40 Burst results for "Police Department"

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on The WOR Sports Zone with Pete McCarthy

The WOR Sports Zone with Pete McCarthy

01:11 min | 2 min ago

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on The WOR Sports Zone with Pete McCarthy

"Of their Boulder, Colorado home and the Boulder Police Department started Woz. Hey, Ramsey's did it. There are any number of investigators who all say that the murder of JonBenet Ramsey was not done by the family but by intruders through a series of Boston vesting ations, multiple district attorneys. Finger pointing at family and friends. JonBenet's killer remains at large. We looked at lots of suspects now. Killing of JonBenet. The final suspects follows a brand new investigation into America's most heinous, unsolved murder in this exclusive 12 part documentary, Syriza's We're looking into the top 10 suspects that were never pursued. Are there other suspects that need to be looked at? Absolutely should there be other suspects? DNA's collected? Absolutely. When Lee Detective Lou Smit died, he left behind a list of suspects he felt were most likely responsible for this crime. He may have run out of time. But now with that list in hand, will investigate each person one by one. My name's Doug Longini have been reporting on this case for 20 years and now assembled a team of investigators to track down every name on Detective Lou Smit's list. The Boulder Police Department still to this day will not come out and give any information follow along as theories are tested nude Nyah evidence is presented and suspects our questions along the way. I believe we have the name of the killer on Lou's list. Way need to now put in the effort. Track down these individuals like there, Edna and roll up in four out. Bottom line. There's still a killer out there. Killing of JonBenet..

Doug Longini Jonbenet Edna 20 Years Lou Smit Boulder Police Department Ramsey LOU 12 Part Boston Boulder, Colorado America 10 Suspects Each Person ONE Jonbenet Ramsey Four Syriza Detective LEE
Rapper T.I., Wife Tiny Under Investigation in Los Angeles for Alleged Sexual Assault, Drugging

Pat Walsh

00:15 sec | 20 hrs ago

Rapper T.I., Wife Tiny Under Investigation in Los Angeles for Alleged Sexual Assault, Drugging

"The Los Angeles Police Department is launching an investigation into rapper T on his wife, tiny former sexual assault allegations, Attorney Tyrone Blackburn says He represents 11 victims who say the sex crimes date back 15 years and happened in California and Georgia

Los Angeles Police Department Attorney Tyrone Blackburn California Georgia
Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Chip Franklin

Chip Franklin

01:19 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Chip Franklin

"Or 15781, 56 94 157815690. What are coins on Lombard Street in San Francisco. Arson investigators in Los Angeles or trying to our are identifying rather the alleged arsonist in custody, who they say set fires that exploded over the weekend, causing people in the pricey Pacific Palisades area to flee their homes. We get more from a B C's Alex Towne from helicopters, Ally police and fire team, so somebody in the brush over the weekend starting multiple fires. Teams were sent in to find the man but had to retreat because of flames. On Sunday, he emerged from brush needing medical help for smoke inhalation. L A arson, investigators say 48 year old transient Ramon Rodriguez is now in custody accused of starting the fires. L. A is dealing with a growing problem of fires being set by the homeless like stone. ABC News, LOS Angeles San Francisco will deploy more police officers to deter crime in the city's mid market and tenderloin areas. Officers on foot motorcycle bicycle, even horseback will cover every block stretching from U. N Plaza to Powell Street. Would meet US found its new police chief in Oakland. Oakland's deputy cheapness shot Joshie is moving next door to head the police department in the island city in June and upcoming reality show could give you a chance to rocket off into space Kjos Mark Miata with that story Discovery is having a solid week so far after announcing a merger with 18 Tease Warner media yesterday. The Discovery Science Channel unveiled a competitive adventure TV show today called Who Wants To Be An Astronaut? The winner of the eight part series next year is expected to get a seat on Axiom Spaces, a X two mission to the International Space station using a space X rocket and capsule. Show was open to the public, and there's an online application asking for a short video about your space desires. Those selected will compete in grueling challenges on the show, and then a panel of expert judges will select the.

Ramon Rodriguez Oakland Los Angeles Lombard Street Sunday Joshie Alex Towne June U. N Plaza Who Wants To Be An Astronaut Discovery Abc News Powell Street Next Year Pacific Palisades Yesterday Discovery Science Channel Kjos Today 15781, 56 94 157815690
Tiger Seen Roaming Texas Neighborhood Found

WSB programming

00:33 sec | 2 d ago

Tiger Seen Roaming Texas Neighborhood Found

"The nine month old Bangle Tiger seen roaming around Houston neighborhood was handed over to authorities yesterday by its owners who reportedly kept India in their home. India will now live in a wildlife sanctuary in Texas Commander Ron Bores a with the Houston Police Department says he'd like to find the other wild animals being kept as pets in Houston, because we got India back doesn't mean There's not other exotic animals in the city, Houston I'd like to round them all up and put him in a safe environment charges against the Tigers owners have not yet been filed at this point, and Ari EMS front man has a hand in

Ron Bores Houston India Houston Police Department Texas Tigers ARI
Fresh update on "police department" discussed on John Howell

John Howell

00:43 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on John Howell

"These are private nude videos, but they're being shared amongst us Julia Police Department and that's you know where we're at in the lawsuit right now, where her lawyer holding events out of Chicago is trying to is in the process. Deposing these witnesses to find out who had who watched the videos. You know what they talked among themselves who make copies of them, you know, and so on and so forth Job. Well, you know if they disseminated the videos, that's you know, that's you are you are, you know you're trafficking and pornography. I mean, that's that there's some serious charges. Here is the we're talking with the John Ferric. He's an editor and reporter for Pat's Julian about this ongoing Federal jury trial lawsuit where, and she's still a police officer with Julian as her as her husband is now husband, and it must be a make for very uncomfortable times. At the police department. Obviously, as this goes forward, how money and I saw your article. It looks like you know 15 to 20 officers, former and current officers are going to be deposed is that accurate? Yes, sir. This John did when she originally filed the lawsuit coming up in three years ago on the Saugus stuff I memory serves. It was one sergeant that was named as a co defendant. Sergeant had gristle and he was the one that ultimately obtained a search warrant to get her phone. But she had also named generally speaking. I think 1 to 20 quote John Doe's, which basically meant this sheet of her lawyer with the belief that there may have been as many as 20 police officers that either knew or had access to these to these videos, and that's where we're at right now. Then Jamus stars. You know her lawyer or trying to figure out you know, um you just the extent of the involvement of other Julia police officers. Viewing it do we know doing off John? Do we know if anybody posted any of this, In other words, you know, disseminated to the extent of posted on the Internet, or is that not part of this? The fact that they just may have viewed it at the You know, in the evidence locker. What have you Yeah, that there's no evidence or or knowledge star is anybody. It's police from it, you know, posting or making copies as far as taking outside the department. Now I do believe that these depositions job are going to get into the Possibility, or, you know, or belief of the plaintiffs that there may have been, you know, multiple copies, copies made of the of the information, the photos and videos that were downloaded from her original phone, so that will be determined probably over the next Month, six weeks with when some of the former retired Julia police administrators have to go in and give their depositions in front of the lawyers. John John and I catch in your Your piece of the then chief is now gone. Correct. Actually, There's been some musical chairs with Julie at the last few years. So actually the chief that was, you know the individual that was the chief at the time. The next trip. Nick Crowley was arrested and went to trial, and he's not listed right now is first undergoing a deposition for Bryant pencil with chief at the time, but L Roach. There has been the he was chief the last 2 2.5 years, and he just retired this test January, and he's supposed to be giving his deposition here in the next Few weeks as I reported in my article in the Julia Patch a couple days ago. Well, the lessons to be learned in my opinion number one. Don't put anything like that on your phone ever. Even if you think it's private things happen in number two, Even if you're at a work, environment, any work, environment, any environment, and somebody says, Hey, take a look at this. Don't look, don't be. Don't get your visual or literal fingerprints on any of that nonsense because it will not work out well for you. In this environment, and nor should it have been in previous environments. But you get cast here pretty quick for even doing that in the workplace environment, let alone a police station. So, John Ferric I thought it was a fascinating piece will stand top it. I wonder how this will all be resolved. And I'm sure we're gonna have you back to talk about it. Thank you very much. Thanks, John for having me out. Take care. Have a good evening. Coming up next time. Remember Steve Dolinsky and ABC seven for so many years. The hungry hound. He has a new venture. We're going to talk to him and also If you ever watched the the last dance, which was the ESPN, Syriza and Michael Jordan and the final bull season with a great team. Uh uh. It was reprieved as an SNL skit this weekend for one particular reason, and it's kind of a minor player. But if you were watching on TV, or you went to any of those games at the UC, you remember Jordan's body guard. Well, he's passed away. In fact, he passed away over a year ago just before the last stance aired on ESPN. But the legacy of this gentleman was put on display, not a nasty where malicious way. Don't think don't think his family thinks so. But we're going to talk to a writer who writes on the media and sports and will bring us up to date on that very interesting story regarding Michael Jordan and the last Dance, won the slam.

