24 Burst results for "Police Systems"

Credible reports protesters shot dead in Nigeria

PRI's The World

03:34 min | 4 months ago

Credible reports protesters shot dead in Nigeria

"In Nigeria's largest city legos reports are coming in of security forces opening fire tonight on unarmed demonstrators the demonstrators had been protesting in fact against police brutality according to several eyewitnesses the live rounds hit several people details on casualties have not yet been confirmed. This evening's violence erupted after the Lagos State government imposed a twenty four hour curfew in response to the growing protests against police violence. Yesterday protesters blocked a major expressway in Lagos and also targeted the main airport shutting down terminals Judeh John was a lawyer and journalist and Lagos earlier today I asked him how people in the city were responding to the curfew. People in a frenzy panicked people are constant appointments people are running home. Lagos notorious for heavy traffic transportation is a nightmare and so I've just feel so sad for people who would have to be rushing home and David cuts under ruled. It's well before many people usually get home from work. I've even seen suggestions on twitter cautioning those not close to home to head to a hotel. Why did authorities take such action what prompted this Nigeria's security systems if the mess that incentivized protect powerful on the privilege against citizens The government in this atmosphere of chaos. Must have made strategy conclusion that the easiest thing to do is keep everybody hope. Just a sense of will not have the capacity to contain spiraling protests on. We should do the easiest thing for us to do to keep this on their ups. The problem with that is that citizens expect that the government should be taken action to protect constitional protests citizenship but the punished. For the government's inability to secure life on property, which ironically is the point of the protests in the first place. So while I can send me a tree she, it's the thinking that led to this. It said Selena against them because even though you can see, yes, people understand that we care on this trees the government was trying to get control over fluid situation. Students expected mental thought of a better way to do this that doesn't infringe on the rights of peaceful protests on the rights of freedom of assembly. So today when you say the police system in Nigeria a mess, a lot of Nigerians point I two SARS a special anti robbery squad, the unit that actually prompted all these protests and now the demands of the protesters have grown beyond just a narrow focus on the SARS unit. What are protesters calling for? Now any serious blended engaged government should have anticipated that the conditions that covid nineteen hundred presented would stimulate already restless citizenry to get on the streets in Nigeria. Young people overwhelmingly. Tired, of bad, governance, they're tired of what appears to be disengaged disconnected. Government, that's the crux of the matter people just feel like the government's a disconnected from the demand the desires of every major ends what people are really tired of is Goldman that doesn't care when citizens die. That's the problem and onto citizens believe that the government is not just going to react to the protests at the time. The government understands that this is about disappointment in the system. The demands will keep on multiplying.

Government Lagos Nigeria Judeh John Twitter Sars Selena Robbery Goldman David
Activists On How To Sustain Movement Against Police Brutality

The Takeaway

08:04 min | 5 months ago

Activists On How To Sustain Movement Against Police Brutality

"Cove in 19 crisis has not just been a health crisis. It's been an economic crisis to and as economic crises arise, so it is unemployment and homelessness. In the years following the 2008 economic collapse, major cities saw a dramatic rise in the number of people experiencing homelessness. And now amid the Koven 19 pandemic, we're seeing a rising rate of addictions, according to the eviction lab in 17 cities that they tracked there have been more than 53,000 eviction since the pandemic began. Results, not just homeless men on the street, but Children living in shelters, families living in their cars and Wal Mart parking lots. People crowding into friends or relatives shared rooms this period of time since the Koven 19 pandemic hasn't just exacerbated the problem. It's also Given rise to a kind of grassroots activism against it. Earlier this year amid the national uprisings for racial justice against police brutality, anti homelessness activists have been playing an increasingly public role. In cities like Minneapolis in Philadelphia, activists have established homeless encampments and protected them from law enforcement sweeps that displaced the camps. I'm joined now by Will James, reporter with Can k X public radio in Washington and host of the Outsiders podcast about homelessness in Olympia. Great to have you here? Well, yeah. Hey, Matt, thanks and were also on the line with Anna or so a reporter with the Philadelphia Inquirer who has been reporting on a homeless encampment slash protest in center city, Philadelphia. Anna. Thanks for joining us. Hey, thanks for having me your welcome. So, guys, let's start with you. Will you've been following the homes this crisis throughout the West Coast? Can you just give us a picture to start of what This crisis looked like before the pandemic. It Yeah. So, you know, just take Washington State, for example. You know, we have an estimated 21,000 people who are homeless in Washington state. And on the West Coast. What kind of distinguishes the West Coast from the East Coast when it comes to homeless is thie proportion of people who are homeless who are living outside who are unsheltered who are living in tents in the woods and on the sides of highways? By some accounts, you know all the numbers and homelessness are a little bit shaky, very hard to get a solid number on them. But as many as two thirds of people who are unsheltered and homeless in the United States live in California, Oregon and Washington, so homelessness has been very visible crisis impossible to ignore in the West Coast, vast encampments of people living in city downtown's and in parks and before a coven 19 homelessness was the front and center issue. In so many West Coast cities. He was getting a lot of attention. There was a ton of advocacy it was, you know, in every City Council meeting every county council meeting now homelessness is one of many emergencies that states and cities and counties they're dealing with. And so We're seeing advocates fighting for attention for this issue in a way that that really hasn't been necessary in past years. How are they fighting for attention House out? What does that look like? It looks like kind of trying to use the media show up at City Council meetings and government meetings and just kind of reminding people in power that Even though there are so many crises that we're dealing with right now, this homelessness emergency hasn't gone away. In fact, much of the West Coast, many of the cities on the West Coast were in an official state of emergency around homelessness before this began, and so cove in 19 is actually you know, a state of emergency on top of a state of emergency in many of these cities. Well, Ana tell us what's going on in Philly. There have been a couple of homeless encampments around for months. But they apparently double is protest movements. Right? Can you explain a bit about what these look like? And what they're like? Yeah, you know, for Philadelphia. It's sort of a new and unique structure. We have had encampments of homeless folks for several years now that I have grown in size and in prominence, and the city has, you know, swept them cleared them out, and then people scatter and eventually re gather somewhere else. Now in the past couple of years, they've really been concentrated in the city's Kensington neighborhood. Which is a couple of miles away from center city, and from where you know, media and politicians sort of do their everyday work. Now the largest encampment of homeless folks, which was organized in June by affordable housing advocates, is on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, which is a very prominent space sort of in the middle of the city. It's where the famous art museum is located. It's surrounded by luxury condos. And it's really in a place that is impossible to ignore. And so we now have this interesting confluence of the racial justice movement mixed with the movement for affordable housing for people living in homelessness. And so it's presenting the city with this really new and interesting challenge because they just can't handle This encampment like they have others in the past. Are they making a connection between racial justice, the black lives matter, Movements and homeless activism. Are they making a connection there? Very much so thie Encampment was established two weeks into You know the racial justice protests here in Philadelphia, and it was immediately tied to black lives matter. The activists connect the criminal justice system and policing systems. With poverty and homelessness. There are a lot of black men and women who are living in this homeless encampment who have been in and out of the sister criminal justice system almost all of their lives and The organizers of this encampment are saying, Look, this is all connected. If we reform our policing systems to stop just proportionately impacting black people in Philadelphia, we can make a you know a real change in what poverty and homelessness looks like in this city if we can get people into housing, rather than putting them in temporary shelters or sending them back out onto the streets where, whereas the activists say Homelessness could be criminalized in a variety of ways. Whether that's folks being charged for substance used public drunk in this, the like these systems really are sort of inextricably linked. And how is the city handling this? Are they allowing this homeless encampment to just stay in the center of town? I understand is also a a second one near the Philadelphia Housing Authority's office. I imagine these folks can't stay living there and intense and whatnot for then, you know, indefinitely. Yeah. You know, it's been interesting. The city has given several eviction notices A TTE this point for both encampments. You're right. There is a smaller encampment in north Philadelphia outside. The Housing Authority, which runs public housing in the city. But so far the people living there, and the activists running these encampments have resisted thes eviction notices in a variety of ways. A couple months ago, there was a federal lawsuit filed on behalf of the encampment. Residents, claiming their first Amendment right to protest was was being violated. And several weeks ago, the city put out a final eviction notice and Went, outreach workers and police showed up early one morning. At seven o'clock. There were dozens of activists who had gathered to defend the camps with sticks, boogie boards, makeshift shields, and it just was very clear that That a sweep of the encampment was going to be really ugly on DH. There was a ton of media there Tio to capture what occur so outreach workers and police sort of stepped back and No eviction has taken place yet. You know the city and the activists are are still sort of negotiating. Will

