35 Burst results for "Policy Analyst"

Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

06:23 min | 4 months ago

Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

"Joining us now. Is laurie garrett. She is a health policy analyst and pulitzer prize winning science writer. Who has been a real voice of reason for us over the course of this crisis laurie. It's really nice to see you. Thank you for being here so you and a lot of other public health experts. They called this back in the summer when the white house decided they were going to take away from. Cdc and have the trump administration. Have hhs collect this data in instead. It really does seem to have been born out in the months since how big a problem is this. How much better off would we be. If we had real data we could count on well. First of all rich we really all agreed to of gratitude to charles pillar who has doggedly covered this story for science magazine for the last three months performed brilliantly and one of them really important things that he has surrey. Thank all of a sudden you are coming on my television for which i apologize talks. And he and he and one of the things that he revealed was that deborah burks was really behind this. She wanted more control of the data she didn't trust. Cdc and claim that the data was sloppy by moving it into hhs they actually then barbed out to private companies. One was a private firm called telegraphing. Biggest client they never had and the other was pailin tier which of course not much later went public on the stock market tear was engaged to sort of massage and analyze the data on the result was of course at the hospitals. Were thoroughly confused. Who are we supposed to send data. To what form are we supposed to fill out. How do we do this. What computers are we supposed to us and for a long time in the summer right after this all started we really had almost no data related to rely upon at all Eventually the federal government started really pushing hospitals around. And said you're gonna lose your medicare contracts. We're gonna take your medicaid and medicare patients and throw them at another hospital if you don't start reporting data to us. Whoa alright swallow hospital start flooding data in. But what's the reliability of the relevance of it. What does it really mean. now. Here's where the the crux of the problem is if your job is to decide how much. Ppe needs to go to arkansas. Or how how much dexsa. Methadone needs to go to south dakota if your job is managing the national stockpile and determining whether or not reading to crisis level of shortages of protective gear for nurses for example. You need to know what's the hospitalization rate. What are the trends. look like. What's the use rate. Well you don't have any such data to rely on right now. It's just a total mess. There's no It's a mess at all levels if the federal numbers don't jive with the state numbers the state the numbers don't jive with the county numbers. The private hospital sector is reporting a different way than the public hospital sector. I mean this is just chaos lawrence this problem or how fixable is. This is a problem. I know that it was a relief to a lot of people to see the list of names who have been advising the incoming president on cova thus far and we've heard sort of reassuring and science based public statements from them during the transition thus far but when they dig in and start to do this work is this a. Is this something that can be is. Is this something that can be undone. Will they have to build this from the ground up. The cdc essentially be put back in charge of this in a way that will just sort of quickly rationalize the state and make it useful again. Will rachel raw. Really anxious to see who biden is going to name as the next. Cdc director and also the next hhs director net will go a long way to helping to answer your question. What we don't really know because the transition team is only just had a few days of access to get inside the cdc. We don't really know what the state of these kinds of programs is now inside in other words. Is it all still in their computers. Are there still personnel. There could reactivate the cdc's tracking system or was it utterly dismantled. And we don't really know the answer to that question right now laura after. Get your reaction to the news tonight. Dr scott atlas has resigned from the white house. I personally was not shy about talking about the fact that i was alarmed to see him in the position that he was in the white house given his stated public views on the virus. What's your reaction to the fact that he's now resigned. It's great. I think that he had a very negative impact on affairs inside the white house. And on our national response and i'm not sure he's going to be welcome back at stanford the stanford faculty have voted to denounce him condoleeza rice his faucet. The hoover institute is indicated some dissatisfaction with his performance. The what's interesting to me is the timing. why now. why did he put out a statement today. Dated for tomorrow and i just wonder if it's in any way connected to the fact that andrews nel who was really the architect of this whole herd immunity approach for sweden Was pushed aside this weekend in sweden. As that country's death toll and case numbers have soared. And there's a strong belief in many sectors of the swedish government that listening to end. Anders was a mistake and also conversely that boris johnson finally rejected of the sort of heard immunity approach that many of his advisor to add been advocating and about three weeks ago started tough lockdowns and since they've been on three weeks of lockdown. They've seen their case load plummet by third

HHS Laurie Garrett Trump Administration CDC Charles Pillar Deborah Burks White House Science Magazine Pulitzer Laurie Surrey Will Rachel Raw Federal Government Cova South Dakota Medicare Dr Scott Atlas Arkansas
Biden likely to remain tough on Chinese tech like Huawei, but with more help from allies

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

03:37 min | 5 months ago

Biden likely to remain tough on Chinese tech like Huawei, but with more help from allies

"Joe Biden will shortly reverse many of President Donald Trump's policies. But to the surprise of some Biden may hold the line when it comes to confronting Chinese technology companies. Reporting on this in The Washington Post is Jeanne Whalen, who joins us now in the coma News line Gene as you're right, President Trump labeled Chinese technology and companies like Wal Way a security threat. How my President elect Biden changed that approach. So from the foreign policy analysts and tech analyst that I spoke with and looking at some Biden's own writings and the writings of his top advisers. It does seem, the consensus is that he won't He won't change it much that he will maintain a hard line toward Chinese tech companies, including hallway, but he will tweak the strategy a little bit, maybe, you know, obviously stop with the extreme tweeting and he'll probably most importantly, try to recruit more of our allies to confront China as a unified front to try, Tonto. Negotiate with China for For it to follow more of the Western Market economy. It's trading rules to try to kind of help bring China more into the western economy. That's that's kind of the contents out there. Of course, protecting intellectual property is a major concern of American companies before they parted with Chinese manufacturing firms. What will binds approach look like on that front. I don't know is the quick answer it, But, you know, I think I think the U. S has been pushing China too. Respect intellectual property more and to to not force the transfer of I P when Western companies enter the Chinese market. China clearly knows the U. S position on that and it Z. You know, I think the Trump Administration has really tried to push that line and I'm sure the Biden administration will continue to whether whether it will succeed is unclear, but Again. It's the main difference will be that it will. I think attempt to try to work more with our allies approach China as one United Group and say, If you want to enter our markets and trade in our markets, then you need to behave more by the Trading rules of the global economy and allow us into your markets and allow us into your markets without unfairly taking our intellectual property. You know, five G check is, of course, has been so important around the world. And we know Chinese Tech has been critical of the vet Our American allies likely to confront Beijing when so much is on the line there. Well, the five G's story has already been kind of shifting, so I think the Trump Administration did make some progress in getting allies in Europe. To cut back on their use of while weighs five g network equipment. Countries such as the UK and France have Essentially barred much quality equipment from their fighting networks and are looking to European suppliers. Instead, there's also a growing movement now to try to Use an entirely different approach toward five D equipment to kind of pivot away from the type of equipment sold by China and some other suppliers and to use more of a software driven. Model that relies more on US software that that's a different kind of network, called an open Ran five G network, which is pretty technical to explain, but They don't seem to be already some movement, perhaps away from Wall Way inside G.

Biden China Jeanne Whalen President Trump Trump Administration Joe Biden Donald Trump WAL Biden Administration Coma The Washington Post Chinese Tech United Group Beijing Europe France UK United States
Judge blocks Trump plan to cut food stamps for 700,000 adults

Here & Now

03:36 min | 6 months ago

Judge blocks Trump plan to cut food stamps for 700,000 adults

"Struck down a Trump administration rule that would have eliminated food stamps for nearly 700,000 Americans. In her ruling on Sunday, the District Court judge in Washington, D. C called the Trump policy arbitrary and capricious, especially during a pandemic that has caused demand for food stamps to rise. 17%. Since the outbreak began. Ed Bolan is a senior policy analyst at the center on Budget and Policy Priorities. It's a nonprofit that looks at how budget policies affect low income households. And thanks for joining us glad to be here. And so it sounds like snap benefits, which is another way of saying food stamps are safe for the time being, but remind us what the Trump administration was trying to do here. Sure, so the Trump Administration had proposed a rule that would have made it much harder for unemployed workers who don't have kids in their homes to get food stamps or snap. The administration did it by restricting benefits in areas where people could still have trouble finding a job or getting toe work, so states couldn't continue to provide benefits after a couple of months, even if somebody was looking for work are working part time. Well, A fair number of people, you know, do believe that if someone is an able bodied adults, no dependence and no Children like there should be more restrictions. I'm getting food stamps, but obviously the situation is very different now because of the pandemic unemployment. Is up four times what it was last year when the policy was first ruled out by the Trump administration, But even like pre pandemic want critics saying that this whole idea was shortsighted anyway? Absolutely. It is interesting. That pandemic, I think, shines a light on why states needed to be able to continue to allow folks to get snap if they were Lowing coming off qualify for it precisely because unemployment hits people in communities in different ways we saw in the pandemic that mostly low wage workers were the ones that lost most of the jobs. Those jobs aren't coming back in many industries like the restaurant industry, janitors, home health aides. All these folks are folks that typically And rely on snap even while they're working, But certainly when they're in between jobs, so that always existed pre pandemic, those same communities and those same individuals might have job for a couple of months and I need some snap. Many of them would be working and getting snapped at the same time. So the rule we thought was arbitrary, capricious and harmful to low wage workers who were in and out of jobs, pre pandemic and especially post pandemic or during the day. And by the way, we've been a lot of reporting on how food banks around the country are feeling a lot of pressure because so many people have lost their jobs in the pandemic. How much strain has it put On the food stamp system on the snap system. Well, there has been a strain on snafus, Well agencies, state agencies that operate the program have been swamped. Although you know it will vary. Some states got hit harder than other states. But almost every single state saw some kind of any increase. We estimate. Six million probably more. At this point, folks have had to turn to snap. But the good thing about Snape is that if you can make it through ineligibility system, and that has been a struggle during a pandemic part because a lot of Snap offices are closed and agencies they're using old technology and everybody's trying to do things remotely. But if you can get on, then you get a benefit card and you can use it at a store or a grocery store. WalMart So it's very efficient and it helps. I think relieve the strain on food banks and community groups that have been startling to also meet the needs of people who have lost their jobs and their incomes that,

Trump Administration Senior Policy Analyst District Court Walmart Ed Bolan Washington Lowing
What would it take to moderate a platform as big as Facebook?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:10 min | 9 months ago

What would it take to moderate a platform as big as Facebook?

