23 Burst results for "Poku"

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

04:58 min | 5 months ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"And I'd be remiss if I didn't bring up our dear sweet boy. Poku. It was the purest experience. I was texting with NBA person during this game. Yeah. And they brought up the idea that he really struggles to play down in competition. Like in the G league in summer league, things like that because he is so confident in his abilities, but also can't shoot yet. And that's a significant problem. And then he just ends up driving, not without a I think he has a plan, but he's not good enough to execute the plan yet. There are so many flashes where you're like, oh, this is great. I love it. And then they're like, oh, this is never going to work. What the fuck are we still doing here? Flashes. And. My point remains that there is somewhere between zero and 100% chance that alexey poker chevsky is going to be an effective NBA player at some point. It's somewhere in there. Yeah, at least he did something that made you feel like he could play on an NBA court, you know? He had some nice passes. He stayed in front of defensively at times. You know, drop back up like 6 times. It was great. For me with poku. What he needs to do this year is not get sent to the G league. That's all he needs to do. If he gets sent to the G league early again this year, I think you can at least, I don't know, you need to pull the plug, but you can put your hand on the plug in preparation to pull it, you know? Here's the thing. Years in a row, in my opinion, for him to really make it. We play trivia on your podcast regularly. Yeah. Trivia time for you. How much older is Alexei chevsky than Chet holmgren?

Poku NBA poku Alexei chevsky Chet holmgren
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

03:07 min | 9 months ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"He still just has these flashes of just brilliance where you're like, holy crap, this guy, if he put it all together, he could be the best player on the thunder, but it happens like ten seconds out of like 5000 seconds. Right. I'm all in. No, I'm not. But I'm intrigued by poku enough. Yeah. Like look, I think they should play him out like through all four years of his rookie scale deal. Yeah. I don't think they should decline the option by any stretch. And be surprised, yeah. Yeah, I would too, given the way that I think they went into that. It's just the fascinating player. The main rule with poku is that there is between a zero and 100% chance that he will be a good NBA player at some point. I think that I'm still somewhere within that range that there is between a zero and 100% chance. I enjoy watching him. He is fascinating. And he's getting, he's getting better, and we'll see. And when I say getting better, I mean, he can be on the court and not being embarrassment. That's the level that we're at today. Yeah, that's a big step though. Being on the court with NBA players in not looking like you shouldn't be there. Yeah. Agreed. Yeah. I don't know. Okay. Andrew schleck, tell the people where they can find your work, tell the people where they can find you. Yeah, you can find me on Twitter at Andrew K schlacht. You can listen to my thunder podcast. It's called down to dunk and then listen to the athletic NBA show where you can find me in various days. Definitely Saturday. Definitely Wednesday night and then scattered throughout. Schleck is the best guys go follow all of his work and those various podcasts. Go subscribe to the game theory YouTube channel. You can find that at game theory podcast with Sam fassini go subscribe to this podcast. We will be back later this week, Matt penny, and I are doing a mailbag episode we decided. The last couple of weeks, we have not answered any mailbag questions because we have just done mock drafts and ended up in a world where we were going way too long. So we wanted to answer some of your questions on the draft heading into March Madness. So that's our plan. If you want to send in questions, please send in questions now. I will put out a Twitter note as well on that probably tomorrow on my end. But until next time, we will talk soon. Bye..

poku NBA Andrew schleck Andrew K schlacht Sam fassini Matt penny Schleck Twitter YouTube
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

04:53 min | 9 months ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"Them in Tulsa, which is a two hour drive. And for most NBA teams, that is totally cool. Like that's close enough, no worries. We'll just send them out the turnpike. And their in Tulsa and two hours. The center of that is not good enough. We need them here. And they played in an arena that was across the street. Now that arena isn't there anymore, they're like just play here. Play play where we play. And we're working the schedule. To me, that's another thing that Sam and his team have done. That has been wildly important to what they want to do. Because they can send poku down there for two weeks. And it's not a big deal. And they can still have a really keen eye on him. Keep them around the team, too. That's the thing. Calling back up. They've done that. They have games at noon. The column up and he'll be sitting on the bench with the team. He may not play, but he'll be sitting on the bench with the guys that night. Well, the bigger thing with poku too is that a lot of G league teams don't have like incredible like weight training facilities, right? And they don't have like NBA level amenities, right? It's not to say that like the G league is improving. Don't get me wrong, like in terms of the amount of money that's being filtered down from NBA teams to them in order to help facilitate the development of those young players. But it's different like literally having the NBA organization right there. You are right there. Able to take advantage of the amenities that the NBA team has so that when you send guys down, you feel like they're not losing valuable developmental time. Watching tape with the NBA coaching staff because you can call them up and just be like, hey, you're in this film session. Let's go. You know, you can call them up and just be like, hey, you're in the weight room. Let's do this thing. You just play for you play for the blue. You were down there for three hours. You're back up. Let's do this. Yep. And the amenities are not bad. I've been in their facilities a few times. Like, they have a chef on staff and got a really nice weight room, the court is really nice. They've got offices. It's a nice facility. It actually used to be an old roller rink called The Rock and roller rink that they converted. Look at this inside info. I love it. Let's do it. The Rock and roller rink. Have you done have you done a down to dunk event at The Rock and roller rink slang? This is too much information, but me and my friend Alex spears, who does the slam jam pod and down to dunk with me. We used to play music together. And we played many concerts at The Rock and roller rink back in the day. That's a dream, unbelievable. I love it so much. Oh, yes. To shift gears from that beautiful moment there, because I'm on the slam and Jim after and you better believe that. Yes. We're bringing that on the spirit. The thing that I think can often be the biggest struggle with tanking teams is the coaching staff, because coaches don't want.

poku NBA Tulsa Sam Alex spears Jim
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"It's like honestly, though, if they would have taken him 6th look, I don't know if I necessarily would have agreed at the time, but I think that my thoughts on this have changed enough to where I think yes. That's fine with me because if you're comparing him or in yakko Kong Wu, who we think is like a solid double, right? You can find on yek, a Kong Wu's. You can't find pokus if poku hits. Like, if poku hits it's a 100 X of what you paid for him. Even at 6, it's 75 X, what you paid for him. Over the course of the 6th overall pick in the first four years of his career. Like, to me, that's the kind of swing that you want in the draft. That's how you win the draft, I think. You definitely can win it that way. A 1000%. I just remember the videos and the clips of trying to find poke stuff and it was like he was playing as like us. There was no barometer of talent of what he was doing. He legitimately looked like a 7 foot one Magic Johnson hybrid, but it's like, I don't know who's honest to God. I don't know who he's playing against. So because of that, it's just kind of hard to make that. It's hard for everybody. Regardless of you draft, right? But it's still a wild one. Yeah, it's a totally different deal with the poker one. Like just the level of tape that was out there on that guy was just like, you had no idea. And by the way, it was the same with Giannis as well. Got it. It was hilarious. You'd watch it at the time, too. And not to compare poku in Giannis, Yanis just always had much better physical tools than what Polk who had. But he was good though. Forever. While tyrese Halliburton's there, we had a whole like you didn't take him. You went too crazy at 6. Like you do that later in the draft. But to me, again, like, from a process perspective like I'm okay with going for swings at this point. I think that's where I'm at. Like, I think that you try to 50 X a hundred X your money in the draft. There's just that's how you win the NBA draft. That's how Milwaukee changed the trajectory of their franchise through building in the NBA draft. They hit Giannis, right? That's how I'm trying to think of like other examples. That's how Denver hit the drafted Nikola Jokić who was 270 pounds and like overweight. But they had a first round grade on him. They had the pick in the 40s. It's easier to take them the 40s. It sounds like it sounds like diplomacy. It sounds like you're on board. Do it. Do it. Here. Say it. Here's what I say. If I had a higher grade on Josh primo, like if I thought Josh primo was really actually really good, I totally agree with you. Like your process in terms of evaluating where you had Josh primo, I totally agree with taking wrong. I was like, oh my God, this is wild, but he's been good. Reports are that he works. Everybody loves him. He's been in these tiny minutes. Like ah, throw a primo see what he does. Oh, he's 8 for 9 for the field as 18 points. And spurs Twitter is going nuts. We did it. We picked it, but that peck was crushed by a lot of people. And I could still be very wrong, but I credit that organization for taking that startup a hundred X, 50 X swing to try to change everything..

Giannis poku yakko Kong Wu Kong Wu Josh primo Yanis tyrese Halliburton Nikola Jokić NBA Polk Milwaukee Denver peck Twitter
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"Unfortunately, we saw him play 5 minutes and 16 seconds and summer league, and then yeah, I think it's not an uncommon tale that people checked out on the thumb there after he was gone, because he was like the most interesting piece by far. Yeah, he really was. Yeah, look, Oklahoma City, I mean, they're probably going to be the worst team in the NBA next year. And that's fine. I don't think they have any illusions otherwise. If they honestly, if they have it their way, they will be. I honestly. That's what that's what this is, that's what this is all about. And I think that there was a lot of people in Oklahoma City that understand what the team is doing. And so halfway through the year, when it looks like they were in the mix for the play and it's like, well, what are we doing, guys? What is this? This isn't the plan. So I think they will play enough young players, and that's why another reason why I think if you are a thunder fan and you understand what they're trying to do, then you can understand why they would just wave Kemba Walker before the season. Because Kimball walkers a floor razor. An unnecessary thing for where this team is headed. So yeah, they should be one of the worst teams in the league. Really just due to an experience. You know, these all these guys had three or four years under their belt. I think this could be a pretty decent team, but they don't. And young players lose games. That's just the way the NBA works. Yeah, I'm going to be interested to see poku this year because he is just the best. Like just watching Pokémon to be happy. What a bizarre player. I'm going to be interested to see Darius baisley this year. Like, that's the guy that's like kind of gotten lost. And I have actually liked more of what I've seen from him than what I think most people have recognized just because he's been hidden away in Oklahoma City. Like he's still learning defensively and he's still like a sub 30% three point shooter. But there are a lot of tools there. There are a lot of athletic tools that he's shown. Yeah, yeah, I'm intrigued. This is a big year for baisley without a doubt. He will be extension eligible after this season and the thunder don't like players to get to restricted free agency and they usually will extend them or they'll trade them. And so to me, this is basically future in OKC will likely be determined how he plays this season. So to me, I'd like to see them not necessarily a box him in, but I'd like to I'd like to see him be able to showcase some kind of like three and D ability and then transition like ball handling and transition ability to because he's got that in his bag, certainly. So I'm interested to see him too..

Oklahoma City NBA poku Kemba Walker Darius baisley Kimball baisley thunder
"poku" Discussed on Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

"Last week is that you lost report. Nicole is my last report that will make it out only with my byline. I will have a draft. That i'll be handing off to others before i leave. Okay we don't worry into snuck in a wet related stats just away markets. You'll have a line when the cookie apocalypse does arrive. The digital ad will look different. Final thing i'll ask you on the show if it's a big question but if you could maybe summarize it for folks because we're not going to have your brain anymore. What will it look like. What are you imagining that digital ad. Well to click. That's a great question. Marcus yeah so. There's two main thing that i have in mind when i say that. So the idea here is that cookie. Deprecation has been essentially put off for two additional years but the world is not standing still over the next two years as people try to deal with that. So what are some things. Some big things that are going to be happening to change the shape of the digital ad market between now and then one is the continuing rise of retail media and just in general publishers. Being better at monetize in their data and more entities like retailers realizing they can be publishers. We estimate that this year one in eight dollars will go to retail media. Already only gonna get bigger from here. The other major change is the continuing rise of sea. Tv and the convergence of address ability across both see tv and forms linear tv including programmatic. An addressable air tv. We have gone through a step change in the amount of money going to see tv because of the pandemic and we're also now an permanently declining linear tv ad market. So the important thing to know here is that see. Tv is a calculus environment. It always has been cookie. Deprecation doesn't affect it so as we head further toward cookie deprecation. We're also spending less and less and less time in web based environments cookies exist so the changes will have different relevance in two years. I feel like now if you have a host jerome poku separates this. Nicole should be caught in the coal knows. Too much remarkable That's why you have to leave. Unfortunately thank you so much to. My guests We stopped with nicole. Thank you so much for being a part of the show. She was there in the beginning. She's helped us so much with everything. You can possibly imagine and then took on hosting responsibilities as well as being a guest and just being a huge supporter of the show so nicole. Thank you for me about victoria. Everyone else who's watching the pope. Everyone in the company and of course thank you so much to my guests. Thank you to thank you guys in the cold. It's been a pleasure and an honor. Thank you pull. Thank you and yes. I agree Nicole it's been amazing working with you for the past. I don't know how long have you been with us. Twelve thirteen years. I've been here longer. So we've worked together many many different permutations and everyone more gratifying than the next. I will miss you. But i'm glad that we will remain in contact and that..

Nicole jerome poku Marcus nicole victoria
"poku" Discussed on Bobkast

Bobkast

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Bobkast

"All those oastler. Maria it is certified Fade in the event. The the own the hardware over. Fred familiar log buffet harder. Gator nomi is fighting. Miguel do holtzman on paul of madonna. Familia nothing cosco. Since the global someone mallender formula coq invited while disc and caulking. Roundup to your Tank there all right it among asper short paying not among aids and had s instead business offer commercial from what some tedium kite mamba unique episode Dumi non tara electing a we certainly cost to spa gotta them for stood before the ball beta now. The on the short sample fit. That are is more in both familiar. So much. the all seven. Thanks to die alphabet. Does mu sandra tradition to hug mcdisney. Dominant on tag level. Somali scholar line. We forbid at end the at vegetables even know bump day almost deterred every moyle. Evan that does not and four young. Because this cottam on the let more by the federal costa matt at saint joe the died me yet and the ankle at they call make saute programs dealings on the drop novi hot. Who's i that cartman than us. Networks yellow took to the canola system to nobody not oh as in suggests elliott uk's that it jokes materials that Salon dot com look among showed children new woman and the semi Response cuba sticky. Hit also meyde monk will then pay mitten saw. So thank you all to be scruple poor naked or from sticky others a headphone somewhere. Making me net down there. How lost fossil. To forestall elgort on. And i'm not through to answer for store. Call that the night. I had Call caller gortat poku awesome briefly remote disc nor retired among for lonzo aspect short. Eleanor tied. Not they're mad. Put amal disc. I'll do nominated to tighten and nitin soko tardelli. Snooka sucked your thoughts. Gordon problem yet. You really good though all of it or of For them and somewhat Them some event coon hall. She love what you really soviet will grow your share some inaba grocer of for example gaming on haiku called look what have meant put out gaming while invited And the and the game media all on the cooperating died over there would get against megrahi recalled now meno nest also some kayak manta. They're not call you. Okay theater roy. Gaming uncle matere out divided rotten mellon gay mirror or somebody that would his gap until do cobra Do do couldn't common l'union mensa languedoc crop scott and also social mellon cuttings mccardinal cardinal. Bet throw you had thought so So i am making video telescope. Tom cobra lull sharon for vate. Upending the buck tabachnic to knock super on concentrations later tat knuckle sumika agony horno. Marisol really stuck so lucas to man's then it'll rekindled although it gaming on so hans present data hype isn't it with you'll contractor lit de document Hongmei clayoquot yeah cobra shot team. Only taylor oh domino to shed the bin laden thing or connecticut and said the phone doma mangled tobar catella. Neither nobody officer told him and mustered up our little slow by the goto bucket harden do not merely divide go sinead o. Vita victor something they would start aldag. Poco russia been tell us been less led. The dow or loans per diem outlook on bail was on with some looked at volk compiler thus what posner allow i looked he had thought look dead. Tariq looked out for big footed aucune From dell thought balanced on roy. Issue at augusta. If it'll tell them home mental Particularly alex eka hold the ball. Pay 'em or i said Oh since the structure that says it's gonna though pepita that will just a disaster menotti sunset math raw bill de would go mike game mccain how foot or For the for the very good. I zakum tat bobby. Mentors the hood is not going little the amount of costa or who skills sure shocked could have all noted the nieta. Her daughter died. It's not comical date mountain men that new scholastic some brooke has forty orlando's nocco home. From tale all dos. Gabu dog scarlet. Over sean farage. Do ya the el-atta soifer for soda. Kanka y'all just with shield. Y'all all davol contra died died these turn shutout Fatah all dealing she'll also economic know sombrero on torch. So ma made on sweat died and grow Dashi okay for dicey namib. Division fred funds kappen some heels and fiscal company. Awesome and i thought who telephoned near the mouse and bringing yeah. Yeah 'cause on the phone okay. Dwindle a little stop organism..

oastler Gator nomi mcdisney cottam meyde monk gortat poku lonzo nitin soko tardelli holtzman coon hall cosco saint joe meno nest moyle cartman Miguel Tom cobra madonna Maria Fred
"poku" Discussed on Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

"Want to chime in on the controversy about benjamin from california so the conspiracy is that There's a a pseudonym benjamin from california that mark is going on debt to complement himself. Now that he's off the show as the question is is benjamin from california real person or is it mark messing with us. So that's the that's the contract controversy. So he says On the controversy about benjamin californian who's kind remarks much appreciated. When i retired few months ago. He is absolutely a real person and not a false identity concocted for the sake of surreptitiously praising myself of course. Marcus and this is insane. You'll have noticed that the phrase benjamin from california is an anagram for a firm. I ran email con job. But that's pure coincidence. Says bass is actually an anagram for that very phrase affirm iran email con job. Benjamin from california. I wonder if mark came up with that on the spot or if he had to rehearse it as well it genius. Now i think you i thought bedrooms a real person. Now i have no idea plot thickens java definitely a contract. He's probably stay tuned. Poku emarketer dot com. If you want to say hi sanderson any thoughts feelings. Questions focused monster dot com. We move now to dinner posse data. This is the part of the show. But we tell you the most interesting thing that we've recently learned you start with tokyo police offers. Why no you've all been waiting for this data point to come through this year the. Us postal service reported on the number of dog attacks. That happened on their postal workers in different cities. Around the us and the city would attract this they. Of course you didn't know of course. Of course they do track this and the honor for the city with the most incidents in. I believe it's twenty twenty was houston texas however what i think is the most important statistic here is not the number of incidents but the number of incidents per capita right and in that sense. The winner is drum. Roll please. cleveland cleveland ohio. Now so if anyone lives in cleveland. Who's listening about we feel your pain. And if you don't live in cleveland but you have friends there's just please think twice before you send them anything in.

benjamin california benjamin californian Poku emarketer mark Marcus Benjamin sanderson iran Us postal service tokyo cleveland houston texas us ohio
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"Where they've just been like actively terrible. Yeah, yeah. And he's twenty-five, not that we should hold that against him, but yeah. Anyway, yeah. That's I would, I would differ just in the one spot there, but that, that would be my pick. You did not go quickly on your team. I want to be clear with everyone, this was not me. This was Kyle man. Go find him at k, e m o n n, o r, n b a on twitter.com. Go find Last.fm, it's five spots people take the stuff so personally. But anyway, yeah, Kyle please tell me tell the people where they can find your work. Tell the people where they can listen to you everything like that, you're going to find most of my life work on the ringers YouTube page. So just go, I do stuff on rookies that your stuff historical stuff. It's all over the map and I host a podcast that is bi-weekly Cohoes wage With a guy named Kevin O'Connor who I'm sure everybody knows and and Jonathan sharks too. And yeah and we those are the main things that I'm doing. So you can you can find those all on the ringer podcast Network. Listen to it on Spotify. Do me a favor on that one. So glad you shout it out sharks too. By the way because yes yeah, John announced that he's going through a cancer diagnosis and is gone through chemo. Genuinely you will not find a nicer human being that works with in basketball than John sharks. Every time that I've ever seen him in an event. He's smiling. You'll sit down next to him. You'll have just the most Pleasant nicest kindest conversation. He's attack like as soon as I saw that he was diagnosed. I mean, just in unreal. Kind person who like just genuinely has like the best intentions for everything. He does in life. Like never wants to like step on anyone's Toes or hurt a fly like just a really good human being so any anyone that can send some good thoughts off his way. I think that would be good. Yes, definitely charts. Charts is truly good. Truly genuine and and we're pulling for him. This has been the game theory podcast please. Remember if you subscribe, I will be back early next month at some point, probably, with Matt Penny and we'll probably talk a little bit about some draft stuff. I will also have a mock draft next week at some point, we're doing the post NFL draft mock draft hype train, kind of deal. So keep it locked here off till next time. We'll talk soon. Bye..

Kevin O'Connor Matt Penny John Kyle next week five spots Jonathan sharks YouTube one spot twenty-five early next month Spotify NFL e m o n n sharks John sharks r n b a bi-weekly game
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"At finishing and drawing fouls. I don't know that I see him becoming like a hyper strong. Pull up shooter either. Yeah. You know is taking a lot of pull-ups but I feel like a lot of them are like Dead Poets goes way under a ball screen so I'm going to pull up or relocation like pull up jumpers where guy closes out heavy, he takes one dribble, knocks down a three right off. I don't know that he's going to be self. Creating a lot of pull-ups at the end of the day. So yeah I feel like I feel like he's going to be one of the best role players in the NBA off. High-quality role-player yeah what you need those two yeah he's going to make a hundred and fifty million dollars playing in the end of yet like it's going to be. I told ya I was telling some of our guys. I was like I I feel very strongly that he's going to play on a title team at some point. Like, I agree with that direct. He strikes me, is that type of player? I mean he might be the fourth best player and it might be ten years from now. Yep. But I just feel like it's going to happen. I guess that's not that wild we're prediction. But he yeah. I mean, I think the difference between him and like some of the big time heavy load pick-and-roll operators like in the league office. Like, I don't know that his body has the the frame to put on the necessary weight that he would need to slow the game down around the nail. Like, I mean, I think he has thoughts passing vocabulary. I think that he has the, the, the field to do that, but I just don't think that. Like, when you talk about, like him getting in and shooting more floaters, I love floaters, but you know, it's like, I don't, I don't think that like, upping the volume is the answer. I think that it would be more, upping the volume of the things that interact with that shot, like, you know, Luke. The thing about Luke is he gets you in that part of the floor, puts you totally in jail and and, and draws fouls, you know? And then he starts pulling, you know, he pulls the, he's pulling the, the backline guy towards you, and then like wage. I don't think that he's, he's going to be able to get to that level of Chess. I think it's more likely, that he just becomes a crazy, crazy volume, movement shooter than than that. But you know, you're nitpicking the kit, honestly, at that point cuz cuz it's already a good DVD player. Yeah. Yeah. Before we get out of here, I feel like we have to talk about quickly or else. Knicks fans are getting like just murder me off in my think it's hockey fans in Kentucky fans to like straight up..

Luke Kentucky two one Dead Poets Knicks a hundred and fifty million do one dribble three ten years fourth best player NBA
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"I think the question for him is, is it possible for him to, you know, rock it over the Ravine of being what he is now which is sort of like his office is pretty simple. You know life will pull up. Game is is pretty decent. I haven't looked at the number on numbers on that lately. But you know, his middle game is pretty decent esteems playing and drop a whole lot. I think that'll change as it goes off, but he shot at from 3. Pretty well at different points in the season. The question for me is just like is it possible for him to if you want to be negative? Is it possible for him to level up and expand? And where would that come from? You know right now his his free-throw generation hasn't been great. I think he's he's going to have to up that. I've actually haven't checked in on that. A little I don't know for sure but I don't know what where where do you see him expanding his offense, what is the simple? Implied thing about Tyrese albertans offense? That could become like this is such a problem. Yep. Have to scheme and stop this. I'm not sure where that would come from from him. I mean, maybe volume shooting. Maybe other than that, I'm not. Totally sure. Yeah, I'll be frank like, I don't really see it, but that's okay. