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Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Tony Katz Today

Tony Katz Today

00:36 min | 5 min ago

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Tony Katz Today

"Has to leave. Cause to leave. There was a AH tweet police brutality as Detroit police department plows through tons of protesters, Roughly 3 to 5 injured, including leaders from Detroit will breathe. And then to leave was like this is outrageous. Our city fought hard to have an elected police commission. Elected commissioner oversee abuse misconduct by police on DH The officers and I like this, you're out of your skull. Nobody targeted people to run them over. The protesters are protesters. They came banging on the car and the cop got out of there. People may get hit by a car. If there in front of a car banging on it. She did sleep. Can't be trusted on Tony Katz, Facebook, Tony catch radio. A CZ. We adopted what life looks like. Now we recognize there are still concerns over the last few weeks way have faced adversity and battled this historic virus. All while remaining vigilant and focused on the health and safety of those were privileged to serve a Franciscan health way..

Detroit Tony Katz Commissioner Facebook
Chicago crime statistics for June: Spike in murders, shootings

Chicago Tonight

00:50 sec | 14 hrs ago

Chicago crime statistics for June: Spike in murders, shootings

"New numbers from the Chicago Police Department show that the city is on pace to revisit historic spike in violent crime, the department is doubling down on. It's all hands on deck policing strategy in June alone. The city saw eighty nine murders and four hundred twenty four shootings that means for the first half of the year. Murderers are up. Thirty four percent and shootings are up forty five percent compared to the first half of last year, but Says over says citywide overall crime is. Down! which includes sexual assault, robbery, burglary and car? Theft data shows though that the three hundred and twenty nine murders. The city has had so far. This year matches that of the first half of twenty sixteen when the year ended with seven hundred sixty two homicides. That's the highest number of murders seen in Chicago in almost twenty

Chicago Police Department Chicago Theft Burglary Assault Robbery
Fresh "Police Department" from Bruce St. James and Pamela Hughes

Bruce St. James and Pamela Hughes

00:31 min | 15 min ago

Fresh "Police Department" from Bruce St. James and Pamela Hughes

"Very c t mobile dot com. News Flash at 9 45 I'm Kevin Christopher. Here's what you need to know. Right now. More than 3300 new Corona virus cases and 37 new deaths reported this morning in Arizona. This comes after more than 11,000 people were tested yesterday. Corona virus inpatients Ventilator use I C U Bed use covered, 19 patient discharge and covert 19 patients seen an emergency departments have all reached their highest point since the pandemic began. Governor Do Si has ordered flags all state buildings to be lowered to half staff today to honor a Pretoria police officer who died after a motorcycle crash in high school. We had earlier performed the demonstration for students, Police say Officer Jason Judge motorcycle came out from under him and caused a deadly crash at Liberty High Officers judges, a 21 year veteran of the Peoria Police Department. 4.8 million jobs were added in the U. S. And June a month every 2.5 1,000,000 jobs were added to the economy. The unemployment rate dropped more than two points to 11.1%. President Trump praised job news as historic You're never more than 15 minutes away. Today's top stories on Arizona's new station..

Arizona Kevin Christopher Officer Jason Judge Governor Do Si Peoria Police Department. President Trump Officer Liberty High Officers Pretoria
How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

All Things Considered

06:50 min | 16 hrs ago

How two promising lawyers found themselves facing life in prison for alleged Molotov cocktail attack during protests in New York

"Rahman Rahman and and Colin Colin Furred. Furred. Mattis Mattis were were kids kids from from immigrant families who made good both graduates of prestigious law schools. She represented tenants in Housing Court. He was an associate at a corporate firm in Manhattan. Now they face life in prison in one of the government's highest profile cases against protesters. Dina Temple Raston of NPR's investigations team reports. The night of May 29th in Brooklyn was chaos as curfew Jew near police in riot gear began to make arrests. Protesters started throwing water bottles and bricks. The NYPD tried to break up the crowd with pepper spray in swinging batons being excessively aggressive with this crowd here, and it is inappropriate. 70 woman Diana purchased and I'm an elected official, and they just pepper sprayed me for no reason. Rouge Rahmon was there to local journalist stopped her for an interview. Her face was covered with the scarf. She was wearing a black T shirt that read. The struggle continues. This protest is a long time coming. I think that the mayor Should have pulled their his police department back. The way that the mayor and Minneapolis But the part of the interview that ricocheted around the Internet was this. Won't ever stop unless we Take it all down. And that's why the anger is being Express tonight. In this way, prosecutors say in NYPD surveillance camera captured images of Rockman a short time later, she was writing in the passenger seat of a van. Her friend Colin for Mattis was driving. What allegedly happened next defense attorney Shipman says is the basis for the charges against them. It's alleges that a rouge threw a Molotov cocktail into a police car and empty police car. Essentially abandoned police car police car that had been previously vandalized. Two police officers were across the street They gave Chase and Rouge and Colin were arrested. The NYPD video apparently shows it all Rothman and that T shirt. Beige van slowing as it neared the police vehicle. The lighting of a toilet paper fuse the arc of a beer bottle as it crashed under the cruiser's dashboard. The whole episode lasted just seconds. Rahman and Mattis now face seven felonies in federal court. The charges include the use of explosives, arson conspiracy, the use of a destructive device, civil disobedience and the use of a destructive device in the furtherance of a crime of violence. This last charge alone, known as 9 24 C of the criminal code carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 30 years in prison. Add that to the other charges against them, and they could face life behind bars. Attorney Paul Shechtman represents a rouge Rockman and he says his client's case has been singled out ever since. It's been taken federally it has been treated with a seriousness. Ah, harshness unlike any I've ever seen. NPR reviewed 47 Molotov cocktail in arson cases filed across the country. That involved the destruction of police property. And this case to which prosecutors added 1/3 person, Rahman Mattis say they don't know is the only instance in which that 30 year mandatory minimum charge appears. Molotov cocktail cases are usually charged his property crimes in state courts. A spokesman for the U. S Attorney's office declined to discuss the case or they're charging decisions. Attorney General William Barr has been saying for weeks that extremists plotted the violence that erupted during the protests. And he said as much to NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview last week when we arrest people in charge them at this stage anyway. We don't charge them for being a member of Antifa. We charge him for throwing a Molotov cocktail or we charge them for possession of a gun or possession of gasoline and things to make bombs with. Those are the kinds of charges that are filed. And while prosecutors haven't offered any evidence that Rothman and Madison, part of an extremist group You wouldn't know it from the way they were charged. Good afternoon. Your Honor, This is David Kessler. I'm in the U. S attorney in the Eastern District of New York. The harshness and the Rothman and Mattis case went beyond the charges. Prosecutors also fought their release on bail even though it was supported by two different judges. 56 former federal prosecutors found the government's position so alarming. They filed an amicus brief with the court. A panel of judges heard arguments last Tuesday and because of the Corona virus, all this happened over the phone. This is how it began. The District court's order releasing the defendant on bond should be reversed. And when I want to focus on here is the core issue the danger to the community government attorney David Kessler. This is not a case about a youthful indiscretion or crimes passion. It's about a calculated Dangerous crime committed by adults who risked the lives of innocent civilian first responders. Their crime is so serious, Kessler argued. It negates any mitigating factors that came before it. To throw that Molotov cocktail, he said, required essentially a fundamental change in mindset about for them. That's really what the core of the cases, Shenkman told the judges. Thie entire evening was an aberration. Here's their exchange. You can't imagine what a soldering event this arrest was. Mr Shipman. I can imagine how these people did what they're shown on video to have done. I find the whole case unimaginable. But having during that happened once I'm I'm wondering why it is so unimaginable that it wouldn't happen again. I think because that night Wass really unique. It was young people not just used to people out to protest police violence who saw more of it. Right one. Khun lose one sense on an evening like this. That argument appears to have convinced two of the three judges that Rockman and Mattis aren't a danger to the community. The judges said in an opinion yesterday that they agreed with the lower court that the pair could be safely released on bail. Rahman and Mattis were allowed to go home last night. In the months ahead, they have more than just the government charges to fight. They also have to battle the suggestion that they're mixed up in what theater knee general is called. A witches brew of extremists. Dina Temple Raston. NPR NEWS New York

Mattis Mattis Rahman Rahman Attorney Colin Colin Furred Nypd NPR Rothman Molotov David Kessler Arson Rockman Dina Temple Raston Mr Shipman Housing Court Npr News Rouge Rahmon District Court
Fresh update on "police department" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:10 min | 56 min ago

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

"And mental health services. Protesters want to defund police to the tune of 50%. Durkin says 5% is more likely on Capitol Hill, Corwin Hey HQ Momo News. Also overnight, a demonstration spilling onto I five through Seattle protesters gathered on the freeway blocking traffic. They were eventually removed from the interstate. The Tacoma Police Department has removed a decal on the back of all patrol vehicles, the thin blue line decals of black and white American flag with a blue line across it. It's a symbol to show support for law enforcement and to honor fallen officers, But it's been tied by some groups to the white supremacist movement. Tacoma Officer Helen Stephen posted a video about it last month. The blue lives matter flag on my car. I'm having it removed today, Officer Joshua Avalos posted a video in response to this officer described this flag the thin blue line flag as a racist symbol. In that video, they incorrectly labeled that flag as a blue lives matter flag. Which is not what it is at all. Several other law enforcement agencies have also been taking the decals off of their vehicles Still to come. I'm Frank Lindsay, our state once again gets close to setting a new record for covert 19 cases in a single day. First, it is 904 Your Homo traffic..