Nick Crowley Jordan Steve Dolinsky John John Julie Michael Jordan Espn 15 SNL John Ferric John Doe John Chicago Julia Police Department January Six Weeks ABC 20 Police Officers L Roach Bryant
Columbus Reaches $10M Settlement for Family of Andre Hill

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 d ago

Columbus Reaches $10M Settlement for Family of Andre Hill

"The city of Columbus Ohio will pay a ten million dollar settlement to the family of a black man who was fatally shot by police in December forty seven year old entree kill was fatally shot just days before Christmas as he emerged from a friend's garage holding only a cellphone then officer Adam Corey who has since been fired and charged with murder was investigating a nonemergency complaint about a car in addition to the ten million dollar settlement Jim frequented by hill will be renamed in his honor attorney Ben Crump says the family is applauding city leadership for demonstrating that hill's life matters but the police department remains under scrutiny for other fatal shootings including last month's death of sixteen year old macarthur Bryant I'm Jackie Quinn

Adam Corey Columbus Ohio Ben Crump Hill JIM Police Department Macarthur Bryant Jackie Quinn
Fresh update on "police department" discussed on John Howell

John Howell

00:36 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on John Howell

"That this will go to a federal jury trial. We're talking about a story out of Juliet and involves current and former members of the Joliet Police Department reading from our next guest. Article on this at the patch. Six members of the Julia Police Department already have given their pre trial depositions during the past month in Officer Cassie. So, chas Revenge porn lawsuit against her employer. It sounds like she still is a Julia cop. Let's welcome John Ferenc. He's an editor and reporter at the Patch Joliet. Back to double the else. John. This is a complicated story. I know that the lawsuit's been underway since August of 2018, but the incident that prompted the lawsuit is back. Into May of 2018 Give us kind of the genesis of this entire story, please. Sure, John. We had a trial that was going on that same well this week three years ago involved the allegations of gun being discharged inside the house. Between the townhouse between the two police officers. They live together at the time. And our since married, Um, the one officer. The male officer was church with several several crimes and his future wife officer soldier testified at the trial. John Um on his behalf and stressed to the judge at the trial that she did that she was not a victim of domestic violence and you know, didn't feel harm to threaten. There was a lot well argument her dog started barking and and her future husband fired the gun. Into the ceiling that night. So that's kind of the precipitation off the incident that eventually it's gonna lead to this federal lawsuit involving this morning and her now husband They were. I guess they were residing together back in May of 2018 when the gun went off. Julia Police officer Nick Crowley. He's still a member of the force as well, correct. Correct. Both of them are officers to this day and our regular patrol officers, Jack. So when that trial was going on, did the state's attorney For evidence did. How was her cell phone? How did her cell phone come into play? It, um, she had sent, you know again. This is a private phone. Um, and she had sent a message. To another witness for the prosecution of woman that she knew. And it was an angry mean spirited message. But there was nothing criminal. There's nothing threatening you. No, nothing like that. No, that she was gonna kill somebody or anything like that. So she sent the message to the to a witness for the prosecution that she knew. And then that woman that witness John then to the other Julia police supervisors who were trying to make sure that Nick Crowley After Crowley was convicted, and the trial did not go their way. He was found that guilty and the allegations in her lawsuit are that the police said went and we judge judge shopping and found one of the World County judges to authorize. A search warrant for officer searches. Private cell phone. Okay, just to be clear. As you mentioned the police office from the incident in May of 18 Nick Crowley's still a cop. He was he was found not guilty of all the criminal charges, including reckless discharge of a gun. But then our cell phone is in the custody of the police. And then what is she alleged happen? Well, First of all, I feel I just said that that that that this was an illegal first one to begin with that there was no evidence of any criminal activity on her phone. John. Um the police already had Julia, please already have the message that she had sent, you know, fun. The other recipients they already had. Quote, if you I mean, I mean, we'll call it evidence for discussion here. But it really wasn't evidence inspires who was no crime that officer so she committed by signing this, you know, you know, mean message, but, um, you know to the to this lady. The Julia police. Like I said, they got a judge to sign off and were able to obtain Officer soldiers. Private cell phone. And again if their whole purpose for retrieving the phone was just to retrieve the set This message she sent to the witness. They started going through her phone and started looking at any and all of our photos and videos. I am Joe. That's what's eventually going to lead to the federal lawsuit, Jack. So here we are, some three years later coming up on three years later, well three years ago this month is when the incident happened. Lawsuit was filed in August. Harmony. How are the photos and videos disseminated? And can you describe reasonably what those are? Um, the the photos and videos. Uh, it's a little murky, but but I generally Noah, you know what the facts are? That's why we have so many police officers that are now being deposed this month and next month. As far as who know who watch You know, and and when and what they did with it, But apparently there were there may have been multiple copies of the videos again, It would have been consensual adult Turner future husband. Having relations together and other members of the Julia Police Department being supervisors, then letting other officers fellow detectives have access to the videos and photos and kind of, you know. Um, you know, talking talking amongst themselves assorted. Hey, you got to take a look at the video of stuff. You know yourself, So apparently, these videos and photos were left in an area of the investigations unit. Where you know, fellow Detective could access them. Um, and again, this is not supposed to be going on under any circumstances again, You know the softest culture. Was not charged with any criminal activity. There was no evidence of any crimes on her phone and again..

Nick Crowley John Ferenc John August Of 2018 May Of 18 Joliet Police Department August JOE Crowley Jack Julia Police Department May Of 2018 Two Police Officers Six Members John Um Next Month One Officer Noah Both Cassie
Watchdog Says Capitol Police Deficient at Monitoring Threats

The Dan Proft Show

00:50 sec | Last week

Watchdog Says Capitol Police Deficient at Monitoring Threats

"Just out now that shows us the U. S. Capitol Police department's internal watchdog showing highlighting some very serious deficiencies. Bill Alexander has that story. The Capitol police force was hurt by inadequate intelligence gathering ahead of the January 6th seed at the U. S Capitol. That's according to a new review by the department's internal watchdog. Capitol Police Inspector General Michael Bolton says the police Department has had problems because of the increase in threats against lawmakers over the last five years, Testifying before a House committee Monday Bolted, recommended that the force hire more agents who are dedicated to assessing threats. The Capitol police sports that Friday that there has been a 107% increase and threats against members of Congress this year compared to 2020. Bill

U. S. Capitol Police Departmen Bill Alexander U. S Capitol Capitol Police Inspector General Michael Bolt Police Department House Committee Congress Bill
Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Gary and Shannon

Gary and Shannon

00:55 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Gary and Shannon

"To help him get over this back. Injuries causing him so much pain. Please send him your good thoughts. Well, the chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, Michael Moore, wants an officer to be fired. This is an officer who allegedly shared that Valentine style MIM of George Boyd's face in the phrase You take my breath away. Now, chief. More cannot fire officers. He doesn't have that authority, but he can send them to the board of Rights. And hope that those people will fire the officer. We will see what happens. Joining us now for tasty. Oh, wait a minute. Don't say the name of the thing until you're ready to hear the thing, right? Joining us for this thing that we're doing every Tuesday, the fourth reporter himself meal, Sir Vedra on social media at Work Reporter and the Fork report. Radio program Saturdays. 2 to 5 P.m. Here on K. If I Hello, Neil. Wow. Hello. There you are. Would you consider yourself an intrepid fork reporter? Sure. All right. Very good. Now, are you ready for the president? In most scenarios so bright, are you? Are you ready to hear the thing? Yeah, It's tasty. Tuesday. Let me did you got it? Let me teach you out it all.

George Boyd Vedra Neil Michael Moore Los Angeles Police Department Saturdays 2 Tuesday K. Fourth Reporter 5 P.M. Valentine The Fork Reporter
Watchdog Says Capitol Police Deficient at Monitoring Threats

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last week

Watchdog Says Capitol Police Deficient at Monitoring Threats

"The capitol police department's watchdog says it was poorly organized equipped or trained to spot the looming threats ahead of the January six the salt capitol police inspector general Michael Bolton tells a congressional committee that the department needs to reorganize he cited one example in which three teams of officers were sent to check out pipe bombs leaving just one team just ahead of the January sixth attack Bolton adding there's a need for a standalone counter intelligence unit in support of protecting the congressional community would improve apartments ability don't find disrupt individuals or groups intent on engaging in illegal activity director at the Gresham community boards led straight a process Fulton says that the leadership was ill prepared for the onslaught is a mob of supporters of former president Donald Trump stormed the building Tim McGuire Washington

Capitol Police Department Salt Capitol Police Michael Bolton Congressional Committee Bolton Gresham Community Boards Fulton Donald Trump Tim Mcguire Washington
Los Angeles PD Officer Suspected of Possessing Child Porn

Tim Conway Jr.

00:14 sec | Last week

Los Angeles PD Officer Suspected of Possessing Child Porn

"Bye Rooter Hero. Officials in Long Beach say. An LAPD officer has been arrested for having child pornography of police Department says the 52 Year old is a resident of Long Beach and was arrested in Huntington Beach this morning. The officer is looking at four felony charges for allegedly having the child abuse

Long Beach Lapd Police Department Huntington Beach
Fairfax County Police Department Welcomes Newly Appointed Chief Kevin Davis

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Fairfax County Police Department Welcomes Newly Appointed Chief Kevin Davis

The Murder of Christa Leigh Steele-Knudslien

True Crime Fan Club Podcast

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

The Murder of Christa Leigh Steele-Knudslien

"New year began with the murder of krista steel nuts. Lean by her husband. Mark steel nuts. Lean on january fourth. Two thousand eighteen on january fifth. Mark went to the atoms police department and reported that he had done something very bad and that he should be put in handcuffs holding out his hands to be cuffed. He went on to tell the interviewing officer that he had struck krista several times with a hammer and then stabbed her in the back with a stainless steel kitchen. Knife officers found christie's body in the basement of the couple's home wrapped in a tarp. Mark told officers. Krista often belittled him and called him names mark said he snapped at around five pm. On january fourth according to marx attorney he and krista had been arguing although his attorney would not reveal the nature of the argument he simply said that mark krista had been at one another verbally for some lengthy period of time afterwards. According to statements made to the police mark maintained his composure. Cleaning out taking a shower and then going to the liquor store. The autopsy report indicated that krista had suffered blunt force trauma. Some of which was consistent with defensive injuries. According to the medical examiner krista suffered from multiple base alert skull fractures caused by blunt force trauma the stab wound to her back east through the upper lobe of her right lung and punctured her heart which caused her death. By loss of blood

Krista Steel Mark Steel Atoms Police Department Krista Mark Mark Krista Christie Marx
Ransomware Gang Reportedly Drops Encryption

Cyber Security Today

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Ransomware Gang Reportedly Drops Encryption

"The babic ransomware gang says it's dropping the encryption of data of victims as a tactic instead will focus strictly on data theft and blackmail to enrich itself until now the gang did both stealing data from victim organizations and then encrypting the data on the corporate servers. The threat to the victim was pay for the decryption keys. Or the copy data will be released embarrassing. You and your customers. If the company didn't have a good data backup it faced to threats embarrassment and loss of business and the loss of data this double extortion. Tactic started being adopted by ransomware groups about two years ago but creating and maintaining encryption isn't easy some cyber security companies have cracked the encryption of a few gangs and are giving away the decryption keys to any victims m saw off is one of the companies that crack the babba code now. Barbeque has apparently decided that is easier and perhaps just as lucrative to only steal data and hold it for ransom a researcher adam soft doubts that other ransomware groups will follow this strategy by the way last week the babak gang gone into the computer systems of the washington dc police department and stole data. It is still threatening to release the names of police informants unless it is paid in an interview with the new site in poland babba claim. The police departments virtual private network was hacked. With a zero day vulnerability that is vulnerability that hasn't been disclosed. That claim hasn't been confirmed.