"Facebook released the independent civil. Rights audit of his platform on Wednesday the auditor said among many other things that quote facebook unevenly enforces or fails to enforce its own policies against prohibited content, thus harmful content is left on the platform for too long. FACEBOOK has said both that it doesn't want to be an arbiter of truth in that it prioritizes free speech over all, but also that it's difficult, if not impossible to actually moderate content on a platform as big as facebook, instagram and WHATSAPP combined. That got US wondering. What is at the heart of this problem spendy saying it's a policy analyst at New America's Open Technology Institute. I think it's important to recognize that there does not necessarily need to be wine gold standard system of moderation. In fact, it's important to encourage platforms to moderate in diverse ways, because at encourages freedom of expression online, but I think what is really important is for platforms to provide more transparency and accountability around how they are trading. These people how accurate they are, and what impact these individuals and their activities have on a online speech of users. So I think when you're talking about what platforms was, a whole can do better. That is particularly one area where Policy makers and civil society and civil rights groups should be encouraging platforms to do more. Let's talk about automated moderation. Is that a similar situation where we just don't know that much about how these tools work, and how good or bad they are, companies tend to tell tout automated tools as a silver bullet solution for content moderation issues, but they do not provide adequate data around how these tools are how they are trained you know and how they refined, and this is why civil society groups and civil rights groups continue to press companies to always keep humans in the loop. Because using these automated tools can have consequences for freedom of expression online, and we have to be cautious about just telling companies to invest more in these tools we need to know how effective these tools are before telling companies to just throw more money on them. Do. You think it's believable that they can't. I think that's like Ben. In argument is. FACEBOOK is like there's too many there's too much. It literally is a scale problem. We cannot do it. You know the experience of the past few months has shown about. Platforms can definitely do more in sometimes it's just about how they assess their goals around removing harmful content and protecting freedom of expression, so for example during the Kobe, nineteen pandemic. We've seen how platforms such as facebook have really responded rapidly proactively to the spread of misinformation, but this has raised questions about why platforms have not taken as proactive a of an approach against types of misleading information such as election voter suppression related disinformation as just about you know. When do they decide to take those moves? And what are the lake lever points that encourage them to do so? spendy saying as a policy analyst at New America's Open Technology Institute.

Facebook Policy Analyst Open Technology Institute New America Auditor Instagram
MTA Allows Some Bus Windows to Open, Still Evaluating Subway Car Windows

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 9 months ago

MTA Allows Some Bus Windows to Open, Still Evaluating Subway Car Windows

"Increase ventilation on New York City's bosses, the empty is allowing drivers to open windows and the roof hatch is but w m. I see Steven Nessen reports it can't be done on old buses or trains. Only local buses have windows that can open the express bus is do have roof hatches, but if they're open, there's not enough clearance and tunnels. They have to stay closed. The MP says it's still evaluating whether subway windows should open. Darwin Kung is a health policy analyst at the Tri State Transportation campaign. He's concerned about underground air quality's amazing in circulation, and we can all feel it. Isn't a vigorous as an outdoor environment right? You can feel a hot system gets another drag. The head of Transit says some writers will feel more comfortable on buses, some on subways. It's up to them.

Darwin Kung New York City Steven Nessen Tri State Transportation Policy Analyst MP
Supreme Court throws out Louisiana abortion restrictions

BBC World Service

00:57 sec | 10 months ago

Supreme Court throws out Louisiana abortion restrictions

"The U. S. Supreme Court has struck down a Louisiana law that requires doctors to have local hospital admitting privileges before performing an abortion. As NPR. Sarah McCammon reports, abortion rights groups are expressing relief as well, A surprise over the decision. The Louisiana law is very similar to a Texas law that was overturned in 2016 before the court included two of President Trump's conservative nominees. Chief Justice John Roberts surprise some observers by siding with the liberal justices this time in striking down the law. Elizabeth Nash is a state policy analyst at the Guttmacher Institute, which supports abortion rights. This case is a way to see where the court stands on abortion and what it means for the future. And I think The court has stood pat on abortion rights. For now. Abortion rights opponents are vowing to keep fighting for new restrictions on the

U. S. Supreme Court Louisiana Chief Justice John Roberts Sarah Mccammon NPR President Trump Elizabeth Nash Policy Analyst Guttmacher Institute Texas
Trump administration is rushing to gut environmental protections

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:53 min | 11 months ago

Trump administration is rushing to gut environmental protections

"Your host for the program is David. Cosso a DC based healthcare policy analyst. And we invite you to comment on the program by visiting the healthcare policy. Podcasts DOT COM. Now here's David. Welcome to the healthcare policy. Podcast I'm the host David Intro Cosso during this podcast discussed with Professor Michael Burger Executive Director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change at Columbia Law School. The trump administration's efforts to unwind the nation's environmental regulatory rules and the status of Climate Crisis Related Litigation. Professor Burger. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Professor Burgers by was posted on the podcast website on background to state the obvious we interact with the environment constantly as a result. We are exposed to harmful animal-borne germs like viruses bacteria parasites or so called zoonotic diseases. Scientists s made more than six out of every ten known infectious diseases and three out of four new or emerging infectious diseases. Come from animals. Think Dengue Malaria Rabies covid nineteen according to the National Academy of Sciences. The environment is responsible for thirty percent of premature deaths. He Fi far higher percentage than healthcare prevents. This explains why minority Communities Face Higher Kobe. Nineteen related mortality. Upwards of three times their immune systems have already been compromised by degrade environment for example poor air quality despite for recognizing the adverse effects. The environment has on our health. The for example environmental impact statements. The trump administration has worked aggressively to gut the nation's environmental protections according to the Save Insanity Administration has unwound or ten zone wind approximately one hundred environment regulations ranging from power plant and car and truck. Co Two emissions. Mercury and hydrofluorocarbons emissions. Who was protecting wetlands from oil and GAS LEAK RULES REGARDING PESTICIDE? Use drilling fracking and coal leasing rules offshore oil and gas drilling rules etc concerned. The climate crisis listeners. Mary call my having discussed research. Polishing Twenty sixteen that concluded the adverse health effects resulting from the healthcare ministries greenhouse gas or carbon emissions our response properties Roberts of nearly one hundred thousand deaths annually in the US alone with begin discussing ministrations attack on Varma deregulations centers. Michael Burger so with that Professor Burger. Let me start by asking. If you can briefly describe the same incentives work sure The Saban Center is a think and do tank housed at Columbia Law School. We focus on Climate Change Law across the board meaning. We look at both mitigation related issues. How to go about reducing greenhouse gas emissions as well as adaptation issues to respond to climate change impacts that are already happening that will only increase in intensity and frequency over time. We are not policy shop so we don't do policy analysis. We're really team of lawyers. That focus very much on the on the legal aspects of climate policy. I and we do this at all. Scales of government from the from the local to the global We have a number of different things. We do On the side of our think and do tank We do what thinks generally do we produce a original research and writing on a range of climate law related topics we also produce An put up on our website free for public. Use a number of different resources for researchers lawyers policy practitioners students and others. These include our climate change litigation databases both US and non us. Our silencing science tracker our climate deregulation tracker which we launched on inauguration day in two thousand seventeen our legal pathways deep decarbonisation database which includes Hundreds of model laws setup for governments at all scales to adopt To achieve deep decarbonisation in the number of other tools on the do side of our thinking do tank We engage actively with partners including international organizations Domestic and international NGOs. Political staffers And representatives other academic institutions And others to leverage our expertise to have an impact on the real world so in this regard be Senate comment letters on environmental impact statements to end proposed regulations. We filed amicus briefs On behalf of scientists coalitions cities and others in big climate cases And we regularly seek to influence an inform public decision making around climate law and policy. So you're busy. Yeah we have our hands especially these days. Yes Okay. So let's go to these days So my next question. Let's get to the meat of this Though would take hours to detail the administration's assault on the environment. Let's focus on air quality since among other things accounts for a seven million deaths worldwide or degraded air-quality so Let's focus more over again on this subject. So what's the administration's policy toward amongst other issues Power Plant emissions. This was the Obama. Administration's Clean Power Plan Auto Tailpipe pipe and particularly as well of course methane emissions which is a much more potent greenhouse gas.

