36 Burst results for "Police Reform"

Maryland legislature overrides governor's veto on police reform bill

Trading and Investing

00:23 sec | 8 hrs ago

Maryland legislature overrides governor's veto on police reform bill

"Maryland's democratically controlled state legislature passed a package of landmark police reforms overriding a veto by Republican governor Larry Hogan. The bills will overhaul the way officers were disciplined, allow public scrutiny of civilian complaints against officers and set a new standard for the use of force. Governor Hogan says some of the measures air on fair to

Larry Hogan Maryland Legislature Governor Hogan
Fresh update on "police reform" discussed on Sean Hannity

Sean Hannity

00:31 sec | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "police reform" discussed on Sean Hannity

"Leveled ABC News senior meteorologist Rob Marciano in ST Landry Parish, Louisiana, north of Lafayette, a strong tornado with winds of at least 130 MPH, striking in the middle of the night glasses coming from the window from the door right there and we could hear is everything was starting to crumble Eva Council on her husband making it into their bathtub, just in time, Cos some twisters or just by itself. Hail, hail, Storm hammering and here in North Carolina yesterday. Historic police reform Maryland state lawmakers setting new rules for when police may use force and how they're investigated and disciplined. No knock warrants are restricted and body cameras mandated Democratic controlled legislature tonight, overriding Republican governor Larry Hogan's Vito's Los Angeles police arrest the mother of three Children killed at their home. 30 year old Louisiana Corio He bc's Alex Stone in L. A Oreo is accused of stabbing to death her three young Children all under three years old, then taking off allegedly Carjacking.

North Carolina Rob Marciano Alex Stone L. A Oreo Abc News Larry Hogan Yesterday Republican 30 Year Old Eva Council Democratic Louisiana Maryland Los Angeles Tonight St Landry Parish, Louisiana Three Children At Least 130 Mph Under Three Years Old Three Young Children
Maryland legislature overrides governor's veto on police reform bill

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 13 hrs ago

Maryland legislature overrides governor's veto on police reform bill

"O P Maryland Senate has just voted to overturn Governor Larry Hogan's veto of two police reform bills. The first bill would mandate the state wide use of body worn cameras by July. 2025 the second bill Regulate the execution of search warrants. Yesterday, delegates voted to overturn the governor's veto of another bill that would repeal John protections in the police disciplinary process. Hogan says the proposals will hurt police recruitment and retention impose significant risks. The

Governor Larry Hogan Maryland Senate Hogan John
Mets-Nationals Game Postponed After Positive Coronavirus Test

Larry O'Connor

00:19 sec | Last week

Mets-Nationals Game Postponed After Positive Coronavirus Test

"To host New York at Nationals Park tonight. Nationals General manager Mike Rizzo says that one of his team's players have tested positive for covert 19 on Monday before the team left for spring training camp. And the Democrat led Maryland Senate is advancing far reaching police reform measures. The bill in the Maryland Senate was

Nationals Park Mike Rizzo New York Maryland Senate
Darnella Frazier, Teenager Who Took Floyd Video, Testifies

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | Last week

Darnella Frazier, Teenager Who Took Floyd Video, Testifies

"Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show Vin presses me into George Floyd's neck, gave emotional testimony today in Children's murder trial. Mats epic of Minnesota public radio reports. The witnesses included the young woman who recorded video of the event. Darnell of Frasier, was outside a corner store in Minneapolis last May, when she saw officers holding Floyd face down as he lay handcuffed in the street. The 18 year old testified that the experience changed her life is the night I stayed up. Apologizing. A politician. It's worked for you for not doing more freezers. Video quickly went viral and led to a worldwide racial justice protests and demands for police reform. The footage is also a key piece of evidence for prosecutors in their case against Sheldon, who's charged with murder and manslaughter. For NPR News. I'm

Derrick Show Vin George Floyd Minneapolis Darnell Frasier Minnesota Floyd Sheldon Npr News
New York City Council votes to end qualified immunity for police

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last week

New York City Council votes to end qualified immunity for police

"New York City Council voted Thursday to end qualified immunity. If the legal principle that can protect police officers from civil lawsuits more now from CBS is Dana Taylor. The protection has prevented officers from being sued or liable for misconduct. New York City is the first city in the country to end qualified immunity for officers. Critics argue scrapping this protection would make officers less aggressive and fighting crime if they have to worry about lawsuits. Measure was passed by the council as part of a package of police reform Bill City Council speaker core Johnson says it has been used denied justice to victims of police abuse for decades.

Dana Taylor New York City Council CBS New York City Bill City Council Johnson
Dallas Deputy Chief Tapped to Run Prince George's County Police

Rush Limbaugh

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

Dallas Deputy Chief Tapped to Run Prince George's County Police

"Also Brooke, announcing the next chief of police for the county and after this long and thorough process, I am very proud to announce today that I have selected deputy chief Malik Aziz, who is deputy chief for the police department in Dallas, Texas, to be our next chief of Police County executive also Brooks, noting Chief Aziz this commitment to community policing his leadership in the National Black Police Association and advocacy for police Reform. We know we acknowledge me. Have never hidden from the fact that we also have a very serious issues in our department similar to other departments across the nation. Barbara Brute W E Mail

Malik Aziz Police County Chief Aziz Brooke National Black Police Associat Advocacy For Police Reform Police Department Dallas Brooks Texas Barbara Brute
Police Chief Art Acevedo leaving Houston to become Miami’s top cop

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

Police Chief Art Acevedo leaving Houston to become Miami’s top cop

"Texas for the top law enforcement job in Miami. Details for NPR's Greg Allen are not so vato leads the police force in the nation's fourth largest city. He's become known nationally for his outspoken comments supporting police reform following the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. At a news conference, he spoke with pride about his leadership in Houston. He said. There's a lot of pain in America now unless we take the time to feel that pain process that pain acknowledged that pain of communities of color It disproportionately are impacted by bad policing. We will never get beyond the summer of 2020 in coming to Miami. Azevedo, who's Cuban American, is leaving Houston for a smaller city with a police force a quarter of the size. Greg Allen. NPR

George Floyd Greg Allen NPR Miami Texas Minneapolis Houston America Azevedo
One year later, the fight continues for justice for Breonna Taylor

Financial Quarterback Josh Jalinski

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

One year later, the fight continues for justice for Breonna Taylor

"Of Brie. Donna Teller's death, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said yesterday it's past time for a comprehensive policing reform. The New York Democrats said the Senate is working to pass the Justice in policing Act. Louisville Police shot and killed Rianna Taylor in her home last year on March 13th female construction worker is still in critical

Donna Teller Majority Leader Chuck Schumer Senate Louisville Police Rianna Taylor New York
Minneapolis reaches $27 million settlement with George Floyd's family

Mark Levin

00:41 sec | Last month

Minneapolis reaches $27 million settlement with George Floyd's family

"Being processed. The family of George Floyd has reached a multimillion dollar settlement with the city of Minneapolis over Floyd's death last year Settlement Is not just historic because of the $27 million Paid out. Back for the impact on social justice, policy reforms and police reforms. Family attorney Ben Crump Floyd's family filed a federal civil rights lawsuit in July against the city. Former officer Derrick Show Vin and three other fired officers charged in his death, Jury selection and Children's trial continued today. Opening arguments are

George Floyd Ben Crump Floyd Floyd Minneapolis Derrick Show Vin
Five officers charged with manslaughter in teen's shooting death

America's First News Show

00:16 sec | Last month

Five officers charged with manslaughter in teen's shooting death

"Manslaughter. And George Floyd's death last year that led the protests and calls for police reform. So far, five jurors have been chosen. Five officers in Oklahoma City are also now facing manslaughter charges after the fatal shooting of 15 year old Stobbe and

George Floyd Oklahoma City Stobbe
While All Eyes Were On the Covid Relief Bill House Passed Two Other Important Bills

5 Things

04:07 min | Last month

While All Eyes Were On the Covid Relief Bill House Passed Two Other Important Bills