Adam Soft Washington Dc Police Departmen Babba Poland
One Month After the Death of Adam Toledo

Latino Rebels Radio

02:38 min | 2 weeks ago

One Month After the Death of Adam Toledo

"We've been following. The case of adam follow in little village especially since the bodycam footage was released by sort of the accountability arm of the chicago police department and obviously once sat bodycam footage came out. Adam story became a global story. And we've been publishing stories from chicago from different chicago voices and we wanted to bring one of those voices on the show who has been covering this Guests from chicago. Do you wanna say who you are in. Welcome to the show. Yes thank you for having me. My name is del. I'ma independent photo journalist in creative south side of chicago mateo Thank you for for saying yes and coming on like we said we've been following your work previously to this but also you actually If people know my working on instagram does fantastic work kind of looking at the images of the side of chicago. We've actually published Several of your photos in the past and then when this story came about we notice that you were actively covering it from from from the time you know adam was killed. So can you tell me the last. You know. it's been about a month now right. It's it's actually a month if we took it april twenty ninth. I mean he was march twenty ninth. It'll be a month so tell me you wrote a really. You wrote a piece for our sort of reflections. But i wanted to give you sort of the space to kind of sort of paint a picture of of the core of the community of what's been going on impressions. What are people missing about this story. The strategy. I think that most people aren't taking a step back and realizing everything that little village along with its surrounding communities and what their experience has been like you know throughout specially the last year and a half This is a community that was Throughout a significant portion of the pandemic one of the highest impacted areas of the city they had a highest kobe case rates for a while they're comprised of a lot of essential workers and aside from that it's a community that unfortunately has an incredibly high rate of gun in has for a really long time.

Chicago Chicago Mateo Chicago Police Department Adam
Suspect Arrested in Attack on Chinese American Man in NYC

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Suspect Arrested in Attack on Chinese American Man in NYC

"Police in New York City arrested man in an attack on a Chinese American who was kicked repeatedly after being knocked to the ground the NYPD says Jared Powell was charged with two counts of felony assault in Friday's attack on yelp town mall the sixty one year old had lost his job and was out on the street in Harlem collecting cans to get by when police say how old viciously attacked him including kicking him in the head and act caught on surveillance camera the police department's hate crimes task force is investigating the attack which appeared to be among the latest in a troubling rise in anti Asian hate crimes Julie Walker New York

Jared Powell Yelp Town Mall Nypd New York City Harlem Police Department Julie Walker New York
Justice Department Launches Investigation Into Louisville Policing Practices

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

Justice Department Launches Investigation Into Louisville Policing Practices

"Department announcing an investigation into the Louisville Metro Police Department. Here is a B C's. There in Qatar ski Following the year of outrage over the police shooting of Briana Taylor, the Justice Department began and invest. Negation into whether Louisville police have a history of discriminatory policing a step Welcome by Mayor Greg Fischer. The recommendations of this DOJ review will help us continue to pursue our efforts. Hard being the bullet Best Police department in America. The investigation will review training, examine use of force stops and seizures and how the department conducts search warrants like the one that led to the death of Taylor. The city settled with her family for $12 million and took other steps toward reform.

Louisville Metro Police Depart Briana Taylor Mayor Greg Fischer Qatar Best Police Department Justice Department Louisville DOJ Seizures America Taylor
US Launches Investigation Into Louisville Police Practices

C-SPAN Programming

02:10 min | 3 weeks ago

US Launches Investigation Into Louisville Police Practices

"Into Louisville's policing practices. The investigation comes as police in this Kentucky city are under fire after the March 2020 fatal shooting of Briana Taylor. She was unarmed and in her home while police were executing what's called a no knock search warrant. Good afternoon. I'm joined today by our recently confirmed Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco and I recently confirmed Associate Attorney General. I need a Gupta. They are leaders of great ability and integrity. And I am very happy that they have returned to serve again at the Justice Department. The department is stronger or their presence. United States Department of Justice is a federal law enforcement agency comprised of thousands of law enforcement officers who collaborate with and support our colleagues throughout our nation's police departments. We are uniquely aware of the challenges faced by those Serve as police officers. You see their commitment firsthand every day, and we recognize the complex issues that make their already difficult jobs even harder. The Justice Department is also charged with ensuring that the constitutional and federal statutory rights of all people are protected. As I explained last week, Congress has authorized the department to conduct pattern or practice investigations. Help it fulfill that responsibility. Those investigations and the recommendations and actions that ensue do not only protect individual civil rights They also assist police departments developing measures to increase transparency and accountability. Those qualities are necessary to building trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve. And community trust is essential to making policing more effective and less dangerous or officers on the street. Today. The Justice Department

Kentucky City Briana Taylor Justice Department Deputy Attorney General Lisa M Louisville Congress
US to Investigate Louisville Police

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

US to Investigate Louisville Police

"Says it will investigate the Louisville Metro Police Department and the city's government. More than a year after the police killing of Rianna Taylor, Stephanie Wolf of member station W. FPL's more. The investigation will seek to answer the question whether Louisville Metro Police routinely used excessive force or violate constitutional rights. Louisville Mayor Greg Fisher says this is a good thing for the city. Good officers will welcome this announcement and see it as an exciting time to be part of reform and transformation. The people of Louisville. Know that you are the ultimate winners of this review. Louisville Police Chief Erica Shields said She also supports the investigation. News of the Louisville investigation comes less than a week after the U. S attorney general announced that his office would review the Minneapolis Police Department. For NPR

Louisville Police Rianna Taylor Stephanie Wolf Mayor Greg Fisher Louisville FPL Erica Shields U. Minneapolis Police Department NPR
Justice Department to Investigate Louisville Police Department

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Justice Department to Investigate Louisville Police Department

"Investigators will be looking into another big city Police Department Attorney General Merrick Garland says the Justice Department investigation will focus on the number of practices and policies of the Louisville Police Department. It will determine whether l m p d engages in unconstitutional stops. Searches and seizures, as well as whether the department unlawfully execute search warrants on private homes. Louisville police have been under increased scrutiny since the death last year of Briana Taylor. She was killed, his police were enforcing a no knock warrant at her home.

City Police Department Merrick Garland Louisville Police Department Justice Department Seizures Briana Taylor Louisville
Justice Dept. Opens Policing Probe Over Breonna Taylor Death

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

Justice Dept. Opens Policing Probe Over Breonna Taylor Death

"For the second time in a week the justice department's opening a sweeping probe into a big city police department after George Floyd's death the department started looking into the tactics of Minneapolis police now it will probe Louisville's department after police killed Brianna Taylor during a raid at her home last year to determine whether LMPD engages in a pattern or practice violations of the constitution or federal law Attorney General Merrick garland says it'll focus on whether Louisville police engaged in a pattern of on reasonable force chief Erika shields says she welcomes the investigation and the so we should her officers they understand that whatever we've been doing isn't working Taylor's family reached a twelve million dollar settlement with the city over her death Sager mag ani Washington

George Floyd Brianna Taylor Lmpd Louisville Justice Department Attorney General Merrick Garla Minneapolis Erika Shields Taylor Sager Mag Ani Washington
Justice Department Launches Investigation Into Louisville PD

Sean Hannity

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

Justice Department Launches Investigation Into Louisville PD

"A civil rights investigation of the Louisville police practices boxes. Jeff Man also has this live police attorney General Merrick Garland launches a probe into the Louisville Metro PD to look for patterns of excessive force and unconstitutional policing. Recommendations and actions that ensue do not only protect individual civil rights. They also assist police departments in the developing measures to increase transparency. Accountability investigation follows the 2020 police shooting death of Rianna Taylor. The Justice Department last week also launched a federal civil rights probe into the Minneapolis police Department after the conviction of former officer Derek Chauvet in the death of George Floyd. Lisa. Thanks

Jeff Man Merrick Garland Louisville Rianna Taylor Minneapolis Police Department Justice Department Derek Chauvet George Floyd Lisa
"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:47 min | 3 weeks ago