Professor Burger David Intro Cosso Policy Analyst Columbia Law School United States Professor Michael Burger Save Insanity Administration Professor Burgers National Academy Of Sciences Barack Obama Assault Sabin Center Mary
"policy analyst" Discussed on South Asian Stories

South Asian Stories

05:23 min | 11 months ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on South Asian Stories

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The Virus Changed China's Big Political Event. Here's How

Morning Edition

03:18 min | 11 months ago

The Virus Changed China's Big Political Event. Here's How

"You China today begins a week of high level political meetings it's called the two sessions and authoritarian one party state makes a show of inclusiveness holding the thoroughly choreographed meeting of the national people's Congress China delayed this meeting by almost three months because of the coronavirus now the meeting signals the party's confidence that the epidemic is under control and that it's time to save the economy here's NPR Beijing correspondent Emily fact at the heart of this year's two sessions is a number specifically what China's annual economic growth target will be or even whether China will set a target GDP at all see teamviewer a political analyst at Panvel institution a Chinese think tank explains why the growth target is especially important this year people need a clearer idea here L. concept or blueprint for the next half of this year or even next year if the virus stays around with us because it's a centrally planned economy China decides what they want the year's GDP to be and local governments scramble to make that target at all costs but this year code nineteen because China's economy to shrink six point eight percent in the first quarter the first recorded contraction and more than forty years given the growth target will be announced nearly three months late others of the se it's pointless to subpar gate because it's already in the middle of the year all I can to do to ensure that the target will be materialized the name two sessions refers to the concurrent annual meetings of China's legislature and the country's top advisory body the two sessions that demotion China's centrally planned economy each year that's why her away the fiscal policy analyst at Beijing research firm gather Kell dragon onyx thinks there will be a growth target announced around three percent GDP growth far short of the six percent China was originally aiming for see if your abruptly say saying that there will be no goal this year I will be very harmful accounting to tell it what to do and they will be up or is it will be very hard for them to you know achieve the unemployment rate targets set by the central government because they don't know what exactly target for them to be so without targets local governments overseeing China's one point three billion people would be left without guideposts making it likely there will be a growth target announced away is also looking for any sign chinaman announced a fiscal stimulus to boost economic activity like it did from two thousand eight to two thousand nine but says that's unlikely China has much more corporate and local government debt now and doesn't want easy credit to oversee its property market the overall policy tool has been relativity of ash and they are not willing to do a big stimulus at two then eight because the major constraint basically at the top high debt level and also the high housing prices tomorrow Chinese premier Li could tell announces China's economic targets most journalists will not be allowed into the legislative hall this year due to the corona virus only one diplomat per and this you will get to attend and will be given a covert testing be bused to a special government hotel each day after meetings with the two sessions underway China is signaling has the epidemic under control but it's still not taking any

China
Meghan suit set for hearing in UK High Court

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Meghan suit set for hearing in UK High Court

"Sweden's women were hearing interior minister in the Duchess says of Sussex authorities is a legal are receiving case worrying against reports a British tabloid about full is outdoor set to take dining place and in Britain's cranking High Court I think has Meghan he doesn't challenges want to see the any publication crowded of outdoor a letter restaurants she wrote to stop to them her father or elsewhere guidelines he's suing must the mail be followed on Sunday otherwise and its parent operations company will be closed associated the Swedish newspapers government for publishing on Friday a letter also she wrote the country to her father is two hundred Thomas Markle ninety municipalities the civil lawsuit accuses to report on how the newspaper restaurants and cafes of copyright following infringement the public misuse health authorities of private advise information Sweden I'm has violating so far opted Britain's data for relatively protection liberal rules policies analysts have to compared fight the the corona case virus pandemic to the late princess Diana's I'm Charles lawsuit the last over month photographs showing how exercising on gym equipment that case was settled before it was hurting called Thomas Markle strained relationship with his daughter has complicated Meghan's entry into the British royal family Charles through this month London

Sweden Britain Diana Thomas Markle Meghan Charles London Sussex
Coronavirus Quashes Iran's New Year Celebrations

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:24 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus Quashes Iran's New Year Celebrations

"Friday was the first day of spring which marks the start of the new year for a rainy ends no rules which means new day is the biggest holiday of the Iranian calendar the celebrations last for almost two weeks people have family gatherings some people even jump over bonfires but this new rules around is in the grip of a major corona virus outbreak Ali Ahmadi a foreign policy analyst joins us on the line from Teheran thank you so much for being with us thank you for having me this is meant to be a time of hope in celebration but these are hard times for Iranians aren't they yes Sir we had over sixteen thousand confirmed coronavirus cases very much possible as in many public health officials inside and outside the country said that it's actually significantly higher when you see all that anxiety on west from friends and family on slack channels a what's app groups that's one thing when you go outside it's surprising the extent to which the street looks normal it's definitely not normal people are trying to stay in but there is a much more activity than you'd expect some of that is a bit deceptive because public transportation is essentially not being used right now you're on has a decent subway system and buses that are present if people do not really trust them right now so they're they're driving in their cars but it is there are a lot more people out and about that then one would

Ali Ahmadi Analyst Teheran
‘Brain Waste': Highly Skilled Immigrants Struggle to Fill Workforce Gaps

Morning Edition

04:01 min | 1 year ago

‘Brain Waste': Highly Skilled Immigrants Struggle to Fill Workforce Gaps

"The trump administration has made it more difficult for asylum seekers to win protection and for refugees to be accepted into the country even so the thousands of migrants here on humanitarian grounds already face big challenges in finding work where they can use their talents and skills Kiki Wheaties Farida traveler Romero reports a small group of recently arrived refugees from Afghanistan in about Ethiopia and other countries are about to start a workshop an office in San Jose today we're going to talk about what a job into looks like staffers with the nonprofit international rescue committee or higher see go through basic do's and don'ts to ace first meeting with a potential employer they asked people to stand up and practice introducing themselves with a firm handshake hi I'm sorry day nice to meet you hi my day he's gone nice of you to while some immigrants here are starting from scratch with not much English for a resume others come with university degrees and a lot more language and professional skills hi my name is even less fun as far has thirty eight she worked in her native Eritrea as a secretary for the European Union diplomatic office and also in community development with European Angie else here in San Jose she starts work at five thirty AM as a cashier at a restaurant I need to support myself about half the clients that we serve come to us with high high skilled backgrounds Kevin Davis coordinates career development programs at the local I. R. C. office and all of them are going to get us revel job first the air C. helps about two hundred humanitarian migrants per year find those first low skilled often minimum wage jobs and then rebuild careers and the US the coaching and scholarships Davis says immigrants living paycheck to paycheck face big barriers to get higher skilled jobs even if they've worked in those fields in their home countries oftentimes foreign credentials for and degrees and even sometimes for work experience is not viewed the same as domestic American criminals of work experience in California nearly half a million immigrants with at least a bachelors degree R. under employed meaning there over qualified for their job or can't find work that's according to an analysis by the migration policy institute that translates into a big loss in state and local taxes almost seven hundred million in California per year John about the lava is a senior policy analyst at the institute unfortunately at the national level that has and they really strategy development how to deal with what we call brain place but they love us as other countries invest more to help immigrants navigate their way into professional occupations the US not so much the approaches single swim there is some limited fetter Earl and local financial support to help refugees and as a lease at just to life in the US the romanizations like I. R. C. in San Jose Kevin Davis says that for survival job is like a stepping stone and once they can pay their immediate bills then we work with them to sort of see all right what comes next for even as fast it was working as a cashier while training to draw people's blood for lab tests now she's getting ready to take her exam to become certified phlebotomy technician when I come here I knew I would be starting from scratch I knew it's going to be a hard road ahead just have to take the steps I need to take to get in there the healthcare industry needs more workers in California and especially says she's excited to leave the restaurant and get a job quickly with a better paycheck her long term plan is to work some and then go back to school to become a medical lab technician in San Jose and Freddie that

Militiamen withdraw from US Embassy but Iraq tensions linger

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Militiamen withdraw from US Embassy but Iraq tensions linger

"Hundreds of US troops are deployed to the Middle East in response to the volatile attacks at the US embassy compound in Baghdad by Iranian backed militiamen the militia men and their supporters were told to pull back by an umbrella group of fighters backed by a run they're claiming victory after clashing with US marines guarding the embassy compound in Iraq's capital city setting fires and smashing windows foreign policy analyst William Ruger with the Charles coke institute says this all stems from the US ratcheting up the sanctions on Tehran not working to reduce tensions and it's not creating a docile Arron in fact it's actually quit creating more hostilities are more challenges a run has denied involvement in the attack on the embassy which is also straining US relations with a rock Jackie Quinn Washington

United States Middle East Baghdad Iraq William Ruger Charles Coke Institute Tehran Arron Jackie Quinn Washington Analyst
First all-female space walk is a symbolic moment for NASA

Morning Edition

02:21 min | 1 year ago

First all-female space walk is a symbolic moment for NASA

"It's a routine space walk but down here on earth people are celebrating a milestone from member station W. MFC Brendan Byrne has the story it's the first all female space walk and space policy analyst Laura for sick is celebrating of course I'm excited that they're both women and off the most is walk into a long overdue a previous attempt at an all female space walk was scrapped back in March when the correct size space suits for the would be walkers couldn't be ready in time instead a male and female astronaut perform the task NASA's Megan macarthur says all for NASA astronauts on board the station now two women and two men can perform the power replacement task but I think the fact that it will be two women just as a reflection of the fact that we have so many capable qualified women in the office and you know many coming in through the different career channels that bring them into the astronaut office women in space walking for decades the Soviet union's Svetlana Savitskaya followed shortly by NASA's Catherine Sullivan became the first woman space walkers back in nineteen eighty four on separate missions and since then more than a dozen women had ventured outside in space but self described friends cook in mere understand the significance of their schedule walk here's cook speaking from the station in the past women haven't always been at the table and it's wonderful to be contributing to the human space flight program at a time when all contributions are being accepted when everyone has a role floating next to cook inside the station mir agrees what we're doing now shows all the work that went into the decades prior all the women that work to get us where we are today and I think the nice thing is for us we don't even really think about it on a daily basis it's just normal were part of the team were doing this work as an efficient team working together with everybody else so it's really nice to see how far that we've come so have criticized NASA and the media for the recent focus on gender diversity in space flight when women have been in space for decades retire NASA astronaut nickel Stott has lived in space more than one Hundred Days and participated in a space walk back in two thousand nine she's worked to get more women into engineering and the astronaut corps are we train astronauts is astronaut doesn't matter what flavor you are I love seeing now that we we are in a place where we have a much larger balance of women and men