"Congress has been working on plenty of other legislation as well senior video producer. Hannah gaber talked with congress reporter savannah berman to catch us up savannah. You've been on the hill all week and it's pretty much been all is on the covid relief package for very good reason. But that's well on. Its way to becoming law. The democrats are looking good for getting. It passed before the march fourteenth deadline. That they're worried about well. We were all looking at the covid relief. Bill what else did we miss the senate. This week has largely been focused on president. Joe biden one point nine trillion dollar stimulus bill but the house passed two other bills. That people should know about those being the house passing the for the people act which would provide sweeping reforms to protect voter rights and then they also passed. The george floyd justice and policing acts but should usher in a series of police reform measures in the wake of national uprising. Saw summer and protest against police brutality and we saw a lot of support for police reform over the summer and this is also not the first time that the democrats have passed this bill. Isn't that right. Yeah so the. George floyd in policing act was actually passed last year. But senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. Who was the majority leader at the time. Didn't bring it to the floor. And since then we have actually seen support for. Police increased quite a bit in recent months so now that the democrats have a majority in the senate. It's a very slim one. Literally one person vice president khama harris there. Are they gonna be able to get this. Bill passed because this is not a reconciliation bill. They're going to need a two thirds majority for this to become law or at least they're going to need sixty votes to get passed a filibuster rate so are any republicans going to get on board. Yes they would need to have ten republicans. Join all fifty democrats in order for this to pass. But republicans have specifically taking issue with the qualified immunity provisions and the qualified immunity provision is a legal doctrine that showed police officers from being held personally liable in civil court. So republicans are arguing. That people will sue police officers. Try to take legal action against them if they simply disagree with being arrested or something else so. Republicans are arguing. That police officers will no longer be protected and that that is unfair for first responders law enforcement officials but how democrats feel about taking that provision out of the amenable to that kind of a compromise. You know i don't think so. There might be some movement with some of the moderates on in the senate side but progressives like cory booker who has really been the point person for democrats when it comes to policing hasn't been hasn't been wanting to budge on this. So i don't think democrats would be willing to take it out of the bill and for those of us who just absolutely love political fine print. There was also a campaign finance reform. Bill passed in the house this week was there not that is correct so the house also passed the four of the people act. And that's going to look at expanding. The voting poll and seeking to increase. Voter turnout by expanding. Early voting lessening identification requirements allowing same day registration and. It's also going to fight against gerrymandering. Boy this sounds like it is in direct contrast with a case that we are seeing in front of the supreme court this very week. So what do you think is the campaign finance and voter reform. Bill gonna make it through the senate. It faces a lot of the same issues. In the with democrats needing ten senate republicans joining them to break. Gop filibuster and for this act a lot of senate. Republicans dislike it and have actually called terrible. Senate majority senate minority leader mitch. Mcconnell has taken a particular dislike to it and one aspects that they dislike is that it will allow states to establish electronic voter registrations a permit voters to actually register on election day and republicans. Say that it's gonna make verification harder and may lead to an increase voter fraud

George Floyd Senate Hannah Gaber Savannah Berman Congress Khama Harris Joe Biden Savannah Mitch Mcconnell Bill Cory Booker House Supreme Court GOP Mcconnell Mitch
Editor-in-chief of the National Journal, Jeff Dufour, Discusses Manchin's Role in Senate Negotiations

WTOP 24 Hour News

04:03 min | Last month

Editor-in-chief of the National Journal, Jeff Dufour, Discusses Manchin's Role in Senate Negotiations

"Let's go live now, with an update on Skype to Jeff Do. Four editor in chief of National Journal. Jeff in the plainest language possible. What did mansion get that caused him to change his mind and end this Well in the context of a $1.9 trillion bill. Uh, not much. These air presents pretty small provision that took nine hours. The final deal essentially is $300 per week of federal unemployment assistance through the end of August, the house had wanted 400. Said. It's bringing it down to 300. It was originally supposed to expire at the end of September. Now it's going to expire at the end of August. Essentially now one of mansions things was he wanted Tonto. To exempt the taxi. You want to accept the tax exemptions from this two households making over $150,000 a year so currently, if you get these jobless benefits, you can deduct tow up to 10,000 of that from from your taxes. He said. That shouldn't apply. If you make more than 100 $50,000 a year in your household, and it appears the Senate is going to agree to that now, the votes technically still open, even though they supposedly have a deal. I mean time wise. A lot was made out of Senator Ron Johnson last night, forcing the clerk to read the entire bill, which took hours. But this one vote on one Amendment has now taken longer than that did last night. And this is the first vote in what they billed as a vote A Rama quote unquote to come. So they're in for a lot of overtime in the Senate this weekend, the Senate record as you mentioned for longest vote has been broken again because all of this the previous record was from back in 2019. Is this something like the longest vote a sign of serious dysfunction on the hill? Or is it a sign of something else? I don't know The dysfunction is any greater than it has been in years past, which is still pretty significant, But it's combining that dysfunction with a 50 50 senate. I think I think we know a couple things now going forward Number one. This bill is probably going to go to the house like this weekend. Like you said, we're barring anything else on foreseen. They're gonna sense that the president for his signature, it's gonna give Biden his first big victory as president. But maybe more importantly, we know now that any significant legislation like this is going to be a real slaughter and a real challenge to pass vote Counting is critical. And there's all kinds of procedural hurdles that a senator, One senator can throw in the way in a 50 50 Senate now that applies to three bills at the House passed this past week that high up on their agenda. The voting rights package. The George Floyd policing reform and extending civil rights toe LGBT Q Americans, It's going to apply the unorganized labor bill and and gun legislation that they hope to pass this week. Those five just to name a few are all going to need 60 votes in the Senate. And if I were a betting man, I'd say they're not going to get it for most of them. President Biden, who you could almost jokingly say it's still a senator. He's you know, inextricably linked to the U. S. Senate, he called mansion directly. One wonders whether this deal could have been done without the president's efforts. And some people, I suppose, would be encouraged to see that he's getting involved. Others would say, Man, it's a bad sign that the president has to get directly involved like that. And I would also say this is probably not going to be the last conversation that by the mansion have during this Congress, because, uh, mansion is for people who count these things. Mansion is the most centrist member of the entire Senate. He is the swing vote. In the Democratic caucus, and he's the most important vote in the Senate right now, and he knows it. He's gonna exact every bit of power he can out of this toe, get what he wants for his state and for his And just for his for his views to make sure that whatever passes the Senate reflects his

Senate Jeff Do Senator Ron Johnson National Journal Skype Jeff George Floyd President Biden Biden House Congress
House passes police reform bill, Florida Police Union Leader says some parts "unnecessary"

Todd Schnitt

00:46 sec | Last month

House passes police reform bill, Florida Police Union Leader says some parts "unnecessary"

"The leader of a statewide police union says a sweeping police reform bill moving through Congress includes things that are unnecessary. The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act passed the house and it's on its way to the Senate. It includes the creation of the national registry to track police misconduct. But Florida Police Benevolent Association President John Kazanjian says the state already has a public record of cops have been disciplined. He says another thing not necessary here. We don't need that didn't review boards. We have the Criminal Justice Commission that Hole just to task on any type of issues that we have Pakistan Gene's biggest issue with the bill is it would take away qualified immunity, which could lead to throngs of lawsuits against individual officers, he says. For minor things, not under their control. I'm Joel Malkin

George Floyd Florida Police Benevolent Asso John Kazanjian Criminal Justice Commission Congress Senate Pakistan Joel Malkin
House Passes George Floyd Bill Designed To Help Prevent Police Misconduct

Pacifica Evening News

00:31 sec | Last month

House Passes George Floyd Bill Designed To Help Prevent Police Misconduct

"House of representatives passed a national police reform bill named effort a black man killed by police last year. George Floyd Justice and Policing Act would ban choke holds no knock warrants and end qualified immunity for police officers. The bills identical to one that House Democrats passed last year and response to nationwide uprisings against police brutality sparked by the police killing of Floyd in Minneapolis.