"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The pandemic the cycle the threats to journalists the economic pressures of the industry. Those are huge stresses that are just ongoing trauma post traumatic stress post traumatic stress disorder. Is something different post traumatic stress. Disorder comes from the direct exposure to or the secondary handling of empathetic connection interviews or dealing with involving overwhelming violence or cruelty or death or chronic threat and it has to do with the brain and body staying in a kind of a permanent alarm state In which we there are characteristic psychological changes traumatic memories that come back at us when we don't want in that are interfering A sense of anxiety arousal being unable to concentrate get to sleep or the other direction. People who become numb and avoidance or whose worldview becomes very dark those are profound psychological changes that begin with our biological response to fear and threat. And what we know from research into journalists is that our profession is exposed through too far more trauma than the general public and even more than some other frontline professions. We obviously reporters who are covering war exposed to a lot of trump but so are reporters who cover Violent street demonstrations or confrontations with the police so our reporters who cover crime and fires but so are journalists. Who never leave the desk. Who are dealing with a steady of graphic imagery and we can't look away because it's our job. Think of you any of the horrible police violence videos over the course of the last week. They're tough for all citizens to look at Particularly people of color particularly people who identify with the victims in those videos but for journalists and editors mp reducers. What the public doesn't see is that we have to view those decide which ones to use verify them. Edit them run them past other editors and producers constantly re edit them. There's a whole process which means that a lot of people who never leave. The desk are dealing with a steady diet of graphic imagery a steady diet of distressing information. Which eventually can overtop. You're sort of personal. Damn your personal levy. Just as much as front-line trauma exposure We know that that these mechanisms mechanisms how the brain responds are very close to what we use. As journalists every day in our work rely on being able to be present in the moment not overwhelmed by last year's police shooting video owner trying to do today story about we rely on being able to focus to put together complex information to get along with colleagues to make empathetic connection with sources with audiences with colleagues. This is so central to news and when an overload of trauma either in the short run through direct exposure terrifying events like those journalists who courageous journals who covered The the insurrection of the.

last year today last week trump
"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:16 min | 3 weeks ago

"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

"More than a bit make that burned out to a crisp and it turns out. We're not alone. According to a recent from the job site indeed more than fifty two percent of respondents reported experiencing burnout in twenty twenty one for journalists like me that burn out has been due in part from our inability to step away from the news between covid nineteen. The election protests against police brutality and more journalists have been caught up in an endless cycle of traumatic news for at least more than a year. And that's been forcing some journalists to step down and take a break recently. A number of very prominent journalists from the editorial director of the texas tribune to the editor of wired announced. They'd be leaving their jobs because of burnout. So what can we do to better support people who bring you the news for that. I'm joined by bruce shapiro. The executive director of the dart center for journalism and trauma a project of columbia journalism school. Bruce great to have you with us era. Glad to be your tenzin of navel-gazing And i know that people have many different feelings about the media. I will say though. That burnout is something that i think. A lot of people whether they work in media or not are experiencing but these very high profile you know departures. I think are signaling. Something that we as journalists need to look at so let's start with why so many journalists are feeling burnt out this this is. This is really important. I've tenzin over the last who i've been spending a lot of time in newsrooms via zoom talking journals about the impact of of this period and a few things are apparent on the one hand people who report the news who produce the news who are in front of the camera and behind the desk have the same very challenging. Big stresses and fears That that the rest of society has we are citizens and we are afraid of covid. Nineteen were frustrated by working at home. We are having to manage boundaries like everybody else. We are fearful for our relatives and people we love. All of that is a kind of open ended stress in and of itself. But in addition i think what the public doesn't see is that there have been a couple of other sources of extraordinary open ended unremitting stress for the people who carry us the news every day One of them is that With the arrival of covid. nineteen and social distancing. I'm working at home. Journalists had to completely reinvent the delivery of news this part you don't seek the paper still arrives on your desk. The bulletin still arrives in your inbox. Were still on air. But the mechanism for delivery the process the workflow had to be completely invented over the last year And has been. Reinvented amid as you were saying. These unrelenting news cycles filled with violence and trauma journalists. Don't have the option of turning away from the news cycle there much. We are reporting on mass death..

bruce shapiro last year Bruce Nineteen more than fifty two percent columbia twenty twenty one more than a year dart center for texas One of them one hand nineteen
"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:10 min | 3 weeks ago

"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And so we really wanted to go and where the problem was most acute right where people were closest to the problems in policing and what we found You know which won't surprise anybody. These days was the same thing that we've been talking about Earlier in the program right that residents particularly residents of color are experiencing pervasive negative encounters with police officers including getting pulled over in cars and getting stopped when they're on the street and being spoken to rudely being treated with hostility by officers and that creates a real sense of distrust of the police department Particularly when per violent crime continues in the community so people had the sense. That law enforcement was not only failing to protect them From victimization in their community but that police were themselves a form of violence in a form of harm because they were constantly stopping and harassing residents. Brent. we've seen Calls for defunding or abolishing the police in fact the minneapolis police department had wasn't weren't they supposed to disband to a certain extent. What happened with that or sure that was last year following. George floyd killing the city council Proposed a charter of a change. The charter said he's charter. That would allow them to basically dismantle the police department in replace it with a different agency that failed because the charter commission felt like they didn't have enough time to properly vet the idea in so it didn't get on the ballot last year. That effort got revised this year. The council also proposed another similar charter amendment A group of citizens have also started a petition. Drive to get that. Also on on the ballot. And there's also change A foot in the the city's charter commission itself is exploring the idea of of changing the charter to to change the how the balance of power works between the council and the mayor. The mayor has the authority over the police department. So those efforts are all still going forward. Full steam brent. What was the perception of the minneapolis police department before the before. Derek chauvin killed. George floyd by residence at least right. Well i'll tell you as somebody who also used to live in north minneapolis. I was there about almost twenty years ago in jordan neighborhood. There was a a young boy was ex- according to police accidentally shot during high risk raid at house word spread around the neighborhood that the police actually shot and killed this young black man. A young boy in that sparked a riot That was just one of many incidents that led to calls from the community to actually put place the minneapolis. Police department under federal receivership. Now instead of doing that they engaged in a federally mediated agreement. That started back in two thousand and three and that agreement expired in two thousand eight. But they actually. We started that process last year. After george floyd was killed so this has been going on for a long time. There's been federal intervention before although not as invasive so to say is This particular and or extensive as as this current investigation. So yes. there's been a ongoing. I'm quite contentious relationship between members of particularly the black community in minneapolis police department. Michelle when you heard about this investigation from the department of justice into the minneapolis police department and new york. Of course your research on the interactions between citizens and police Probably informed a lot of what you're thinking in terms of recommendations for the minneapolis police department in in advance of this investigation. Where do you see the biggest areas of improvement that need to happen for the minneapolis. Police department sure yeah..

George Derek chauvin Michelle george floyd Brent last year north minneapolis two thousand George floyd three this year new york eight steam brent twenty years ago minneapolis jordan neighborhood minneapolis police department charter commission commission
"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:43 min | 3 weeks ago

"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Br there's also a separate civil rights investigation into the chauvin case. Is that right. And what do we know about that. So far yes As attorney general garland mentioned yesterday This is separate from the federal criminal. Investigation I don't know much more about that. We've we've heard about some of the That there'd been a grand jury impaneled a that investigation but other than that. I don't have any more information michelle. Let's talk a little bit about the federal government's role here because if the federal government identifies that something needs to be fixed or changed who will then do. The of those changes will be up to the department to take that those findings and do with them as they please or will there be some sort of mandate that comes from the federal government. How does that work. So typically When there is caused issue a report when the investigation finds that there was a pattern and practice of discrimination or excessive force. Typically what happens after that. Is that the department releases. A report and then the jurisdiction under doj work together to negotiate an agreement That agreement is often legally binding and can be enforced with a A team or an individual who monitors that consent decree and ensures that the department is meeting the conditions that they promised to And that can lead to a litigation if the department does not do the kinds of reforms that it had promised to implement. How effective is this strategy. The using the muscle of the federal government to reform police departments. You know so. There's only a couple of studies on the issue and it still a little bit of a murky territory. I mean i think the big picture is that the the scale of the operation is just so small that you're only ever going to be able to touch you know at max of twenty five cities or jurisdictions at a time so there's just a scale problem but in terms of for the cities that do enter into a consent decree what changes part of the problem in the complexity of that research is that it's a little ambiguous what the outcome goal is. So if you look at for instance. Civil cases filed against the department. That's one outcome. People have also looked at what happens to crime rates in a city. People have also looked at you. Can't apartment sustain the effort. So i think you know the the big picture summary. Is that these These consent decrees in these investigations effective in helping to compel department to revise their policies and practices. But they take an enormous amount of resources and are hard to sue for department sec- ridiculously when they face a lack of internal or political support for continuing the reform. Brent when you look at the minneapolis police department. How would you as a reporter described the patterns of policing And maybe things that we here at. The national level aren't seeing an in terms of how well they're received by the community before potentially this the derek chauvin Trial but just in terms of how what their philosophy on policing is right so actually. There is a fair amount of data. Excuse me. I'm going back twenty years just about twenty years showing How minneapolis police department has Used a force more likely against African americans in the have White residents traffic stop data showing.

yesterday michelle twenty five cities twenty years minneapolis police department Brent about twenty years one outcome attorney general federal government Trial garland African americans
"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:21 min | 3 weeks ago