Brendan Byrne Nasa Megan Macarthur Soviet Union Svetlana Savitskaya Catherine Sullivan MIR Stott Policy Analyst Laura One Hundred Days
Retiree checks to rise modestly with a cost of living adjustment amid push to expand benefits

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Retiree checks to rise modestly with a cost of living adjustment amid push to expand benefits

"We say all the time on this program that you can spout a headline economic indicators until you or blue in the face but it's what people are feeling in their economic day to day that really matters and today we can quantify what people are feeling in their economic day to day this morning as does around this time every year the Social Security Administration announced its cost of living adjustments one point six percent is the bump that about seventy million retirees are going to get started in January but as marketplace's reduce your reports for a lot of seniors that adjustment and the way it's calculated doesn't reflect their reality when the social security administration figures out how much more expensive life is getting for seniors it uses data from not seniors based on consumer price next for urban wage earners been clerical workers Mary Johnson is a social security policy analyst with the Senior Citizens League and advocacy group in other words working adult younger working adults do not spend the same way that seniors do seniors simply use more healthcare we all will as we age Webster Phillips is with the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare healthcare costs have been rising more than twice as fast as everything else so if that's left out of the calculus it reduces the measure of inflation being experienced by seniors so social security it's aren't keeping up with costs again Mary Johnson with senior citizens leak it means that their social security benefit can't buy as much Today as it might have participation years ago a more accurate measure of inflation for seniors actually does exist and sure enough it is almost always higher than the one the social security administer Asian uses this year one point nine percent versus one point six percent but switching over would require an act of Congress Dean Baker is at the Center for Economic and Policy Research you have a lot of people in Congress more anxious to see spend more on security they'd rather use lowered measure given what is going on in Washington this is kind of the last thing that Congress wants to be fighting about right now in New York I'm sure for

Social Security Administration Mary Johnson Policy Analyst Senior Citizens League Webster Phillips National Committee Congress Dean Baker Washington New York Center For Economic And Policy Six Percent Nine Percent
NYC plan will fight traffic and climate change

Climate Connections

01:30 min | 1 year ago

NYC plan will fight traffic and climate change

"I'm Doctor Anthony Lights and this is climate connections in Manhattan frustrated drivers often sit include lock traffic in their cars often blocked busy crosswalks putting pedestrians in danger but the city is developing a strategy to combat congestion after twenty twenty twenty it plans to charge drivers fee to enter its most crowded districts energy policy analyst Charles Coming off says the goal is to eliminate maybe fifteen eighteen percent of all of the traffic trips into and within the heart of Manhattan that means fewer tailpipe emissions and less carbon pollution. He says over time the climate benefits will grow the plan is expected to generate more than a billion dollars each year most of that will go to improving the subway system awesome so even fewer people will choose to drive coming off says that's good for the climate and people's quality of life it will make New York City function auctioned better people will be able to get around better. The city will be more economically viable as well as a more pleasant place to work live and visit he expects is that New York's example may inspire other cities with busy congested downtown's to take action. I can tell you that those cities are going to be watching New York very closely. climate connections is produced by the Yale Center for Environmental Communication. Learn more at Yale Connections Dot Org.

Yale Connections Dot Org Manhattan New York City Yale Center For Environmental Doctor Anthony Lights Charles Coming Analyst Twenty Twenty Twenty Fifteen Eighteen Percent Billion Dollars
"policy analyst" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Be able to practice freely their religious beliefs according to their conscience well talking about so is some of the human rights violations in which the Chinese amazing gauge I was the president trump has taken a very strong stance against the Chinese with regard to trade infringement he's been a little bit less overt in his calls on the Chinese with regard to human rights in fact I can't recall him actually speaking overly about the Chinese and in human rights impact of the bomb it tended to do that a little bit more often but what are some of the bigger human rights violations in which they are currently engaged yeah people heard sort of the of the of the Uyghur Muslims are the running a genocide people don't know much about these things yeah that's so true so there between one and three million we are Muslims who are held in political re education facilities today some of them have disappeared and their families have not heard from them we've heard reports of torture in some cases forced labor inside this political camps and so what you have seen is just a really awful awful situation where these individuals are being collected by it's not unlike how we saw the communist regime act under the Cultural Revolution and of course we're also seeing Christian pastor is human rights lawyers baton Buddhist facing increasing persecution and we're seeing China in particular using new and emerging technologies as an extension of its authoritarian policies instituting something called the social credit system as well as various surveillance technologies that essentially monitor their every move the Chinese people and what's even more terrifying is that the surveillance technologies are already being exported across the. low and being deployed by other authoritarian governments for the purposes that stand to surveil their own citizens and violate their own citizens right well the lady you know senior policy analyst.

trump China senior policy analyst president
"policy analyst" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