Philadelphia West Coast Washington State City Council Philadelphia Housing Authority Wal Mart Philadelphia Inquirer Washington Cove Anna Reporter Will James United States Housing Authority Benjamin Franklin Parkway Minneapolis Olympia
"police systems" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:32 min | 6 months ago

"police systems" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Saw the whole ordeal on Twitter. And by the way, one of the gals called one of the state troopers, eh? Inward calling Mac and that state Trooper Haplin. I happen to know that state trooper right there. So here's what I saw. I saw the state troopers. I thought they handled it Excellent. Although they did a Fanta and that in that one scene that I saw, I thought they did a fantastic job of him. They kept their cool They were being talked at And I need to get this off my chest because some one of the things that I was thinking about since I've been gone is there's there's been an attack on common sense. These base, right? Like big time, right? And so and there has been a lack of examples that have being set now, no doubt about it. You know how I feel about police systems across the country. I believe they need to be re structure. I think there needs to be a lot of things that have happened because there has been huge problems in that. Even though that there is a problem. You can't just shut the police system. You can't just shut him down and respect for things to be fixed Number one number two when you are involved in these situations and with police officers in in in this case The way that they were trying to fight back with the police officers. Look, I'm not condoning that. So if there's any kids there, listening, Actually, you shouldn't be should probably be in school. But there are don't do that. So don't. That's the biggest takeaway that I have from that video in particular, and also I want to say I am glad that they are shutting down protest on the freeway because we don't want to see any problems in someone lose their life on the freeway, and I talked about that before, right, Like what happened in July when summer Taylor was hit. A driver during a protest and people were asking. Well, why was that protests allowed to happen in the first place? I think that the the freeway is not where you want to have your voice heard. Be a lamb protesters often get accused of being violent. But over the weekend it was right wing protesters who gathered outside in Salem for a pro trump rally. And one speaker blasted democratic leaders for allowing the violence to happen. And we're going to hear this. But we just want to make sure that everything is bleeped because there is no here we go. Here we go. We have said.

Trooper Haplin Twitter Salem Taylor
Several protests to take place over holiday weekend in Washington, DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

Several protests to take place over holiday weekend in Washington, DC

"Protesters are still working to bring about change as the movement to support black lives continues the organization DC protests has put together several Marge's since the death of George Floyd, including one today in Malcolm X Pork. There's still not enough reform in the police system, and we've been protesting for about 30 plus days, though we're out here trying to take back before Justin Dawes is the co founder and says they're working with a number of organizations, including the Equal Justice Fund Initiative and bartenders against racism. And they plan to continue providing education within the community. Our next protests and demonstrations be focused on more education and getting all of our community outside locally vote, So we're out here, enforced and showing up in numbers, so let them know we won't be intimidated and we won't be silent. Melissa how w. GOP news

Equal Justice Fund Initiative Justin Dawes George Floyd Marge GOP Malcolm DC Melissa Co Founder
California City Bans Predictive Policing Software

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:06 min | 8 months ago

California City Bans Predictive Policing Software

"In the wake of black lives matter protests, governments across the country have been weighing how to reform their police, departments and address inequities law enforcement. One tactic that's come under scrutiny has been the use of surveillance technology last week, a city council in Santa Cruz California voted to ban what's called predictive policing software? It could be the first measure of its kind in the US, our reporter David. Bertie has been looking into this and joins us to. To explain hey, Dave. Thanks for joining US Qatari all right, so explain to us what is predictive policing? How does it work predictive policing technology as it's used in Santa Cruz or has been using Santacruz? Essentially a data analysis tool that tracks usually three types of data, crime, type, location, and timing, and essentially allows the police department project where hotspots within the city would be an argument for this type of technology is that would allow police department? To basically make decisions more efficiently in terms of how they allocate resources. So why is it coming under? Scrutiny is coming under scrutiny for a few reasons. One is sort of this national discussion. We're having about race and policing which has filtered down to local areas such as Santa. Cruz in California, but also people in that city had a first hand. Look at how this technology has played out the police department. There was an early adopter of the. The technology and decided that if we base our policing tactics on analysis of data that is inherently biased is going to produce an in some cases replicate biased policing tactics. So why is it inherently biased? Explain that to us. How does watching where crimes are happening now and using that data to predict new crimes? Why why is there bias in their book to Santa? Cruz Mayor Justin Cummings explained it this way. Basically, it's garbage in garbage out. Coming said to me if we collect data from police, stops or crimes that are reported in our current policing system, it's going to reflect a policing system in which underrepresented communities such as black communities or Hispanic communities face disproportionately heavy police presence, so we take data from a policing strategy. The disproportionately put officers in communities of color were going to get data reflects. Reflects that policing strategy so in ways in some cases perpetuates that cycle, so it's not I mean just to be clear. When we say, it's collecting data about crime that's happening. It's using data that the cops are giving them about things like police stops there stopping someone, and that is being recorded as crime whether or not actual crime place. They're not yet the. Gist of it and what Cummings would argue, and what the city council. Santa Cruz also agreed upon is that they will also reflect sort of the disproportionate ways. Cops have been shown to stop people of Color, so you know in some cases they might stop a black driver more often than a white driver for a regular speeding ticket, for example that's sort of a mundane example, but I think you could play the Dow and people in Santa. Cruz have played it out over the course of different types of potential crimes now, Santa Cruz isn't the only place in the country. That's used this sort of predictive policing New York. City has used it as. As well, and they've been under fire for many years for stop and Frisk. Policy which basically feeds into exactly what you're talking about. Roy New York pioneers a statistical modeling called COMSAT in one thousand nine hundred ninety S, which is a little bit more of a primitive version of this essentially uses big data from different types of crime committed around the city in order to project where officers should spend the most time in resources, so predictive policing technology basically takes that to the next level. It injects an artificial intelligence to the process. It basically allows software to learn crime patterns over the course of time in order to better project, police should go. So are other cities following I mean this is obviously happening in the wake of the killing of George Floyd and a lot more attention, being paid to the way that policing is taking place around the country. Are we seeing other cities and states kind of think about this in the same direction Santa Cruz is thought to be the first city in the country to actually ban predictive policing, and it did so in large part because. It has experienced with this technology actually in two thousand eleven time magazine named the Santa Cruz police departments. Use of technology is one of the fifty best inventions of the year, so they're definitely ahead of many other cities in this regard, but spoke to some civil liberties advocates over the last couple of days, and they said this is certainly a new front in this larger discussion we're having about police surveillance, which is really ramped up over the last few weeks. Particularly Municipalities, so you have places like Boston, which recently voted to ban facial recognition technology. Technology for its police. Department California, also recently stopped bill at the state level that would regulate facial recognition technology, and I think at the state and local level across the country you do see a lot of lawmakers and activists really start to push reconsider how police use technology

Santa Cruz Santa Cruz California Cruz Santa United States Justin Cummings New York Bertie Dave Reporter California David George Floyd Comsat
Senate Republicans unveil the JUSTICE Act

All Things Considered

00:30 sec | 9 months ago

Senate Republicans unveil the JUSTICE Act

"Atlanta the day after president Donald Trump signed an order aimed at problems in the nation's policing system Republicans in the Senate are out with their own plan today the GOP proposal meant to counter policing legislation proposed by house Democrats and staying clear of federal mandates of the justice act it's a direct response to recent public protests of the job of George Floyd encrusted Minneapolis police sent a proposal to establish a database to track excessive use of force complaints restrictions on choke holds a new commissions to study law enforcement