"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Look at some of those past Officer involved killings andbranch just wondering if the minneapolis police department has said anything about this investigation or have they just Not issued any statement so far. Well yeah the. The police department issued a statement including a reaction from chief arredondo. He basically expressed support for it. I i've spoken with Some people who are have worked with the chief in the past they say this is something that could bolster his efforts to bring about a change in police culture a however we have not heard any comment from the police federation as michelle. What type of. I mean the the you've done studies on these police departments in north minneapolis in particular. How would you describe the history of the minneapolis police department and its relations with black and brown residents of the city. Sure yeah so for the past five years or so. I've been doing a study of the minneapolis. Police department looking at it from the perspective of community perceptions of the police activists demands for changes in policing And then what. The department has actually done to reform the department. And i think minneapolis is more typical of american cities in some ways than it is atypical and that the problems in minneapolis. I think our nationwide. So since two thousand and fifteen the department has actually been pretty aggressively involved in a lot of the kinds of best practices police reforms That have been suggested by things like consent decrees through the doj program and yet they have also had this continuing series of high profile. Police killings And more routine sort of day to day harassment of residents particularly back black and indigenous residents. And so there's a long history in minneapolis. Both of Police misconduct and police abuse of police reform and activism to change policing michelle. This is supposed to be a pattern or practice investigation. What do we know about these types of investigations. So these types of investigations were relatively common under the obama administration and then petered out during the trump administration. They you know at their height are still touching only a handful of departments. There's eighteen thousand police departments nationwide. And so you can really only respond to kind of the the the most high profile cases and cities. But i think what the pattern and practice investigations allow us to do is to as The attorney general said to really get at these more systemic issues rather than these one off cases and try to see. What's under girding those problems. And ideally i think the the model was that some of the forms and consent decrees that came out of this process could be applied to other places. Right could be that same. Package of reforms could be implemented in other kinds of cities. And i think one of the concerns activists have today is whether the return of these pattern and practice. Investigations will help to or will Block efforts to really reimagine policing and kind of move away from Police reform and towards really thinking about alternative systems of public safety..

trump obama arredondo two thousand north minneapolis eighteen thousand police depar today american Both minneapolis minneapolis police department michelle fifteen one past five years
"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:11 min | 3 weeks ago

"police department" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Or continuing to process the guilty verdict of former minneapolis. Police officer derek. Chauvin in the murder of george floyd for many. The conviction is a first step towards accountability. After a year of reckoning with institutional racism in policing on wednesday morning the justice department announced it will launch a civil investigation into the policies and operations of the minneapolis police department. As a whole here's attorney. General merrick garland speaking on wednesday. Yesterday's verdict and the state criminal trial does not address potentially systemic policing issues in minneapolis. Today i am announcing that the justice department has opened a civil investigation to determine whether the minneapolis police department engages.

wednesday morning Today wednesday Yesterday george floyd minneapolis police department Chauvin merrick garland minneapolis first step justice
DOJ Investigates Minneapolis Police Over Possible Patterns of Excessive Force

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:28 min | 3 weeks ago

DOJ Investigates Minneapolis Police Over Possible Patterns of Excessive Force

"Justice department is opening sweeping investigation into policing practices in minneapolis. After a former officer was convicted. In the killing. Of george floyd attorney. General merrick garland on wednesday. The justice department was already investigating whether chauvin and the other officers involved in floyd's death violated his civil rights. Yesterday's verdict in the state criminal. Trial does not address potentially systemic policing issues in minneapolis garland said the investigation is known as a pattern or practice examining whether there is a pattern or practice of unconstitutional or unlawful policing. And we'll be a more sweeping review of the entire police department. It may result in major changes to policing in the minnesota city. It will examine the use of force by police officers including force used during protests and whether the department engages in discriminatory practices. It will also look into the department's handling of misconduct allegations and its treatment of people with behavioral health issues and we'll assess the department's current systems of accountability garlan said the minneapolis police department is also being investigated by the minnesota department of human rights. Which is looking into the police department's policies and practices over the past decade to see if it engaged in systemic discriminator

George Floyd Justice Department Merrick Garland Chauvin Minneapolis Minnesota City Floyd Garland Garlan Minneapolis Police Department Minnesota Department Of Human Police Department
"police department" Discussed on Good morning, EVIT!

Good morning, EVIT!

08:10 min | 6 months ago

"police department" Discussed on Good morning, EVIT!

"Good morning even bring marshall the host of good morning event and this is a new podcast. Whose purpose is to help. Even staff and families stay connected. Thank you so much for listening following along on some of these adventures. I really appreciate it. Inspiration for today's episode comes from students. Shout out to an officer for being mentor. That inspired me to reach out to mesa. Pd for conversation about community and mentorship. And i'm so thankful to have opportunity to bring to you. Sergeant robert she han and officer. Burkey surgeon sheehan. Could you please introduce yourself and tells a little bit about. You does absolutely so My name's robert sheehan. I'm the sergeant over our youth development unit which is in between engagement division. So i oversee our police cadet program that officer burkey run. You also have various other programs like mesa program at keno. Junior high school teen court run police athletic league so we play soccer basketball different sports with kids. Usually at the boys and girls club one of the program's all talk about throughout. This is our youth leadership academy these leadership academy so open to high school age students. It's the summer between your freshman and sophomore year up until your senior year. It's two weeks in the summer that we host monday through thursday. It's free to all the kids. We see breakfast and lunch. Throughout the time and over the years we've had parents who because of school boundaries don't follow the city boundaries. You know like they'll have friends in the mesa school district. They hear about the youth leadership academy and they're like well. I want my kid to go. And so we'll get him gilbert chandler queen creek and mason. Patrick junction cohen can relate so much. It's the same thing over eve. It we serve the entire east valley. So when you're coming into a class or program you have diversity and you need to be able to learn to work with the team and the best part about it is seeing them really grow and get out of their shell. It is an an like for yourself. It is so cool to see these kids come together. These kids didn't know each other. They'd never would have known each other coming from opposite ends of the city and here they are now best friend. What's it like for you to be a part of this. It's amazing when you're in a career like this you know whether you're a nurse firefighter doctor. you know. you're dealing with everybody. In the worst time of their life and then come into this and the kids and the hope that the world our country has is just so incredible. It sounds so rewarding. Now let's talk skills. Can you share what they learn how that helps them in our community on day one. He put them in an uncomfortable situation. We allow them to go up to the top of our seven story fire tower and they repel off the side of it with our swat clough. And how does that help them be successful just to get over their fears. Give them confidence. It's safe that supervise and you can do it. That's awesome. What else do you incorporate into the program job interview skills. The dangers of texting and driving indian distracted. But then on the other side we throw in a lot of the police things that people just see on tv and they want to learn about it. Do swat canine demos. We have our driving. Instructors show them some of the driving that Police officers go through. So they'll do you know reverse one eighty on the trash and that's one of the hits with kids and then giving back to the community we also feel a service project in there and all of our service projects go to veterans. That's cool. is there a project that you'd like to share before we switch the conversation up to mentor. Ship and introducing officer burkey last summer. We had to cancel due covid year before that There is a veteran. Her brother had cancer and so she moved from california to here to help take care of them but she didn't have the funds or anything else. A house was actually donated through veterans organization and all our kids went there and repainted it and replace bathrooms and flooring and things like that and just three built this house for her so that she can move here and take care of one of the things that i'm enjoying the most about this is feeling the love and admiration respect and the drive that you guys are pushing these young individuals to grow and i thank you both for coming on officer burkey. I can't wait to hear about the mesa. Cadets program and you welcome to the show i have meat. I'm born and raised here in mesa arizona. I joined the united states marine corps when seventeen. I'm graduated out of red. Did six years in the reserves deployed overseas and operation iraqi freedom. There's a long line of military service in my family as well as law enforcement so as scamming tradition and joined up here the mesa police department in two thousand eight service andrew families services well what is the cadet program arc. That program has been around since nineteen sixty nine was first established by a couple officers and voided entail is basically creating a better understanding for the youth in our community and building their cohesive relationship between law enforcement officers of the city and pretty much high school to college age program. I've been at this position for last or years. And although it is a law enforcement program. Second objective of the program is to make a more well rounded and more productive citizens. If you look at today there's so much divisiveness. There's so much i'm this and you're that it's just finding awkwardness engaging them in conversation that may not be the most desired conversation his current events occurring now but also approaching it and attacked roy hearing the mouth shut people out. It's about kind of creating an environment. Where an expression come out between us and we can talk about have fun making fun of each other or their sponsors that we give it in a productive way mentoring relationship that you try to build with the cadets right exactly and it starts from the moment that they decided to turn into application and what would you like parents challenger kids and i'm going to do my this to be a good mentor to them. All kids there. I'm gonna push you sometimes. You're going to get mad at me. But everything i do. This for a reason in the reason is is to make you a better productive citizens and to make a difference in your community if you will not the end of the world need to get back up. Brush yourself off and keep moving forward and tell me about some of the students that you've got as cadets in your program they have more of you and direction on where they want to go. But sheila vasquez wants to be named at this moment in time i give her a hard time on time because she changes her last name frequently she the great kid and then i have jonathan arvizu. That just started up very family oriented driven so had isabel salad. I think she's graduated from the program there but another excellent kid fully hearing officer like you say that about our criminal justice students thank you. Is there anyone else. You'd like to give a shout out to tomorrow man. He's a the reason why i end away. I'm lucky to have had a father is good him growing up in values. I have Today in my family. My professional life and sergeant sheehan. Is there anyone you would like to recognize going along with officer burkey to dad. I know shayla vasquez and jonathan arpey. Su so much heart into their community to cadets are all volunteer and they put in thousands of hours and on top of going to school going to eat it going to their job dealing with family stuff. You know every day bay surprise me and how much that they could put into their community and that's not the majority of kids in the community. So i just really wanted to give them a shout out of how incredible they are. How incredible we think pay are and just to keep up the good work and with that. We've reached the end of today's episode. If you're curious about any of the programs that they offered feel free to visit mesa dot gov in future episodes. You'll get to know. Humour friendly faces so until next time be kind. Stay safe and have a wonderful rest of your work..

officer mesa mesa school district robert sheehan mesa arizona Sergeant robert sergeant sheehan soccer marshall mesa police department chandler queen creek united states Patrick junction california shayla vasquez cancer sheila vasquez roy
"police department" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:22 min | 7 months ago