13:46 min | 1 year ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"We're speaking with Peter wolf. Peter is a research and policy analysts for best friends animal society, what of the largest animal welfare organizations in the United States and a leader in the development and operation of community kept programs. Peter's role involves the analysis of science and public policy related to community cat issues topic. He's been researching and writing about since two thousand ten through his blog, vox Felina Peter, welcome to the show. Thank you for having me back. Yeah. Yeah. It's great to catch up with you again. And find out what you've been up to the last couple of years for folks that are. Unaware, Peter was a past guest on the show can always go to community cats podcast dot com and go in the search bar and just put in Peter or Pieter wolf and the show we did back in September of two thousand sixteen will come up so you can find out a lot about Peter's background there some of his past. But today like to talk about a newly released paper that Peter and Dan har- have put out an I'm just going to throw a hand. The mic over to you, Peter and you can share what you discovered through the process of this article. Thank you. I should mention I in Craig Marin Dan has actually been on the podcast before is that crap. Yes, Dan, has been a guest and he was instrumental working with you on the research around, our newburyport project. Absolutely. And he's Dan has once again, taken the lead on this. I, I like to tell people that there's a reason his name is listed first on the paper. And it's because they're enough pedicle order, Dan. Was responsible for the compilation and Alice. That was then published in this article, it's in the online, peer review journal frontiers in veterinary science part of actually a whole collection of articles on this topic for a special issue of the journal and what we pulled together for. This was a very large data set nearly seventy three thousand cats in total. And they were from six what we at best friends called CCP's or community kept programs in these are again, large-scale three year programs that integrates return to field with a targeted trap neuter return program. And so just by way of explanation, for any listeners who might not be familiar with return field or maybe millet by another name. It's sometimes called shelter neuter, return or s and our I sometimes refer to it as shelter based TR. The key distinction being how does one come across the cat prior to doing the sterilization vaccination in return traditional teen are, of course, would be more of a community based. Maybe it's a, a group operating largely for the purpose of TR, or it could just be a resident who is taking advantage of local resources, and taking care of a couple three cats. You know, in the immediate vicinity a return field by contrast. It's the same essential process in that. It's trap neuter return. The difference is these are cats who come into the shelter either by a resident or by an animal control officer. And again, if they're eligible meaning in the broadest terms, neither too young more to old not declawed generally good health in lacking, owner identification than against our backs. Nate put right back where you got them. And what are CCP's do in, in Bryan is, again, I believe, has been. A guest on your show, when Brian was at PetSmart charities. He really honed in on the importance of integrating, return field and targeted TR, and we come to call that the it's rather clunky term, but we call it. The red flag cat model and the premise, there's really pretty straightforward. A cat comes into the shelter again. Brought in by a resident or maybe an animal control officer. And the assumption is this cat has family and friends nearby. And so our staff embedded in these programs go out and they knock on doors. They walked the neighborhood find those other cats and get them sterilized Bax needed in returned as well in circa, preemptive fashion the assumption being it's quite likely at some point in the future. Those cats also would've been brought to the shelter. Maybe not before having more kittens and adding to the population of community cats in that era. Area. You know, if you talked to anybody who's worked the intake desk at a shelter, especially large shelter for any length of time, they can likely tell you where the kittens are coming from right down to individuals who bring in litters annually. And so in some ways, I think the whole read flight cat model that Bryant honed in on like so many really good ideas. It seems utterly hobbyists in retrospect, and yet, this was information. We were not capitalizing on where are these other cats who are likely to be headed to the shelter in likely to be intact and breeding let's take advantage of that, again using the one intake as a red flag as it were. So again, we compile all this data from six of these CCP's across the country and the findings are really compelling. Specifically best friends is in particular interested in reducing the animals dying in shelters across the country. So some of the metrics where most interested in. Of course, would be a reductions in youth Naser reductions than intake in what we saw was again, this is a across the six programs median decrease of eighty three percent in feline euthanasia and median reduction thirty two percent in feline intake, pretty impressive numbers, and I think one of the most impressive when your drill down a little bit further into the data you find what I think, is, maybe most compelling is the reduction in kittens eight weeks of age or under we were only able to really look at data from four of the six program because we didn't have the kind of granular data, we needed from the other two, but across those four we saw median reduction of forty one percent in kitten intake, in, of course, the reason that I find that the most compelling is it suggests that you're actually having an impact on the reading population in the community through these targeted efforts. So fairbury exciting our results in new. Insofar as the size again, we're talking nearly seventy three thousand cats across these six three programs. Not hardly knew in that. There's definitely published data from other programs. Similar parameters that show similar results to this adds to the body of knowledge telling us that, especially by integrating these two there's a real benefit to the shelters. Obviously the cats to the communities, suits, very, very exciting to see this spurt be published. It's phenomenal. And I just want take a little quick step going back to some of the comments that you were talking about use the word targeted than you use return to field. And I think that those might have two different definitions around them. And I didn't know if you had any thoughts or comments about whether or not with the increase of return to fields movement. Are we moving away from targeted efforts or are the targeted efforts still out there? We definitely. We see it comes out in the data, but also anecdotally might colleagues who spend their time in the trenches. We see considerable benefits of targeting rather than simply a return field program in, in particular. We have had a couple instances, where communities have applied for one of these parameters. And as you can imagine, you know, we're talking a three year program, best friends comes in we embed staff. We buy one or two vans. I mean there's a considerable investment. So the competition for these parameters pretty stiff and we see communities apply at times communities already doing return field, but they're unable to really get a handle on kitten intake to their shelter because they're not doing the targeting piece of it. So again, there's very compelling evidence to say you definitely want to be doing the targeting. And again, it's we're seeing it. It's been published. Elsewhere girder import. In in again, you know, having had Brian on the show. That's something he really anthocyanins is. And a lot of ways, it's not so different than what's been recommended for years, just looking at the community based TR, of course, you want to get, as many cats in every colony sterilized, as possible to have the greatest impact, and it's no different return field again that key when you integrate the two together is you're using that one cat two cats coming into the shelter as information as a clue to where the cats and kittens are. And that's how you can do your targeting. Can you list out the six communities that you had a C P program in, and were there any geographical issues like one being in a colder climate than another or anything like that, yet, that's a really good question of the first for Rams were in Albuquerque in, in San Antonio? And then we moved over to Philadelphia in Baltin. More and then we had Columbus Georgia in there and Pima county, Arizona witches were Tucson is located. So we got a pretty good mix. There's a few, obviously, in there from the southwest, part of the country, but then, again, Philadelphia and Baltimore words, it's much colder in for the most part, the trends, we saw across the board held up to varying degrees in h of the programs and of course, it's also little difficult to tease out any geographical differences. Because certainly, we were learning as we were going Albuquerque in San Antonio were, I and, you know, by the time we got to Tucson, which arguably is geographically most similar, but it was the last of the six in. So a lot had already been learned, as I say, the trends, generally held up the exception being actually San Antonio. I mentioned that the intake went down considerably across the board year to, in San Antonio intake, actually increased in its complete. Anomaly, got a chart of that actually in the paper and all the other five drop off considerably in San Antonio. Soul line going in the other direction then tapers downward? But talking to the folks involved, my college who were actually involved at the time, the only explanation, we could come up with because virtually no other programming was changing. It wasn't as if as you probably number listeners are aware, there's programs. Now, kind of coming online around the country often called safe at home, where for example, if you call the shelter and said, I've got some little kittens under my deck in my backyard. Whatever in some cases, fuel just keep them in till they can be weaned few will look after them until they can be brought into the shelter after they've been weaned. They'll bring your kid provide you all sorts of resources. None of that was available at the time of these programs of that doesn't seem to explain things, what we're told is once the community found out about the parameters and learned that. Trip to the shelter was no longer a one way trip for these free roaming cats. They sort of came out involves folks, who wouldn't would never call the shelter in the past where calling the shelter again. I was the only explanation. We were able to really nail down to explain that trend. But again, even in San Antonio the numbers dropped off after the second year, I've seen in some communities, a little bit of an uptick in a lot of it has to do with find at there's Stephen a little bit adjusting in your outreach in your community gets a sense of different type of messaging usually for the better. But they're like, oh, you're here for community resource. We can utilize you not really worry. And so I think that can happen. There can be an uptick, when you first start a community can't program, but then, you'll start declining their numbers will start going down quite a bit very, very quickly. It's interesting it until you mentioned it occurs me only now that we're when we're talking in some ways in sort of tracks with on the much, much smaller scale at the colony level in again, personal experience suggests. This is the case. But also number of published papers indicate that year one or your to the numbers in particular, colony may increase again, as things stabilize, there's food being provided and the numbers go up, and then they dipped down after say the second year in. So if it's an interesting parallel illustrates, the point that you need the right time horizon, to look at these sorts of programs. If you only looked after your one, you might get a very different and misleading impression sort of, like investing, you don't want to, like, look at your vestments at a twelve month period, especially if it was like, oh, eight oh nine or something like that. You know, you wanna look at it at a much longer timeframe three to five years, ten years, you know, that kind of window is a much better window. Trying to catch a pregnant cat in time. Are you after that last cat who isn't fixed in your ten cat colony? Got a widely feral who just won't go into a box trap, no matter how much you spend on roasted chicken. How about catching a litter of kittens, all at once with their mom all these tough trapping situations, and more can be solved if you know how to use a drop drop. Join neighborhood cats co designers of versed, mass manufacturer dropped trap on.

Felina Peter San Antonio CCP Craig Marin Dan Peter wolf officer Brian United States Philadelphia newburyport Tucson Dan har PetSmart Alice Nate Bryant Pieter wolf Albuquerque
Trump will nominate former adviser Stephen Moore to Fed Reserve

Killer Innovations

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Trump will nominate former adviser Stephen Moore to Fed Reserve

"President Trump says you'll nominate Stephen Moore to fill the vacancy on the board of the fed reserve Moore's an economic policy analyst and fiscal conservative. Who's been also critical of bed chair Jerome Powell more joins Fox News and talks about what he's going to try to implement on the board. I will try to pursue promote policies that that that increase wages and increase growth in. Berry. That's my whole agenda. Here is what what makes Merican businesses in American workers better off

Stephen Moore Jerome Powell President Trump Policy Analyst Merican Fox News Berry
"policy analyst" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:36 min | 2 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Now. Adam Michelle is a policy analyst in the Tom's a row institute for economic policy. Studies at the Heritage Foundation and joins us now to talk about this trend. We're seeing in the Democratic Party. Thanks for joining us. Adam it sounds like they're sort of falling all over each other to figure out who can have the biggest tax cut against the wealthiest people in this country. It started with Bernie four years ago. And boy, oh boy. Are we seeing it on steroids? Now. Yeah. Well, thanks for having me on your. You're exactly right. We've seen sort of flurry of proposals. We've seen a flurry of these proposals to tax the rich whether it's a seventy percent tax rate wealth tax, and and we're and we're going to see more and more as the twenty twenty campaign season heats up, and it's it's a worrying trend because the taxes on the wealthy. Never saying the wealthy. They always end up being higher taxes on all Americans. Let's let's break this down a little bit. First of all what always bothered me about this tax, the wealthy thing as they define wealthy as you know hundred and fifty two hundred thousand dollars a year, which in a major metropolitan area where you are. And I'm not saying, that's that's poor. But if you're married you live in a place like DC or in the suburbs around DC, twenty thirty miles out of DC. And you've got a few kids maybe some of them going to college. Boy, that's not rich. So is that what we're seeing here or are. They really talking about some kind of wealth excise tax on millionaires billionaires. So the two proposals that are out there, or at least being talked about one seventy percent rate on is on people earning over ten million dollars in its wealth taxes on a fifty million dollars or more of net wealth. So right now, they are talking about taxes on just the wealthiest of folks. And okay. So this is Jeff pays gonna brazenness money to fund all the things they want to fund so numbers will have to come down. This is just a sort of opening sales pitch. That is really just too good to be true. That's the thing. I mean, I mean, you're taxing Jeff as as you're taxing Warren Buffett your tax Howard Schwartz who apparently is is going to be running Howard Schultz, excuse me from Starbucks who will run in the race just to make sure he can keep his wealth. I don't blame him. Let's say they did that let's say it was just the good Jillian airs. And it's this excise has have heard Alexandro Cortez say, you know, after after your first million or once you reach a million, then it's going to be seventy percent of every. Dollar after that. Out. What's wrong with that? You know, I think some people in the middle class might not all of them not me. But some will say, yeah. They've made enough money. They can give some back to the government now. Yeah. I mean, ultimately, the high high tech high tax rates on really high income folks aren't necessarily going to really set those people back, but they, but they will set the American economy back, and you and you and I back these are the people these are the Jeff visas of the world who have developed new technologies and lowered prices to get the things we need to our doors fast as possible. This is is this taxing the Henry Ford's of the world who made cars more affordable and easily accessible to all of us are the or the Bill Gates who made computers more more formidable and more powerful year after year after year, and and so these high taxes they ultimately discourage people like that from bringing these innovations to market here in the United States or elsewhere. And so ultimately, these types of taxes mean that there's less investment in the United States, there's lessons -ation, and those are the things that drive wages up for you. And I sort of the average American it's so it. It's harder to see. But the taxes do have ripple effects throughout the economy that ultimately harm us more than the people who may have to pay the tax out of their pocket. Am I naive in thinking and believing that even the Elizabeth Warren of the world, and the Alexandria Cortez's and Bernie Sanders and pretty much probably the majority of Democrats running for the nomination they recognize that this kind of taxation is not really sound policy in terms of raising money for the federal treasury. And also just like you said punishes, those who are innovators and are actually doing great things and contributing to jobs and contribute to our economy. They recognize that, but it doesn't matter. They just like the populist idea of it that they can stand up there and say they've got too much money, and we're gonna tax it because that is popular sometimes. Yeah, I think that's that's the danger is there's a there's a lot of power in the politics of envy, this idea that that someone else has something. And and I want it, and we need to we need to spend more money on x program that sounds popular. So they should just kick in their fair share. That's a really powerful message. That is is is gaining popularity across America is going against the ethos of of what built America and what made America great. And that was come here. Make something amazing lower the cost of some product create something new, and and you'll be rewarded for it? And this new sort of tax policies are telegraphing the opposite message to to to to Americans and to people that that may want to move here and bring their ideas with them. Well, and and ultimately, even if it gets soundbites and people like to, you know, take their pitchforks and torches and say, yes tax, the rich burn the ridge, eat the rich. Ultimately, I remember I never forget this line from seventeen seventy six the musical about the founding of our nation where the the conservatives in the room that people who are trying to protect property ownership and wealth, one of their spokesman says Americans will always protect the possibility of becoming rich rather than face the reality of being poor is how they put it. In other words, the idea that in America, you can be that rich guy one day, that's very powerful. And ultimately, I think that people are you tell me, but I think that the more. Powerfully politically persuasive argument is why punish the rich. When we all want to be rich in the long run. Yeah. I mean, I hope that that message bears out that that is both what what motivates a lot of Americans, and what ultimately has led to the economic success that America sees that idea that you too could could could be rich one day is what drives our economy forward. It's it's the it's one of the backbones of what has made America's great.

