well, it was interested in it was quite influential. So I was always happy to know that. And, but yes, for music thing for me was always huge huge still is I mean, maybe less so now lost touch popular music. But I still have opinions. But yes that was that not having any boundaries. I think it was the interesting thing with him film magazine music arts performance, in a way in his life was a performance for me as he's a great influence in that respect and the spies. Also, the fact that he sort of corralled people together into interesting situations. And you think about the film's may very many of them Warhol setting up a situation. And then seeing what happens, and you see that to certain degree in your work as well. Yes little bit. I mean, very different situations. But he's yes, he was of wire he's clearly was of wire of people. He wasn't really take palm things and I had a little bit about me as well. Very good at taking pond things. I like getting the paper to take part in. It's a contradiction in a way. That's yes. I deaf is definitely a connection in that respect. All over was an artist too. Had a very object based practices. Well, as the sort of more Merel in film based works and stuff like that. You will. I don't think of you as somebody who produces objects..

Andy Warhol Mark Polin Altarpieces Merel
"polin" Discussed on Overnight Drive

Overnight Drive

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"polin" Discussed on Overnight Drive

"Really what I'm looking for is the past return, and that's not going to happen. So I just got used to it and that's why I get so fucking happy when you send me things like that Morton Downey junior episode because just for a brief shining moment, the past has returned and I feel warmth, and then it ends that I to go back to reality. I've been watching. Metallica documentary that is only day McCain interviews because they couldn't get any other dudes and Damon stain has the chestnut of. Well, the reason why we moved from LA is because of all the glam music can do. No. Glam stands for. Yes. What gay LA music Yar there it is. There's the mistaken God, damn the whole thing is about like them doing heroin and justifying it by being jazz musicians. Fucking really weird. Like girl Samuelson of Chris Polin all jazz. They play jazz together and jazz players. Do they do heroin in Garside straight up? If you want to be great. Do heroin and day mistaken is like a wanna be great. So I did her. Like, okay, I'm sure there's other ways to be great. Cool. But yeah, it's totally fine. Here's one from sid and Brooklyn. I think Mino this is. If it is the person thinking of somebody I've known. For a long time, but otherwise. Yeah, I think it is. Somebody in Brooklyn. Other than me, I do. It's not cool. Sorry about, I know I'll break my friendship off. Perfect. Yeah. Well, think she wasn't San Francisco now? No, she worked for something and then I think she might live in Los Angeles now anyways, it probably isn't the singer. She lived here a long time ago. Whatever my boyfriend works at a little coffee place drinks, coffee all day. Free.

heroin San Francisco Morton Downey Los Angeles Brooklyn McCain Damon Garside Chris Polin Samuelson sid
"polin" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

AM 870 The Answer

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"polin" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

"Mining's joe anderson i'm a certified financial planner professional and with the cpa stick around we got paulie limb big bad paul lim so broken up that i missed this interview that big al in polin have together you know there was quite a bond there was like the tack and insurance i've known paul for years and so yeah we're going to break down some insurance and there was a reason why i missed i went to the dermatologist and i'll tell you what i had probably a lot more dermatologist versus listen to paul allen quote by louder i have to tell you it was pretty good but i am by all right we got some email questions yes we do i run out of paper printing up knicks email questions i ran out of paper writing down all the facts this is gonna take fifteen minutes just to read the fact pattern here all right so the question is will out live my money so nick here he's fifty three years old planning to retire in january of twenty twenty at fifty five years old his pension starts at fifty eight all right so fifty five he's got a bridge a gap so it's pension starts at fifty eight two thousand four hundred bucks a month got it got it and then if he passes his lovely wife would get fifty percent of their pension got it right so he's planning on starting to withdrawal from 401k for three years and then the pension will start in two thousand twenty three okay so he's gonna retire fifty five he's gonna pull the money from his 401k for three years i'm guessing at twenty four hundred dollars a pop and then he's going to stop with the 401k and then turn the pension on in two thousand.

Mining paul lim polin paul joe anderson paul allen nick 401k three years twenty four hundred dollars fifty three years fifty five years fifteen minutes fifty percent
"polin" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"polin" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Her wherever you may be an however you may be listening iheartradio fox sports radio f at one brought to you by firestone complete auto care running newer longer with firestone lee jenkins the guy who broke the story brawn james going back to cleveland the letter joins us in less than thirty minutes mark slayer at the top of our number three one hour from now it is great to have in golden state obviously vanquished houston last night there clearly the better team there's a difference between reacting and overreacting okay lebron loses game one to boston don't overreact he's lost game one eleven times he's eight and three last night it's not overreacting to say houston gave golden state their best punch and was dominated for the last twenty five minutes of that game chris polin harden were great they shot over thirty five percent they were at home steph curry was off a lot of things went right they got off to a great start and that game last fifteen minutes i mean the fourth quarter there was never a second you watched and thought golden state in trouble here they control the game a lot went right yeah houston had some turnovers so what everybody turns the ball over against golden state steve well houston houston missed them gimmes onto last time an nba team didn't miss four five guineas rudy go bare mrs fourfive hafer utah you miss gimmes the big issue is everything golden state does is systematically better they've got a better coach they adjust better they're better defensively they pass better they're less eyeso and they adjust the smartest team and this generally is the case the smarter team wins the championship people look at those jordan teams at remember scottie pippen's on tv jordan's become.