Atlanta Donald Trump Senate George Floyd President Trump GOP Minneapolis
Senate Judiciary Committee held hearing on police use of force, qualified immunity

Forum

01:06 min | 9 months ago

Senate Judiciary Committee held hearing on police use of force, qualified immunity

"Senate Republicans are set to unveil their proposed changes to police procedures and accountability of their packages to be introduced Wednesday a day after the Senate judiciary committee held a hearing examining the use of police force impairs winter Johnson reports a panel is taking up the issue amid the nationwide demonstrations against the police killing of George Floyd in other instances of racial injustice democratic senator Cory Booker says the pressure is on to make substantial changes to the nation's policing system will we meet this moment in history and actually do something real or will we find ourselves back here again a year from now three years from now Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Lindsey Graham says he wants to reform police departments not to define them more accountability the national registry of that how many people actually die in police custody the time has come to create a system to combat a broken system the hearing comes as Senate Republicans craft legislation to address police brutality house Democrats plan to vote later this month on their proposal which includes a ban on the use of

Johnson George Floyd Cory Booker Lindsey Graham Senate Senate Judiciary Senator Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman
"police systems" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:32 min | 10 months ago

"police systems" Discussed on Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

"Months in advance dining out his always had a special role in our culture in every culture. We go to restaurants to celebrate catch up to explore meet new people being a new environment. It's often how we connect but of all the places we like to gather now shutdown by this pandemic restaurants are also some of the hardest hit so today. We're going to talk to people in the industry. The chefs the restaurant tours to find out what they're trying to do to survive for them for us for everyone. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction restaurants. Sort OF BOTTLE. The zeitgeist their community. And it's where people celebrate as not just about eating. That's David Chang. He's a chef and the founder of the momofuku group which has restaurants around the world. He's also the host of the Netflix show ugly delicious if food establishments were important. People wouldn't want it so badly. There's just somethin'. That is a connection to just being human besides tasting delicious foods. Chang calls restaurants quote cultural banks and worries about the erosion. This pandemic has had on all aspects of the dining experience. We literally take ninety percent of cash flowing. Give it back to everybody else. On top of trying to make delicious food and build organizations however small they might be no one gets in this business at least that. Iron Meyer so they can make a ton of money they do it because of the life and the positive impact you can have both on yourself and others around you and you that away that that. That's that's going to be pretty brutal closing. His restaurants in March was extremely difficult. He had to furlough around. Eight hundred workers in this week decided to close to of his restaurants reopening others. Maybe even harder. You have to reconfigure literally every decision of how you operate in a restaurant. It was hard enough to begin with. How do you taste food? How you order food. How do you sanitize now? How do you do contact with delivery? You even allowed transaction via credit cards anymore. So now you there's like all of these things now that are going to be expensive. Chang doesn't have the answers yet. But he thinks he knows what it's GonNa take. Define I just think that we're going to need some ingenuity and creativity to sort of align some mutual problems that we have in this country particularly in the food space and sort of reconfigure. How this whole works on his twitter feed. Chang has also been asking people to send him photos of reopened restaurants in cities like Taipei and Hong Kong. It's fascinating to look at them. Some of the photos show. Police Systems delivering coffee. Temperature checks at the door and customers. Even receiving full body disinfectant sprays. Don't worry with their clothes on too many. These measures may seem a little over the top. The common thread is we have to actually make impossible hap and that gives me optimism really genuinely does because these kinds of impossible tasks that sort of her. My brain are what I most attracted to. And we can't have anyone working off a different playbook everyone needs to be working the same playbook every restaurant every business in the absence of a so called restaurant playbook the National Restaurant Association which is a lobbying group is doing what it can to try and offer some guidelines for reopening obviously frequent hand washing some element of distancing some element of face covering certainly reduced interaction between the host. And the guest. That's Larry Lynch Senior Vice. President of Science and Industry at the National Restaurant Association Lynch said it's already begun. Restaurants are already testing out new methods. Everyone's looking visit different ways just this weekend. We saw one of the towns here in Florida. Closed down one of their street to the restaurant. Tours could pull the chairs out into the street. If you're used to going out as being a curated. Dining Experience Lynch describes the post pandemic world as sort of a safety focused obstacle. Course I would say what you're probably GonNa find is before you get there. You're going to look online and look what the instructions are in that particular restaurant what their expectations or. It may tell you to wait outside. May Ask you to place your order online. It may tell you that once you get outside. Send them attacks and let them know. You're outside wait once you're inside. You may wait a bit before the waiter or waitress actually comes up and greets you greeting maybe something as simple as confirming your order rather than taking your order. Once you die. You may find that your table is included as fasces. Wasn't it passed. It's going to be cleared all at once rather than sporadically during the dining experience. When you're dining probably won't see the manager come over to ask how your view was and whether or not you enjoyed yourself. Restaurants are going to have to tailor safety measures to suit their capabilities and it is possible. Not everyone can physically accommodate these recommendations for example Irene. Lee doesn't see her Boston. Restaurant may may hosting sin diners anytime soon. We're a small restaurant so we have about thirty six seats. Which means the possibility of socially distancing inside the building is basically none but Lee. Who was a finalist for this years? James Beard Rising Star Chef Award has still managed to find a silver lining. We are pretty much going to have to change our whole model which sounds scary but is also a really exciting opportunity. So how do we re imagine what a restaurant can be? Water restaurant can do what restaurant staff are capable of Lee in her employees are already starting to answer those questions. For example her restaurant may may is open for delivery and is also hosting virtual dumpling classes. The restaurant is delivering groceries to healthcare workers and selling pantry staples to the community like milk and eggs. The goal to help customers avoid the grocery store because I think supermarkets are going to feel unsafe for a lot of people for a long time and I just think like we have the ability to get almost any of those products probably at a better price at Mamie and so it would be kind of unconscionable to not try to use that to help keep people safer and to make their lives more. Convenient Lee is taking this time to rethink how a restaurant should operate. And she's hoping the industry is a whole does the same especially in the areas where it was struggling even before the pandemic. I think that this is a huge opportunity for us to keep talking about the biggest issue that our industry house which is Labor on the issue of jobs and low wages and like terrible workplace environments. That is always been the bane of this industry. I am hoping that the compensation model could be altered and cross training could become more prevalent. But that's the long term in the short term lease preoccupied with just keeping may may afloat even though she says. The survival of the restaurant isn't her biggest concern. If mamie doesn't exist in in five or ten years that's totally fine with me. I'm going to be really pissed off if there are no cool. Independently owned quirky restaurants to eat at like I cannot eat every day I refuse and so I think that for me. The question about Future is almost a little bit less important but for a lot of people in this industry is all we have one thing I've learned. Is that the restaurant. Industry is full of dedicated creative leaders and is someone who enjoys dining out. I'm optimistic. They're going to find ways to meet the challenges ahead and keep this important part of our culture alive. It's definitely GONNA be an uphill battle but I'm GonNa do what I can to support my favorite places with takeout orders and contributions to out of work employees. They could really use the help if you have questions. Please record them. As a voice memo and e mail them to ask Sanjay it's dot com might include them in our next podcast. We'll be back tomorrow..