George Floyd House Of Representatives House Floyd Minneapolis
White House narrows income limits for stimulus checks

Here & Now

04:30 min | Last month

White House narrows income limits for stimulus checks

"Of a threat from far right groups, including followers of the Cuban on conspiracy. Those extremists claim Donald Trump will retake the presidency today. This is not stopping the Senate from carrying on the House adjourned, but not before Democrats passed two major bills last night. One on voting rights, the other on police reform for more. We're joined by NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. And so Democrats have railed against bills passed in state houses across the country that would make it harder to vote curbing things like mail in voting and early voting that work expanded last year during the pandemic. So what would this federal voting rights bill do about that? Well, this legislation has been a top priority for the party. It's not new. It was introduced in passed in the house in the last Congress. So this vote this week was a bit of a do over. They've called it the most sweeping government reform bill since the post Watergate era. And what wouldn't do it would do things like allow for automatic voter registration, it would make Election day of federal holiday. It would restore voting rights to people with past felony convictions. It would also expand early voting that we saw you so much in the 2020 elections. It would also do things like create more independent redistricting commissions to sort of end party controlled drawing of congressional district. On campaign finance. It would require more disclosure of big donors. It would require transparency about those ads you see in your social media feeds, and it would create a new public financing system for congressional candidates. Would also do things like expand conflict of interest laws that would ban members of Congress from serving on corporate boards and require presidents by law to disclose their taxes. Okay, sweeping to say the least. Thea other bill passed last night is the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. Police reform has been a democratic priority for a long time. What's in this one? This is another bill that passed in the previous congress. So they're doing it again. This'll legislation would do things that would ban choke holds, it would change so called qualified immunity protection so it would make it easier to pursue claims of misconduct against police officers. It would put restrictions on no knock warrants, and it would require new data collection on a police encounters. It would also direct more money to community based policing programs. This one is not. I mean, it's not as controversial as the voting reforms Bill, which has very strong Republican opposition. No Republicans supported it. There is a bit more support among Republicans for police reform, especially in the Senate. There's competing measure by Tim Scott, who's a Republican of South Carolina. So there's maybe a chance there could be more bipartisan effort to move that bill forward, But the other measure is purely a symbolic one of the stage. It's still a tall order in the House Democrats know based on previous failures that these bills don't have much hope of getting to 60 votes in the Senate, which, of course, is the magic number to break a filibuster, they would need 10 Republicans to vote with Democrats. So why are they so determined to pass them if the prospects looked in Part of this is just elections are making good on their promises. These issues are very important to the Democratic base, and I think it's about keeping that promise. But you're right. I mean, I think that's going to be one of the cork tensions, if not the court tension of this Congress. I think Democrats really sensitive this fact that they control Washington. Now they have Congress and the White House and they want to be able to run in 20 to 2022 on accomplishments. But they have these really narrow majorities in the House and Senate, which really limits what they're going to be able to do. You know, it's not just the filibuster to the parties are really divided right now. There's not much that they agree on. The bigger picture, though, is Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer just doesn't have the votes to change the filibuster, and it's not clear that he ever will in this Congress. One of the biggest opponents, a centrist Democrat, Joe Manchin, of West Virginia. He was asked last week if he could ever see changing his mind. And he literally yelled never at the reporters who asked him the question, Okay, digging in on the filibuster, So just in the moment we have left we have the Senate is still in session. They're debating that Cove in 19 relief package. What's the latest? You know they're making some tweaks to the bill. They've done things like reduced the income limits for people to get those $1400 stimulus checks. There was concerns among Senate Senate Democrats that too much money was going to people who didn't need it. Otherwise, The bill seems to be on a glide path. They don't expect to get any Republican support. But Democrats seem pretty unified behind it. If it passes this week, they gotta send it back over to the house to pass it back over there, but Right now. They're on track to meet a march 14th deadline that they've set, which is when current extended unemployment benefits run out, and they don't want to see those benefits lapsed. So there's a real pressure campaign to get it done by then. OK, that's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis with the latest thanks to your right welcome. Well, every

Senate Congress George Floyd Susan Davis Donald Trump House Democrats NPR Thea Tim Scott House South Carolina Bill Chuck Schumer Joe Manchin White House Washington West Virginia
House passes significant voting rights bill but it faces an uncertain future in the Senate

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:09 min | Last month

House passes significant voting rights bill but it faces an uncertain future in the Senate

"Call for details. 2 35. Democrats have passed a sweeping new voting rights bill in the house, and it goes on to the Senate. It is called the four the People Act, but it faces Republican opposition in the Senate could become the most significant overhaul of U. S elections and government ethics in a generation. Before the People Act requires states to offer same day voter registration and would automatically register all eligible voters. It also limits state's ability to purge voter rolls and restore voting rights to felons have completed their sentences. Democrats say the reforms would expand voting access to marginalize groups, especially minorities, and established a national standards. Republicans say it gives too much power to the federal government to manage what is supposed to be state run elections, and the fate of this legislation isn't likely to be good in the Senate. Where the current filibuster rules require at least 10, Republican votes and all 50 Democrats to pass it. But it's part of House Speaker Pelosi strategy to pass Big Democratic Party priorities like police reform is they did last night and gun control is they will soon but would be even narrower margins in the Senate. Put even more pressure on majority leader Chuck Schumer to consider scrapping or at least modifying the Senate

Senate U. House Speaker Pelosi Big Democratic Party Federal Government Chuck Schumer
House passes sweeping elections and police reform bills

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | Last month

House passes sweeping elections and police reform bills

"Bill has passed in the house over GOP opposition House Democrats passed a sweeping voting and ethics bill Wednesday, sending the legislation to the Senate where it faces an uncertain fate. The bill would be the largest overhaul of U. S election law in at least a generation HR. One would restrict partisan Jerry Mandarin of congressional districts strike down hurdles to voting and require so called dark money political groups to disclose anonymous donors. The House vote was to 22 to 10 with every Republican voting against passage. Although vice president Kamila Harris holds the tie breaking vote for most legislation in the 50 50 Senate, 60 votes would be needed to overcome a Republican filibuster. Mike Rossi, a

Jerry Mandarin GOP Senate House Bill Kamila Harris Mike Rossi
House passes sweeping elections and police reform bills

Kentuckiana's Morning News

00:38 sec | Last month

House passes sweeping elections and police reform bills

"What would be the largest overhaul of the U. S election long at least a generation has cleared the house. CBS is Jennifer Keiper, with details headed to the Senate is sweeping voting and ethics legislation that Democrats say would expand voting rights and set up new national standards for automatic voter registration and how elections are conducted. It would also restore voting rights to former felons. The bill passed in the house over unanimous GOP opposition the same sentiment from Republicans in the Senate, which would make it hard to get the 60 votes needed to pass. The legislation comes his Republican controlled state legislators across the country, try to limit mail in voting and impose stricter voter identification

Jennifer Keiper U. Senate CBS GOP House
"police reform" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:07 min | Last month

"police reform" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Who's using who's taking too long of a shower when everybody needs to get ready You know and so the the only the only thing i'd say is that a social workers not enough right because this i'll give you an example of something where in washington dc. There's an emergency psychiatric clinic where police can take people who are sort of flagrantly crazy and danger to themselves or others even involuntarily. You know so. Let's say you've got someone who's mentally ill and they're running around and they're threatening people but you don't think they should be arrested so you take them off to the emergency psychiatric clinic. Where the odds are they'll be given a dose of meds and they'll back out again in the morning so having a social worker. A psychiatrist who checks in doesn't get you far enough. Because the the underlying problem there is that there's nowhere for them to go they'll end up back out on the street the next day threatening people because we don't have a inadequate mental health system. We don't have an adequate system of providing shelter for people who lack it and so social workers who would go to some calls would be a good start but it's not nearly enough and this leads back to your conclusion about police and police reform. It's complicated it's simultaneously very very complicated and really pretty simple right. There are lots of pretty simple and straightforward changes. Let me give you one one. Final example of that sure. Many many of the police shootings take place in the context of traffic stops which are perceived by police and the public alike as really dangerous moments. But we don't need to have that many traffic stops part of the reason we have so many traffic stops. Is that as a society. We have decided that we one armed uniformed people with badges to be the ones who enforce civil traffic law so eg you know your parking sticker is blocking your windshield too much. Your brake light is out or you make a right..

washington dc next day one one
"police reform" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:13 min | Last month

"police reform" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Frances mcdormand plays fern a sixty one year old van dwelling modern day nomad who embarks on a journey. Through the vast landscape of the american west now nominated for four golden globe awards best director best actress best screenplay and best picture of the year in theaters across the us and streaming on hulu february nineteenth. Let's get back to my with rosa brooks a law professor at georgetown university who became a cop to see from the inside what police was really like. And better understand the racial disparities in the social justice system and why they're so much police violence from two thousand sixteen to twenty twenty. She served as a reserve police officer with washington. Dc metropolitan police department. It's a volunteer position. That requires you work. Twenty four hours a month receive the same training and have to pass the same tests as any other. Mp de officer while serving on the force. Rosa brooks founded georgetown's innovative policing program which partnered with the metropolitan police department to create the police for tomorrow fellowship. Would you describe the neighborhood. That you patrolled..