America Jeff Bernie Sanders Adam Michelle DC Democratic Party Heritage Foundation policy analyst United States Alexandro Cortez Tom Elizabeth Warren Starbucks government Howard Schultz Henry Ford Jillian Bill Gates
"policy analyst" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Our guest legal policy analyst in the meat center for legal engine studies at the Heritage Foundation. And we're looking at the certain a new effort at gun control legislation regardless of two things a the impossibility of it becoming a law since only the the has drove by the Democrats and be the fact that even if it were to pass it just doesn't work the places with the biggest problems are the places with the tightest gun control laws, which shows certain extent, I think is is the counter intuitive. And I would just offer this thought AB, and that is that we are gun gun gun in this country. There are guns everywhere. Now, you may look upon that as a sign of a healthy free. Society or as a terrible cancer and curse on the public. However, that's beside the point the point is that if you were to throw out the second amendment and the fourth amendment against unreasonable search and seizure if you were to send Gestapo troops into every basement attic closet and garage in America. You would not get all the guns. That's just the way it is. And why this this fact is driven home. I don't know. I just wish thing that we really want to pretend like we're doing something you tell me. Well, I think a lot of times people like to point to Australia and a mass public by back that they did of assault weapons in the nineteen nineties. I by back, but really it was forced confiscation. It was mandatory by. Buyback aid budge of a buyback. That's right. We're just with the country that one doesn't have a second amendment had a much well where per capita number of firearms. And even then they did some of the math, and they figured they were able to to get rid of about one third of the country's overall. But when we look at what's now since happened in the last thirty years, we see that between imports and a new purchases they're actually right back to where they started in in terms of the overall number of guns in the country that even you know, this very intensive effort to to rid the country of of assault weapons, really wasn't all that successful. Now when you take that same math. And even w let's assume that the United States could be even twice to successful in confiscating weapons to the point where we're getting rid of upwards of half two-thirds of guns in this country. You're still looking at over a hundred million firearms. Many of. Which would be in the hands of people who were not law abiding enough to turn in their guns in in any sort of you know, buy back for a mandatory confiscation measure. So you're looking at one hundred million guns. Minimum that that we know of that that we are aware of that would still be in the hands of people who are the most likely to abuse the use of the. The underlying a theory here seems to be I'm a crook. And I'm a. Steal rape plunder pillage. But boy the minute somebody says that I have got to get rid of my weapon that I I'm I'm immediately complying with the law. I mean, what planet are these people from Jim in Mesa, Colorado. Hello, jim. Hello, jim. And amy. I just like to ask what you both think about what the media. The second media has on on all of this. It's almost to the point close..

assault policy analyst Heritage Foundation Gestapo cancer Jim United States amy America Australia rape Colorado Mesa thirty years
U.S. court orders Trump administration to fully reinstate DACA program

07:42 min | 2 years ago

U.S. court orders Trump administration to fully reinstate DACA program

"I'm Charlie Pellett the Dow the NASDAQ all advancing stocks higher is results, lifted berkshire-hathaway, higher oil prices boosting energy producers right now west Texas intermediate crude up one and a. Half percent sixty nine fifty one four barrel. Of WTI gold. Is down, four tenths of one percent twelve o nine the. Ounce, the tenure of three. Thirty seconds yield two point nine three percent. SNP up eleven higher by four tenths of one percent the Dow up fifty five, up two, tenths of one percent NASDAQ up forty three a gain narrow of six tenths of one percent should mention that the Dow the s&p. NASDAQ all at. Or near their highs of the. Session I'm Charlie pelletan, that is a Bloomberg business flash thanks Charlie on Friday the California federal judge presiding over the reunification of immigrant children separated from their, parents called the government, efforts unacceptable. Earlier in the week. Senate Judiciary committee chairman Chuck Grassley also Also criticized the administration's policies our like many well intentioned, policies these were there, were unintended consequences And in another federal courtroom on Friday on the opposite, side of the country a judge upheld his order that the DACA program should be fully restored giving the. Administration twenty days to appeal joining me is David. Beer immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute David turning to the federal. Court room in DC judge John Bates gave the Trump administration a second chance to show him there was a legitimate reason to rescind DACA, tell us what. He, asked the. Administration and what the administration provided Well when the administration I rescinded DACA for the dreamer sue immigrants who entered the United States as children They did not explain why they believed that that was a proper, decision for the government t- taking and so what the court found with this decision was arbitrary and capricious did not have a basis in law and the judge required the administration to reissue that memo recinding. That policy or provide the court with a valid legal reasons why it believed that that policy was unlawful. The government really failed to do that in the decision from the judge really lays out in detail lie. The court felt that the department of homeland security. Has, not shown why they are are taking this action, so the judge didn't say that the DHS secretary Didn't have a thirty to rescind the program so if the Trump administration which is expected. To appeal can come up with a better explanation with a good explanation is it possible that the judge. Will rescind the order or that the court will Well this point really the appeals court is going to be looking at whether or not the judge had used his. Discretion in this case, to basically, enjoying the memos that department of homeland security has put. Out so that the really going to be ruling on whether or not. D h s had provided the courts with an candidate reason? So they could overturn but at this point you know providing new rationales is not going. To help the administration it's going to be decided based on what they've already put out there and what's your legal. Opinion about what they've put out there do you think it can sustain an appeal Well I would be surprised that this went to the supreme court the supreme court did. Not, uphold the determinations, by the department of homeland security I mean when this policy was rolled out was done without going through the regulatory process this is always been, an agency you know the types of decisions that agencies have routinely taken based on their own discretion without judicial review and it's somewhat surprising that the the administration has so far been unable to. Convince any court across, the country, that they actually have the ability to do this without. Providing a detailed explanation of of their decision and part of the reason. Why they've had so much trouble is that they tried to? Say that they're not doing this for policy He. Reasons it's not that they don't want DACA exist it's that they believe it. DACA is, illegal and that is what the judge continuously came back to you and said, you'd never explained why you think. It's illegal and your vacations for why you think so don't hold any water so why not tell us, the real reasons that you're doing that and they failed again to provide the real reasons for them taking action now there have been previous court rulings in California and New York there's another case pending in Texas. Which may find the program to be unconstitutional the ninth circuit is going to issue a decision how do all these cases fit together It's really all of these cases so far, have pointed in the same direction that you know really the administration has, done a very poor job in how they justified the decision to rescind DACA and of course you may know. That be court in Texas is also looking at this this is the same court that struck down the Obama administration's expansion of the DACA. Program, to parents of of of American born children and he is. Likely to strike down DACA based, on the reasoning that he provided back in. Twenty fifteen and so we could have conflicting decisions. Both in DC in Texas and California One requiring the administration to continue Dhaka and the other one's the other one in Texas striking it down so that, will, lead to the supreme court intervening and deciding the issue wanted grow and you think the supreme. Court will uphold, the government's position I expected the supreme court will side with didn't instruction. On this issue despite the fact that Moore lower courts have gone against the admitted the administration that's right because well I think the, reason is that as I explained before many agency actions similar to this one have been taken in the. Past and have been allowed to stand particularly decisions about whether or not to Issue certain benefits on a discretionary basis or within certain administrative actions such as know a program for people Not want to remove David we run out of time it's always great, to have you on that's David, beer immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute coming up, on, Bloomberg politics. Policy President Trump's inaction, on infrastructure a new ad campaign that's coming up.