National Restaurant Associatio David Chang Lee Dr Sanjay Gupta Mamie Cnn Lynch Netflix Larry Lynch Senior Vice twitter Iron Meyer James Beard founder Florida momofuku group Police Systems Taipei Irene President
The Future of Restaurants During COVID-19

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

07:57 min | 10 months ago

The Future of Restaurants During COVID-19

"But of all the places we like to gather now shutdown by this pandemic restaurants are also some of the hardest hit so today. We're going to talk to people in the industry. The chefs the restaurant tours to find out what they're trying to do to survive for them for us for everyone. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction restaurants. Sort OF BOTTLE. The zeitgeist their community. And it's where people celebrate as not just about eating. That's David Chang. He's a chef and the founder of the momofuku group which has restaurants around the world. He's also the host of the Netflix show ugly delicious if food establishments were important. People wouldn't want it so badly. There's just somethin'. That is a connection to just being human besides tasting delicious foods. Chang calls restaurants quote cultural banks and worries about the erosion. This pandemic has had on all aspects of the dining experience. We literally take ninety percent of cash flowing. Give it back to everybody else. On top of trying to make delicious food and build organizations however small they might be no one gets in this business at least that. Iron Meyer so they can make a ton of money they do it because of the life and the positive impact you can have both on yourself and others around you and you that away that that. That's that's going to be pretty brutal closing. His restaurants in March was extremely difficult. He had to furlough around. Eight hundred workers in this week decided to close to of his restaurants reopening others. Maybe even harder. You have to reconfigure literally every decision of how you operate in a restaurant. It was hard enough to begin with. How do you taste food? How you order food. How do you sanitize now? How do you do contact with delivery? You even allowed transaction via credit cards anymore. So now you there's like all of these things now that are going to be expensive. Chang doesn't have the answers yet. But he thinks he knows what it's GonNa take. Define I just think that we're going to need some ingenuity and creativity to sort of align some mutual problems that we have in this country particularly in the food space and sort of reconfigure. How this whole works on his twitter feed. Chang has also been asking people to send him photos of reopened restaurants in cities like Taipei and Hong Kong. It's fascinating to look at them. Some of the photos show. Police Systems delivering coffee. Temperature checks at the door and customers. Even receiving full body disinfectant sprays. Don't worry with their clothes on too many. These measures may seem a little over the top. The common thread is we have to actually make impossible hap and that gives me optimism really genuinely does because these kinds of impossible tasks that sort of her. My brain are what I most attracted to. And we can't have anyone working off a different playbook everyone needs to be working the same playbook every restaurant every business in the absence of a so called restaurant playbook the National Restaurant Association which is a lobbying group is doing what it can to try and offer some guidelines for reopening obviously frequent hand washing some element of distancing some element of face covering certainly reduced interaction between the host. And the guest. That's Larry Lynch Senior Vice. President of Science and Industry at the National Restaurant Association Lynch said it's already begun. Restaurants are already testing out new methods. Everyone's looking visit different ways just this weekend. We saw one of the towns here in Florida. Closed down one of their street to the restaurant. Tours could pull the chairs out into the street. If you're used to going out as being a curated. Dining Experience Lynch describes the post pandemic world as sort of a safety focused obstacle. Course I would say what you're probably GonNa find is before you get there. You're going to look online and look what the instructions are in that particular restaurant what their expectations or. It may tell you to wait outside. May Ask you to place your order online. It may tell you that once you get outside. Send them attacks and let them know. You're outside wait once you're inside. You may wait a bit before the waiter or waitress actually comes up and greets you greeting maybe something as simple as confirming your order rather than taking your order. Once you die. You may find that your table is included as fasces. Wasn't it passed. It's going to be cleared all at once rather than sporadically during the dining experience. When you're dining probably won't see the manager come over to ask how your view was and whether or not you enjoyed yourself. Restaurants are going to have to tailor safety measures to suit their capabilities and it is possible. Not everyone can physically accommodate these recommendations for example Irene. Lee doesn't see her Boston. Restaurant may may hosting sin diners anytime soon. We're a small restaurant so we have about thirty six seats. Which means the possibility of socially distancing inside the building is basically none but Lee. Who was a finalist for this years? James Beard Rising Star Chef Award has still managed to find a silver lining. We are pretty much going to have to change our whole model which sounds scary but is also a really exciting opportunity. So how do we re imagine what a restaurant can be? Water restaurant can do what restaurant staff are capable of Lee in her employees are already starting to answer those questions. For example her restaurant may may is open for delivery and is also hosting virtual dumpling classes. The restaurant is delivering groceries to healthcare workers and selling pantry staples to the community like milk and eggs. The goal to help customers avoid the grocery store because I think supermarkets are going to feel unsafe for a lot of people for a long time and I just think like we have the ability to get almost any of those products probably at a better price at Mamie and so it would be kind of unconscionable to not try to use that to help keep people safer and to make their lives more. Convenient Lee is taking this time to rethink how a restaurant should operate. And she's hoping the industry is a whole does the same especially in the areas where it was struggling even before the pandemic. I think that this is a huge opportunity for us to keep talking about the biggest issue that our industry house which is Labor on the issue of jobs and low wages and like terrible workplace environments. That is always been the bane of this industry. I am hoping that the compensation model could be altered and cross training could become more prevalent. But that's the long term in the short term lease preoccupied with just keeping may may afloat even though she says. The survival of the restaurant isn't her biggest concern. If mamie doesn't exist in in five or ten years that's totally fine with me. I'm going to be really pissed off if there are no cool. Independently owned quirky restaurants to eat at like I cannot eat every day I refuse and so I think that for me. The question about Future is almost a little bit less important but for a lot of people in this industry is all we have one thing I've learned. Is that the restaurant. Industry is full of dedicated creative leaders and is someone who enjoys dining out. I'm optimistic. They're going to find ways to meet the challenges ahead and keep this important part of our culture alive. It's definitely GONNA be an uphill battle but I'm GonNa do what I can to support my favorite places with takeout orders and contributions to out of work employees. They could really use the help

National Restaurant Associatio David Chang LEE Mamie Dr Sanjay Gupta Netflix CNN Lynch Larry Lynch Senior Vice Founder Twitter Momofuku Group Iron Meyer James Beard Florida Police Systems Taipei Irene President Trump
"police systems" Discussed on en(gender)ed

en(gender)ed

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"police systems" Discussed on en(gender)ed