"police department" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"The relationship has always been tense Philadelphia's police department has a troubling history with the city's black community. By Joe Ziya Bates. Philadelphia is the latest American city to be at the center of racial tension and protests. After the October, twenty six killing of another black man by police officers since the shooting of seven year old Walter Wallace junior in a West Philadelphia neighborhood by two members of the Philadelphia Police Department the P. P. D. and all-too-familiar series of events followed protests and rioting looting violent confrontations between police officers and demonstrators, and please from family members of the victim for people to not destroy their communities. Over one hundred, seventy people have been arrested across four nights of protests and more than thirty officers have been injured Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney issued a curfew and called for the National Guard to come to the city. Following the killing of George Floyd, there's been renewed spotlight on officer involved shootings and police killings of black people in many instances that spotlight reveals long standing mistrust and. Between the black community and law enforcement in impacted cities, it's no different in Philadelphia those familiar with the city and its history say there's a well documented record of racial discrimination and police brutality wrought against black residents. The most infamous incident occurred in nineteen eighty five when police dropped two bombs on the headquarters of move a black militant liberation group similar to the Black Panthers, which was founded in the city in nineteen seventy, two in nineteen seventy, eight move members had been involved in a shootout with police that led to win officers debt. The group had been classified as a terrorist organization by then Mayor Wilson Goode and his police commissioner Gregory. J SAMBOUR on May Thirteenth Nineteen eighty-five police received warrants for multiple members of move who were living in the group's headquarters. In West Philadelphia, the warrants were for parole violations illegal possession of. And making terrorist threats among other charges after police arrived at the house, a gunfight between officers and move members began lasting for over an hour commissioner samborn. Then order the house to be bombed a state police helicopter flew over the neighborhood and dropped two bombs destroying the house as well as nearby homes that had already been evacuated eleven people including five children died in the move house. The only adult move member to.

Philadelphia Philadelphia Police Department West Philadelphia Black Panthers Joe Ziya Bates Mayor Wilson Goode officer George Floyd Walter Wallace commissioner Jim Kenney National Guard J SAMBOUR Gregory P. P. D.
"police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

04:27 min | 8 months ago

"police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"According to the black information. Network Rochester New York police chief Laurent Single Terry. said in a statement that he was honored to serve the city and upstate New York for twenty years and commended his staff. However, he said the protests and criticism of his handling of the investigation into the March twenty third incident are an attempt to destroy his character and integrity. Now, this is in a video that you may have seen on social media Rochester police, officers, approached Daniel prude who was naked and he initially complied with the officer's orders. Mr Perroud. Was subsequently seen shouting and spitting, which prompted officers to place a spit bag over his head. It looked like a hood, the officers then seen pinning Daniel. PRU To the ground while the bag is still on his head and eventually goes lifeless. The medical examiner said that prude died from. Eight complications the mayor of Rochester Her name is a lovely Warren said the police, the mental haircare, the mental health care system, our society and She said, she have all failed Daniel proved. Another one and this happened back in March they just the way they was leaning on his head. Yeah. It was crew. It didn't make no sense man it looked inhumane. It looked just reminded. US of me of George Floyd and how he was killed and it was around the same you know in. March. We didn't even know about this and this is September yeah. Yeah Yeah now, the officers involved initially, they were suspended with pay right now I understand they all quit. They've all resigned while they resigned. Not just the officers their supervisors are the ones that really the chief and his officers in an ranking supervisors under underneath and they say more are coming with the department. I was reading an article in new. York Times about this. Situation as well. It is just sickening and the President says nothing about it and I'm telling Y'all man for president to be in this position and do nothing but divide. You can't allow this in it and just in in brazen's them in makes them feel more empowered to do what they wanna do they just do they've never felt more comfortable in spite of the black lives matter movement. Steel out here doing what they WanNa do and we still get this video footage late so they can build a case up and all this crap. just like they doing with the brother in In Wisconsin trying to come up with here. He had a guy and You had no idea. He was going to get a knife in a car now. What is we Dan Dancing around for? Killing his killing. If you kill somebody if you put a mask, ask anybody and they suffocate you go to jail. You me everybody else you mean, Jack Regular citizens just. Anybody killing anybody for any reason. Except the police. When it comes to killing black people, I'm giving example sadly, the thirteen year old White Kia. The autistic kid in Utah got shot by police. Watch what happened in this police. Watch watch what happened. I'LL BET is ask go to jail I. Promise you that you the shot a thirteen year old little white boy and he was autistic. Oh No sir no sir. Oh No sir yeah yeah. You you're not going to be able to had this sweep this under the rug they're not gonNA. Let you. Talented Child Yes are you kidding me kill this boy? What could you? What else could you have done to subdue him? Yeah and our prayers go out to that family for sure coming up we'll have more of today's trending stories on the Steve Harvey Morning Show.

Daniel Rochester Laurent Single Terry. New York George Floyd Mr Perroud President Steve Harvey York Times officer Wisconsin Dan Dancing Warren Utah
"police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

01:50 min | 11 months ago

"police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"And some officers have now opted just to walk away. Atlanta police said in a statement that eight officers have resigned from the department this month the Atlanta police. Foundation earlier had reported that nineteen officers resigned since the start of the social injustice protests or demonstrations, the foundation has since retracted that incorrect number in south Florida ten officers resigned from their city Swat unit over concerns about safety, saying they feel restrained by the politics of it all a by their tactics. That's according to documents obtained by. By CNN and Buffalo New York nearly sixty officers resigned from the forces emergency response team over the suspension of two police officers who were caught on video. We also this pushing down seventy five year. Old Man is name was Martin Good Gino and this man. This older gentleman has suffered a fractured skull, and he cannot walk as he continues to recover from home. He can't. He's unable to walk now. yeah, so you say police officers in that city resigned We know about that sixty nearly sixty officers, but but they were from. You know that special team the emergency response team. That's what they resigned from the police force his Emergency Response Team Steve. Because those two officers were suspended when they were caught on tape for pushing the man down. This is a when at mortgage, Dude. They'll be back. This. be mad right now, but when I get here. Yeah and we told you earlier that president trump signed an executive order on police reform as he tried to address the national outcry of police brutality..

"police department" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"police department" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"And I mean I, think the last couple of years we've seen. We've seen the press sort of have to weather. Verbal attacks from the highest rungs a government and I think that's been a wide range, a conversation that has been happening in the press and in our newspapers and our airwaves for the last couple of years and so there's certainly a heightened attention being paid to that in terms of freedoms of the press in what our constitutional rights are with this escalating to physical violence This is not the first time. I think that there are reporters working particular beat here and abroad who have always been subject to violence to physical violence peeing. It happened domestically, and in such a widespread way I think has been jarring for some folks, readers and the public and reporters alight. In terms of changing attitudes. I think you made the point that the safety of journalists is not more important than the safety. Of anybody walking down the street, but I think that the. I think what we're likely to see you. What we are seeing is that. Folks are sort of using physical attacks on the press as a means by which they can get four people who previously didn't care about similar attacks on general members of the public particularly people from certain marginalized communities. She sort of get them to care to wake them up. It's the sort of is the argument that if it's happening, you know two reporters while they're live on CNN. Then think about what might be happening to people when there are no cameras around or to people who don't enjoy the prominence of being a national reporter and so I. think that there's a sort of awareness reading that it's not just about what it means. When the police are physically violent with the press when they're outside trying to do, their jobs would also went at suggests about the larger institution of saying and the violence that people in communities all over the country experience every day. And this piece goes in soon, really immune very extended history of this relationship between basically. The US almost being like a PR. Department for release. Which I want us to get into the? Can you start by telling us the story in site in your piece of Josh Lucille? Share so Joshua Bill the man from Indianapolis, who, in the fall of twenty, sixteen was in Chicago for a relative's funeral and there was a procession, a car procession, leaving cemetery in a neighborhood amount greenland in Chicago, in Mount Greenwood is a neighborhood that is a predominantly white in a city. In which the majority of the population are people of Color An, it's in particular notable because it's home to many of the city's cops and firefighters. And there's a cemetery there. They were leaving the cemetery after having buried a relative, and there was this sort of altercation on the street And basically. A car cut off some of the vehicles that were in the funeral a concession. And an argument began. People got out of their cars. And what happened was that to narratives quickly emerged Joshua beal guy out of his car, and they were two men who later found out. Were police officers off duty? Police officers, and there was there was sort of alive chaos. There is loud music. There is a lot of yelling. And this argument very quickly escalated and there were dozens of nine one one calls made from the scene, in which spice standards were describing two white men, waving guns around and Joshua beal, who is legally licensed to carry a firearm retrieved. A firearm from his car, and minutes later, he was dead in the street. And very quickly to separate narratives emerged from this scene. There is the police narrative and then there is voice. His family said what bystanders said. The police said that what had happened were two officers. Joseph Tracy and Thomas Heroin. I'm off duty and sort of happened upon this. HAPPENED UPON THIS Joseph Teresi got into an argument there was you know the police said that on someone had been walking a fire lane at. That's how the argument began. and. Notably. The police said that Joseph Sees Me Joshua. Beal had fired his weapon I and that they had returned fire on, and they also said that both Darwin Andruzzi were in uniform and obviously law enforcement. This was not reflected in any of the nine one one polls that came from bystanders and the family. Who's there insisted that it was not clear at all, but they were law, enforcement and so what you had. Is the police saying that they were justified in shooting and killing him because it was obvious that they were police in that he made the decision not to lower his weapon and everyone else saying that these were just too angry. White guys in the street, waving guns and that Joshua Bill. Br his firearm out in self defense. In response to them, having pulled a I and what happened is that. Reporters get to the scene and they start to write these stories, and they start to speak to the communications representatives on Who Represent the Chicago Police Department? And those details about The officers being uniform about. Having pulled his weapon I they start to leak into the stories that are written and that appear in local news media, and imports. You know the detail about the cops having been in uniform in particular release spread on sort of started with Anthony, the WHO's the chief communications off surfaces Chicago Police, department telling that to reporters on the police chief also repeated this to reporters. It appears on the nightly news in local newspapers. It was also many autopsy report. And you know guy and then months later nine one one calls are released and the family sort of from the first from day one had always insisted that no, they weren't in uniform and nobody had any idea who. These people were. And so you started to see this spread and spread and spread and it wasn't challenged you know by reporters until months and months and months later. This came you know just. Two years after the city of Chicago had erupted in protest over the murderer climate, donald, and so it was a familiar scene where you know, black man is killed by police and the police say happened in. Everyone else's that something else happened. who is a local reporter for the Chicago reader wrote a piece eighteen months later examining the misinformation particularly that the officers were in uniform and sort of detail. Why that hadn't been challenged I reporters even as through the course of the investigation of a this incident. Sort of began to reveal more and more. That, this was a blatant lie. The Look on with Donald case they put out of a fleet misrepresentation of his murder, and the only reason i. mean that was. That was feared because. Videotaped state suppressed actually got released the public. Right and so that you know with Quantum McDonald. The story was that. The officer was justified in Shooting and killing him because he had been holding a knife in at lunch. That reporters and then you know report a reporter style you know over a dozen freedom of information requests to release the tate that would show what actually happened and the all of them were denied the police departments line was that releasing it would interfere with their ability to conduct a proper investigation and so an investigative report the only reason it was released. Released, was because an investigative reporter sued the city and the department and a judge sided with the reporter, and so this ape was released, and what we know now. Is that what the police said? Happen Justin just never happened, and in fact that officer Jason Van Dyke. was later arrested and convicted.