Officer Officer Joshua Avalos Tacoma Police Department Officer Helen Stephen Tacoma Frank Lindsay Durkin Seattle
Los Angeles school police chief resigns after budget slashed by public school board

All Things Considered

00:37 sec | 17 hrs ago

Los Angeles school police chief resigns after budget slashed by public school board

"To slash his department's budget by 35% percent. Los Angeles school police chief Todd Chamberlain has resigned. He resigns from the state's largest school district. The Board of Education voted to cut $25 million from its police force at 35% cut has mentioned. For the school Police department. The board says the money saved will be used to serve the needs of black students and fund a taskforce studying ways to reimagine campus safety. The plan approved also calls for officers to give up their uniforms and patrol off campus. The L. A Unified board debated several proposals last week but failed to come to any agreement. This proposal passed narrowly on a vote of 4 to 3. The City Council,

Todd Chamberlain School Police Department Los Angeles School Board Of Education City Council
Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:03 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

"To defend it. Police chief Carmen Best says her officers deployed crowd control projectiles was individual pepper spray from officers and maybe wanted to flash bangs. She says those measures do not violate a federal judge's temporary restraining order on using force against protesters. It's an out and out ban on tear gas. Of course that wasn't deployed last night on capital Hill, Corwin. Hey HQ Momo News. The demonstration spilled onto Interstate five in downtown Seattle. Once again, protesters gathered on the freeway block. In traffic and they were eventually removed from the freeway. Seattle City Council president Lorena Gonzalez says she's in no rush to investigate a complaint against Councilmember Shama Sawant. Mayor Jenny Durkan sent a letter this week outline an incident she says could lead to Sawant being removed from the council, accusing her of leading protesters to her home and opening city Hall to demonstrators. Gonzales says the issues the council prefers to focus on are the crises facing thousands of families and small businesses during the pandemic and the civil rights movement. The Tacoma Police Department has joined a long list of other law enforcement agencies now removing thin blue line flag stickers from patrol cars. More from Cuomo's Carleen Johnson. Tacoma officer Helen Stephen posted a video on TIC Tac a month ago. Showing the detail on her patrol vehicle is a black and white American flag with a blue stripe in place of one of the white stripes is much show support for law enforcement and honor the role they play in society. In more recent years. It's been associated with white supremacist groups on some have said the details part of the Blue lives matter movement which.

Councilmember Shama Sawant Jenny Durkan Seattle City Council Tacoma Police Department Lorena Gonzalez Carmen Best Tacoma Seattle Corwin City Hall Tic Tac Interstate Gonzales Cuomo Carleen Johnson
San Francisco police halt release of most mug shots in effort to stop fueling racial bias

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

01:10 min | 18 hrs ago

San Francisco police halt release of most mug shots in effort to stop fueling racial bias

"In an effort to reduce racial bias, San Francisco police will stop releasing mug shots of people who have been arrested. The only exceptions are when there is an imminent danger to the public or when the police need assistance. Locating a person could be asked is Kathy Novak despots discussed the decisions with police Chief Bill Scott. Calls for changes in policing are sweeping the nation chief Bill Scott says he hears them as we see what's going on in our country. Right now. Nation, your race and how we're going to change the narrative on some of these issues is very important topic and weaklings. Only that this is a step in the right direction to start changing that now, he says, mug shots of black and brown people who often haven't been convicted helped fuel a perception that people of certain races are more likely to be criminals. Using Berkeley public policy professor Jack Glaser says it's a positive move. This was away for something under the control of the Police department that they can make a change that will reduce the impact with regard to public and police stereotypes. There's another reason for the decision. People are And until they're proven guilty in a court of law looking photos when they release before such a person is convicted. Khun do harm to an

Bill Scott Police Department Kathy Novak San Francisco Khun Jack Glaser Berkeley Professor
Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

01:19 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "police department" discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Read and the trip as fireworks light up the. The skies almost nightly while some Greeley residents are having a hard time getting a full night's rest and well. Let's just say their firm. Babies aren't too happy about it. Either Quick Skim at the neighborhood APP next door, says posts going back to late May complaining of fireworks, being shot off almost nightly across, he posed described fireworks, going off at all times of the night anywhere from nine thirty, pm to about. Four thirty in the morning now Greeley fire, Lieutenant Greg Cobb said the noise caused by fireworks as one of the biggest problems around this time of year for both people and pets. Complaints have gotten so bad this year. That Greeley police have actually reallocated some resources to dedicate eight officers to illegal fireworks enforcement during random evenings, particularly those days, and leading up to and after the fourth of July the Police Department wrote in a post to facebook. The public has made it clear to the PD they are sick and tired of all the illegal fireworks going off. Off The old days of using up all your fireworks on one special evening, of course, the fourth of July have long been over, and folks are lighting up the sky, rocketing windows, and making dogs tremble and run for cover for what seems like the entire summer. Any fireworks in containers by the way that explode on or off the ground are indeed illegal in Greeley residents can face a misdemeanor for the use, possession, sale or manufacture of illegal fireworks, and some cases police may even issue a court summons. The Weld County. Sheriff's Office also notified resonance this year. which fireworks are legal and which are illegal? In the county important safety tip particularly when it comes to the possibility of being find all aerial devices, including yours Roman candles bottle rockets and more says well as firecrackers are indeed illegal possession of such fireworks is punishable as a class three misdemeanor according to the sheriff's office, those caught with illegal fireworks may also have all their fireworks seized including the legal ones. It is unlawful to sell gift, Re gift, or otherwise furnish any kind of fireworks to anyone under the age of sixteen,.

Greeley Sheriff's Office Weld County Police Department Facebook Greg Cobb RE
Seattle police clear CHOP zone and make arrests after mayor orders protesters to leave

All Things Considered

00:38 sec | 18 hrs ago

Seattle police clear CHOP zone and make arrests after mayor orders protesters to leave

"News. Several police officers have been clearing the Capitol Hill organized protests zone. Police officials say they've arrested about a dozen people so far. Jill Jackson of member station KOW has more officers descended on what's known as the chop early this morning, wearing body armour and carrying weapons. Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan issued an emergency order allowing police to clear the chop after four shootings in the area left two black teenagers dead. The chop zone was taken over last month by people protesting police killings of black people. Officers even had to abandon their own precinct. Many chop residents don't want to leave the area until Seattle defunds its police department by

Seattle Jenny Durkan Jill Jackson
Los Angeles City Council votes to slash LAPD budget by $150 million

Ben Shapiro

00:14 sec | 18 hrs ago

Los Angeles City Council votes to slash LAPD budget by $150 million

"Los Angeles Police Department's budget is being cut by $150 million. The 12 to 2 vote comes as city leaders continue to face activist calling for major cuts, The department will likely see staffing levels at their lowest point in a dozen

Los Angeles Police Department
Budget cuts will take Los Angeles Police Dept. ranks below 10,000 officers

Dr. Drew Midday Live with Lauren Sivan

00:11 sec | 19 hrs ago

Budget cuts will take Los Angeles Police Dept. ranks below 10,000 officers

"The Los Angeles City Council is cutting the Los Angeles Police Department's budget by $150 million. Ellie's school police are also seeing major cuts. The number of officers in both departments will drop

Los Angeles Police Department Los Angeles City Council Ellie
Ex-officer who fatally shot Rayshard Brooks released on bond

On Point with Juandolyn Stokes

01:11 min | 1 d ago

Ex-officer who fatally shot Rayshard Brooks released on bond

"Garrett Wolfe, former Atlanta police Department officer charged with the Ray shot Brooks murder. He's bonded out of jail. Actually, this former police officer charged with this murder in the shooting death of Ray shot Brooks. He posted bond over night. Ah, he was outside the Gwinnett County jail all night Tuesday and all of this morning where Garrett role was being held, he posted out but there are some conditions to his bond. And what do you think of how bad his conditions are? First of all, he must wear an ankle monitor off so he will have a curfew from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. With exceptions for work, legal or medical reasons. Hey, must surrender his passport. Ah, he's also not allowed to possess or carrying any firearms. He will not have any contact with family members of Brooks or any witness says, including the three other victims in the case, and he will not have any contact with other AH police officers,

Brooks Garrett Wolfe RAY Atlanta Police Department Gwinnett County Jail Murder Officer
Seattle Police Break Up CHOP Area Ahead Of Budget Meeting

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

02:37 min | 1 d ago

Seattle Police Break Up CHOP Area Ahead Of Budget Meeting

"Of of violent violent incidents incidents in in the the Capitol Capitol Hill Hill protest protest zone. zone. Led Led to to Seattle Seattle Mayor Mayor Jenny Jenny Durkan Durkan this this morning morning to to order order police police to break up the protest. Let's get the latest live from the scene. Here's Cuomo's Corwin. Hey, KD. And just moments ago, police chief Carmen Best told US jerk and gave her the order to sweep out shop early this morning Thiss order and our police response. Comes after weeks of violence in and around the capital Hill occupied protest zone, including multiple shootings, resulting in many injuries and two deaths. Death of two teenagers at this point we've had at least 13 arrest. Now the eviction itself began just after five this morning citizen journalists, Omari Salisbury was on hand. He described it to me to say, declared illegal assembly and gave order this first. For about 10 minutes. They sat there asking people to move. The police started moving five foot at a time. You know, like we see a lot here, the move back, move back. Now there were raised voices. Otherwise, the eviction of chop was largely peaceful. Now I have heard unconfirmed reports that at one point pepper spray was deployed, perhaps even a rubber bullet fired. I don't know that for sure. That's what the witnesses told me. So we'll see what happens next. We have our upcoming later this morning a list of demands from protestors What they want to see happen next. It's possible that this entire group if they don't return to chop, they moved this protest elsewhere in the city Live on Capitol Hill, Corwin Hate almost Matt Markovich has been covering the police response to all of this since it began last month, and we asked him this morning why he thinks that police department decided to finally move him Today. Today is a very important day for the defunding of the Seattle Police Department. The Budget committee is going to meet this afternoon is the third session about how did to fund the Police Department. They look at a $300 million deficit for the budget, so there might be some political overtones here about the timing of why it happened today because of discussions the City Council is going to have this afternoon that just one idea why the timing of it, protesters on Capitol Hill say recent violence within it, shop would have happened. Even if chop didn't exist. It's not happening here, it would have happened elsewhere. This just kind of the epicenter of where people are coming to this point, right? That's protester Tafari Maynard. Two teenagers were shot to death within shop over the past 12 days, including a 16 year old boy who died Monday. Protesters say they'll present an updated list of demands later today,

Seattle Police Department Mayor Jenny Jenny Durkan Durka Matt Markovich Omari Salisbury Seattle United States Cuomo Tafari Maynard Budget Committee Carmen Best City Council Corwin
New York Police Department's budget has been slashed by $1 billion