"The system and and do wrong here and then stop to the next spot and hop to the next spot and yet we also have to honor some of the laws you referenced and others that I'm not an expert in although aerial founder is <hes> with with what what can be taken from one place of occupation to the next <hes> so like I said very good question. Tell tell me how your APP differs from the competitors in your space sure so I think <hes> there's not a lot of I haven't seen any direct competitors per se I think <hes> the majority of companies <hes> that we are talking to what they have in place is their H._r.. Department Ren and preferences that people come and speak face to face <hes> and their preferences that people not be anonymous which I understand that makes it easier for them to get to the root of the problem quickly however the reality is that a lot of people don't trust H._R.. Right now and and see that H._R. is being paid to protect the company which in some ways is the case then and yet you'll also have some really great people in H._R.. Trying to do the right thing so we think this can be a great tool for them and then the other thing that came up you know I think years ago was the hotline and people great. This is our answer to anonymity but <hes> again when you call someone on the phone one of the reasons people don't do this is the pain of saying their story over again and into whom is that person on the other line of the having a good day a bad day is their voice one that is caring and compassionate or just jotting down your notes and moving onto the next question <hes> and so those are the primary. Sorry quote unquote competitors that exists today yes. There's some new things coming out <hes> like I said we haven't seen anything quite like ours yet <hes> but anybody WHO's working on the same goal we we we applaud that <hes> it's it's we're all on the same mission <hes> but I do think that there's a few things that distinguishes what we're doing compared to some others a big one of that being who who makes up our team <hes> and I think aerial our founders story and history and expertise and who he's brought together on his advisory board and who's consulted in in making the products <hes> what it is today is this is a really big thing and then the Brinkley the technology when it comes to some of the huge <hes> places of work and not just places of work. I mean there's as you talked about the the police system. There's we've worked with firefighters. There's universities in this make sense and a lot of different places but <hes> one of the issues that they tell us they have is when when our population is this big. If there's areas of of high frequency that are reported those are easy to catch a nail down but when it's low frequency and high impact something that's awful but not happening that often if it's one of hundreds words of reports that's about you know dear team reading through each of these reports then deciding where there's overlap then deciding what the priority is all of these things that are human capital in human time while potentially the same act is happening running again and again so they're having a hard time with the time in tackling it and the technology for US really helps to like centralize Organiz and prioritize the data's that employers can more quickly take care of the issues that they need to before they escalate to Margaret just acts or if they already are just really if those in the bud quickly you mentioned earlier the <hes> App not me is targeted towards both the B. Two B. and the B. Dec- market so both employers targets. I'm just thinking about other scenarios like for example college campuses where you have <hes> title nine violations and if if there if there were an APP that could help and address both groups. I'm having a hard time reconciling that an APP conserve both constituents <hes> without one side either exploiting it or weaponising it against the other so I could see like let's say this was in a college scenario. <hes> someone who may have committed sexual assault as a preemptive that person goes into the goes into an APP not yours worse and puts some note about how there was consensual sexual activity and then when the person who may be a victim of sexual assault goes in then it kind of contradicts that and so I'm wondering rain. Is there any way that your APP can be used against and be harmful to the target by the employer besides just over it retaliation of course sure not not that we've seen so far dr but I also think that you know we have this is the you know the challenge of technology <hes> it can do great things and then if it's misused or abused it can be harmful <hes> so while we haven't seen that yet I think our our our big focus has been on making sure that there's not <hes> retaliation used the scenario you just used about <hes> some other technology that they're you know they're using and combining that with the you know assuming that someone's GonNa use ours ars <hes> I think the best answer to that is honestly everyone taking part meaning. There's so many people who have endured something that this personally awful to them and we already don't hear a lot of those as you know right <hes> but there is so many people who have witnessed something they knew was not right. They heard that was not right right. They sensed or something that was not right and have used this <hes>. I don't want to call it an excuse but sometimes it is this like it's not my business and so one of our big league big pushes is please report it if it's happened to you or if you've seen it or if you've been a party to and heard about whatever it may be so you can you can report anonymously or using your name you can report as someone who's been the recipient scipion of misconduct or if you've witnessed it so I answer that your question with that meaning that if anyone else were to see that then then hopefully there might even be multiple reports toward it now it's sexual assault and it's you know the one person's word versus another and someone you know someone else went in and said consensual and someone else came to us and said not we have yet to see that case happen but <hes> but hopefully in light of potentially other predictive behavior <hes> that that person might have already been involved in with other people if they already have a history of if there's already been reports of that's going to help a lot to the person who just went through something when when all they know is that one occurrence with the offender but come to find out three other people on campus or at work or whatever it may be have also said I went through something that was uncomfortable or that was wrong <hes> and forced and and what's been the reception so far to your APP. Are there any industries that are <hes> disproportionately being represented and more interested in proactively reaching out over others. I think <hes> the I think the technology allergies sector is more open to technology <hes> some of the more conservative old school type industries <hes> are a bit more protective of of this type of information which is understandable. <hes> you know a lot of it's about I._T.. Security and you know and that we can secure their their mind around because our entire product was built around security. We know how sensitive information isn't if we're trying to prevent these awful accident we definitely built it to make sure that those details at someone entrust us with are not going to get elsewhere <hes> but some the answers were talking to people across all different industries. I do think that technology side in the adoption and the understanding of how helpful the A._I.. Can Be for saving time and money and energy is more easily adopted by the tech sector and they think some of the companies that you're seeing being in the news about this <hes> often the generation of millennials who are no longer standing for the quote unquote old school way of things being done so if you know when we're meeting with we're meeting was one of two types of companies either a company that has had something something already been made public and they're trying to rebuild their trust and their credibility with their employees and with the public or a company that proactively realizes that it only takes you know one thing that they miss and something like that to go down that could really hurt first and foremost their employees is what we hope that their priority is but also their brand reputation and everything else so it's not specific to a sector by do think the more technology <hes> the more tech focused first and more tech evolved companies are more quick to to get it and to adopt it and these are small startups as well as bigger more established companies. Yes we haven't had a startup per se <hes> Yes yes. They've there's any it works with any size company. Okay because I'm I was just thinking that with startups there's more risk and both both for the employer as well as the employee because if you have a handful of people in one person's reporting it's not that hard to through process of elimination figure out who might be the person on the other hand. There's a greater risk because there's not the formalize set of practices that a a larger <hes> H._R.. Company would be able to manage exactly and they have to pick and choose where they're putting their budget in terms of what matters most for up leveling their culture and for retention and for recruiting and what matters most people of why they're choosing and so when they can't necessarily give you an onsite gym and pay for your dry cleaning their the very least GonNa make sure that what you have is a safe healthy environment in that regard so so yes the some of the smaller companies absolutely see this as this makes complete sense for us to. Have <hes> and then the larger ones it's again it goes back to that example. I was giving just the need of the amount of reports and things that they get and how do they prioritize this data and centralize it when it's currently coming into all these different individuals in different different reports and such just a much better slough they're cleaner system for them to tackle the issue. What are some of the features and functionality that are on the product roadmap coming down the product roadmap or put in so much already? A lot of them are things that we're getting from clients. <hes> that are seemingly seemingly small to to share in report here but again it's just feedback from our clients so what would be helpful to to them. I think in terms of the some of the bigger things coming would be stepping into some of these other realms right now we are very focused on workplace misconduct <hes> but as we've spoken about some of them and there are other the places where it just reporting alerting issues early on to prevent awful things happening later <hes> that can go into to various realms. I <hes> in preparing for this discussion. I was thinking about other sectors that I would love to consider penetrating into and leverage technology for because especially <hes> government <hes> sectors because there are federal laws with regard are two obviously discrimination <hes> for protected categories and classes and <hes> one of the I.

H._R assault founder Ren US H._R. advisory board Brinkley Margaret
"police systems" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"And we'll tell you which states allow it, and and whereas legal, and what you need to do if you are going to be tethering your dog, what is acceptable. So what can you do if you need to keep your dog in a confined space, but do not tether him inside us your crates? Your gates or an expert to keep them safely contained outside. You can use a traditional fence. That's the best thing that actually keeps other dogs and wild animals out and keeps your dogs safe. If you have a small dog, a real fence is your only real option besides walking that dog several times a day war. You can use those underground electric fences, they can work. But again, they don't protect your dog from coyotes and other animals out that they may bring harm to your pet and also another dog, but the electric fence can work if the dog is trained appropriately to that fence. I also will tell you that some people will use that police system where it's a pulley. Where they basically the dock and run up and down between two trees. This is probably maybe mildly better than tethering your dog. The dog does have a little bit of an ability to flee. But you know, what I don't like those police systems easier because again your dog is becoming loaded up in protective of one area of your yard. And it is kind of like being tethered up. All right next. We're gonna talk more about that fight or flight response and dogs and how that may affect their behavior on and off leash, but I will take a quick break. Here. A word from our sponsor. Stay. We'll be right back. Right after we give them a little with our sponsors..

"police systems" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on Kickass News

"And earlier you were talking about how Raymond Chandler made Philip Marlowe an outsider looking in you decided to make Bausch and Rene Ballard insiders who worked within the police system in L A. What made you wanna do that? It was you said I'd spend a lot of years as a reporter. And so I was in that environment. I was in the police stations, you know, that plan from my dad is in courtrooms is in the police stations. And so I wanted to use what I knew, and I thought that you know, there's a lot of people writing novels or trying to write novels, and I thought, you know, what do I have that? Maybe they don't have that can set me apart, and it was like access because I had a big overlap. I wrote my first read novels while still being a crime reporter for the LA times. And so I had access in the end. So I was using it. And you know, what I had fourteen years of anecdotal stories that never end up in newspaper stories, but you know there. In your back pocket that are perfect for novels vixen. So when do that, but I, but you know, I am the disciple of Raymond Chandler. So I did my best to make these characters loners and outsiders and not feeling comfortable. Even though he do carry a badge and carry a gun. In are definitely the the long arm of the law the representation of the power and might of the state. But you can feel uncomfortable. If you're that. And and and so that's why I. I went that route. But I also tried to adhere to the author who inspired me, you know. So I did stuff Bosch like in the beginning. You know, like I made him a smoker because you yet to go outside to smoke. I made him left-handed because it's a right hand is society. You know, I just did little things that maybe were subliminal. But I think together added up to him feeling like I'm outside looking in. I'm like, Philip Marlowe. Yeah. Yeah. So it wasn't so much that you're creating characters who were outsiders looking in as it was they were outsiders who were in where. Yeah. Related in in the on the interest side, and I'm trying to remember, I don't know if you've ever explained this. But how did you end up naming your character? Harry Bosch after Harare's Bosch, the Dutch painter of the fifteenth century. Well, I was you know, Chandler inspired me when I went down that road, you know, at nineteen to wanting to be a writer. I, you know, I knew I wasn't gonna suddenly right?.