reporter Joshua beal Chicago Chicago Police Department officer Joshua Bill investigative reporter donald US CNN Joseph Tracy Joseph Teresi Josh Lucille Quantum McDonald Joseph Indianapolis Mount Greenwood Justin
"police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"With Katie and foes on the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your favorite shows. Members of the Minneapolis City councils their overruling mayor Jacob FRY and will commit to dismantling their police department meaning. Get rid of it. Completely The stunning announcement was made on Sunday with nine out of thirteen members coming out in support of that idea, which gives them a majority. That can't be vetoed by mayor. Fried so now. What does this mean exactly okay? The council members admit it won't be an immediate change, but make no mistake they say when the Dust Settles Minneapolis will not have a traditional police department What the alternative according to them is community based safety a term? They've yet to explain. Well. I don't know what that means. I need. Police in the city I'm living. Yeah. I mean you want the good police there to serve out what they have to do though is. They have to go in and totally revamp the hiring policies and the training policies. They have to ban Cho- Kohl's. They have to ban shooting in the back. and. They have to ban knees on your neck. Seat Dot. That's because look man, if a guy here and it has to be consequences for murder. If you kill a person who is unarmed under no circumstances that allowed you going to do some jail time. If you're murder. You cannot murder person for resisting arrest. That's not a killer offense, and you're not judging. Jury you the police. Your job is to protect and serve, and so far that's not been. What are some of the police? Officers have done especially in the black community, so I think they have to change policies and I. Think they have to have a directive. Come down and just let it be known. If you shoot an unarmed person, you're going to do time. Have you seen that movie the purge? You guys have seen that movie where it's just. Lawlessness after certain time at night. People are saying that's what it would be like if we didn't have the police. The you know the good cops to protect if you don't have police, you gotTA. Have Law and order you have to. The low. But the law and order has to be fair and just across the board. And the most law and order that needs to be put into place right now because we have law and order for regular people we don't have law and order for police is what we don't have. They're the ones right now. We have to police the police. Because they cannot continued, be able to continue to get away with these crimes against people of Color. Again. And our notes concert if you shoot an unarmed person, that's that's a crime. If you kill a black person, that's a crime. Bro How did is simple as change. Not a crime Dale Yeah All Right Steve Coming up at the top of the hour. We're GONNA talk about voting on Tuesday right after this you're listening to. Morning Show. Forgotten is a new podcast about hundreds of young women who disappeared and turned up dead in Juarez Mexico. Right across the border from El Paso. There were not just random victims. The women were picked. They were selected. I mean there could be an abduction in broad daylight. No one saw it leaves her like ghosts. They were killed for a reason. The burning question is. Why isn't not a major emphasis of investigation? These crimes have been unsolved for nearly thirty years. We talked victims, families FBI agents and a psychologist who claims to know one of the culprits to understand why. and. We reveal how these women's deaths force us to think more deeply about borders, migration, trade and corruption. Listen to Forgotten Women of Juarez on the iheartradio APP or wherever you put costs. Young World the world's Asia. It is I.

murder Minneapolis Jacob FRY Katie Juarez Cho- Kohl Juarez Mexico FBI Asia El Paso TA Steve
"police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

13:56 min | 1 year ago

"police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Investigative sergeant in a supervisor of the School Resource Program in Twenty Nineteen. Pruitt was promoted to captain. She currently serves as a deputy. Commander Supervising Calls for service. Countywide PRUITT is a past president of the coalition of black police officers among only Maryland. In since two thousand eighteen has serves as the chairperson of the National Black Police Association chills. Bs In criminal justice from University of Maryland University College and an Ma in front of psychology from argosy university. She's an adjunct professor of Criminal Justice Administration at the Montgomery College and teaches courses including introduction to policing criminal investigation in Police Organization and administration. She's also a member of law enforcement action partnership otherwise known as leap as well as myself so without further. Doing Ladies Gentlemen we are going to be discussing the importance of diversity within police department so I. WanNa thank once again my special guest Captain Sonia Pruitt to Captain Hunters podcast. Here is the interview all right so once again. We're talking to Captain Sonia Pruitt and thank you so much for being on Captain Hunters podcast. Thanks for inviting me. Your member of Law Enforcement Action Partnership as M. I in so just tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do for that organization just yourself in general okay Well I I call myself a transplant from north. Carolina ended up in the Washington metropolitan area as a student at how university Undergrad In nineteen eighty one. I've been here for a while now and I feel like I'm a a member of DMV as we call it the district Maryland. Virginia Became a police officer after deciding that being a doctor was not for me. I knew I was NOCCO. Stay up all night long doing any kind of internship or residency or anything like that. So they're not because I'm a science geek. I tried to go into Research so worked at the National Institutes of helpful. I don't like the repetitiveness of research This is no not for me so I became a police officer because as I was working for the US Postal Service Inspection Service. Which is their law. Enforcement Ranch I decided I wanted to go into law enforcement so I became a police officer as a yeah could be outside like being outside. I like being around people. This'll be fun and exciting. I did not know what I was getting myself into. Actually but I was ready for it. So that's how I became a police officer. I've been a police officer for twenty seven years. I'm currently a captain in charge of community engagement for the Montgomery County Police Department and I am also the chair woman The National Black Police Association and I got my my hat and various other incendiary rings of law enforcement and speaking and things like that. Very good awesome. Awesome my cousin. A currently works for the inspectional services. I'm hoping saying that right for the post office. He works service. He'd probably kill me tells me so many times but he actually is Located in Tampa Florida. So he's got a actually fairly wide range of territories. He's gotTa deal. With as far as his responsibilities e e installs Even saying he's installs a security surveillance equipment. Try to catch the postal workers. Stealing or yeah. Yeah yeah he's got some really cool guests. Can I wanted to have you on because I had a previous conversation with another person Leader of a black national black police officers of Association of America and So I wanted to have you on to talk about the importance of black police officers. And you know we're having a problem right now with the recruitment overawe police officer people do not want to be companies. Police officers overall but particularly. It's it's problematic within the black community. I want to have you on his to kind of talk about that and what we can do to fix this problem. Are you seeing A problem with getting more young people or more people particularly people colored black people to become police officer I'm not sure whether that is that. An urban legend or not Let me tell you why so in my career. I have worked in background investigation and we did. We were having that same dialogue always so hard to find particularly black people to become the police but I contend that there are plenty of black applicants out there. You just have to hire them. You cannot Find excuses not to hire them because of your implicit biases or your Your your overt biases. You cannot put them into a are you you. Can't you can't measure them by measurements? That are not the same measurements that you measure all the Atkins by meaning once they pass the basic parameters you don't get to add extra parameters for and I'm going to use this as a as a true example once you pass the parameters you can't say well they well. They have to have a bachelor's degree which they have but they didn't pass a class when they were in Undergrad. There's no such parameter. They have a bachelor's degree which is what the with the parameter is so I have seen that happen and you know question that and you know I had argued about it and that person was not hired so I'm going to say that if you're not doing everything you can to diversify your police department in a fair and impartial way that I'm going to throw out the window. That argument there are not enough Black Africans not enough women applicants not enough. Latino applicant is whatever the you know the category is. I'm going to say unless you're doing. They're fairly at across the board. And then I'm going to also add if you going out of your way to bypass the parameters in order to get certain hype of applicant or a certain category. Then you're not. You're still not playing fairly okay. So I am not clear Sir. Captain that that is really an issue. I think Anecdotally that it doesn't excuse because what I see is okay the black community. They have an issue with us so we can always say that they don't want to become the please I'm just not. I'm not convinced that when we had a black cat who was the director of our Personnel Division for instance with my police department. We didn't seem to have that issue. You one has to wonder what the issues really are. Okay that's that's a very fair very fair point. I too But I here's here's Mike attention and I too was a member of our background team in on all that kind of stuff recruit team and so. I went to colleges the schools Two Barber shops churches etc tried to get many applicants to sign up and many You know when you go to colleges we were heading You know some universities here in You Know Yukon Wiscon- Western Connecticut State University and other other schools. Rama stated Connecticut and even our home city and the people that were taking. The applications are showed some type of interest generally were white and many black applicants or or potential black applicants. Were would tell us straight out that they weren't interested in Assam down that saying that any didn't but those who dead Show some interest. Obviously you know they. They came on the Chicago Tribune. Awhile ago maybe I read. This article may be back in October or so September October. They did a really good article. I I can send it to if I can find it and it was talking about this whole problem that they were having in Chicago with all the problems. That Chicago Police Department has and they want more black people To to apply in their head of their personnel division for the city now as the police officers but for the city was talking about. How come there were no Not Enough Black applicants and one of the things that the that the personnel director was talking about was was similar to what you were just mentioning about about Going through with with this selection process many people are being weeded out for silly things that others others were not being weeded out as on on. And she was saying that. There's the legacy groups particularly Latino legacy groups right so so we have you. You remember the National Black Police Officers Association right so their legacy groups so a Latino groups Were actually staying with their applicants throughout the process right. So they're helping them back. Prepare for the physical prepare for the written. Prepare oral. And that was the difference. In why the Latino Applicants were doing better on the test whereas black people black officers or black applicants were taking a test and then that was it next time you see them was for their physical prison for the physical portion and they couldn't pass it will one of the reasons is obviously because you groups were not doing enough to make sure that they passed it so that was one of the critiques that the Personnel Director Had. I'd seen know and I liked the idea of Following the applicants so when I first apply My blue background. She was my and not in the background investigator Recruiter I missed my first test. I exit show up. I'll be lazy. You know that happens a lot with the cruise black white brown. You know because we are young and we're not Dedicated yet and and you know we're young. So she called me and she said. I'm a need you to come to this test and I said yes Ma'am I showed up so when I was in background I I remember having a conversation with one of the The executive that was there at the time and I said hey you know I had this idea. Why don't we make sure that we follow up with our African because we're having a problem with adversity A problem there's somebody says they have not sure really had one but anyway. Why don't we call advocate? Who we think things not to want to come and take the test to make sure they come in and take the test and she said well. We can't do that and I said why not. She said because that's against federal loss will turn we tell me see that we can understand it. Can we find that in the federal wreck so that we can read it and she never answered because there is no such thing so I suggested then because I got the impression that she was still some kind of way about calling black Africans? Why don't we just call? The Africans have to just call the black Africa's we can call them all and make sure that you know. They know that they need to come and take the test because they are most of them are young and we probably need to give them a little nudge ono that we can't do that. That's the guest federal rigs. That was like okay. So it's it's stuff like that they keep us from being able to hire qualified Women and Black and Latino Asian and so forth advocate in my opinion so my small vantage point and I and I take that unaccept- that I think that that's I think that what you're saying is absolutely valid and I and I'm not pushing back against that I'm trying to add to it and say that It is a it is a problem we do need to. Give people a nudge and we also have noticed. Where as you mentioned as you sat in your I out so meetings. Whatever and talked about okay. Wh why are we mountains personally because when they were? Fourteen smoke weed. Wh what are we talking about here So why are we? Why are we doing that? And we we had to have the same conversations with. Wait a minute okay. This guy got a ticket when he was eighteen. These these thirty three. Now what are you talking about? You know so so. Sometimes I think that the that the rules if not a fairly across the board can bounce people who could be potentially good applicants. I completely agree with that. So just tell us a little bit about The Organization the National Black Police Officers. Tell us a little about them. And what you do and as you are the chair woman and what. Your responsibilities.