Morning Edition

03:37 min | 1 d ago

New York Police Department's budget has been slashed by $1 billion

"And that means a new New York City budget. The City Council voted shortly after midnight to adopt Mayor de Blasio EOS, $88 billion budget. It was a plan that only passed after weeks of protests back and forth between council members and the mayor and a lot of finger pointing. City agencies across the board will shoulder painful cuts due to covert related revenue losses and costs. But the most intense negotiations leading up to the last minute were about cuts to the NYPD. We're joined now by WN reporters Yasmeen Khan and Glen Hogan, who's actually at City Hall where police have moved in, and things are a little bit tense. She joins us on Skype. Morning, Gwyn, what's happening there? Good morning, yet they're you know. Throughout the night, protesters had taken some of the city blocks around the occupied city hall. But then, as the morning came, they went back into the plaza to fortify the boundaries. And now No, I'm about 1/2 a block away where there's you know, I would say a couple. You know dozens. If that, you know, 100 or maybe more police officers who are lined up right here they have shields batons. Andi was sort of a tense standoff that's happening. The activists are urging people to remain calm and not agitate not to throw things. The mood is pretty festive, but you know, it's one of those moments. I could flip on a dime and become violent. Yes, Mein. The budget negotiation is always kind of a dance. But this year, the overall budget was cut significantly because of the public health crisis. Can you give us the broad strokes of this new fiscal plan that takes effect today? Yeah. Hi. This budget process is painful carry, you know. Earlier this year before the public health crisis, the mayor proposed a budget that was more than $95 million we're down to a plan that about 88 billion So there are deep cuts across city agencies. As you mentioned. This is a budget that doesn't draw on city reserves. Onda does fund some important program. You know, the city has a restored funding for summer youth jobs. The budget, address his food and security, and it restores the school counselor program for the highest need kids. But the city actually still needs to find another $1,000,000,000 in labor savings between now and October. Otherwise, there could be layoffs of Abducted 22,000 city employees. Community advocates have called for a least a $1 billion cut to the NYPD and the mayor said he'd get there. Yes, I mean, where does City Hall in the council land on this? It's not quite a 1,000,000,000 or it depends on how you view a cut versus moving money around and you know the people who wanted major cuts. To the NYPD wanted savings that could be reinvested in young people and in communities of color. So this was a debate about providing resources that promote public safety. Just not her policing. So what? What they landed on with that that some personnel under the beady will now go to other city agencies like school safety agents will gradually shipped back to the Department of Education. There is a pretty big cut to the overtime budget for uniformed officers. There've been cuts in the past OT, though, that haven't really been met. There is the city will be eliminating a new class of cadets. Scheduled for July. So that's about 200 officers that won't start this summer. Otherwise, there is no hiring freeze for the NYPD, which is a real sticking point. For some people on the mayor does expect patrol levels to say the same. There will also be a new classic death starting in October, so there will be no officers added later this fall.

Nypd City Hall City Council New York Glen Hogan Blasio Eos Andi Yasmeen Khan Gwyn School Counselor Onda Department Of Education
Officers investigated over photos at Elijah McClain memorial

WBZ Afternoon News

00:41 sec | 1 d ago

Officers investigated over photos at Elijah McClain memorial

"Water. They're accused of taking disrespectful pictures at the memorial for Elijah McLean, the black man who died in police custody last August. In a statement Monday, Aurora's interim police chief said the department has investigated a report that multiple police officers were depicted in photographs near the site where Maclaine died. Sources tell CBS News those officers were imitating the chokehold. McLane was placed in just days before his death and that the photos were shared with other Aurora police officers. The police Department says it will release evidence of its investigation into the inappropriate photos, including pictures, and the officers identities very soon. Laura Podesta, CBS news judge says the former Atlanta police officer

Police Department Aurora Elijah Mclean Cbs News CBS Maclaine Mclane Laura Podesta Officer Atlanta
Colorado Police Officers Under Investigation Over Photos At Elijah McClain Memorial

WBZ Afternoon News

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Colorado Police Officers Under Investigation Over Photos At Elijah McClain Memorial

"Officers in a world of Colorado or in hot water, accused of taking disrespectful pictures of the memorial for Elijah McClane? He's the black matter, died in police custody. Last year. In a statement Monday, Aurora's interim police chief said the department has investigated a report that multiple police officers were depicted in photographs near the site where Maclaine died. Sources tell CBS News those officers were imitating the chokehold. McLane was placed in just days before his death and that the photos were shared with other Aurora police officers. The police Department says it will release evidence of its investigation into the inappropriate photos, including pictures, and the officers identities very soon. Laura Podesta, CBS news

Elijah Mcclane Police Department Aurora Cbs News CBS Mclane Laura Podesta Maclaine Colorado
De Blasio seeks to cut $1 billion from New York Police Department budget

KYW 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 2 d ago

De Blasio seeks to cut $1 billion from New York Police Department budget

"The barrel of budget cuts thanks to the Corona virus economic slowdown, But the city will also cut the police Department's budget is part of Mayor de Blasio is police reform move the NYPD needs budget will be cut by $1 billion but the mayor was short on details. There has been a very intense Detailed focus discussion over the last month on how we change policing Bill de Blasio said an additional 500 million would be taken out of the NYPD is capital budget and moved toward youth services in public housing. We want to shift resource is more and more into young people in particular, some of the ideas being discussed include shifting school safety officers from the police department to the Department of Education. And getting police out of the business of homeless outreach. Steve

Police Department Mayor De Blasio Nypd Department Of Education Steve
“SAFE LA Task Force” created by Los Angeles Police Department

All Things Considered

01:07 min | 2 d ago

“SAFE LA Task Force” created by Los Angeles Police Department

"Say Fella Taskforce is calling on the public to help solve crimes that were committed during the recent protests against police brutality and racial injustice. Most of the protests were peaceful, but several spun out of control when demonstrators in what police have described as opportunist, committed acts of vandalism and violence. This case your W's Kelly Wells reports, authorities unveiled a new Web page today for the public to leave tips. About those crimes. Local officials formed the task force earlier this month, and it includes police from Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, and torrents as well. A zealous city's fire department and the FBI. L A P D says that since the taskforce started, they've investigated hundreds of assault, attempted murders, arsons and looting incidents and made several arrests. Now, law enforcement is turning to the public to find additional suspects. The website shows photos of people from surveillance video breaking into buildings or destroying property and law enforcement is offering up to $10,000 for credible tips. You confined the photos at LAPD online dot org's slash, Say fella tips or on instagram at safe Lha tips.

Kelly Wells Vandalism Lapd Beverly Hills FBI Santa Monica Assault
New York City's Mayor De Blasio agrees to cut $1 billion from New York police budget

Larry O'Connor

00:19 sec | 2 d ago

New York City's Mayor De Blasio agrees to cut $1 billion from New York police budget

"They're building. Blasio says he's proposing slashing the New York City police budget by a $1,000,000,000 with the defunding police sit in protest continuing outside City Hall. Blasio says that the New York Police Department has found ways to find the cuts from its current $6 billion budget that would open up more funding for youth, another community

New York Police Department New York City City Hall Blasio
Minneapolis police union says there's no problem with systemic racism, but is open to reform

Chad Hartman

05:19 min | 2 d ago

Minneapolis police union says there's no problem with systemic racism, but is open to reform

"Yesterday in the one o'clock hour Bob Kroll was her feature gassed in machines on right now to talk about this the the interview rishi thanks for coming on give me give me from when you're in the moment when you look back at it the most notable part of the interview the the some of some of the comments of Bob Kroll made that to you has so much been a journalist for a long time most news worthy well I think it's partly when he was trying to describe the union's role and the four different I think he said mayoral terms that he was part of the negotiations over the years with the union contract and I thought that was notable and that's part of the reason I actually wanted him to come on was to help people really understand what is the role of the union because I watched for weeks now as a lot of people are blaming him for my city burning down and I'm telling you it's my city because I live in it you and I work in it and I know there are a lot of layers to this is a dynamic situation and I don't know that you can put the blame for what happened on the weekends during the week of may twenty fifth on any one doorstep and I know you can't put it on his because that's just not his role so when he described the role of the union the negotiations from his past with past administrations mayors city council and then that he does want to be it sounds to me like part of the solution I asked him if he's visited the site I asked him did he visit thirty eighth in Chicago and he said he didn't really visited he went by it and that was interesting for me because he probably would you help me I don't know but my guess is he knew it might have been a spectacle if he had shown up but I think it was important that he at least drove by it and that's why I asked about that a number of times with me and a number of times this last week when he did a series of interviews he was asked if he believes there are systemic racism within the police department which then affects people of color in Minneapolis he we he adamantly said no you'll have said on the station many times as a person of color that you have face racism in the city of Minneapolis is it then fair to say that you don't agree with Bob Kroll on his point I think the question was is there systemic racism in the police department I think there is systemic racism in our city I think there is in our entire state I believe it is so insisted that a lot of people don't really understand it you know questions Chad that I've gotten in my mother has gotten throughout our lifetimes where you from and when we say Dinah accessory grew up that's where she still lives people come back at us with more questions will know where you from and I know where they're going and I I kind of don't want to play ball so finally I will say if you mean my country of origin I was born in Sri Lanka but I'm an American so like it it was that kind of commentary that I'm talking about it's as a specific they'll because Bob pushes back and says of those separately there is not systemic racism in the Minneapolis police department I adamantly disagree I think the data is over well me where do you stand do you think there's systemic racism in the Minneapolis police department how you would be treated compared to how I would be treated it's an interesting question because I think the black Minneapolis resident is treated differently from you and for me I have not been pulled over because I'm brown I was actually murdered at gun point in twenty thirteen and the Minneapolis police officers and other members of the system connected to juvenile court that dealt with me we're very respectful I think Bob can have an opinion that there's not systemic racism you can believe there is I mean I'm probably leaning closer to you on this because I think this city there's an issue with systemic racism in the city I mean I take it to even the renaming of lake Calhoun we renamed lake Calhoun because Calhoun was bad well the name we replace it with is from a native peoples and also did some things other native people but some people don't have issues with that so there's racism everywhere is it systemic absolutely in our city in our state is only happening at the police department no I think when you have mayors and Cassidy council people who aren't necessarily passing the laws in the ordinances that are fair to all of us you know when it comes to getting loans when it comes to other parts of living in what we have to do it it goes very deep and this is where a state it is a dynamic and very layered problem why is my deep blue black is not just on the police it really isn't

Bob Kroll
Saturday WERE GOING TO BUILD OUR OWN TABLE!