Raymond Chandler Bosch Philip Marlowe reporter Harry Bosch Harare LA times Rene Ballard Bausch writer fourteen years
"police systems" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

The Flop House Podcast

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

"That play the caretaker. I got to see it with Jonathan Pryce Senate. He was amazing. So guys, Johnson fries rate, active starve. GI Joe cobras, revenge or whatever. GI Joe here comes Cobra again. GI Joe three. Oh, here he comes. He's a Cobra starring Hollomon. Sobre let go on. I said here comes Honey Cobra. Because it's for Cobra to read Nick Nuys. What's going on here? So anyway, they need to find the guy who put the spell on them and which I guess is screaming Jay Hawkins because they're his and get him to say the spell and cut out his tongue, and they have to put it in a little jar that I guess has made that has like evil Ernie painted on some kind of grinning like ninety smell. Yeah, it looks. It looks like a failed monster energy drink logo. Breads with his dad when he gets truth or dare his dad is a cop and the truth, or dare says, steal your dad's pistol and make him beg for his life. And rather than Brad being like DAT breads that has been okay. Is there anything going on here with all your friends dying that we should know about anything? And for some reason, none of these college kids when they're talking about policemen, even tries to tell the story of what's going on and you'd expect in a movie like this, they'd be like it's a demon and they'd be like, sure, sure it is. We'll get to the bottom of this, but they don't even try and they never say like, I can't tell him, he'll think I'm crazy. They just don't bother. And it's one of these things where I'm like, is this really about the generation gap? How hard it is for young people to communicate with their elders, Dan Stewart, it's open a symposium here. What do you think. Yeah. I mean, I do like how are teens are better crime solvers than the public. So I think that's kind of a harsh indictment of our police system that we have. Right. Yeah. I mean, to be fair, they're not cooperating with the police force which would give the needed information like the reason why this is all happening, but but the police do seem maybe they're trying to maybe they're trying to save their the adults in their lives from being trapped in their own true air game. That's as you're an adult, those those troops get harder for. Dared multiple times a day to wipe human ship off of a person's, but multiple times a day and that Daniels like a dare you to do it. Ask. Like just what that, but she's like truth or dare. Okay. Dare clean that baby's diaper. Oh, man, I again, but Dan, you're gonna say something about babies and diapers. It wasn't that important another another. Another role game. What I was gonna say, I remember guys never played dungeons and diapers. That's also not a good role playing game, very different, very different. And if you're into it, that's totally cool. I'm not going to judge you, but I am not into dungeons in diapers. Gonna say, goes to talk about a let me put my sunglasses on. Yeah, go on. Shitty game. Okay..

Joe cobras Jonathan Pryce Senate Dan Stewart Brad Jay Hawkins Nick Nuys Joe Daniels
"police systems" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"This does folk. We are the people, this Logan shouted by far right groups on the streets. Again, thousands from the anti immigrant of trinity for Germany party the af D. And the anti Islam picky movement. Thousands also turned out for rival demonstrations by left-wing groups. Tension has been sparked by last week's fatal stabbing of German allegedly by Syrian and Iraqi. These people told the BBC why they joined the demonstration Justice system here is completely broken down. The police system here is completely broken down. Say, we now have a situation where left-wing extremist views and ideology have become state doctrine. I'm not rigidly a supporter of the right, but I am for balance. And as long as this is not, I was support the other side. So serious topic equillibrium. The thing is that we Germans are no longer allowed to feel solidarity with or sympathy for our own people. Johnny hill has been at the protests and she's been speaking to my colleague, Oliver Conway. Well, once again, we've seen real fury and I think real fit to on the streets of Chemnitz yet another set of demonstrations this time, four to five thousand protesters taking positive March organized by a far right group as well as the the far right party political party alternative for Deutschland, and there were some scuffles over some pretty angry scenes as protests from that much clashed with counter-demonstrators about the same number somewhere between four and five thousand counts. Demonstrators police were very much heavily prepared their water cannon on the streets that they weren't. Tonight's mounted offices to, and that's because the police force it admission earlier this week that they were very overwhelmed by. Some of the the violence swept through the city following the death of a German man lost weekend apparently at the hands of t. migrants. So by comparison to what we have seen today was relatively peaceful, although still very, very tense. I think really looking at the numbers turned out today in thousands on on both sides of this debate on you really go a snap show to just how horribly divided Chemnitz is how how horribly troubled this town is German, Foreign Minister, whose party holds the mayor's office in Chemnitz tweeted it when people are roaming all streets where the Hitler salute. We need to stand up for democracy, but clearly many divisions in Germany. I think what's important perhaps to emphasize is that there are so many different groupings of people in Chemnitz right now, you've got ordinary citizens LVAD saying to me, we've ready scared about migrant, fueled crime. Now that being. I think hijacked some Watson, the tensions are being inflamed by the presence of far right groups in the town who without doubt trying to to make out that migrants responsible for more social ills than than is this true is correct, and, and then you go to close this political party Alternativa for which land which sits in the the German parliament. They've been accused of jumping on the bandwagon trying to to inflame tensions trying to make political capital out of this. But of course, this comes down to is the fact that they're all there is still very sensitive debate about migration in this country, and actually the reality on the ground isn't as you might think there are a few Mike winds coming into the country. Integration is is getting that crime rates which had gone up have have now gone down pretty significantly. And yet this remains such on oppressing political topic really is very, very sensitive indeed. And you know what ching tonight? I'm the police suspect. Considered tonight a success. You know that that one major instance there wasn't any major violence. They manage to keep it under control, but the real long-term challenge now for the authorities, hey, how an earth to get a handle on the anger and the fed is this really consuming this home hills speaking there to Oliver Conway. You may recall this story from earlier this year, the Russian journalists who faked his own death with the help of Ukraine security services. Do you cranium? The thirties came under heavy criticism for staging, the killing of Cardi Bob Chinn go back in may, but insisted that it was the only way to prevent a real assassination. Now, Ukraine, state security agency, say the men who tried to organize the killing of Mr.. Bob Chen girl has pleaded guilty and been sentenced to four and a half years in prison. Correspondent in Kiev Jona Fisher gave me more details. The man's name is Berry's Gherman. He was the key organizer base..

Chemnitz Oliver Conway Deutschland Germany Ukraine Logan Bob Chinn Jona Fisher Bob Chen BBC Kiev Johnny hill demonstration Justice system fed Berry Watson Mike
"police systems" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Created an amazing technology that allows this one bedroom to a two bedroom. His name is son cushion. Did I pronounce your name correctly? It's Carson son. Carson son Carson. I think I got it. Welcome to this week in startups. Thanks for taking me to this interesting apartment. This is a looks like a living room slash office. Yeah, you walk in. It's looks like living room. There's a coffee table projector, you can hang out, entertain your friends to the study area. All of this for twenty six hundred dollars, but my bed. Well, there is the bed except for now using volume metrics phase for for the bed. So where's the bed? The bed is in the ceiling. Yeah. So here's how here's how the bedroom works. So we call the bed down. There is a control panel over here. Okay. So for those of you listening, I'm going to step out of the way so I don't get in the way of a bed dropping from the ceiling and what you're hearing is some police system of some type and wallah in a matter of what seems like about twenty seconds. We now have a bed on the floor of this apartment. Yeah, and then there's also a nightstand. Okay. What's way for that? Let's go over the bed for a second. Before you jump the gun shirt. Or drop the nightstand. Here's your nightstand dropping down very fast. So let's talk about what we see up here. I'm looking at a police system for those people who are listening that looks like bans. They're kind of like the band's, I would use. When I'm tying something to the roof of my car. Right, very strong. Yeah, Ann's. Yeah. And they go up this obviously four around the four bedposts or what would be the bedposts and some kind of police system here. Explain to us what we're looking at. Right. So basically, this is a hoist of, you know, normally industrial hoists are these steel cables loud ugly things that that are used in automated storage and retrieval systems? Right? Like in very houses to take, take take things up and down. But what we've kind of developed is a much more home friendly version of where you can do like a smooth start, smooth, stop. It's quiet and it's got seatbelt kind of material almost us Bill. Yeah, yeah. So it's still a friendly to touch. It's not like a steel cable. You can run into it and it won't hurt too, and then but it's also has a really high, infinite amount of cycles it can do. In a very high load situation. So something like three Newton's you can infinitely cycle within that Lord and nothing happens to this. So and then it's also safe. So it's redundantly saved. Just mechanically itself flocks, it's okay..