National Black Police Associat officer National Black Police Officers National Black Police Officers black community Captain Sonia Pruitt Montgomery County Police Depar Law Enforcement Action Partner Police Organization Chicago Police Department Maryland personnel director University of Maryland Univers argosy university supervisor Personnel Division Commander Captain Hunters president
"police department" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"police department" Discussed on 1A

"And when you say that it they were thrown away to clear up space in an evidence room. I'm that sounds very callous on its face. But you know, I'm not in law enforcement. I don't know how much evidence law enforcement agencies have to go through. What did you make of that rationale? Yeah. Obviously that's something all on forcing agencies have to take into account. We we have a limited space for evidence collection and evidence submission evidence stored. So it is something that has to be taken into account. But there comes a time where certain pieces of evidence probably need to be given more of a priority. Over other pieces talk about the culture of the Fayetteville police department at the time, particularly as it relates to the way that rape and sexual assault were investigated were treated compared to other crimes like robbery. Or homicide or a non sexual assault. Yeah. Back then we just didn't really do that great a job. And I had this conversation recent with that recently with Ashley, and I told her I don't really wanna come across like, I'm pointing fingers like I'm this high and mighty great detective because I was there I investigated rapes in the nineties and night. I did not do that great job with a lot of the rapes I investigated. So just the culture was and I'm sure this wasn't, you know, unique to the fabled police departments just they weren't always a priority, rapes weren't always a priority. The you know, I was crimes against persons detective, and you know, homicides were the priority business armed robberies after that aggravated assaults after that. And usually after that is where the rapes fell into line. And we just didn't have quite an understanding. I think of the dynamics of rapes investigations, or why victims might not always make sense, you know, when we're interviewing and so they they weren't always a priority. And I think just over the years we've made some significant movements. Definitely want to talk about that as we continue our conversation. And we're starting to get some comments from you, particularly your stories of dealing with this firsthand. Laurie wrote on our Facebook page hearing things like this make me feel certain. I did the right thing for me by not reporting. My rape. This is proof that women's lives. Don't matter and undoubtably women of color experience this more than white women. Actually, I'd like you to respond to that last comments. I read that's heartbreaking. But it's understandable. And I can certainly. I can certainly see where she's coming from having reviewed along with my colleagues sonum Bashan Sergio Hernandez who are the other reporters on this investigation reviewing more than fourteen hundred rape investigations. This is certainly a a widespread problem we found that law enforcement agencies.

rape Sergio Hernandez assault Facebook Fayetteville Laurie Ashley robbery
"police department" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"police department" Discussed on WCHS

"Time is now seven seventeen coming up cow wiggs joins us on sports right now in our background her head bear steve williams says he understands why hunting to residents are concerned the city recorded its 18th homicide this year on tuesday had prompted williams to call a news conference any sent a message to the city with representatives of law enforcement at his side part of that statement in our metronews background the citizens of our community are not just hard not just protected by worldclass police department huntington police department were also we're also protected at the at the local level at the county level through the sheriff's department at the state level through the state state police department through the marcy university police department as well and we have working relationships with the fbi the da the atf and the us attorney's office will be looking forward to continue with that relationship and working sprinkling those relationship in relation relationships in the future this strong show of force is intended really to be able to show the public of what they can basin continuing the same moving forward in in preventive measures to ensure that the public to the public that we're doing everything in our power to to keep them safe very simply this every person in this community has understandable angst over of quite has.

law enforcement huntington police department marcy university police depart fbi atf us attorney steve williams worldclass
"police department" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"police department" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And so there is a higher level of accountability and focus because you are the only one that have the power to take away someone's life and freedom under the law and so because you have that kind of power it is our responsibility to make sure we hope that system accountable beat you know and it's interesting to because so much of we went with the scandal that that that happened um so much of what was positive that was happening at the department was lost one going back to one of the original questions of with surprise me anew it was those went in the department as a whole that the seemed like an incredibly progressive department was making lots of progress officerinvolved shooting were way down on they were at the at the front leading the charge on body warned cameras saying though the first department the nation to sort of fully implement body warned cameras and for four four you know the failures to occur apt in the in the midst of all this progress particularly at that that at the lead of sean went what we were trying to reconcile that sort of us a store tells what does this mean and coming as it did alex say and with a new mayor who had come on an inherited the shows and i guess not brand new but you know at changes at the top of the political structure are always disruptive and met with some cynicism i think in police departments i mean i think for the first part of her term we be chef was presiding over a city in a police department that was being held up as a model for the nation on early adoption of body cameras was a major part of that as well as some of these other um you know more nittygritty sort of statistical um but really achievements that the department had had built in and there was much discussion that federal court oversight wouldbe ending soon on before the sexual exploitation case surfaced so but like other mayors before her on the oakland police department became a major overriding challenge and hat and has has remained for about a year now the fbi chief yes and i think i want to respond to something that was mentioned earlier about the department ten and not being responsive to these issues around the scandal i think uh is being clear ivc that achieve as is done a critical review of a.

sean oakland police department fbi alex
"police department" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"police department" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That the chief and we may have access to the chief but the chiefs meeting with people within the justice department from the outside who may not know about the film and so's a constant pushing poll between us wanting to get as deeply on the inside not just doing right along with the officers we feel like we've seen that you know we wanted to sort of get his as intimately involved in that process of reform as we could and we could not get into every every meeting soza constance renegotiation that we have with a department and of course part of reform it begins with training and other many scenes in the kaddoumi where of their hers instruction being given to these recruits and a lot of this is about history of the department how did the opd get to a point where it is today and i want to play a little clip and this includes so you deputy chief armstrong and pastor mcbride talking about miss trust in the community this community as hat is is is that they can point to that affects the way they deal you not you as an individual but you in that police uniform the oakland police department has a history that's been contentious with this community although some of us might say others have anything to do with me man all that stuff was hell a long time ago born on lift enough is the pass stole your identity and ran up an incredibly high bill and so many of us much open historian be like it's all be yes these false complaining about stuff they just make making a mountain out of a molehill but the past stole your identity and it has run up an incredibly high bill and everything that we do is either ghana helped run that villa or is going to bring that down again that clip from the force about the oakland police department and run our strong you were born and raised in oakland you are now deputy chief of the opd talk about the the bridge you have to the divide but you have to.

oakland police department oakland deputy chief chiefs chief armstrong pastor mcbride ghana