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

06:01 min | 4 d ago

Saturday WERE GOING TO BUILD OUR OWN TABLE!

"Day when everybody. How's it going? You ever reached native opinion. We are an indigenous information and education radio, show and podcast. Every week we talked about current affairs related to and from our own native American perspectives. My name is Michael, kicking bear and this guy over here. You can see him catch you. Well actually. How good morning your brother, how are you? I'm well. Thank you, are you? Doing I'm doing good. Health Wise, actually a David I were talking before we went on the air here and. I was happy to report that somehow in some way I've managed to lose pounds. So congrats good especially in a pandemic right so. I just decided I had to get serious with this so. Yeah so kind of happy about that. I should be like Yeah Ya. Doing. I am doing a good thank. You have waned myself off. The Oh, two excellent. So Excuse me. Feeling a little stronger every day. Long still have a ways to go, but they'll get there, yeah. Well you know, obviously I don't have to tell you. Take precautions and especially in the light of the fact that your state is. One of. Many that are spiking right now. So. Well we're we're. We're adding so many cases so quick. Every day we break record. And one day this week, we. had. Eight thousand. Nine thousand new cases in one day. It's just. It's just insane because of responsibility. Absolutely. That's absolutely was to. Morning San chat rooms open you guys. If you're listening to live you can go to our website. NATIVE OPINION DOT COM instructions their please please feel free to join us here in chat. So. let's see also a regular who listens to the show in a participates in chat is bath and she will not be with us today. She She is participating in a She said he poetry marathon. Storming out her time there. And says wanted me to pass on that. She says hate everybody and wish her luck at I guess it's a writing. Suppose him on poetry so they have to produce. New Poems I guess every hour I'm not quite sure how that works that sounds. That sounds like insanely challenging. Especially creatively. Guess Henceforth Day Marathon. Yeah Yeah. Let's say to say the least morning. Sean good to see you there and chat. Show. Yeah and that's also sent us an article brother. Regarding and I know we covered this I'm going to say probably going back a couple of years ago. Maybe not quite that long, but tytler reads REMINGTON. preps for bankruptcy sale to Navajo nation. We were This is the recent article because it was June twenty-sixth. This year I'll just read a little bit from the article. REMINGTON Arms America's oldest gun maker is preparing to file for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection. And is in advanced talks for a potential sale to the Navajo nation the Wall Street. Journal reported on Friday. REMINGTON is making preparations for the native American tribes serve as they lead bidder to purchase its assets out of chapter. Eleven. The Journal reported here. People familiar with the matter so. I I seem to remember. That Remington, and or the tribe was considering purchasing. The company. didn't realize that they were in trouble. And then like as we were at speculating before we went on the air, I. You said If. You're the federal government. And this is this is this guy's listening to? So? It's a good question or if you WANNA email us. Hosts with an S. host that native opinion dot com you can comment. But. Looking at this from the perspective of the federal government, or probably more accurately today, looking at this through the eyes of white supremacists. Do you want a native American tribe owning a gun company? Just put that out. Well, the good thing is the government can't block it. Yes, that is true. That is true. Can't block the sale, but all all the conversations that I had about And one not necessarily dropping a seat of hint. To other nations out there. But all the discussions that I've had over the years of wealth of Zavod over the years about true sovereignty would have to include. Defensive Our borders meaning. The ability to form something beyond a police department. Right. So. Anyway that's. Leave it there, but I just I just found that to be an interesting thought process maybe. but but if the sale goes through, and that's what nomination wants to do, congrats man you know. I. No reason. To not think it's a good idea, you know

Federal Government Remington Michael Remington Arms America SAN Zavod The Journal David Sean Remington.
A Hidden Side of Police Abuse

Slate's If Then

06:26 min | 6 d ago

A Hidden Side of Police Abuse

"In response to weeks of protests across the country, police departments are starting to change in New York. For example, disciplinary records for the NYPD are finally going to be made public and last week. New York City, police. Commissioner Dermott Shea made announcement about the NYPD'S ANTI-CRIME UNITS UNDERCOVER COPS who tend to be involved in police shootings. Effective immediately we will be transitioning those units roughly six hundred people citywide. Into a variety of assignments including detective bureau. neighborhood, policing and other assignments. When he made that announcement. said that it was part of an outdated model policing in that they generally are much more focused on intelligence. This is twenty first century policing. Intelligence. Data. Shot Spotter. Video Make no mistake. This is a seismic shift in the culture of how the NYPD polices disgraced, city. It it gives you a sense of. How a lot of the focus is on sort of individual officers on the street, but increasingly young PD's focus is on surveillance, and it has been for a long time. On Hell, story starts almost two decades ago the years just after the nine eleven attacks. Nine eleven, because it happened in New York has had a very long shadow and fundamentally changed. How many communities view the police department? Nine eleven not only to look to automate in. Sharing between different federal agencies, it also tried to turn local police departments into sort of the eyes and ears of intelligence on the ground in major cities, so it became a really important time for police permits to start to view themselves as counter. Terrorism agencies in that perspective is also true to this day. So unhealthy after nine eleven when this technology really expanded. was there a sense of? Push back. was there a sense that this was controversial that there were these growing NYPD dragnets of both Cameras and investigations and wiretaps that that seemed to be targeting regular New Yorkers who might not have been guilty of anything at all, so there's always been pushback from impacted communities and from civil liberties, advocates, but. It goes to show the effectiveness of the police department in the influence of the police department where a lot of the concerns were allayed by saying. This is going to empower us to catch terrorists in that terrorism label really. Calms a lot of fears for many because they thought well, these are tools that are only going to be used against the most dangerous people, but in reality was never limited to counter terrorism in the first place. It was just presented as a counter ripped terrorism tool. The most notorious example of NYPD surveillance was the illegal spying on Muslim New Yorkers after nine eleven. The NYPD sent informers to take photos inside mosques. They infiltrated Muslim student groups at local colleges. Undercover cops, twelve bookstores, restaurants and hookah bars. Even played cricket. The group was called the demographics unit. But until the Associated Press revealed its work. NYPD denied it existed. Now the demographics unit is gone, but the police departments post nine eleven surveillance infrastructure remains. Everything, the police know shoveled into a giant database called the domain awareness system. That includes audio from gunshot detectors, two billion photos of license plates, hundred million summonses, eleven, million arrests, two million warrants and thirty days of video from nine thousand cameras. How will that information gets crunched? We don't really know. And some of the things we do know suggest the NYPD could use more oversight. And, that's where the post doc comes in. To give you an example of the types of things that they've done. They use facial recognition systems to try to identify people that are suspected of crimes that were captured on. Let's say TV camera. So there is an example of someone who went into a CVs and stole a six pack of beer and the NYPD try to run a picture of that suspect through its facial recognition system. But it didn't return any results, so the NYPD thought well. You know that person looks a little bit like woody. Harrelson, so why don't we grab a photo of Woody Harrelson run that through the facial recognition system and see if we can find a match that Oh my God. How did this become public? The seems like something. The NYPD would never want to admit. So, one of the things that the post actors trying to do is to change the way that we ordinarily find out about surveillance abuses, which is costly public records, requests or through leaks to journalists in this case data that information came from an internal training guide that was obtained by Click Gharbia Georgetown that was turned over through a public records request. To what extent do we find out about these kind of technologies? When some kid ends up in court, and they say well, we know it was you because we have a witness identifying a dragon tattoo. We searched our database for a dragon tattoo and it turns out the. We knew you had one because you were stopped and frisked five years ago. Annie's Harlem. Only, it was that that linear. That would be great. Essentially does work that way most often. We don't get a sense of what tools are used at all. Sometimes the NYPD will enter into contracts with vendors that require them to be secretive, and they'll sign a nondisclosure agreement or a confidentiality clause that prevents them from disclosing the use of particular surveillance tools to the point where there are instances that police departments have dropped. Dropped charges against a particular person because they don't have to explain how they found them using the technology. That is still secret

Nypd New York City Commissioner Dermott Shea Woody Harrelson Associated Press Annie Gharbia Georgetown Harlem
"police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

"police department" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"And some officers have now opted just to walk away. Atlanta police said in a statement that eight officers have resigned from the department this month the Atlanta police. Foundation earlier had reported that nineteen officers resigned since the start of the social injustice protests or demonstrations, the foundation has since retracted that incorrect number in south Florida ten officers resigned from their city Swat unit over concerns about safety, saying they feel restrained by the politics of it all a by their tactics. That's according to documents obtained by. By CNN and Buffalo New York nearly sixty officers resigned from the forces emergency response team over the suspension of two police officers who were caught on video. We also this pushing down seventy five year. Old Man is name was Martin Good Gino and this man. This older gentleman has suffered a fractured skull, and he cannot walk as he continues to recover from home. He can't. He's unable to walk now. yeah, so you say police officers in that city resigned We know about that sixty nearly sixty officers, but but they were from. You know that special team the emergency response team. That's what they resigned from the police force his Emergency Response Team Steve. Because those two officers were suspended when they were caught on tape for pushing the man down. This is a when at mortgage, Dude. They'll be back. This. be mad right now, but when I get here. Yeah and we told you earlier that president trump signed an executive order on police reform as he tried to address the national outcry of police brutality..