Carson Newton Ann twenty six hundred dollars twenty seconds three Newton
"police systems" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reminder of what's going on we are halfway through the opening round of this intelligence squared us debate i'm john donvan we have four debaters two teams of two fighting it out over this motion the more we evolve the less we need god you've heard the first two opening statements and now onto the third debate for the motion here is michael shurmur publisher of skeptic magazine leading michael shurmur thank you thank you so much so first john mentioned necessarily god is necessary necessary for what i contend that our starting point is the survival and flourishing of sentient beans that's us and the central problem with group living is trying to figure out how to get selfish genes these survival machines to cooperate with other survival machines built by selfish genes and so there's this constant conflict between our inner demons and our better angels and so when we began to coalesce from these tiny bands and tribes of hunter gatherers into the giant chiefdoms instate around ten thousand years ago this was the central tension how do we do this tools that evolved to do this where god and government so government basically gives everybody copied the rules and says these are the do's and don'ts and here's the penalties if you violate them of course there's not not sophisticated police systems at the time so people got away with it but you don't really get away with it because there's an eye in the sky that sees all and knows all that you're doing and can impose punishments in the next life to this is god or religion so for thousands of years it was kind of a tossup between anarchy of heavy no state or government organization and tyranny having either oppressive governments or religions oppressing their people but something then evolved at about four centuries ago the scientific revolution discovered that the universe is knowable and that it's governed by natural laws that we can discover and understand and that led to most of the moral progress we've made over the last several centuries the abolition of slavery and torture the death penalty the increase in civil liberties and civil rights the bending of the moral arc if you will toward greater justice for more people in more places i argue has primarily been the result of science and reason and these enlightenment values like natural right with a few exceptions almost all the progress has been the result of secular forces justifying why you're making certain social changes are passing laws based on reasons good reasons and evidence rather than appealing to a higher supernatural power the problem with religion is that the greater the universe has set down many different rules of how we should live together and there's no means to determine which is the right one there's no methodology and religion comparable disci let's run an experiment and see which one is the best which one most closely matches reality then finally the social sciences of just one study among many by gregory paul correlating the differences between rate of religiosity belief in god biblical liberalism belief in the afterlife and heaven hell in twenty different leading democracies in the western world it turns out that the higher the rates of religious the more people believe in god in a nation the worst they score on these indices of societal health and america stands out by far with no one even a close second as the most religious of the western democracies and the worst on all of these we have the highest homicide rates suicide rates teen td rates and so on income inequality alcohol consumption life satisfaction employment levels now i'm not saying that those things are caused by religion but religion and belief in god it's such a great force driving moral progress hachem it fail so abysmally here and every other nation where religion and belief in god is the more we evolved the less we need god thank you michael that is the resolution the more we evolved the less we need god and our final debater who will be speaking against the motion a kamar he's an emergency physician and author of michelangelo's medicine ladies and gentlemen a new kamar.

ten thousand years four centuries
"police systems" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Com we'll tell you which states allow it in whereas legal and what you need to do if you are going to be tethering your dog what is acceptable so what can you do if you need to keep your dog and a confined space but you not tether him inside us your crates your gates or an expert pin to keep them safely contained outside you can use a traditional fence that's the best thing that actually keeps other dogs and wild animals out and keeps your dogs safe if you have a small dog a real fence is your only real option besides walking that dog several times a day or you can use those underground electric fences they can work but again they don't protect your dog from coyotes and other animals out that they may bring harm to your pet and also another dog but the electric fence can work if the dog is trained appropriately to that fence i also will tell you that some people will use that police system where it's a pulley where they basically and run up and down between two trees this is probably maybe mildly better than tethering your dog the dog does have a little bit of an ability to flee but i you know what i don't like those police systems easier because again your dog is becoming loaded up in protective of one area of your yard and it is kind of like being tethered up all right next we're gonna talk more about that fight or flight response dogs and how that may affect their behavior on and off leash but i will take a quick break the hear a word from our sponsors stay we'll be right back right after we give.

"police systems" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reminder of what's going on we are halfway through the opening round of this intelligence squared us i'm john donvan we have four debaters two teams of two fighting it out over this motion the more we evolve the less we need god you've heard the first two opening statements and now onto the third debate for the motion here is michael shurmur publisher of skeptic magazine lady michael shurmur thank you thank you so first john mentioned necessary god is necessary necessary for what i contend that our starting point is the survival and flourishing of sentient beings that's us and the central problem with group living is trying to figure out how to get selfish genes these survival machines to cooperate with other survival machines built by selfish genes and so this constant conflict between our inner demons and our better angels and so when we began to coalesce from these tiny bands and tribes of hunter gatherers into the giant sheikdoms in state around ten thousand years ago this was the central tension how do we do this tools that evolved to do this where god and government so government basically gives everybody copied the rules and says these are the do's and don'ts and here's the penalties if you violate them of course there's not sophisticated police systems at the time so people got away with it but you don't really get away with it because there's an eye in the sky that sees all and knows all that you're doing and can impose punishment in the next life to this is god or religion so for thousands of years it was kind of a tossup between anarchy of heavy no state or government organization and tyranny having either oppressive governments or religions oppressing their people but something then evolved at about four centuries ago the scientific revolution discovered that the universe is noble and that it's governed by natural laws that we can discover and understand and that led to most of the moral progress we've made over the last several centuries the abolition of slavery and torture the death penalty the increase in civil liberties and civil rights the bending of the moral arc if you will toward greater justice for more people in more places i argue has primarily been the result of science and reason and these enlightenment values like natural rights with a few exceptions almost all the progress has been the result of secular forces justifying why you're making certain social changes are passing laws based on reasons good reasons and evidence rather than appealing to a higher supernatural power the problem with religion is that the greater the universe has set down many different rules of how we should live together and there's no means to determine which is the right one there's no methodology and religion comparable to disci let's run an experiment and see which one is the best which one most closely matches reality then finally the social sciences of just one study among many by gregory paul correlating the differences between rate of religiosity belief in god biblical liberalism belief in the afterlife and heaven and hell in twenty different leading democracies in the western world it turns out that the higher the rates of religiosity the more people believe in god in a nation the worst they score on these indices of societal health and america stands out by far with no one even a close second as the most religious of the western democracies and the worst all of these we have the highest homicide rates soon suicide rates teen td rate and so on income inequality and alcohol consumption life satisfaction employment levels now i'm not saying that those things are caused by religion but if we're legion and belief in god is such a great force driving moral progress it fails so abysmally here and every other nation where religiosity and belief in god is high the more we evolved the less we need god thank you that is the resolution the more we evolved the less we need god and our final debater who will be speaking against the motion a new kumar here's an emergency physician and author of michelangelo's medicine ladies and gentlemen a new kamar.

ten thousand years four centuries
"police systems" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"We'll tell you which states allow it and and whereas legal and what you need to do if you are going to be tethering your dog what is acceptable so what can you do if you need to keep your dog in a confined space but do not tether him inside us your crates your gates or an expert pin to keep them safely contained outside you can use a traditional fence that's the best thing that actually keeps other dogs and wild animals out and keeps your dogs safe if you have a small dog a real fences your only real option besides walking that dog several times a day or you can use those underground electric fences they can work but again they don't protect your dog from coyotes and other animals out that they may bring harm to your pet and also another dog but the electric fence can work if the dog is trained appropriately to that fence i also will tell you that some people will use that police system where it's a police where they basically run up and down between two trees this is probably maybe mildly better than tethering your dog the dog does have a little bit of an ability to flee but you know what i don't like those police systems easier because again your dog is becoming loaded up and protective of one area of your yard and it is kind of like being tethered up all right next we're going to talk more about that fight or flight response and dogs and how that may affect their behavior on and off but i will take a quick break here word from our sponsor stay will be right back right after we give.