Rosa brooks rosa brooks sixty february nineteenth hulu two thousand georgetown university tomorrow georgetown Twenty four hours a month washington american sixteen Frances mcdormand twenty twenty one year old Dc metropolitan police departm four golden globe awards
"police reform" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:08 min | Last month

"police reform" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And there's a dark living room and then suddenly a light comes on at the end of the hallway and of silhouette. Just pops out at us of a male silhouette. And that's exactly the kind of situation you train for at the firing range. Something pops out at you all of a sudden you shoot it and luckily i. The guy i was with my partner was a very calm guy and he kept his gun down and he just said hey there it's the police We got a call about a burglar alarm. And could you step out here so we can see you and it turned out it was a it was another kid. It was a teenage boy and he said i can't. i'm naked. I just got out the shower and my partner very calmly said well you know how about you put a towel on or something and the kid says okay and he disappears and he comes back out. He's got a towel is dripping wet. And he's he's clearly terrified But in that situation my partner. And i said you know. Hey don't worry it's fine and everything. Well we got his dad on the phone. He hadn't realized he was going to go to the apartment and it was fine. It was a non event but we didn't even have to file a report because nothing had happened but that was just another situation. Where with a different officer. I thought wow you know you get another dead kid the gear that you had to wear attached to your belt and i say multiple belts affected how you could walk and move and how you physically felt. Would you describe what you had to carry in those belts. Oh goodness it's a long long list. How much time do you have You know yes. I had always thought if this sort of cop swagger these cops and they're kind of walking a little bowlegged and they're their swaggering around that. I always thought that was that was sort of related to being arrogant or wanting to be intimidating. But i realized that it's mostly just that you have so much stuff on your belt and your vest that you you can't walk normally you've got stuff in your way so you wear an inner belt and then you wear a an outer belt that to the inner belt and on that belt at a bare minimum you you have your radio. You have a an expandable baton. You have pepper spray. You have a tourniquet. You have your your gun. You have a flashlight you have your handcuffs. You have a little pouch containing rubber gloves and often. You have a whole lot more than that to you. Know that you you need somewhere to put other junk. You may also have a leg pouch with your tactical emergency casualty care kit. You have to have. Oh you have to pens. You have to have a certain number of the right kind of pen. Attached to in the right kind of way you have to have your body worn camera attached to the right position and the right part of your shirt or your vest You have to have your little secret service style earphones or some other earphone. So that your radio's not blasting to everybody in the world You have your cell phone..

"police reform" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:02 min | Last month

"police reform" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in philadelphia. I'm terry gross with fresh air to better understand the causes of police violence. And the racial disparities in america's criminal justice system. Georgetown law professor rosa brooks became a cop a reserve police officer in washington. Dc's metropolitan police department. She was in her forties. Her husband thought she was insane. So did her mother writer and leftist activists barbara ehrenreich. Who saw the polices. The enemy brooks emerged from four years of patrolling one of the poorest neighborhoods in dc with a much more complicated view of policing. We'll talk with brooks about her. Police training the difficult decision. She had to make us an officer incidents that could have ended badly and what meaningful reform might entail. She's written a new memoir called tangled up in blue policing the american city. My.

rosa brooks washington philadelphia barbara ehrenreich dc forties america brooks four years one american Dc Georgetown
"police reform" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

04:46 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"Hello Bill Hi Kyle. On Wednesday, the Democrats in the Senate were poised to block consideration of the police reform package drawn up by Republican Senator Tim Scott from South Carolina. Three Senate Democrats Chuck Schumer the leader There Cory Booker and Kamala Harris wrote in a letter to Mitch McConnell. The majority leader a quote bill is not sell vigil, and we need bipartisan talks to get a constructive starting point They went on to say the the justice. ACT The Republican bill is so threadbare and lacking substance that it does not even provide a proper baseline. Ford unquote I mean what what's going on here I. I mean. Is this just the usual jockeying Congress well? This is pure cynicism that the the real the way things are supposed to work in Congress even though it does feel like it's a long time since they have operated that way. Is that the the Party empower or a an individual member working either on their own with a with a someone on the other side submits legislation. You bring it to the floor you offer. Offer amendments you see then if you have sixty votes to pass that filibuster threshold and the Senate. If you do it goes on to conference with whatever the House produces There's absolutely no reason why this bill can't be going through the same process here. Especially, because if you step back and look at it Democrats and Republicans agree on about seventy percent of the issues, and about seventy percent of what Democrats want is already in. In this bill, so take it to the floor. Have a debate and have an amendment process, but Democrats seem to want this issue more than they actually want a solution. They would rather go out and claim Republicans. Aren't doing their their duties and beat them over the head with it suggests that they are somehow opposed to racial justice and take that as an election campaign, and it really is cynicism at its edits worst. As, you mentioned. There are some between these two proposals. For example, the the Democratic House bill says that chokehold would be a civil rights violation. The Republican, Senate bill would condition federal grant money on reforms. That would that would make choke holds less likely to be used at the local level and would ban federal agents from using them except when deadly force is authorized. But the the rhetoric is is getting pretty heated bill I. Mean Nancy Pelosi Speaker. said that Republicans seem like they're quote trying to get away with murder, actually the murder of George Floyd Unquote. I think Kim's point is is really the operative one here?.

Senate Bill Hi Kyle Congress Mitch McConnell Chuck Schumer murder Kamala Harris South Carolina Cory Booker Senator Tim Scott Party George Floyd Unquote Ford Nancy Pelosi Speaker. chokehold Democratic House
"police reform" Discussed on Seattle Now

Seattle Now

08:47 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on Seattle Now

"Hey, there I! Hear a lot of things from you. Listeners about why you hit play on Seattle now. It keeps you up to date with what's going on in the city. It helps you get some understanding of the upside down world. We're living in right now and sometimes you just need a laugh if we can bring any of those things into your day, I want to ask you to help us make the show happen. You're listening to this right now. Because someone before you chose to support K. U.. O. W.. You could be that person for someone else consider becoming a monthly donor kyw, even five dollars. A month goes a long way. And that's half the price net flicks. There's a link in the show notes to donate and thanks. Hey It's Patricia. Murphy this is Seattle now before George Floyd in Minneapolis. There was Manny Ellis into coma. He died in police custody in early. March, his family wants answers, a new police accountability law was supposed to help, but so far it hasn't Cayenne K. EX reporter will. James is here to explain things but first? Let's get you caught up. With protesters and some city council members calling to de-fund the police by as much as fifty percent mayor Durkan proposed a much smaller number on Tuesday Durkin suggested a cut of five percent or twenty million dollars. The mayor has also asked s PD to figure out what twenty percent thirty percent and fifty percent budget cuts would look like protesters have demanded a significant reinvestment of public safety money into restorative justice and social programs run by the community. Governor inslee asking anymore yesterday he issued a statewide public health order, requiring people to masks in most indoor and outdoor public settings and businesses don't have to let you in without one. It doesn't add to be fancy, but it does have to cover your nose and mouth, and this is enforceable. Not complying is a misdemeanor offense that could get you ninety days in jail and a thousand dollar fine. The order takes effect Friday June twenty sixth. And while we're all circling dates on the calendar about drawing one around July twenty fourth. That's the plan for baseball's opening day. The League reached a deal with players yesterday for a sixty game season, no word yet from the mariners about when or wear their season will open. On Tuesday the State Attorney General's said he would examine thirty recent cases where police used deadly force, these deaths were supposed to trigger an independent investigation. Thanks to the states, New Police Accountability Law that voters passed in twenty eighteen, but now case in Tacoma is raising questions about how the law is being applied, and who's even keeping track. It's the story of thirty-three-year-old Manny Ellis by many accounts. He was getting things together. He was in stable housing and playing drums in his church, but in early March. He had an encounter with the Tacoma police officer that ended with him, saying I can't breath sir. Will James is a reporter with Cayenne kayaks. So on the night of March. Third Minneapolis was on this kind of nightly walk on his way home and. According to police, officer saw him trying to open the doors of occupied vehicles on the street. So officers responded somehow this leads to a fight between the officers and LS of physical fight that escalates until many Ellis's taste. He's taken to the ground and he's handcuffed on this residential street. And a spit hood is placed over his head. And at some point. Many others. What are his last recorded words which are I can't breathe sir? The officers at some point call for help. Some medics arrive and they try to revive this, but he. He dies there on that street corner. And, according to the Pierce County, medical examiner, the cause of death was lack of oxygen. Due to the way he was restrained his positioning on the ground and spit hood that was over his face. And a secondary factor was a high level of methamphetamine that was in his system. And the medical examiner ruled his death a homicide meaning in this context it was caused by another person right, and it is important to remember that police officers are often the people that get called to scenes just like the one that many Ellis was killed at scenes where someone is not doing something that is particularly dangerous or crimen all. But just requires some sort of response. It kind of brings home, one of the points that's emerging all around the country in the wake of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis and these protests, which is that police are often filling a role that might be filled by social workers or something in a different context. Maybe Manny LS needed a ride home that night. Yeah So much of the conversation, the past couple of weeks has focused on on race, and that is a huge underlying factor in all of these cases that we've been hearing about, but what's interesting about many Ellis's case to is it brings up another issue that we've been talking about in Washington state for a long time, which is de. Raden. This idea that maybe their ways to train police to respond in a way other than with force. Were there other choices? The police officers could have made that night. That would have resulted in a different outcome. And that gets to the accountability piece will Washington. Voters passed new statewide police reforms less than two years ago. What's supposed to be happening here? That's new from I nine forty. Yes so nine forty was a whole suite of police accountability regulations that affected training and the abilities that prosecutors have, but the relevant part of it here is the investigation part of it. And what was supposed to do was ensure that when police agencies investigate each other for deadly use of force. That those investigations will be more transparent and more independent. So what was supposed to happen was that. Number One an investigative team was appointed and that the names of those investigative members were made public. There's also supposed to be to community members to people outside the police department. who were supposed to have been picked to help of that? The members of that investigative team. The sheriff's Department was also supposed to appoint a family liaison, a person whose job it was to regularly update the family members to make sure the family was not just sitting on the sidelines. Waiting as is so often the case in these investigations. We still don't know exactly what went wrong or how much went wrong, but there are certainly indications right now that. The Pierce County Sheriff's department didn't do those things. And there may have been several cases in Washington state since nine forty became law that were supposed to follow these requirements, and didn't so. We're still learning more about how wrong this has gone in implementation of nine forty, and why those things are happening. And there was an investigation of Manny Ellis's death. It was being handled by the Pierce County Sheriff's department, but that had some problems. Tell me what happened. Yeah, so after investigating the case for like three full months. When it came time for the sheriff's Department to present its findings to the county prosecutor, the county prosecutor learned that a sheriff's deputy was actually at the scene of Alice's death, and in her eyes and then governor. Jay Inslee is. Is that just tainted the whole investigation and prompted them to want to start over? Okay so now the investigation has been taken over by the state and the attorney. General will be the one to decide on any charges..