"police department" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

09:01 min | 2 weeks ago

"police department" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"And I mean I, think the last couple of years we've seen. We've seen the press sort of have to weather. Verbal attacks from the highest rungs a government and I think that's been a wide range, a conversation that has been happening in the press and in our newspapers and our airwaves for the last couple of years and so there's certainly a heightened attention being paid to that in terms of freedoms of the press in what our constitutional rights are with this escalating to physical violence This is not the first time. I think that there are reporters working particular beat here and abroad who have always been subject to violence to physical violence peeing. It happened domestically, and in such a widespread way I think has been jarring for some folks, readers and the public and reporters alight. In terms of changing attitudes. I think you made the point that the safety of journalists is not more important than the safety. Of anybody walking down the street, but I think that the. I think what we're likely to see you. What we are seeing is that. Folks are sort of using physical attacks on the press as a means by which they can get four people who previously didn't care about similar attacks on general members of the public particularly people from certain marginalized communities. She sort of get them to care to wake them up. It's the sort of is the argument that if it's happening, you know two reporters while they're live on CNN. Then think about what might be happening to people when there are no cameras around or to people who don't enjoy the prominence of being a national reporter and so I. think that there's a sort of awareness reading that it's not just about what it means. When the police are physically violent with the press when they're outside trying to do, their jobs would also went at suggests about the larger institution of saying and the violence that people in communities all over the country experience every day. And this piece goes in soon, really immune very extended history of this relationship between basically. The US almost being like a PR. Department for release. Which I want us to get into the? Can you start by telling us the story in site in your piece of Josh Lucille? Share so Joshua Bill the man from Indianapolis, who, in the fall of twenty, sixteen was in Chicago for a relative's funeral and there was a procession, a car procession, leaving cemetery in a neighborhood amount greenland in Chicago, in Mount Greenwood is a neighborhood that is a predominantly white in a city. In which the majority of the population are people of Color An, it's in particular notable because it's home to many of the city's cops and firefighters. And there's a cemetery there. They were leaving the cemetery after having buried a relative, and there was this sort of altercation on the street And basically. A car cut off some of the vehicles that were in the funeral a concession. And an argument began. People got out of their cars. And what happened was that to narratives quickly emerged Joshua beal guy out of his car, and they were two men who later found out. Were police officers off duty? Police officers, and there was there was sort of alive chaos. There is loud music. There is a lot of yelling. And this argument very quickly escalated and there were dozens of nine one one calls made from the scene, in which spice standards were describing two white men, waving guns around and Joshua beal, who is legally licensed to carry a firearm retrieved. A firearm from his car, and minutes later, he was dead in the street. And very quickly to separate narratives emerged from this scene. There is the police narrative and then there is voice. His family said what bystanders said. The police said that what had happened were two officers. Joseph Tracy and Thomas Heroin. I'm off duty and sort of happened upon this. HAPPENED UPON THIS Joseph Teresi got into an argument there was you know the police said that on someone had been walking a fire lane at. That's how the argument began. and. Notably. The police said that Joseph Sees Me Joshua. Beal had fired his weapon I and that they had returned fire on, and they also said that both Darwin Andruzzi were in uniform and obviously law enforcement. This was not reflected in any of the nine one one polls that came from bystanders and the family. Who's there insisted that it was not clear at all, but they were law, enforcement and so what you had. Is the police saying that they were justified in shooting and killing him because it was obvious that they were police in that he made the decision not to lower his weapon and everyone else saying that these were just too angry. White guys in the street, waving guns and that Joshua Bill. Br his firearm out in self defense. In response to them, having pulled a I and what happened is that. Reporters get to the scene and they start to write these stories, and they start to speak to the communications representatives on Who Represent the Chicago Police Department? And those details about The officers being uniform about. Having pulled his weapon I they start to leak into the stories that are written and that appear in local news media, and imports. You know the detail about the cops having been in uniform in particular release spread on sort of started with Anthony, the WHO's the chief communications off surfaces Chicago Police, department telling that to reporters on the police chief also repeated this to reporters. It appears on the nightly news in local newspapers. It was also many autopsy report. And you know guy and then months later nine one one calls are released and the family sort of from the first from day one had always insisted that no, they weren't in uniform and nobody had any idea who. These people were. And so you started to see this spread and spread and spread and it wasn't challenged you know by reporters until months and months and months later. This came you know just. Two years after the city of Chicago had erupted in protest over the murderer climate, donald, and so it was a familiar scene where you know, black man is killed by police and the police say happened in. Everyone else's that something else happened. who is a local reporter for the Chicago reader wrote a piece eighteen months later examining the misinformation particularly that the officers were in uniform and sort of detail. Why that hadn't been challenged I reporters even as through the course of the investigation of a this incident. Sort of began to reveal more and more. That, this was a blatant lie. The Look on with Donald case they put out of a fleet misrepresentation of his murder, and the only reason i. mean that was. That was feared because. Videotaped state suppressed actually got released the public. Right and so that you know with Quantum McDonald. The story was that. The officer was justified in Shooting and killing him because he had been holding a knife in at lunch. That reporters and then you know report a reporter style you know over a dozen freedom of information requests to release the tate that would show what actually happened and the all of them were denied the police departments line was that releasing it would interfere with their ability to conduct a proper investigation and so an investigative report the only reason it was released. Released, was because an investigative reporter sued the city and the department and a judge sided with the reporter, and so this ape was released, and what we know now. Is that what the police said? Happen Justin just never happened, and in fact that officer Jason Van Dyke. was later arrested and convicted.

reporter Joshua beal Chicago Chicago Police Department officer Joshua Bill investigative reporter donald US CNN Joseph Tracy Joseph Teresi Josh Lucille Quantum McDonald Joseph Indianapolis Mount Greenwood Justin
"police department" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:32 min | 2 weeks ago

"police department" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Be right back. This is on point. Protests over racial injustice are spreading across the country. Mullah pandemic continues to take its toll. The next weeks and months are leading to a consequential election. This November and every day the NPR politics podcast is here to discuss how it could reshape your world. This is on point. I'm Meghna Chakrabarti this hour were trying to understand the real story of what happened in Camden New Jersey when back in two thousand thirteen, the Camden city police was dismantled, and a countywide police force was put into its place because. Back in two thousand fifteen, and especially now once again Camden is being held up as an example of how you successfully reimagining reimagined policing. But of course, the truth is far more complicated, so we're trying to understand that complexity this hour for example in the year after that first big dismantling of the Camden police former New Jersey. Governor Chris Christie really celebrated the progress that was made by the Police Department so here's Chris Christie in two thousand fourteen. Let me just say that. All of US Republicans and Democrats alike have supported better stronger and more effective crimefighting here in Camden, and by all accounts, the groundbreaking action and the commitment of the mayor, the freeholder director and the police chief are improving police services.

"police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

13:56 min | Last month

"police department" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Investigative sergeant in a supervisor of the School Resource Program in Twenty Nineteen. Pruitt was promoted to captain. She currently serves as a deputy. Commander Supervising Calls for service. Countywide PRUITT is a past president of the coalition of black police officers among only Maryland. In since two thousand eighteen has serves as the chairperson of the National Black Police Association chills. Bs In criminal justice from University of Maryland University College and an Ma in front of psychology from argosy university. She's an adjunct professor of Criminal Justice Administration at the Montgomery College and teaches courses including introduction to policing criminal investigation in Police Organization and administration. She's also a member of law enforcement action partnership otherwise known as leap as well as myself so without further. Doing Ladies Gentlemen we are going to be discussing the importance of diversity within police department so I. WanNa thank once again my special guest Captain Sonia Pruitt to Captain Hunters podcast. Here is the interview all right so once again. We're talking to Captain Sonia Pruitt and thank you so much for being on Captain Hunters podcast. Thanks for inviting me. Your member of Law Enforcement Action Partnership as M. I in so just tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do for that organization just yourself in general okay Well I I call myself a transplant from north. Carolina ended up in the Washington metropolitan area as a student at how university Undergrad In nineteen eighty one. I've been here for a while now and I feel like I'm a a member of DMV as we call it the district Maryland. Virginia Became a police officer after deciding that being a doctor was not for me. I knew I was NOCCO. Stay up all night long doing any kind of internship or residency or anything like that. So they're not because I'm a science geek. I tried to go into Research so worked at the National Institutes of helpful. I don't like the repetitiveness of research This is no not for me so I became a police officer because as I was working for the US Postal Service Inspection Service. Which is their law. Enforcement Ranch I decided I wanted to go into law enforcement so I became a police officer as a yeah could be outside like being outside. I like being around people. This'll be fun and exciting. I did not know what I was getting myself into. Actually but I was ready for it. So that's how I became a police officer. I've been a police officer for twenty seven years. I'm currently a captain in charge of community engagement for the Montgomery County Police Department and I am also the chair woman The National Black Police Association and I got my my hat and various other incendiary rings of law enforcement and speaking and things like that. Very good awesome. Awesome my cousin. A currently works for the inspectional services. I'm hoping saying that right for the post office. He works service. He'd probably kill me tells me so many times but he actually is Located in Tampa Florida. So he's got a actually fairly wide range of territories. He's gotTa deal. With as far as his responsibilities e e installs Even saying he's installs a security surveillance equipment. Try to catch the postal workers. Stealing or yeah. Yeah yeah he's got some really cool guests. Can I wanted to have you on because I had a previous conversation with another person Leader of a black national black police officers of Association of America and So I wanted to have you on to talk about the importance of black police officers. And you know we're having a problem right now with the recruitment overawe police officer people do not want to be companies. Police officers overall but particularly. It's it's problematic within the black community. I want to have you on his to kind of talk about that and what we can do to fix this problem. Are you seeing A problem with getting more young people or more people particularly people colored black people to become police officer I'm not sure whether that is that. An urban legend or not Let me tell you why so in my career. I have worked in background investigation and we did. We were having that same dialogue always so hard to find particularly black people to become the police but I contend that there are plenty of black applicants out there. You just have to hire them. You cannot Find excuses not to hire them because of your implicit biases or your Your your overt biases. You cannot put them into a are you you. Can't you can't measure them by measurements? That are not the same measurements that you measure all the Atkins by meaning once they pass the basic parameters you don't get to add extra parameters for and I'm going to use this as a as a true example once you pass the parameters you can't say well they well. They have to have a bachelor's degree which they have but they didn't pass a class when they were in Undergrad. There's no such parameter. They have a bachelor's degree which is what the with the parameter is so I have seen that happen and you know question that and you know I had argued about it and that person was not hired so I'm going to say that if you're not doing everything you can to diversify your police department in a fair and impartial way that I'm going to throw out the window. That argument there are not enough Black Africans not enough women applicants not enough. Latino applicant is whatever the you know the category is. I'm going to say unless you're doing. They're fairly at across the board. And then I'm going to also add if you going out of your way to bypass the parameters in order to get certain hype of applicant or a certain category. Then you're not. You're still not playing fairly okay. So I am not clear Sir. Captain that that is really an issue. I think Anecdotally that it doesn't excuse because what I see is okay the black community. They have an issue with us so we can always say that they don't want to become the please I'm just not. I'm not convinced that when we had a black cat who was the director of our Personnel Division for instance with my police department. We didn't seem to have that issue. You one has to wonder what the issues really are. Okay that's that's a very fair very fair point. I too But I here's here's Mike attention and I too was a member of our background team in on all that kind of stuff recruit team and so. I went to colleges the schools Two Barber shops churches etc tried to get many applicants to sign up and many You know when you go to colleges we were heading You know some universities here in You Know Yukon Wiscon- Western Connecticut State University and other other schools. Rama stated Connecticut and even our home city and the people that were taking. The applications are showed some type of interest generally were white and many black applicants or or potential black applicants. Were would tell us straight out that they weren't interested in Assam down that saying that any didn't but those who dead Show some interest. Obviously you know they. They came on the Chicago Tribune. Awhile ago maybe I read. This article may be back in October or so September October. They did a really good article. I I can send it to if I can find it and it was talking about this whole problem that they were having in Chicago with all the problems. That Chicago Police Department has and they want more black people To to apply in their head of their personnel division for the city now as the police officers but for the city was talking about. How come there were no Not Enough Black applicants and one of the things that the that the personnel director was talking about was was similar to what you were just mentioning about about Going through with with this selection process many people are being weeded out for silly things that others others were not being weeded out as on on. And she was saying that. There's the legacy groups particularly Latino legacy groups right so so we have you. You remember the National Black Police Officers Association right so their legacy groups so a Latino groups Were actually staying with their applicants throughout the process right. So they're helping them back. Prepare for the physical prepare for the written. Prepare oral. And that was the difference. In why the Latino Applicants were doing better on the test whereas black people black officers or black applicants were taking a test and then that was it next time you see them was for their physical prison for the physical portion and they couldn't pass it will one of the reasons is obviously because you groups were not doing enough to make sure that they passed it so that was one of the critiques that the Personnel Director Had. I'd seen know and I liked the idea of Following the applicants so when I first apply My blue background. She was my and not in the background investigator Recruiter I missed my first test. I exit show up. I'll be lazy. You know that happens a lot with the cruise black white brown. You know because we are young and we're not Dedicated yet and and you know we're young. So she called me and she said. I'm a need you to come to this test and I said yes Ma'am I showed up so when I was in background I I remember having a conversation with one of the The executive that was there at the time and I said hey you know I had this idea. Why don't we make sure that we follow up with our African because we're having a problem with adversity A problem there's somebody says they have not sure really had one but anyway. Why don't we call advocate? Who we think things not to want to come and take the test to make sure they come in and take the test and she said well. We can't do that and I said why not. She said because that's against federal loss will turn we tell me see that we can understand it. Can we find that in the federal wreck so that we can read it and she never answered because there is no such thing so I suggested then because I got the impression that she was still some kind of way about calling black Africans? Why don't we just call? The Africans have to just call the black Africa's we can call them all and make sure that you know. They know that they need to come and take the test because they are most of them are young and we probably need to give them a little nudge ono that we can't do that. That's the guest federal rigs. That was like okay. So it's it's stuff like that they keep us from being able to hire qualified Women and Black and Latino Asian and so forth advocate in my opinion so my small vantage point and I and I take that unaccept- that I think that that's I think that what you're saying is absolutely valid and I and I'm not pushing back against that I'm trying to add to it and say that It is a it is a problem we do need to. Give people a nudge and we also have noticed. Where as you mentioned as you sat in your I out so meetings. Whatever and talked about okay. Wh why are we mountains personally because when they were? Fourteen smoke weed. Wh what are we talking about here So why are we? Why are we doing that? And we we had to have the same conversations with. Wait a minute okay. This guy got a ticket when he was eighteen. These these thirty three. Now what are you talking about? You know so so. Sometimes I think that the that the rules if not a fairly across the board can bounce people who could be potentially good applicants. I completely agree with that. So just tell us a little bit about The Organization the National Black Police Officers. Tell us a little about them. And what you do and as you are the chair woman and what. Your responsibilities.