Daca Supreme Court Government Texas Policy Analyst David Cato Institute California DC Obama Administration Charlie Pellett Department Of Homeland DHS Charlie Pelletan Chuck Grassley United States Bloomberg Senate Judiciary Committee
Julian Emmanuel, Vinny Del Giudice and Fed discussed on Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

02:20 min | 3 years ago

Julian Emmanuel, Vinny Del Giudice and Fed discussed on Bloomberg Best

"Awareness partners from the bloomberg ninety nine one newsroom in washington i'm nathan hager with the latest headlines this red headline just crossed the bloomberg terminal president trump confirms the first round of tariffs against thirty four billion dollars in chinese goods will kick in just after midnight tonight wall street time about six and a half hours from now president says a second sixteen billion dollar round will come in two weeks china has promised immediate retaliatory tariffs of similar size the president also says he's down to four finalists to succeed anthony kennedy on the us supreme court earlier sources told bloomberg he had three in mind all federal appeals judges and under a deluge of revelations about his spending and travel scott pruitt is out as head of the environmental protection agency president trump tweeted that he accepted for its resignation tuesday his deputy andrew wheeler will take over as acting administrator on monday global news twenty four hours a day on air to tick tock on twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries let's check the markets in the latest business headlines thank you nathan it was an update is markets prepare for tomorrow morning's jobs report and the employment of fresh tariffs between the us and china julian emmanuel is chief equity and derivative strategist at ti we think that the us puts its tariffs on china retaliates and then everyone looks at each other and perhaps as maybe we should start talking and the markets are trying to take that tack clearly it's been difficult and isaac boltanski is trading policy analyst at compass point research and i think what we have now is a new phase in a trade standoff where we're going from the theoretical tangible minutes of the federal reserve's last policy meeting show central bankers reaffirmed plans to raise interest rates at a gradual pace at the session they lifted the main lending rate for the second time this year with more years bloomberg's vinny del jude is the minute show fed officials debated how many more rate increases would be needed to keep the economy on a stable footing is what was the timing perhaps twenty nine thousand nine hundred twenty twenty they also discussed the risks of white house trade policy and american businesses as well as political and economic turmoil in emerging markets at the meeting fed officials raised the main lending rate for the second time in two thousand eighteen vinny del giudice bloomberg radio.

Julian Emmanuel Vinny Del Giudice FED Isaac Boltanski Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler Scott Pruitt Vinny Del Jude Policy Analyst Washington United States Twitter Bloomberg Anthony Kennedy China President Trump Donald Trump Nathan Hager Thirty Four Billion Dollars
"policy analyst" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Must be spread by senior policy analyst is elliot's the nine hundred ninety s he speculated that if the west continues to push against a weakened russia in the aftermath of the break up of the of the soviet empire that eventually they'll would emerge a stronger russian leader he would take 'em bridge this and seek to do much of what putin's doing which is to try and so some seed of doubt amongst military leaders even not necessarily the political leaders i think one of the things that was really interesting was in the same interview where he talked about wanting a strong european union he also had also praised for austria in particular for its neutrality and he sort of stressed that not only was it a neutral country but it had been consistent in its neutrality and there is an idea that if you crane were able to be persuaded to declare itself neutral then that would be that would go a long long way to reassuring russia and could be the price of ukraine remaining territorial integrity but probably without it has to be said you crimea mary let me just put you up on the point you met earlier about this idea of stability sort of independence from the the the inner domestic politics of the eu countries specifically because moscow does have this cooperation agreement with the freedom party of course the sort of australian far right political movement what does that what does that sort of cooperation agreement what does that look like and what does that tell us if anything further about the more of the mechanics of how the the kremlin works i think this been maybe a little bit of rethinking going on here about russia looking maybe to friendly and this being interpreted obviously in a particular way by the mainstream in the countries concerned we saw the same thing with france and marine le pen being rec.

senior policy analyst elliot russia putin austria france ukraine eu moscow kremlin
"policy analyst" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners of k k d the time is now seven forty five this is morning edition from npr news good morning i'm david green and i'm rachel martin lawmakers are expected to take up the massive farm bill soon but there's a big hurdle to getting it passed and it has to do with the biggest expenditure in the bill the supplemental nutrition assistance program graham or snap the fight is over the expanded work requirements that house republicans wanna put in place for anyone getting food assistance grant girl walks of any t news in nebraska reports for the past two decades adults up to forty nine years old with no dependence have been required to work at least twenty hours a week to get assistance house republicans want to tweak that adding parents with school age kids and adults up to age fifty nine that could affect up to seven million people who would be required to work texas congressman mike conaway is chairman of the house agriculture committee which oversees the program and he argues it will push more people towards self sufficiency that's the result we want to have across the board is people bettering themselves getting what they need in plug into the economy ghetto that economic ladder success can start moving up on their own house democrats are holding back support saying that the expanded rules would only punish people who struggle finding work at bowling is a policy analyst for the center for budget and policy priorities and he's empathetic to that argument he says in most snap households with children there is someone who works but maybe not as much as would be required engage in the labor market or they have very serious barriers to it whether it's a criminal conviction lack of a car physical or mental condition that makes it hard to work but both sides agree that the states should have to step up their employment programs to better prepare snap recipients like eric galvin for jobs galvin lives in columbus nebraska enjoyed.

chairman bowling policy analyst eric galvin columbus nebraska npr david green rachel martin nebraska texas congressman mike conaway house agriculture committee forty nine years twenty hours two decades
"policy analyst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To take up the massive farm bill soon but there's a big hurdle to getting it passed and it has to do with the biggest expenditure in the bill the supplemental nutrition assistance program or snap the fight is over the expanded work requirements that house republicans wanna put in place for anyone getting food assistance grant girl of any t news in nebraska reports for the past two decades adults up to forty nine years old with no dependents have been required to work at least twenty hours a week to get assistance house republicans want to tweak that adding parents with school aged kids and adults up to age fifty nine that could affect up to seven million people who would be required to work texas congressman mike conaway is chairman of the house agriculture committee which oversees the program and he argues it will push more people toward self sufficiency that's the result we want to have across the board is people bettering themselves getting what they need in plug into the economy ghetto that economic ladder success and start moving up on their own house democrats are holding back supports saying that the expanded rules would only punish people who struggle finding work at bowen is a policy analyst for the center for budget and policy priorities and he's sympathetic to that argument he says in most snap households with children there is someone who works but maybe not as much as would be required during in the labor market or they have very serious barriers to it whether it's a criminal conviction lack of a car physical or mental condition that makes it hard to work but both sides agree that the states should have to step up their employment programs to better prepare snap recipients like eric galvin for jobs galvin lives in columbus nebraska and joined a state run pilot program similar to what lawmakers have in mind at the time the single mother was working the night shift at a nursing home and it was taking a toll she was only sleeping a few hours a day and one of her sons was struggling at school crazy stability is better than no stability i guess is the way i looked at it like it's bringing in money she started meeting with a caseworker to update.

chairman policy analyst eric galvin nebraska texas congressman mike conaway house agriculture committee columbus forty nine years twenty hours two decades
"policy analyst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"She's a senior policy analyst for access now a nonprofit international organization working to protect human rights in the digital era speaking with us from brussels well the laws are changing in europe digital norms are changing around the world many experts say people are coming to expect more transparency in terms of what data is collected about them and how it is used here's npr's tech correspondent arthur shahani ahead of the change in european law set for may there's a lot of forecasting going on according to data privacy experts like reina ska who's based in paris the internet is going to change in a big way it's going to become a place where no means no before you even you know put your cookie on my computer or my mobile device you have to make sure i consent to being followed a cookie is a small piece of data website might slip into your smartphone or laptop to keep track of what you're doing online right now without clearly asking your permission she says many sites are watching your every move under europe's new directive that's not okay consent must be given and it can be taken away consent just like sexual consent is they namic stabalise could gives this simple example say you want to buy a new pair of heels your fine with marketers slipping zappa's add into your morning feed but then later you're done shopping fine if tomorrow i decided that shoes i must have the ways to withdraw my consent and say look on fed up of your shoes now just stop profiling means the following me and please do remove the data you have a me because i no longer want you to keep it europe a continent that has not created internet giants like google or facebook is now engineering a legal way to control them if you capture or mine personal data like height weight race religion browsing habits you've got new obligations steadily ska says for too long american companies have gotten away with too little oversight in a row recent scandal facebook lost control over the data of eighty seven million users while ceo mark zuckerberg said sorry she says you know we don't need your apology we need you to be respectful it's aspirational aspirational meeting that of course we would like to strive for what considered the gold standard michael cohen is a lawyer who advises american media and internet companies that operate across the atlantic europe's directive is sprawling ninety nine articles long how us companies.

senior policy analyst brussels europe npr zappa google facebook mark zuckerberg michael cohen arthur shahani reina paris ceo
"policy analyst" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

AM 870 The Answer

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

"The muslim world with the arab world with with you the poorly educated masses in southern egypt nope we don't resonate very well we really don't where you know on on the top of this hill and they don't they don't get us so we need to have alliances with people who do resonate whether it's the grand move the in jerusalem or or preachers in mosques in alexandra we need to make sure that we know when we when his our position to speak and when we need to rely on another you are listening to champions of justice with tom gerardy joined today by justice trish bigalow and attorney bump finnity and you've been listening to the the voice of our guest he's the former national deputy director of the national counterterrorism center currently a senior policy analyst at the rand corporation he is andrew lippman our program today is a reassuring of an interview that we recorded after alqaeda attacks on publications in paris the events of those days are very similar to the events that we have experienced here in the past week and today's program gives us a perspective on the issue of terrorism justice and you were the thing theory talking about a lunch we had before we got hair was trying to understand fully why it is that al qaeda up our qaeda and isis hate america and america so much can you explain that to us it was it says something we asked ourselves alive as we think research nice people and you know they don't hate us as human beings general debate what we stand for the the eight the freedoms that we enjoy that we take for granted uh their values are very different from ours um the mixing of the sexes in in in many conservative a muslim countries we wouldn't be allowed to be sitting next to each other as we are today you uncovered and and just having a conversation nao that that's neither good nor bad it's just a different difference of culture so why i am fully address had as yet the rest of us has finally shouldn't sleep man and i know how the unhcr uncovered with the justice would not be he'll play here i'm sorry i interrupted you know so he'll bin laden who i think is the architect of the current ideology and i think i said before the.

deputy director senior policy analyst rand corporation america egypt jerusalem tom gerardy trish bigalow attorney andrew lippman paris unhcr
"policy analyst" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