Manny Ellis officer Governor inslee Seattle Tacoma George Floyd Pierce County Sheriff Minneapolis reporter James attorney sheriff's Department Washington Pierce County Manny LS baseball League
"police reform" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

CNN's The Daily DC

03:34 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

"What was your take on the executive order. Well my knee. Jerk. Reaction is and this has been forming for the past several years has been to not completely. You can't trust Washington to make all of the decisions for you I would have preferred if he would have brought a lot of the more local entities and said this is what I'm hearing. This is what they're saying I would prefer for the White House, not to handle these types of policies to just enforce the laws that are created by the legislative branch. There've been so many of the blurring of the lines there that I do agree with with with the White House saying look we're going to have to. Congress is going to have to make these decisions. I agree with that, but I also think that there's a little bit of leadership I shouldn't say a little bit a lot of. Missed opportunities in in healing, the nation I think one of the first things that the president should have come out and said is that what is happening is absolutely wrong and I am going to be there to make sure that this. We don't get another George Floyd. We don't have these situations. It's gone on for way way too long. Have you heard anything like that from him? Since the beginning of this I? Don't know if you have I. Haven't I really wish that would go a long way. And right now it's almost like we're taking sides. When people say hey, everybody's wrong on on both sides. Well, what what side is that? Is that police versus people? What is that because there's some great police officers and and. This is an American side. There are people that there are police officers that should not be there really i. do like the idea of the database, because obviously, some supervisors are letting these things slide in the case of George. Floyd, this officer had several incidents had several. Cases where he should have been punished, and it shouldn't have gotten as far as it as it has but I. Think all of these people need to be held accountable, and the only way that you do that is having their record. Follow them so I, mean! I just WANNA get us away from this. Taking sides of all of this, we should be always on the side of. The the American people when you're up against a law enforcement officer and they have the tasers. They have a gun. They have the batons. The responsibility should shift heavily on the side of the person who has power over the person in the community. That is just you know. That is assumed innocent until they are actually guilty. You know the the other thing that seems to me..

George Floyd White House officer executive Washington Congress legislative branch president
"police reform" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

CNN's The Daily DC

03:17 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on CNN's The Daily DC

"That has been at a lot, but I was stopped this year. Driving while black, we find ourselves at a place with a package that I think speaks to the families that I spoke with yesterday. Who Lost loved ones? We hear you. I think this package speaks very clearly to the young person who's concern when he stopped by the law enforcement officers. We see you. That was Tim Scott, the only black Republican in the United States Senate and the man spearheading his party's efforts on police reform. He's laying out his personal experience with police as he introduces the bill. Hello, everyone I'm David Chalian the CNN political director. This is the daily DC momentum for police reform continues to build in Washington. But Republicans and Democrats appear to be on a collision course when it comes to turning that momentum into law today, Senate Republicans introduced their version of police reform legislation as Senator Scott Outline, but their proposal stopped short of the sweeping national mandates proposed by House Democrats like requiring officers to wear body cameras and banning colts today. House Democrats led the markup of their bill in committee setting up a full vote next week. Meanwhile, the president put forward his own executive order police reform yesterday he maintained his hardline law and order rhetoric and he raised. Raised questions about what he would actually support and signed into law, which certainly ensures that all this action on police reform will continue to be a major theme heading into November's election, so joining me now to help break all of this down. His former Utah Republican congresswoman in one of our political commentators MIA. Love Congresswoman! Thank you so much for being here. Thank you. Thank you for having me, so let's start with the bill that Senate. Republicans introduced this morning. Eight incentivizes things like bans on choke holds and the use of body cameras by making federal grant money contingent on policy changes, but what it doesn't do is actually mandate many of these reforms which the. Democratic Bill does what do you make of the competing approaches sort of a mandate on one end from the Democrats sort of hold her band versus the Republican approach, which is federal money contingency sort of to incentivize behavior well, it's really interesting because you are hitting upon the problems that Washington actually has as a former mayor, and also as a former member of the Republican Party in the United States House of Representatives. Feeling like you needed to do. Something is what Washington is good at, but actually putting teeth behind the policy is what they are not good at. It's almost like we want to show America that we're doing something, but we're not really willing to enforce those policies because we're going to be held accountable so I know that Kevin McCarthy really wanted to support the ban on the to- colds and I. Know that there was some issues with Republicans actually supporting that, but you really you can't enforce anything unless you actually have teeth behind it..

United States Senate Senator Scott Outline Washington Republican Party United States House of Represe Tim Scott colds Utah CNN Kevin McCarthy David Chalian political director America president colts executive
"police reform" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