National Black Police Associat officer National Black Police Officers National Black Police Officers black community Captain Sonia Pruitt Montgomery County Police Depar Law Enforcement Action Partner Police Organization Chicago Police Department Maryland personnel director University of Maryland Univers argosy university supervisor Personnel Division Commander Captain Hunters president
"police department" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:44 min | 6 months ago

"police department" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Is the zodiacs DNA but it's also possible belong to the mailman right right is it possible that there is still viable DNA of the zodiac killer out there in an evidence box somewhere well about what's the towards the end of two thousand sixteen and the two thousand seventeen the Vallejo police department submitted a few items of evidence I believe it was two envelopes and three letters and it was submitted for DNA testing and it's been it's been a couple years or more and unfortunately there really isn't a big budget in Vallejo for these types of investigations of whale has a really high crime rate and a lot of you know and they don't have the resources as to be able to say let's devote enough manpower and money to these old pieces of their busy fighting current cases and so so that the DNA evidence was submitted what's you know and it was sent to a lab I don't know the last name but the hope is that some DNA can be obtained finally that is likely the zodiac killer's DNA and that genealogy can be done obviously that everybody already knows this article the C. killer suspect was identified through genealogy after first his DNA was obtained and that's what everybody expects will solve the zodiac cases is the the some lab we'll be able to get a sample of DNA from the back of the stamp or something as a ten genealogy okay so yeah certainly the police department while attempting that they.

Vallejo police department Vallejo
"police department" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:32 min | 10 months ago

"police department" Discussed on Science Friday

"Why is this so appealing then I mean why why do companies like Amazon WanNa get in on and even though it doesn't align with what we know uh-huh about facial expressions well. I think that there is a persistent belief that everybody around the world smiles when they're happy and frowns is when they're sad and scouse when they're angry and everyone around the world can recognize smiles and frowns and scowls as expressions of emotion and so companies think God this is a really great way to be able to read someone's emotions in an objective way and then capitalize on that for for selling products or for determining guilt or whatever people wanna use it for but the fact of the matter is that as I said facial movements hence can mean many different things depending on the context and they're not universal. That's one thing that we know pretty pretty clearly. I think at this point the agreed. Do you think these companies are aware of. The issues with their technology is not being quite ready. I don't think they're necessarily aware that they're making claims. Sweeping weeping claims that are incorrect. I think a couple of companies are becoming aware based on this paper that we published in the press that it's getting but it's it's really interesting. Some companies are super interested in trying to figure out how to do what they want to do. which is to you know gas? what someone's emotion is in an accurate way. Other companies are maybe being a little more defensive and really WanNa defend what they have because you know they've invested a lot of money in it Jennifer. What do you think about all of this emotion detection technology well. I'm really worried about it because I think as your other guest mentioned in the best of circumstances the technology might be able to identify a frown or a Smile L. But it can't identify what that means however when we see this technology sold to law enforcement agencies or schools which is where it's being sold quite a lot now. All the companies really claimed that they can tell if somebody is going to do something they can predict with this emotion detection technology analogy and it's just not there. It's just not accurate and I think it will be used to to target people especially people who are from from different cultures different races or ethnicity and it will be used to make assumptions about people who is going to be the bad kid in the school who we need to pull out of a school or who is going to be the person who is lying about whether they committed a crime. That's how emotion detection will be used in the near future. You're not ready for prime time but still moving ahead. I think we have run out of time. I'd like to thank both of you. Lisa Feldman Barrett professor of psychology at northeastern Eastern University Jennifer Lynch Surveillance Litigation Director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Thank you both for taking time to be with us today. We're GONNA take a break and when we come back. We're going to continue our theme here. We're GONNA talk about how bias shows up in a I am. I replied Oh. This is science. It's Friday from WNYC studios science Friday. It supported by married hotels. Researchers have proven that travel challenges the mind into thinking in new and and more complex ways. It's amazing what disrupting your routine with a simple change of scenery can.

Jennifer Lynch Amazon Wan WNYC Lisa Feldman Barrett professor of psychology Director
"police department" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