lebron steph curry houston scottie pippen jordan firestone lee jenkins cleveland boston chris polin nba thirty five percent twenty five minutes fifteen minutes thirty minutes three one hour
"polin" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"polin" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Her wherever you may be an however you may be listening iheartradio fox sports radio f at one brought to you by firestone complete auto care running newer longer with firestone lee jenkins the guy who broke the story brawn james going back to cleveland the letter joins us in less than thirty minutes mark slayer at the top of our number three one hour from now it is great to have in golden state obviously vanquished houston last night there clearly the better team there's a difference between reacting and overreacting okay lebron loses game one to boston don't overreact he's lost game one eleven times he's eight and three last night it's not overreacting to say houston gave golden state their best punch and was dominated for the last twenty five minutes of that game chris polin harden were great they shot over thirty five percent they were at home steph curry was off a lot of things went right they got off to a great start and that game last fifteen minutes i mean the fourth quarter there was never a second you watched and thought golden state in trouble here they control the game a lot went right yeah houston had some turnovers so what everybody turns the ball over against golden state steve well houston houston missed them gimmes onto last time an nba team didn't miss four five guineas rudy go bare mrs fourfive hafer utah you miss gimmes the big issue is everything golden state does is systematically better they've got a better coach they adjust better they're better defensively they pass better they're less eyeso and they adjust the smartest team and this generally is the case the smarter team wins the championship people look at those jordan teams at remember scottie pippen's on tv jordan's become.

lebron steph curry houston scottie pippen jordan firestone lee jenkins cleveland boston chris polin nba thirty five percent twenty five minutes fifteen minutes thirty minutes three one hour
"polin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"polin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ancient trees and deadwood dwi polin correspondent is usually and banner who joins me now hello you leeann palo so the first time pollen has been ordered to stop logging in this particular forest is it now this has been going on for the past two and a half years since the nationalist government took office in twenty fifteen pollen has been reprimanded time and again that's the previous environment minister yang cisco just refused to accept this and logging when tom and there's a lot of damage has been done because of this logging isn't there it is staggering one hundred and eighty thousand trees were cut during this time and the authorities tripled the logging quotas during this period and according to statistics compiled by collage organizations more than half of the trees were more than one hundred years old okay cutting trees that are over one hundred years old gus just against e law one fourth of the total area on the polish side of the border because there is also the byelorussia inside and the byelorussian side is covered by the national park in its entirety and the ecological changes that happened because of this logging concern the whole forest what about financial penalties as things stand there have been no penalties imposed on power lines and i think the decision by the polish authorities came just in time although and is to bear the cost of european court of justice proceedings and these are going to be no small sums of money and of course there's always the the threat that some kind of financial sanctions might be imposed in the future if logging where resumed on the scale at any time this is the latest in a string of battles between poland and the eu well the polish nationalist government seems intent on completely transforming power lines into its own image into a vision of a country which is guided by the wellbeing of the nation however you define it and for this reason the government has been basically dynamiting everything that was there before whether it concerns the way the legal system was organized whether it concerns the education system whether it concerns the independence of public media all this has been tampered with and although there has been criticism of every step coming from europe the united states and the polish government just keeps on saying that it's an internal matter that it's ready to discuss with the.

cisco tom poland eu united states leeann palo europe one hundred years
"polin" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"polin" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Houston it feels good i thought chris paul and harden would work in my theory was it would work because of this the both really smart in life if i hire to smart people they'll be smart enough to go okay let's get over our egos and let's just make it work like it wasn't about styles it was always like chris polin hardener smart players smart guys at any industry have more self awareness and just figure crap out and they have their beautiful together in almost instantly because they don't have like lebron wade worked they weren't perfect together but they're really high functioning smart guys so they sit down and have a glass of wine on an off night and go okay i'll give you this you give me that and i think it works finally westbrook's patting his stats you don't have a problem with it i'm told noah's patting okay let's let us get that out there the last time i checked there's nine other guys on the court so you telling me rushes out text the his teammates other to like hey i'm all of these free throw rebounds and no one jump everyone move or yet i'm gonna get twenty rebounds guys let me get lease fifteen of them that's impossible to do you don't think he needed to have as greatest rebounding night ever in the last year last game of the season any did you don't think he's aware of stats he got twenty rebounds no one's going to let you get twenty rebounds a game and what he said was really true if people could do it they would do it but they can't because it takes so much energy to do it and russ can dominate in play different styles of basketball i i will take this from russ i will say russ you guys play phenomenal that night you get twenty rebounds nineteen assists six points and paul george have one of the best games that he had as your teammate maybe skilled that and we're all festively.