Money For the Rest of Us

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

"Ed mills a washington policy analyst with raymond james says there's really no difference between owning and renting in the tax code anymore for most americans you're in different used to there was an incentive to take out a mortgage because you could deduct interest now for many that incentive is no longer there that potentially could have an impact on on home prices it's an impact on charities if you're less likely to itemize you don't have the financial incentive to to necessarily to give to charity and so charities worried about the all these people worried when you simplify the tax code there are those that are impacted in potentially chaired charities hopefully we give the not for profit not just for tax benefits but it it will have an impact it will have an impact on higher states maids makes living in a high tax state because the the deduction is capped for state and local taxes and property taxes you can only deduct ten thousand dollars i very much when you have a high income and you live in a high income tax date and so one of the things when it comes to taxes and one tries to to pay as little as possible on a try to find ways to get around the systems and state governments in high tax states are doing exactly that read an article in new york times says the proposing replacing state income tax which are no longer fully deductible with payroll taxes on employers so can't if the players can deduct it but not household so we'll just shift the burden to them or perhaps.

policy analyst raymond james new york times income tax Ed mills washington property taxes ten thousand dollars
"policy analyst" Discussed on X96

X96

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on X96

"Trump administration had banned the center for disease control from using seven words the words were sciencebased evidencebased entitlement diversity transgender vulnerable and fetus the center for disease control which studies health issues were told not to use those words policy analyst with the cdc were given the list of forbidden words at a meeting on thursday with senior officials who oversee the budget according to the washington post so the cdc has now tried to spin this story the director of the cdc has tried to spin this story and say well no they were just telling us we probably shouldn't use those words in a budget presentation is sarah inflammatory nerves wish science bay we shouldn't put them in and so she's trying to soften it and make it look like his but i you know and then i thought well who letsie she's the director of the cdc i wonder who appointed her to that position because that's how you get that job yeah and there of donald trump appointed heard of that position so that's why she's trying to spin it and soften it make it seem like it's really no big deal that they can't say those things so he he now here this is a story in utah uh this is a quote melissa george said i was i wish i was a i wish i was breast feeding so i could go on a break any time i wanted to our supervisor said that to her according to a complaint that she made to an employee hotline in august of two thousand four miss george was in her twenties mid20s her supervisor was a man more than twice her age after the supervisor said and did more did more that george thought constituted discrimination in retaliation including recruiting amanda replace her because she was breastfeeding at work she compared planed to the state agency gives assigned to investigate that the utah anti discrimination and labour division right so she did she went through the channel she said i i feel like it was eliminated against breastfeeding at work is is not a crime i should have been able to do that well the staff there at the utah administration in labour division this is a story massala tribune found no evidence to support her complaint and and denied her any recourse.

policy analyst cdc director donald trump melissa george supervisor massala tribune washington sarah utah amanda
"policy analyst" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"The senior policy analyst at hedge i potomac research in washington dc and he's an expert at the intersection between business and politics jt it is great to have you back on the show with us we'd like to jump right into it what is the latest on what type of tax reform we can expect for personal taxes but one thing you guys in fact if everything goes as planned or republican planet are the bracket now sort of a reduction of seven records down to three or four bracket a note brackets art and twenty five and thirty five varied a lot of noise and i noticed something you guys are interested in a lot of noise about the socalled northerners act bracket which is the thirty nine point six one you owe the republicans are finding it hard to pay for the tax bill um and utah that with the border adjustment tax being shot down earlier in the year right now the state and local tax reduction humping something that that all the bar here in dc and there that that was supposed to bring him some revenue it looks like that can be pared back so they're trying to aren't places two cave if you will word of or to actually pay for this thing so what about the middle class in owen you when we go from seven to three some people are going to go down some people you know theoretically are going to go up do you see based on what you're reading in hearing do you expect any sort of middleclass tax hike going forward i really don't i really don't i mean a drink that president trump has in the case they're interested harden does have the bully pulpit we saw him a treat on this report went through the other day so i think that uh trump and and hill republicans are well aware the hack that if they do anything erase half.

senior policy analyst utah dc owen trump harden bully pulpit potomac research president
"policy analyst" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"The senior policy analyst at hedge i potomac research in washington dc and he's an expert at the intersection between business and politics jt it is great to have you back on the show with us we'd like to jump right into it what is the latest on what type of tax reform we can expect for personal taxes but one thing you guys in fact if everything goes as planned or republican planet are the bracket now sort of a reduction of seven records down to three or four bracket a note brackets art and twenty five and thirty five varied a lot of noise and i noticed something you guys are interested in a lot of noise about the socalled northerners act bracket which is the thirty nine point six one you owe the republicans are finding it hard to pay for the tax bill um and utah that with the border adjustment tax being shot down earlier in the year right now the state and local tax reduction humping something that that all the bar here in dc and there that that was supposed to bring him some revenue it looks like that can be pared back so they're trying to aren't places two cave if you will word of or to actually pay for this thing so what about the middle class in owen you when we go from seven to three some people are going to go down some people you know theoretically are going to go up do you see based on what you're reading in hearing do you expect any sort of middleclass tax hike going forward i really don't i really don't i mean a drink that president trump has in the case they're interested harden does have the bully pulpit we saw him a treat on this report went through the other day so i think that uh trump and and hill republicans are well aware the hack that if they do anything erase half.

senior policy analyst utah dc owen trump harden bully pulpit potomac research president
"policy analyst" Discussed on Warm Regards

Warm Regards

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on Warm Regards

"This is former kearns dialogue linking climate scientists news majors journalists and other human on the front lines of climate change on mandy rabkin pro a senior reporter for climate recording today and calls for new york where it's been in the '70s for a very long time although i from one eric holds house told us so by via twitter the first game of the world series will be the hottestever than that high 90s la area when we're recording jacqueline gil are resident panel colleges is in kuwait and eric hold house our master meteorologist and grist blogger is to whose family so is just me today by i'm thrilled to be able to have a conversation with joe climbing a longtime department of interior staff scientist in see your poly policy analyst back in july clement stirred things up by filing a complaint and a whistle blower disclosure form with the office of special counsel at the interior department why not explained in the washington post on that very day he was one of about fifty senior department employees who received letters informing us informing them of involuntary reassignments as he said in his op ed citing the letter cited a need to quote improve talent development mission delivery and collaboration and he said the letter informed him that he was reassigned to an unrelated job in the accounting office that collects royalty checks from fossil fuel companies irony alert there's other news but i think we're going to focus on this because it's so extraordinary easing he has set in motion and so jal greetings and thank you for being with us i any thanks it's good to be on.

climate change reporter new york twitter world series kuwait staff scientist policy analyst clement special counsel washington post kearns eric jacqueline gil joe
"policy analyst" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"The way of of that true tax reform and then we do we need to push for for spending reform that that that that at any but also a very important part of this puzzle so some of the press we're talking with adema shield from the herridge institute days and economic policy analyst the your we already have headlines none of which i am uh seconding i still you know we all to hold our breath it seems to me on day one or two of attacks planned announcement but already mud folks like the washington post suggesting that this tax plan provides major gains for richest one percent uneven benefits for the middle class these kinds of a reports that are surfacing now defined in the accuracy in them at i think all the reports that claim any of these any of these numbers right now have they're all making so many assumption and all the assumptions they're making are biased biased in the direction of of of undermining the tax plan rather than supporting it though and white why would they the why why would the way would the the major media in this country have a bias against the tests planned from john street yeah it i mean that i think that you third of in is in line with the dare at their general reporting on just about everything but the reality is we do we're still waiting on a lot of details we know that tax reform can grow the economy significantly and and note that that's where the focus should remain this the the narrative it is just a tax cut for the rich is often fueled by myth information we note like the corporate tax cut it is either tax cut four american workers through higher wages week noted that corporate taxes passed on uh to workers in i 75 to 100 percent of adults passed onto workers and and most uh most governments score keepers we you read in.

policy analyst herridge institute washington corporate tax 100 percent one percent
"policy analyst" Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

WBAL 1090AM

02:29 min | 4 years ago

"policy analyst" Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

"Policy analyst for a couple of years the heritage foundation you can't just read through this thing okay i get it how you can do that for some of the provisions but not a lot of it healthcare and well first of all legislate lation is very complicated in reading it so i'm not going to spend a lot of time on it today tomorrow i'm going to because i'll have more time to have digested it and maybe i'll see if i can get my old boss to to come on and give a current expert's opinion on it but there it it is being greeted with scepticism from republicans which is good every piece of legislation should be greeted with scepticism but it is being greeted with a pearl clutching panic by democrats which is kind of funny because just based on what i've read so far which is an a whole lot since there isn't a lot of serious analysis out there yet it's not all that different from care it tries to rein in government spending and give a little bit more freedom least as of now to the american people than obamacare did but that is the end of the world as we know it by democrats according to democrats and they don't feel fine about it i'm sorry michael stipe they don't and this is the world we live in and 2017 nancy pelosi renounced this bill within minutes of it being released within minutes of her even possibly knowing what the title of the legislation was she renounced this bill that should tell you a lot of what you need to know chuck schumer's out there whining about how this is going to arm bebo this is gonna hurt people he's seemingly ignorant blissfully so of the impact of obama care and what it has done to the american people they don't give a damn they are pretending now now the republican built maybe worse it may well be worse especially from my perspective where i think the government on a federal level needs to get the hell oudda this business and empower the individual but you can't deny that the current system that democrats designed has been a disaster maybe you're somebody you know has benefited personally from some aspect of it but would you support a piece of legislation.

Policy analyst michael stipe nancy pelosi chuck schumer bebo obamacare obama