"police systems" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

"Next day with all the professionals came in check it out down the hall luckily the bomb squad got it out via police system from the second story window and no one was injured but just the thought of tending school for over ten years where there was a bomb in the upstairs closet gives me the chills anyway stay sexy and clean out your damn closet lizzy guys that's a safety lesson for today don't put your pick brick acid with metal pit creek gassing i said all right let's good one i like it all right you never know tell me things okay this one's called well which to read okay here we go this one's called i laughed at my home invaders two oh hello georgia and karen and company after listening episode one twenty four hearing georgia assume she laughed if she were going about her business in her home and saw an intruder i thought hey i did that i'd like to tell you the story that how i woke up i woke up too sexy and somehow didn't get murdered one night in twenty fifteen when i was when i lived with a few roommates in pittsburgh i woke up to a man telling me to get the fuck up now i was very soundly sleeping commando in in a ninety don't ask why i don't know air it out girl sure i was very confused and figure it was one of my roommates drunk friends coming harass me to wake up and drink i lightly told them to fuck off and get outta my room at which point they started shouting to give them my phone and tell me where the money is all well i have a gun to my head liz is what things started come more clear osha i was being robbed i don't know what came over me maybe it was the fact that i had no wonder on and i was terrified of being raped but i started cursing at these masked intruders and i gave them my phone i laughed in their face when they ask for the money is because i was twenty five living with four other people and completely broke they had my three roommates face down on a bed on the lower floor i hadn't addict room attic room and they're trying to get me to come with them so i would be with the rest of them in total there were four intruders it took three of them to get me five three hundred and twenty five pounds to come downstairs i demanded that i grabbed a hoodie to wrap around my waist that i knew had a stabby cat in it just in case they got physical wow my god brave question mark they forced me down the steps well yelled at them not to hurt my cat that was just lying there next to my bed totally chill for the next twenty minutes or so they aforementioned turns laughing pushing guns in our heads and our backs while they ransacked our home i continue to call them stupid idiots walking aso's pieces of shit etcetera my roommate's beg me to shut up yeah you should have shut him that's insane i don't know what came over me i'm the kindest piece most peaceful person in every situation but i guess my fight or flight kicked in yeah taraf things up dues left my one roommate phone someone on skype to call the cops i throw clothes and ran to the gas station to phone the cops to by the time i got back the cops were there they didn't catch anyone that night and the next two pm one of the idiot robbers came back for my roommate's car and sped off with it luckily my friend was there with a cell phone so i call the cops immediately they got the car but the robber bailed in rand the all former mates left the house immediately after the robbery however i stuck around and check the locks on every single door and window a few times at night for a few weeks you know.

twenty five pounds twenty minutes ten years
"police systems" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"The the thorny question of how much is to monitor how much is not enough when it comes to bail for somebody watering great euro you're caller really nailed it currently in or not to mention the fact that everyone talking about how this is supposed to be a deterrent from flight or whether they're gonna hurt some one or hurt themselves while a couple of things first of all i didn't know the government should be able to hold its instore wheel with a cash long if we're going to hurt ourselves secondly basically all we're doing it saying that if you got plenty of money now does he really matter about the bell if i give that balance its million dollars would i can take care of that then you know that does he keep me from and myself or someone else or to take all so really i think it's more of the punitive thing than anything else because it's obviously now going to keep some more from doing what they were wanted to do if their independent blue wealthier will have the finances to do it it's just the guy on the street can't do it but i've got plenty of money well then you know i i can get around that well we have wheat you much of that nor a police system as it is you know the the bail bonds lady that just called up said the the bail is supposed to take into consideration when they said it all what you are able to pay above run it is true but a lot of times it does it but then we had is the other case where they say that the uh the guy this belcher guy uh beat up this this fifty four year old guy in the parking lot of dollar general there in eastern hensley and almost a month later the guy died and now they're going to up his charges from seconddegree battery to some kind of homicide charge but they still haven't set any bail on the guy and even though he is arrested for a few hours a couple of days ago he's out around but now that.

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"police systems" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"To hide it or not deal witted and i think that it is an absolute disgrace is a horrible all what trump did and what others do to tried to make mockery out of an illness set i mean any illness should not be marked because it is not the doing of the purse it's not it makes me think about what happens here in georgia as regards the anthony hill who was shot and killed by the police he was running in a neighborhood lednicky naked and it was clear and he was also a veteran and it was clear that he suffered from a mental health disability and they ended up shooting him on and killing him and so i think moving forward in 2018 more people shit starts one be more consider as regards the people's mental health disabilities and who i think government likely people or or even like just people in hospitals aminian our government our police systems should really starts to figure out how a which they can um adapt to this growing um issue as regards to americans the in mental health disabilities and how they handle those people with care um and how they acknowledge that there needs to be a change in which they assist these people all right we gotta take outbreak in comeback to franz we're talking about meant to help with thailand about donald trump as we start king weekend your views and other views on the new forms of the day mary pat hector sharpton on a.

georgia franz thailand donald trump mary pat hector sharpton
"police systems" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Would the what should the inference have been well known one there's no such thing as a lawyer dog really yeah although ask cooper maybe cooper would bike to represent him in court yeah seriously there no such thing what could possibly have thought that he meant that's the core gives me a lawyer i'm telling you man this sounds like some sort of 1950s kind of problem with with the louisiana police system down there or a is specially for this to go to the supreme court and then say that oh yeah he didn't get a lawyer but you know one he didn't ask for one he asked for a lawyer dog i don't think any but nobody lawyer dog is like some garbage sitcom from the 80s right give me a lawyer dogged the court says he wasn't asking for a lawyer where is this i must know where this happened man where did this case app it originally i do not know oh it was new four lines for crying out loud man this wasn't like livingston perisher or some other backwater this is new orleans dte these people no exact now look i don't have any sympathy for warned demands me this guy says that or or excuse me the charges are that he assaulted two juveniles for crying out loud this guy is likely not a good fellow are right but a lawyer dog yeah yeah i mean there's at target you have put into words how stupid that out well the guy did actually admit to the crime okay he's in the orleans perished jail right now where i don't know if you seen it before they could that i've seen guys with guns there's video for these guys with gunsmoke in grass in the in the parisian prison i'm sure these things have changed but this guy asks for a lawyer he should have gotten a lawyer and the sad part about it is i wonder if he's going to end off going scot free end up going scot free despite the fact that he admitted to raping two children embarrassed the problem right where deliberate obfuscation kelly say yes that when when that police deliberately miss i understand it opens the door for this guy to walk exactly now i know he's detestable he sounds really ridiculous speaking like.

cooper louisiana kelly
"police systems" Discussed on That Awful Sound

That Awful Sound

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"police systems" Discussed on That Awful Sound

"Frontside air backside air they got air there's no i don't think they could do actually do a christ air so uh they just so what are the what are the band members whose levitating put his arms out to his side but they have they have this police system they have this guy has this crane that he keeps having to use what's he actually escape board and do what would you hold escape would you hold escape actually offsets the police system it's really bad for the rig certain like what are they call those jackie board in each hand so that it's even release liability he can only have liked the skaters sign it for the vert ramp like you couldn't sign it for the police system to or maybe like they only were able to afford the frontside air and backside air like the the skateboarders had a per diem system you know like gin and just couldn't afford that christ or they could only afford to like get like four copies of this certain like release liability contract and then they just you know this the singer has like this rare thin goatee be don't see in in music videos from this era this is it's it's nicely groomed his vehicle painstakingly groomed the opposition spatial here is this or is it like it not singers i know know is it they were talking about a common it does not like a common walk goat would be like bigger bolder like a patch suggest a sole patch where no they like a very thin aj from backstreet boys their dis or alif oh is disease ldl have one of those igf 1 has that.

aj per diem