05:35 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"So, I think that that's one issue here and it's a this issue of kind of qualified immunity Tim Scott has called it a poison pill, and it's because it does rankle so many Republicans on this issue of federalism, and why the Congress is setting a standard here. I think the other issue and the reason. It's because a poison pill. Democrats aren't really interested, and those kinds of nuances as you described them, they basically want to get rid of any protections for police officers to be sued in just about any circumstances, which would be a devastating to police departments. And, so you know and again this seems to be more about you know. giving a payoff to our our trial lawyer buddies at least in terms of the sweeping nature in which they wanted to get rid of this so. I, don't think that that issue is going anywhere in Congress for those reasons, and it's why Tim Scott attempted to to kind of take it off the table with his bill, and to make it clear that this was not an area. That republicans were necessarily willing to go to right now. There are some new developments in the Michael Flynn. Court case Bill. What's the latest there? Well? The latest is that there was a hearing on the Mandela's petition to either force the judge to dismiss the case as Justice Department wants. or To to let it play out or two remove him from the case altogether and It's been kind of been haggled over one one technical point. The the decision to Withdraw Prosecution is submitted by the Justice Department and then it says would leave of the court and judge. Sullivan's arguing that that's not just a rubber stamp, and so forth so he's taken in this direction at least in the questioning the appellate court panel hearing. This seem skeptical about intervening before the judge has made his final decision, remember because he's holding these hearings and so forth. It's still inactive case and. And a lot of people are arguing that they should wait and see what the judge does. Maybe does dismiss the case I I'm of the other view I think that what the judge is done is extraordinary. It's irregular by any definition. He has no case to adjudicate now. The prosecution and defense agree he assigned a brief to a judge that has a known hostility to the defendant to argue why should be prosecuted on? He used a Mr Flynn of treason and said he was disgusted by him in the beginning I mean I. Think he's shown his bias, I think the credibility of the courts are at stake, and I think he's playing a to string this out as long as he can. maybe in hopes that Abidin Administration will will take it up and I don't. I don't think the courts for their own credibility should allow judge to play games like this Kim. We'll give you the last word if you WANNA take it. Well here's the problem. In its I agree with everything. Bill just said that what the judge has done here is extraordinary. It's also potentially very very bad precedent, because a what the deputy solicitor general argued a Jeffrey Wall and he was very eloquent in this hearing. He said look. We're in a situation where the judge could come in and as part of this hearing and demand to know all of our internal deliberations, and then disagree with those make up his own mind about whether or not we should have dropped the charges..

Tim Scott Bill Mr Flynn Congress Justice Department Jeffrey Wall Michael Flynn Sullivan Mandela Abidin Administration Kim
"police reform" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:44 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Center for Policing Equity and also twenty five year veteran of the Denver and New York, city police departments as well. Thank you again for joining us today. and. Thank you for having April. Wanted to spend a moment talking about and we're talking about the community here and specifically we're talking about. Families that have endured terrible losses and and. and. President trump did meet with some family members. Of Victims of police violence, he met with them yesterday before announcing the executive order, and then during the press conference, the families were not there, but he spoke about them, and here's what he said. To all of the hurting families I want you to know that. All Americans mourn by your side. Your loved ones will not have died in vain. We Are One Nation, we grieve together, and we heal together. I can never imagine your pain or the depth of your anguish, but I can promise to fight for justice for all of our people. And I gave a commitment to all of those families. That's the president yesterday now, Ben, crump. Is An attorney representing the family of George Floyd and he explained on the view. Why are the family did not attend the White House press conference? that. The president had after meeting with families when the president size to be or there is presented by the Congressional Black Caucus. Really effectively speaks two days decades long killing of. Black people these open season. Kevin's a black people. Then that's when the floor family will acknowledge their presence at the White House, but they want to. Make sure everybody understands. This is not a photo for them. This is their life. George was killed other black people being killed. April I mean even talking to the families. Can you tell us more about yesterday for them? So I've been talking to people who are representing the families, and working with family so People want action. The families want action and listening to. The attorney that actually. took. Ahmad Aubrey's mother there onto the White House, you know. ECON hearkens back to what. Benjamin, crump set. What is the action? Lee Merritt the attorney for Ahmad Aubrey. Said you know it's great that the president wants to have a federal investigation for these families that have been highlighted right now, but he said what about the rest and that's the issue. You know it's one thing to go in. People were concerned about a photo out. And that's essentially what it was in. Almost you know the White House is being very clever, trying to very clever and its attempt to quell the protests in the midst of an election year bringing the families, but there was such A. About the Lee Merritt and families that he took their to go, so at issue is. Nothing really actionable except for the families that were there. people want action in the short term and the long term. It's great to say the database you know. We know this needs to be a copulation. They WANNA have a database on no, not once, but there's still issues of no knock wants. Taylor was killed because. A failed attempt at a no knock war. You have the chokehold issued? We're seeing we're seeing people dying just last weekend in Atlanta. People want actionable items. The database is database is great for the long term there needs to be stopgap measures now as well as in the long term and Ben crump is right, and so as we merit, but Lee Merritt went to the White House. And he found exactly what Ben crump already. Nothing new. Nothing new for the for the whole versus. The small song. Well April, hang on here for just a minute because I wanNA invite Paul Butler to join us now. He's a law professor at Georgetown University of former Federal Prosecutor. As well he worked in the Department of Justice and author of chokehold, policing black men professor Butler welcome to you. It's great to be here. So first of all, let me ask you. The community and communities across the country are are asking for. Sweeping change in the practice of law enforcement in America. And many people are already saying that perhaps none of these three federal efforts at the moment satisfy that demand for sweeping change yet at the same time. Is it not remarkable that within the course of a couple of weeks due to? Pressure coming from protesters across this country, we actually have a congressional Republican proposal. A congressional democratic proposal and an executive order from the president. All about American law enforcement in in the span of a of a fortnight. Is that not a remarkable moment professor butler. It is a remarkable moment. Again we see different. Representatives of government kind of rising to different levels, but the fact that the republic kids who have not been. In the. kind of leading a criminal justice reform the fact that they're now on board the fact that president trump feels that he has stat. Is a kind of. Unique moment in the politics of criminal. Still there. We're GONNA try. We're going to try and get him back here for a second but April. Professor Butler you back with us your, are you okay, my my politics. We just lost you there for a couple of go ahead and complete your thought about first of all this particular moment. So I think it's a unique moment in our recent history in reform of criminal justice, and the issue is whether the problem is a few bad apple cops, or whether the problems are more systemic, and so the Republicans approach in President Trump's approach. Is that just a tiny number of officers who just need to get with the program? The Democratic Bill suggests that the problems are wide, ranging and cultural, and so we're four is just the beginning. If you look at what the Democrats critique of policing. Transformation is really the goal and so tell me more about how. How do you see the Democratic Bill as? As taking meaningful steps to affect that transformation. So. The devil is in the details, but you can look at the Republican pro proposals as kind of offering carrots, police departments to change or reform, and so they get priority for grants under the Republican proposal if If they take certain actions, whereas the democratic bills that if.

president White House President trump Ben crump professor Butler attorney Lee Merritt Ahmad Aubrey George Floyd executive Congressional Black Caucus professor Center for Policing Equity Department of Justice apple ECON Denver Kevin
"police reform" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

03:18 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"Again on these debates I just don't find the mysterious I. I think we should have debates, but I think the debate should be in Atlanta and Minneapolis New York City and see what they WANNA do. We haven't had a serious debate. In these cities Minneapolis the city council. They reacted and they said okay. Let's disband the police. Is that a serious proposed mean? Does anyone think that going forward any that that Minneapolis is going to be better off for this? We needed debate at the local levels. Levels to hold everyone accountable to hold people accountable that built these systems at the local levels turned. You know turned a blind eye to to different abuses, I do think the union reform is a big one, because sometimes the city's do move on someone and a police chief fire someone, and then they win back at arbitration or something. Get their jobs back, but I would I'd be much more optimistic if I could see it these states. States especially the blue cities you know these people have been in charge for a long time. It's not it's not Republicans have been charged. What did we do wrong in? How can we fix it? I'm not looking to assign blame looking to say what what are we doing wrong? And how can we fix it? While on the point about qualified immunity, so to argue the other side the the argument that there's a real problem here. I think part of the the case is that. As I understand the doctrine. It would show immunity that excuse me to show liability that the officer was liable for something. You have to show that there was a previous case that was kind of on point of exact specifics of what the officer did so so just a read a couple lines from a reason magazine report from April. So reason says last year the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit Court decided that two police officers in Fresno California who? Stole more than two hundred twenty five thousand dollars wall. Executing a search warrant could not be sued over the incident. And then it quotes the ninth circuit panel saying that. Although the city officers ought to have recognized that the alleged theft was morally wrong. It did not have clear. They did not have clear noticed that it violated the fourth amendment. So because of cases like this I, mean there's been a big push to get the Supreme Court to take up and reconsider qualified immunity. The court had a series of cases that were up for. It's review and on Monday dismissed those with a dissent from Justice Thomas. Who expressed? His strong doubts about this doctrine, but Kim I mean to my mind. I mean this might be another instance where in any event it's, it's better for Congress to have this debate and to decide the the nuance trade-offs of how this kind of immunity should operate then for the Supreme Court to come in with a sweeping deflation. Well I would still argue that better than both of those options would be for this debate to play out across the states where all of this policing is taking part and you know. Yes, let's have that debate and maybe we find that if different areas institute different forms of it we learn from that and we move ahead as a country remember the laboratories of democracy..