14:21 min | 10 months ago

"police department" Discussed on Science Friday

"Protect new podcast from WNYC studios in Dublin Acuity saw in which people share stories about the classical music that gets them through their lives. The people like threat to San Mendez Musicians GIANBATTISTA and Wynton Marsalis Koyo girlfriends. I'm not so and are very Alec Baldwin. It's pop mix tape part sonic. Love let a Connecticut daily musical journey of the human lives. Listen for free wherever you get your podcast and sign up at openings protect. This is science. It's Friday. I'm Plato Three. US cities I'm talking about Oakland. San Francisco and Somerville Massachusetts have banned their police departments from mm using a form of artificial intelligence called facial recognition it analyzes a person's facial features and checks its database of faces and and comes up within identity match the idea that your face is now being recorded and stored can be upsetting presidential candidate. Bernie Sanders is demanding. A national ban on this technology and other candidates are calling for greater scrutiny of how it's being used this hour worth. We're going to be talking about it. Ourselves salves taking our own look at how police departments law enforcement agencies and courtrooms are using facial recognition and other forms of Ai from emotion motion detection algorithms to risk assessments and asking whether these technologies I really accurate and fair and that's what I'm going to be asking you. What do you think about using facial recognition and other forms of a in the criminal justice system. Give us a call our number eight four four seven two four eight eight two five five eight four four seven two four eight two five five or you can tweet US tweet us at Sei fry. Let me start out with the facial recognition and technology I Jennifer Lynch is the Surveillance Litigation Director at the Electric Frontier Foundation. Welcome to science Friday. Thank you well. We'll just just to start off giving me. Give me a definition of what facial recognition is sure. Facial recognition face recognition is a technology that allows you you to identify or verify the identity of somebody based on specific features of their face usually that's performed on digital images but it can also be performed performed on video and when a law enforcement law enforcement is using facial recognition we are these photos coming from well for the most part if law enforcement is using face recognition the photographs are coming from mugshot databases so about fourteen different states partner with the FBI and share their mugshot photographs with the FBI and then they have access to the FBI's photos but what we also know is that many states also include face recognition in their driver's license databases so about forty three states in the United States include face recognition and their driver's license databases databases and of those twenty to thirty states are sharing that information with the cops as well. That's really very interesting could it. Could I find down. If I'm in a database. Well you know I think that if you live in one of the forty three states that has face recognition in their driver's license database then you're likely in that database of you have a driver's license. If you have a passport you could also be in the State Department's face recognition database and if you've ever been arrested for a crime there's a good chance that you're in the FBI's mugshot database so but there's no central place on the Internet then I can look up my name and see if I'm in a database implant nope. There's no central place on the Internet and so I think that's really challenging for Americans right now because based on a study out of Georgetown we learned a couple years ago that pretty much fifty percent of Americans are already in a government face recognition database but it's hard to figure out which database you're in who has access access to that information and whether you can actually get yourself out of that face recognition database does law enforcement have to disclose how they're using your day year facial recognition commissioner of the UN the database well. I think there's a good argument that under public records laws they should have to disclose that we have a right to WHO information about what data the government has on us under the Privacy Act which is a federal law but you know we should also be able to contact contact our local and state police departments and ask them whether they have information on us as well and that includes face recognition. Do we have a sense of what could be next and how it's used news well. We do have a sense of that and so for the most part what we're seeing now with face recognition is that law enforcement is trying to use face recognition finish non static images so that might be trying to identify somebody in a facebook post or instagram post or trying to identify somebody who refuses to identify themselves against the mugshot database but what we're seeing on the near horizon is the the use of face recognition on the back and of cameras surveillance cameras embody cameras so I think we will start to see that very soon and in cities across the country unless we see cities start to pass bands or Moratoria like we've seen in San Francisco Disco Oakland and Somerville. What about facial recognition for example used in the public by commercial uses like if you walk into a mall and you're going to a store they did they take a picture of your face and going to a database or possibly figure out what you're shopping for yeah well. We don't have any federal privacy. Laws is right now that require stores or malls to disclose that information to you we do know that there are companies that are selling face recognition and technology to stores and malls and and these companies are claiming that stores can use it to identify shoplifters or even to identify people who you're a longtime customers who might be willing to pay a lot of money for that next shoe or piece of jewelry and sorry go ahead. I'm sorry oh I was going to say what we don't know is. How do people get into these databases in order to have face recognition identification. You have to match somebody's somebody's image against an existing database of photos so our stores responsible for putting people in a database. We don't know that and stores could be basing that AH on discriminatory practices that I think that's even more of a threat from government database because we don't have access to public records laws that can let us know whether stores have us in a database so that's one of the biggest worries. If this thing just gets totally surge flooding right everybody sooner or later database yeah. I think we're on the cusp of that right now and that's why it's so important for communities to have conversations nations about what they really want to have happen in their communities. we're seeing this happening California. I mentioned the two cities that have already banned government use of face recognition but we also have a bill that just passed the Senate yesterday our state Senate that would put a moratorium on face recognition use on mobile cameras for three years. So how can how concerned should we be about the I'm going to call universal face recognition coming coming our way. I think we should be very concerned learned. We can look at what's happening in China right now where there are multiple cameras on every street corner and those cameras aren't just using face recognition but they're also using other other kinds of technologies like gait recognition to identify people as they're walking away from the camera object recognition and character recognition to recognize license plates and cars all sorts of different technologies like that and and I think that we already have existing networks of cameras in the United United States. It wouldn't take much to add face recognition onto the back end of those cameras. What about the possibility of mismatch. How accurate is face MM facial recognition well? It really depends on several factors so lighting and angle of you are huge but we also know based on some research studies. Eddie's face recognition is much less accurate at identifying people of Color Women and children or young people a lot of people that is a lot of people and if you consider that our criminal justice system is disproportionately made up of people of color that means that the USA face recognition in the criminal justice system what have an even more disproportionate impact on people of color. We we got a comment from a listener through science Friday vox poppy Robert from Holly Springs. Georgia facial recognition is already in use with passports and other security devices so why should should the criminal justice system night used facial recognition. Yeah you know you you you get your phone open right by facial recognition. Mike and you were already being recognized there well. There's different ways to use face recognition so if you're using face recognition on your phone in general dot doc biometric is just stored on your phone and your phone is the only source for that and the only place where there is access to that but there are also these vast government databases now the question is should the government have access to photographs that were taken not for criminal purpose but for a purely civil purpose to be able to drive a car to be able to travel outside the country and I think there's a strong argument that we have never allowed the government to have fast access to those databases unrestricted access and we shouldn't allow that now and I guess they have the difference would be when you use your phone for facial recognition. You've given on your phone permission to look exactly have yeah I want to move on a little bit and believe it or not there is also emotion and detection and this technology that claims to assess facial movements and expressions and make conclusions about whether someone is frayed or nervous Jason Angry. It's just interesting to think about and if you follow the money this is a twenty billion dollar industry companies like Amazon and Microsoft and IBM are developing and and selling this technology to police departments among others so how accurate how accurate could these emotion detection systems be here to fill us in on this is Lisa Feldman Barrett a professor of psychology at Northeastern University. She joins us in via skype. Dr Barrett Welcome to the program. Thanks for having me on your show. You're welcome. Let's start with how good are humans at detecting emotions from facial expressions. Well humans don't detect emotions humans infer emotions so if you and I were in the same room right now we our brains would be processing not only are facial movements but our vocal sounds is our body postures. There's a whole broad context that your brain takes advantage of to make a guess about what the raise an eyebrow means what the curl of a lip means and so on but so can we tell with any shirty. How if someone is happy or angry or we're not well? I think it depends hands on how well we know each other and whether or not we come from the same context so same cultural context so I think the research shows pretty clearly that humans are guessing you're to you. It feels feels like you're reading. Someone's face like you would read words on a page but that's actually not what your brain is doing. It's making an inference and if someone comes from the same culture as you and you've known on them for a long time you've learned a lot about the patterns of their facial movements and what they means so you can guess pretty well but if you and I come from a different culture then we're probably going to have some you know mistakes and our guests is because the data are really clear that people in Western cultures like ours scowl more often than chance when they're angry but only about thirty percent of the time which means that seventy seventy percent of the time when you scowl on average you know you're feeling something else and you scowl at a lot of times when you're not angry like when you're concentrating or when you're confused about something so we're using not just the face but a whole ensemble of signals and so face reading and is is really limited. I would say that's from what my question was. If we are not good as humans in knowing what you know these expressions I mean how do we teach that to one to recommend so. It's so first of all. I think it's really important to understand what a I can do and what it can't. I have four senior colleagues. Colleagues in the five of us just published a paper where we reviewed over a thousand scientific studies some of which are a studies where we reviewed all the I studies that we could get our hands on and it's really clear that what I can do pretty well is it can detect a smile but not what to smile means. It can detect a frown not what a frown means and that's under perfect recording conditions so when the face isn't included and when the lake conditions are are good and so on so you know hey I can it doesn't make inferences about what official movement means it just text the facial movements. She'll bins are are. I would say you know reasonably good at guessing under some circumstances and really bad at other circumstances and scientists study. You know what makes a good perceiver. When do people make mistakes and so on so you know. It's it's a complicated question. That's not just about the movement of the face. It's also also about what that movement means in a psychological way on my replace this is science. Friday from WNYC studios talking about artificial artificial intelligence and facial recognition so so.

United States FBI WNYC studios San Francisco Alec Baldwin Oakland San Mendez Wynton Marsalis Koyo Bernie Sanders Dublin Acuity Connecticut Senate Sei fry Jennifer Lynch State Department California Electric Frontier Foundation
"police department" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"police department" Discussed on 1A

"And now we have a a statewide tracking system put the entire state when a survivor has a rape kit done it is scanned in also it has entered into a computer database when it's picked up by law enforcement is entered into the computer database when law enforcement takes it to the crime lab it's entered into the computer database. And when law enforcement picks it up after the kid has tested it has entered into the computer database, and there is a victim portal with the victim condole in and find out where they raped it is and it's not fully implemented yet. We have done it on the west side of the state, and it will be fully implemented. I believe by the end of the year. So all over Michigan. We could know where each and every rape kit is at every bend intern. So we're very proud of it. We should never have in any stockpiling rape kits in Michigan. If this works properly, and we know that it will do more of the a prosecutor in Wayne County. Michigan Kim, I really appreciate your time. Thanks for talking to us. Thank you. Let me get to a few more of your questions and comments as we continue with CNN's, Ashley fonts and Lieutenant John summer and dyke of the Fayetteville police department, rob emails in college. I had a close friend who was drugged and raped. She begged me to stay as a rape kit was administered from a third party in the room. It was soul Baring and a horrible experience for her. I died inside for her during the process. The fact that her kit could have gone to waste after that is devastating miss Spencer tweets when my vagina is a crime scene. I expect compassion and human connection from all involved. Training is essential. Actually, could you respond to miss Spencer? One of the big parts of the investigation that you and the team at CNN put together is just the disrespect that some victims of rapes were treated with what's behind that. Sure. I'll respond to that in a moment. But I have got to respond to the frightening. Ignorance of that Utah. Prosecutor who left a voicemail I want to touch on a point that she needs to understand. And so do every other law enforcement agents agent in this country as well as every single prosecutor that a prosecutor worthy did not address when you have a case in which a suspect claims can sense..

rape prosecutor Michigan Spencer CNN Lieutenant John summer Kim Wayne County Fayetteville police department intern Utah Ashley
"police department" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"police department" Discussed on 1A

"And when you say that it they were thrown away to clear up space in an evidence room. I'm that sounds very callous on its face. But you know, I'm not in law enforcement. I don't know how much evidence law enforcement agencies have to go through. What did you make of that rationale? Yeah. Obviously that's something all on forcing agencies have to take into account. We we have a limited space for evidence collection and evidence submission evidence stored. So it is something that has to be taken into account. But there comes a time where certain pieces of evidence probably need to be given more of a priority. Over other pieces talk about the culture of the Fayetteville police department at the time, particularly as it relates to the way that rape and sexual assault were investigated were treated compared to other crimes like robbery. Or homicide or a non sexual assault. Yeah. Back then we just didn't really do that great a job. And I had this conversation recent with that recently with Ashley, and I told her I don't really wanna come across like, I'm pointing fingers like I'm this high and mighty great detective because I was there I investigated rapes in the nineties and night. I did not do that great job with a lot of the rapes I investigated. So just the culture was and I'm sure this wasn't, you know, unique to the fabled police departments just they weren't always a priority, rapes weren't always a priority. The you know, I was crimes against persons detective, and you know, homicides were the priority business armed robberies after that aggravated assaults after that. And usually after that is where the rapes fell into line. And we just didn't have quite an understanding. I think of the dynamics of rapes investigations, or why victims might not always make sense, you know, when we're interviewing and so they they weren't always a priority. And I think just over the years we've made some significant movements. Definitely want to talk about that as we continue our conversation. And we're starting to get some comments from you, particularly your stories of dealing with this firsthand. Laurie wrote on our Facebook page hearing things like this make me feel certain. I did the right thing for me by not reporting. My rape. This is proof that women's lives. Don't matter and undoubtably women of color experience this more than white women. Actually, I'd like you to respond to that last comments. I read that's heartbreaking. But it's understandable. And I can certainly. I can certainly see where she's coming from having reviewed along with my colleagues sonum Bashan Sergio Hernandez who are the other reporters on this investigation reviewing more than fourteen hundred rape investigations. This is certainly a a widespread problem we found that law enforcement agencies.

rape Sergio Hernandez assault Facebook Fayetteville Laurie Ashley robbery
"police department" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"police department" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"I i do want to thank all of the multitude of law enforcement agencies involved in this process include the santa fe police department galveston sheriff's office texas department of public safety league city police department as i mentioned earlier about the fbi as well as the atf the galveston police department harris county sheriff's office texas city police department police department and houston metro police department and two things we're working on as we speak one is is to make sure that parents are going to be notified as swiftly as possible one thing that depends upon is how swiftly the crime scene is going to be able to be dealt with with the concern being that for the potential explosive devices on the crime scene i think that's something that can be worked out here in a very short period of time second very importantly is the necessity of providing counselling to everybody involved certainly counseling for the families for for any living victim but for all of the students at the school and i would say the entire independent school district the i know that resources are being provided by the county for that they also being provided by the state and we will have whatever amount of counselors the the school district needs i've had the opportunity to visit with the superintendent you're listening to the.

fbi houston metro police departmen superintendent santa fe police department texas atf galveston harris county texas city police department
"police department" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"police department" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"What's not talked about a lot in relation to this cops there is that he was planning on testifying against these guys and he was actually not part of their scheme and in fact when he found out about it he complained about it to higherups and help to get the case going then he is mysteriously killed the baltimore police department turns it against the people in baltimore locks down the neighborhood which is something that they have done for decades that goes all the way back to my youth where they would lock down a whole neighbourhood if something happened that they didn't like and the whole neighborhood suffered collective punishment and ignored the fact there who was really benefiting by this guy's there were the cops carrying out this dirty deeds among the masses and interestingly enough the police department was in especially interested in investigating it a call was made for the feds to come in for the fbi to investigate it and the fbi refused to do so which tells us something about this now there's something to be said about the defense theory in this with defence the cops are putting forward one defence is what we were just following orders which interesting but the orders were clearly a legal 'cause he if a higher up cop is telling you to go rob people implant guns and drugs on a you should be pretty clear that he's giving you a legal orders and carrying them out means that you should go in each go down with you one of the cops though has an interesting approach to it he says well it's not really robbery because we were taking the money from people who gained it you'll legally and if only becomes wrong when we didn't turn again and the reason he's making this argument is that of charge.

baltimore police department fbi robbery baltimore
"police department" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"police department" Discussed on WCHS

"Time is now seven seventeen coming up cow wiggs joins us on sports right now in our background her head bear steve williams says he understands why hunting to residents are concerned the city recorded its 18th homicide this year on tuesday had prompted williams to call a news conference any sent a message to the city with representatives of law enforcement at his side part of that statement in our metronews background the citizens of our community are not just hard not just protected by worldclass police department huntington police department were also we're also protected at the at the local level at the county level through the sheriff's department at the state level through the state state police department through the marcy university police department as well and we have working relationships with the fbi the da the atf and the us attorney's office will be looking forward to continue with that relationship and working sprinkling those relationship in relation relationships in the future this strong show of force is intended really to be able to show the public of what they can basin continuing the same moving forward in in preventive measures to ensure that the public to the public that we're doing everything in our power to to keep them safe very simply this every person in this community has understandable angst over of quite has.

law enforcement huntington police department marcy university police depart fbi atf us attorney steve williams worldclass
"police department" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"police department" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The chief of the plainfield police department just rolling as i think that's this is why we can't have nice this is but did you hear them the guy said he chief or he can let her get away with that he because on june worth let me help you and under all why i raise a flurry speak hey speaking of offensive councilman jeff miller issued a statement yeah this came out about an hour ago r a lot of people are wondering why he has not stepped down from his position in the council yet pretty ugly charges of molestation and he's not have stepped down yet sue i'm wondering why i guess he just issued a statement so obviously it's addressed here in the statement correct it's a long statement it rambles it goes into like sidewalks in graffiti is an infrastructure but the meat and potatoes of what you need to know is that he states i entered a plea of not guilty in my case but otherwise cannot discuss the details that's the only thing about the charges you'll hear in the statement he does go onto say quote but i did want to address why i'm remaining in my council seat when i ran for council in two thousand eleven it was for one reason on only to give a voice to those who felt they didn't have a voice and he goes into a long rant about the things that a council is supposed to do and wrapped it up by talking about how he wants to be such a good father to a son uh the only statement i'm issuing a five have those kinds of charges levied against me and i didn't do it would be i didn't do it i did not touch care that's probably the only statement that i'd make hate real quick before we hit into a traffic here while matt bear standing by in just a moment there was a.

plainfield police department jeff miller matt bear
"police department" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"police department" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And so there is a higher level of accountability and focus because you are the only one that have the power to take away someone's life and freedom under the law and so because you have that kind of power it is our responsibility to make sure we hope that system accountable beat you know and it's interesting to because so much of we went with the scandal that that that happened um so much of what was positive that was happening at the department was lost one going back to one of the original questions of with surprise me anew it was those went in the department as a whole that the seemed like an incredibly progressive department was making lots of progress officerinvolved shooting were way down on they were at the at the front leading the charge on body warned cameras saying though the first department the nation to sort of fully implement body warned cameras and for four four you know the failures to occur apt in the in the midst of all this progress particularly at that that at the lead of sean went what we were trying to reconcile that sort of us a store tells what does this mean and coming as it did alex say and with a new mayor who had come on an inherited the shows and i guess not brand new but you know at changes at the top of the political structure are always disruptive and met with some cynicism i think in police departments i mean i think for the first part of her term we be chef was presiding over a city in a police department that was being held up as a model for the nation on early adoption of body cameras was a major part of that as well as some of these other um you know more nittygritty sort of statistical um but really achievements that the department had had built in and there was much discussion that federal court oversight wouldbe ending soon on before the sexual exploitation case surfaced so but like other mayors before her on the oakland police department became a major overriding challenge and hat and has has remained for about a year now the fbi chief yes and i think i want to respond to something that was mentioned earlier about the department ten and not being responsive to these issues around the scandal i think uh is being clear ivc that achieve as is done a critical review of a.

sean oakland police department fbi alex
"police department" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"police department" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That the chief and we may have access to the chief but the chiefs meeting with people within the justice department from the outside who may not know about the film and so's a constant pushing poll between us wanting to get as deeply on the inside not just doing right along with the officers we feel like we've seen that you know we wanted to sort of get his as intimately involved in that process of reform as we could and we could not get into every every meeting soza constance renegotiation that we have with a department and of course part of reform it begins with training and other many scenes in the kaddoumi where of their hers instruction being given to these recruits and a lot of this is about history of the department how did the opd get to a point where it is today and i want to play a little clip and this includes so you deputy chief armstrong and pastor mcbride talking about miss trust in the community this community as hat is is is that they can point to that affects the way they deal you not you as an individual but you in that police uniform the oakland police department has a history that's been contentious with this community although some of us might say others have anything to do with me man all that stuff was hell a long time ago born on lift enough is the pass stole your identity and ran up an incredibly high bill and so many of us much open historian be like it's all be yes these false complaining about stuff they just make making a mountain out of a molehill but the past stole your identity and it has run up an incredibly high bill and everything that we do is either ghana helped run that villa or is going to bring that down again that clip from the force about the oakland police department and run our strong you were born and raised in oakland you are now deputy chief of the opd talk about the the bridge you have to the divide but you have to.

oakland police department oakland deputy chief chiefs chief armstrong pastor mcbride ghana
"police department" Discussed on College Football Live

College Football Live

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"police department" Discussed on College Football Live

"Would you know i think it was a combination of things so is the world's largest baptist university they were concerned about protecting their christian um reputation it was a football programme that has traditionally been one of the worst programs in the country suddenly they were very successful under our browse and and i think there was just ineptness across the board from the ethnic department to the coaching staff to the title nine office which really wasn't what are we supposed to be in in even the waco police department in the baylor police department all eu has story on espn dot com right now basically a column wearing talk about writing this book you called it a story of loss what did you mean by that you know when i look back on my college experience and me a lot of people look back on there's they think of the funding had the you know professors they meer uh that were funny and and younger experiences for these women when they look back on their college experience they're going to be thinking about rape kits and interviews with police detectives and trying to sort out their classes so they avoid their alleged of perpetrator they have lost what the the college experience was supposed to be for them they have lost their expectation of safety uh and they will be dealing with that for many months and years to come new noted that it was also a loss for society as a whole everyone seems to want to know what art brial is new and when he knew it why did he not take advantage of this opportunity to speak to you guys mark.

waco police department baylor police department eu espn rape
"police department" Discussed on True Crime Garage

True Crime Garage

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"police department" Discussed on True Crime Garage

"The chicago police department and he told the investigators involved he said look my son's name is no longer on this database for missing persons did you find him of course is the first thing he wants to know and then second of all he wants to know what y what his name be removed i don't know the specifics of why it was taken off but the problem that dawn ross has with the investigation and that i would have with this investigation as well is that he'll lurd did them of this and they seem to drag their feet about putting him back onto the database so the way the database works is that information has to be uploaded uploaded in inputted by somebody by one of the investigators involved in the case so then that database didn't do anything wrong they sit around waiting for somebody to give them the information lesotho was a glitch right regardless though captain give a here's how it works you file missing person report than you go looking for the person if the police find the person they have no legal responsibility to tell the family that we found this person and that he is okay to have no legal responsibility to do so right and and that's that's on them now they might the say jesse went missing on his own accord and they go jesse do you want us to tell your family now they don't have any responsibility to tell the family all we found him he's okay the ever responsibility to the city and the taxpayers to close the case so i wonder if on some level it was one of these things where they closed the case.

chicago police department dawn ross jesse