Houston chris polin lebron wade noah russ paul george chris paul harden westbrook
"polin" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"polin" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Bielski brothers b i e l s k i it was turned into a popular movie with daniel craig i forget the name of the movie ryan remember it what is it called defiance with daniel craig these were ordinary i think they were a butcher's in a small town in polin what mary brothers regular guys basically you know townspeople when the nazis took over the town they fled into the woods they had to live in the snow that secure food the first thing that had to secure guns to survive read their history they had no guns but the first thing they wanted to get their hands on were guns to survive in the woods of poland and so they either broke into farm houses and stole a guns from polish farmers or they laid in wait and they killed germans on patrol with rock stones bricks and stolen guns so they could then protect themselves and their women and some of the children it's one of the most stirring stories in modern history and it's a story that should be told and taught in every school in america and then you wouldn't see all these foolish children marching with such self righteousness we're also gonna talk about my book god faith and reason today because friday for the christian world is good friday we're moving into passover for the jewish world friday.

daniel craig ryan polin poland america
"polin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"polin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Moments engaging mateen in a gun battle killing him but not before he took forty nine lives video was released at the trial of mateen's widow noor salman and prosecutors are trying to prove she played a role in the attack the embattled former hanson police chief and his wife are charged with shoplifting from a kohl's department store in hang police say edward savage and his wife christine record on video stealing more than four hundred dollars worth of clothes from kohl's on derby street last april theft was caught on surveillance video district court clerk magistrate decided not to file charges following a closeddoor probable cause hearing last spring officials are now moving forward with the euro charges after the couple failed to write apology letters which would have led to the charges being dismissed president trump is set to roll out new plans to combat the national opioid crisis on monday senior white house officials say those plans include calling for tougher penalties for drug traffickers possibly even the death penalty the president is also expected to propose new substance abuse prevention and education efforts in manchester new hampshire the white house official says that congress has set aside six billion dollars to combat the crisis and the president's plan will outline how to spend that money wbz news time one twenty two a bill is introduced this week in albany new york aimed at making marijuana legal in the medical treatment of pets reporter james flippin has the buzz on the push to make pot legal medical marijuana is already available for humans throughout the empire state this proposed law aims to give vets the option to prescribe pot for fido and kitty it was introduced by westchester lawmaker amy polin at the state assembly she says the measure would give owners an option when pets aren't responding to other treatment the thought is consuming cannabis could also benefit pets that suffer from chronic pain or seizures california and nevada are considering similar laws james flippin new york the screen without a significant storm number three wins heavy snow coast lizard condition snow coming down wrote condition this is one to three inches no emergencies at worse by the minute schools the accuweather upto with wbz stormcenter newswatch never stops wbz newsradio in thirty wbz news time one twenty three traffic and weather together the subaru retailers of new england allwheeldrive traffic.

marijuana nevada westchester reporter albany manchester white house christine hanson accuweather new york california cannabis amy polin mateen james flippin congress official president
"polin" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"polin" Discussed on Unorthodox

"I think it's because he's not funny or like because he's the there's a producer who just raised his hand in i'm gonna sue agreement because he's not funny our producers is a communist he's done like really sort of like racially and culturally insensitive things in the last few years right wasn't there that movie about native americans though yeah sort of retro right and away that where he was culturally appropriating six year olds yeah that's fensive i'm going to take your questions seriously and say yeah let's say that but donald trump is president so item seven out of lettuce out so far off right oprah what's amazing all the people who are littered on the floor right eric cantor eric graydon's alfred run point i talked to my friend my jewish friend and i was like what should ask what question should i ask them and then i came up with us in he was like well you know they're going to talk about eliot spitzer oh yeah or that he leaders jewish friend about mostly his forays into dating but that's for joe i'm just i'm going to say that certainly chuck schumer wants to be president i don't think it's going to happen shot he didn't run at some point and then there's some you know some congress people who i mean jared polin colorado probably wants it and and ted deutch and florida's calmer i mean but no a lot of the great ones are just you know the anti semites took them to vladimir putin took down anthony weiner he took down franken and you know he's he's coming for all of them air garcetti's.

florida franken vladimir putin ted deutch jared polin congress eric cantor donald trump anthony weiner producer colorado chuck schumer joe eliot spitzer eric graydon president six year