Supreme Court Minneapolis New York City officer Ninth Circuit Court US Court of Appeals Congress Atlanta Justice Thomas Kim theft Fresno California
"police reform" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

05:55 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"Is Potomac Watch welcome back has asked for your point bill to the range of what the protesters are asking for. It was notable to me on Tuesday that president trump was offering. You might call it counter programming when he signed an executive order, so he said here's a couple for me, said I strongly opposed the radical and dangerous efforts to de-fund dismantle and dissolve our police departments especially now when we've achieved the lowest recorded crime rates in recent history And then he stood up for police officers as brave people doing a hard job, he said. The vast majority of police officers are selfless, courageous public servants. He talks about how they ran into the twin towers on nine eleven. Many of them never came back out and so there's the the difference in his rhetoric bill I. Think is is notable, too. Yeah I. Think it is I mean again to just to go back to that point about the database. That's all fine to me in theory I'd like to know that knowledge if I were hiring someone, but let's look at these cases the cases that we've seen in the last year or go back to Eric. Garner the men in Staten Island. Who Died when he refused to be arrested and the recent case are these really cases of police officers like shopping for jurist that have been booted out somewhere. I'm not sure look I. Think once it. Wants something turned, interaction turns into a fight. It is ugly. It is not there. There's no magic way to put someone on the ground and subdued them, so I just again I wonder that we have a lot of well intentioned ideas. I just wonder if it's going to solve the problem that that we have at hand and I think that solutions are more likely to come from the bottom up from these places you know. Our colleague Jason Riley Right Stat. One of the things lost in this conversation today is that the silent black majority as he calls, it is far more frayed of criminals than they are police, and we're supposed to distinguish as we should. Between peaceful protesters, and you know looters and rioters. Surely we shouldn't conflate one police officer Minneapolis with every police officer. Out In, America I think that's I think that's what's being happened, look? Police there's a social compact police represent the public, and they're given a monopoly of force, and that's a very serious thing. It's going to lead to tragedies in some case, but. This you know part of this is endemic to the profession, and so forth and I think police have made extraordinary strides in years and bringing down crime, and in earning the trust of some neighborhoods does obviously a lot more to do,.

officer Eric president executive Staten Island Jason Riley America Garner Minneapolis
"police reform" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:43 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"From NPR and you are Boston mega truck, Roberta and this is on point. President trump signed an executive order on American policing yesterday it calls for the creation of a federal database to track police misconduct and recommends incentives for state and local law enforcement to change training among other provisions. Here's the president yesterday we will have reform. Without undermining our many great at extremely talented law, enforcement, officers and today Congressional Republicans led by South Carolina Senator Tim Scott unveiled their own Reform Bill Democrats have already launched their legislative plans to transform American policing. They did so earlier this month so this hour on point. We're going to analyze each one of those plans. Where do they overlap? Where do they differ? And how far do they go in making meaningful changes to law enforcement in America so we're going to be looking at federal level efforts to transform policing in this country and we will begin today with April Ryan she joins us from Washington. She's white. House correspondent in DC bureau chief for American urban. Radio. Networks April welcome to point. Thank you so much magma! How are you? I'm doing well? There's obviously a lot of news today out, of Washington, but let's just sort of methodically begin with yesterday and the President's executive order. On on American policing first of all, what what do you believe? What do you see as the major provisions of this executive order. To be honest, would I took from. This is the fact that this president does not want to federalize these ads niche McConnell says, but the main takeaway in one of the main sticking points for me. between Democrats. Republicans seems to be this chokehold issue. The president is saying look. We will allow for Choko. We will not allow chocolates, except if the officers life is in danger, and at issue, police a lot of nine times out of ten will feel that the allies say their lives are in danger, so and in the onus is really left the person who's dead or the person who's been brutalized to prove it police how? For oriented purposes they're giving the benefit of the doubt and court than the victim or the dead person with a person who requested so that the in that that might their sticks out to me more than anything this back and forth between the President and Democrats Democrats want. To abolish choke holds We've seen the chokehold situation with Gartner Six years ago. I can't breathe. I, CAN'T BREATHE! It, he died in New York. And now we're seeing this again. This time with a choke hold with the knee. In watched how the officer head to reposition himself, and he kept doing that and with the nets span of eight minutes and forty six seconds about my minutes. George die from a chokehold in having police on him where he could not break up, you could. Inhale and exhale properly so that is one of the major pieces to me. April if I'd just jump in here, there's there's a couple of layers of a of layers regarding that just just that one piece of them want to dig into a little bit more and comparing the executive order the Democratic Bill and the Republican bill that just came out today, so first of all in the president's executive order it says that the Attorney General shall certify independent credentialing bodies, and it's those credentialing bodies which I'm not quite. Quite sure what those would be, but that would add a minimum confirm, so we got another step there. They would confirm that state and local law enforcement agencies would prohibit the use of chokehold, except as you said in situations where use of deadly force allowed by law, so there's like two or three steps between the federal government and state and local law enforcement there the Democrat, the Democratic Bill just wants to outhouse band chokehold. Is that right? Yes, so here's here's where it gets really sticky. And as you said, the president really is trying to put the onus on local governments to police itself. He is pushing local governments to look at this more so than to have the justice, Nilo, we talk about Doj you talk about these independent bodies That's a whole nother thing especially when you have an administration, that is more police. and this president has made it known that he supports, and we want to put that out there that we do support the police, but at issue is. And I don't want people thinking my reporting about you know Banjul or anti flees. The vast majority of America supports police, but if weeding out of the bad police it and that is what has been the issue. UH, since even before a calling half Colin Kaepernick. took the knee we saw this starting. We saw this pattern during the Obama administration was video cameras now in the Obama Administration the Department the Division of Civil Rights and the Justice, Department took over these. Issues the civil rights division in this trump administration has been abolished downgraded significant. So what are these independent bodies? Who will make this up? And that is the question there is a is is a stark difference between the mindset of the Democrats and the Republicans, and there is you would say I guess, or the Democratic side, a more pro civil rights versus the trump administration is more police. At issues. How do you marry the concerns of the people? To make this equitable for the people vs just being Pro Civil Rights because depending upon the spectrum, you have so many. Beliefs adopts in it. Sad. It is almost coming down to. Politics, it's if you're a Republican. You're on the side of the Democrat side, and it's almost coming down to that. It's just a sad situation as people have been dying for years, and there are more people that we have not seen on a video camera footage. That have died versus the sensational stories that we're seeing so this has been a pervasive problem for years at issue is how you marry..

president executive President Washington America South Carolina NPR trump Boston Senator Tim Scott Obama administration Gartner Roberta Banjul bureau chief April Ryan
"police reform" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

03:28 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"Ferrari sims. Follow me. OTC second foul on the bother large-scale podcast today. On iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. Well President Trump's police reform bill that was yesterday. He signed an executive order aimed at tracking misconduct by law enforcers and creating incentives for departments to improve their practices, and he banned choke Kohl's unless the police officers life. Is that risk? The trump administration's order rejects. Calls to defunding police that have gained traction from within the nationwide protest movement. Take a listen, but I strongly opposed the radical endangers efforts to defend dismantling dissolve. Are Police departments especially now when we've achieved the lowest recorded crime rates in recent history. Americans know the truth without police. There is chaos without law. There is anarchy without safety. There is catastrophe. The police reform bill comes as lawmakers in both parties pursue wrote for him exactly, and he said he said demand in its defined. Yeah come on the police reform bill comes as lawmakers of both parties pursue legislation to reform law enforcement in the wake of George Floyd's death in police custody president. Trump also said that his predecessor President Obama and vice president. Joe Biden didn't know how to do police reform. He's got to be. Yes. He got to. Saudi yesterday. He's eight. They couldn't do it. Now! He's putting Biden's name in it because that's going to be if you listen to. The reform bill is not much most police departments now because that have already said, we're going to ban the chokehold. He anti new. better ways of policing and and all this hit David Turn. Out For years, the hanging on do nothing 'cause. He got back to right to what he wanted to say. We're not disbanding police departments. This man has said nothing about healing this country in any way. To make the protesters feel better to make black people feel better to make white people feel better. He has not made a single statement as the leader of a country who ravished internal. Steady rising numbers on this cova they heat. quit talking about that. He just like the rest of them. Stupid ass. Americans that thank Cova just 'cause. They tied to being in the house right and he didn't have a mask on or anything. He's Never WanNa mask and have one on. Taking drew surely He. He's not leading by example added at. A hit a swipe both predecessor leading by example. He don't wear a mask a whole lot of people that way. He says nothing to heal. The Nation and people have been more hate doing this administration than ever before I Golfer these protesters. That's out there white and black red yellow green blue, black white. All right. Coming up next thirty four after the hour we'll have more of the Steve Harvey Morning Show right after this..

Joe Biden Cova Trump President Kohl Ferrari President Obama vice president Saudi Steve Harvey president David Turn George Floyd executive
"police reform" Discussed on Labor Relations Information System

Labor Relations Information System

08:14 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on Labor Relations Information System

"Hello folks. This is will aitchison with another special podcast I. Know You guys a probably tired of hearing from me right now, but the developments in the area of police labor issues are coming so fast and furious furious. That I want to get this information out to you. What I want to talk about today. Is the whole issue of what police reform legislation is looking like. We have three examples that I want to cover the first. Is the executive order issued by President Trump today? The second is a bill that has been introduced in Congress by the a number of Democrats in the Senate. And the third is the first piece of statewide reform legislation that has passed in the country, and that is known as Senate bill twenty, two seventeen from Colorado. We will be posting online. The executive order from President Trump. Unfortunately, we can't post the Senate Democrats bill because believe it or not. It hasn't been printed but we can tell pretty much. What's going to be in it from the press releases and so? We will give you that summary as part of what we are posting. I wanted to post as well a bill that has long been promised by Senate Republicans, but they don't even have a summary out yet much less the entire bill. And then, lastly in Colorado, we will be posting the entire text of Senate bill twenty two seventeen, in addition to all that I have put together a matrix feller. Fairly lengthy matrix is ten pages long or so of the various provisions of these bills, and the reason that I'm doing this is there is reform legislation of one sort or another pending in a number of states across the country. But in particular, what happened in Colorado I think is quite important. Because in Colorado all of the forces were marshaled, and the idea was to set a precedent in Colorado that could be considered in other states around the country, and so I, think we all need to know what's in that Colorado Bill and from time to time we'll do some editorializing as to some problems or issues, I see not just what the Colorado Bill, but also with the executive order and what the Senate Democrats have announced. There's no good way to do this podcast. From a structural standpoint, it's kind of hard to put all the topics together and in a way that meaningful. I know if I go through the executive order, and then go over to the Senate Democrats next will lose track of what happened in the executive order on the issue. So what I've decided to do is I'm going to go topic by topic and tell you how all three of these bodies of legislation or in the case of the executive order a decree from the president how they treat particular issues, so let's start with body camps I just arrange these medical. Let's start with body cams. The executive order doesn't talk about body Cams, one way or the other, not an issue so far what we've seen from the Senate Democrats. They're not proposing anything on body cams in Colorado. What came out on body cams is pretty darn incredible. The legislation mandates that all law enforcement agencies must issue body cams to every officer by July one, twenty, twenty, three, I can just imagine the people in corporate headquarters at on formerly tastes her jumping for joy when bill was passed, there is no funding mechanism for those body cameras they they do referred or the legislation does refer to a grant program that exists in Colorado. Colorado up, but they're not putting any money into the grant program, so it's pretty apparent that law enforcement agencies are going to have to find a way to not only purchase the body cams, but also to pay for what you're about to hear is going to be immense storage of bodycam video and pretty incredible retrieval cost for Bodycam video. What else does that Colorado? Legislation say about body Cams, first of all has an activation threshold. Officers have to activate body cams whenever. A quote responding to a call for service or during any interaction with the public initiated by the peace officer. When enforcing the law or investigating possible violations of the law, there's a modest exception for undercover work so pretty much anytime. They officer is doing pretty much. Anything set maybe on a break. You know getting a hamburger or something like that. The officer is going to have to have their body cam on if they are responding to a call for service or during an interaction with the public. There are sanctions that are built in to the bill for noncompliance with that. Obligation to turn the body camera on. What are those sanctions? First of all the sanctions are disciplined up to and including termination and a one year suspension of the officers post certificate if the officer intentionally fails to activate a body CAM. If the incident involved the death of a civilian, the revocation of the Post Certificate is permanent. What about disclosure of Bodycam videos? With some exceptions, all body cam videos half to be released to the public within twenty one days. is a little exception for videos that substantially interfere with or jeopardize an active or ongoing investigation. They can be withheld from the public for forty five days. But then. After forty five days, they have to be released even if releasing them would substantially interfere fear with or jeopardize and investigation. there is a much broader exception for what the bill refers to as substantial privacy concerns. He's our privacy concerns, not on the part of the officer that on the part of whoever the body Cam would be capturing privacy concerns like interviewing victims are dealing sexual assaults or nudity and medical information and the like privacy concerns. When you read the bill, you're GONNA see. That's not very well defined, and it's going to lead some law enforcement agencies, guessing as to what a substantial privacy concern is if there is a substantial. Privacy Concern. You don't get complete redaction. Excuse me complete nondisclosure. Instead you get redaction, so you're GONNA have partial body camera videos out there..

Colorado executive officer Senate President Trump Congress Bodycam president
"police reform" Discussed on The Point with Chris Cillizza

The Point with Chris Cillizza

02:34 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on The Point with Chris Cillizza

"I'm here to cut through the political spin to bring you the news you need to know. President Donald Trump took to the Rose Garden today to unveil his new executive order around police reform. Trump said he was taking executive action to encourage police to adopt the highest and strongest professional standards, even as trump lambasted efforts to de-fund departments, and said police were owed respect for their work. This all comes in the wake of national scrutiny over police, brutality, violence and the unequal treatment of black Americans. Here's what this executive order does. It will create a federal database of police officers with a history of using excessive force. It also sets financial incentives for police departments to establish credentialing programs and follow. Standard Best Practices. While trump signalled last week that he may support out long chokehold. The executive order is not expected to completely ban them. As a whole, the order is relatively muted when it comes to sweeping police reforms that are being discussed by both Republicans and Democrats. It mainly leans on lawmakers to do the heavy lifting. Why for starters, the President has privately expressed caution around alienating police officers by going too far. Both parties on Capitol Hill also have competing bills on police reform in the works. The Democratic measure goes the furthest by banning choke holds and no knock warrants. Among Republicans White House officials coordinated with South Carolina Senator Tim. Scott, the lone black Republican senator. He is spearheading his party's legislative effort. Back Trump's Rose Garden address. Up until now he and some of his top advisors have failed to acknowledge the role of systemic racism in police departments. Before the event, trump said he met with the families of police who lost loved ones to police, violence and racial profiling, including the families of a Marbury Botham Jeanne and Antoine rose. They did not accompany him in the Rose Garden. Instead his audience was made up of representatives from law, enforcement and police unions. Let's get to the point. President Trump's executive order on police reform is something, but with just incentives and guidelines. It is far from a solid mandate..

President Donald Trump executive Rose Garden President Senator Tim South Carolina senator Antoine rose Scott Botham Jeanne
"police reform" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:06 min | 10 months ago

"police reform" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Ever seen from president. Trump appears to be based on a news clip. From the one America News Network, which is network for Conspiracy Theory Kooks, Guinot is a long time peace, activists and volunteer for Catholic worker, which is a movement dedicated to justice peace yeah. Trump is so desperate to defend the police ben instead of admitting that maybe they used excessive force, and that none of them helped person who was bleeding out on the ground. He turns around and blames the old man from that video. For being an antique provocateur, who busted his head open on purpose. And I mean. I can't believe that actually has to say but like that. Some Bat Shit crazy theory. Let me tell you something. If someone came up to me with a plan that involved me busting my head open on the sidewalk. I would ask them to come up with a better net I mean. How do you look at that video? See! That old man! And think that he's an antique. provocateur you that old man. Is causing chaos. Who sees that? Like I feel like trump is the kind of person who watched the movie up and he thinks is a story about an elderly terrorist who hijack balloon house, but I guess with this tweets and everything else that trump is said and done over the past couple of weeks. Trump has clearly picked which side he is on in this debates. And I mean forget about eight percents of the black vote. If this is trump's attitude towards reforming the police all, there's no cloth in the world big enough to make up for its coming up. We'll be having a discussion with leading experts and activists about fixing America's police problem, so stick around. Support for the daily show with Trevor Noah and the following message is brought to you by Ben and Jerry's in their three new non dairy, frozen desserts that are new twist on Vegan Fauria Ben and.

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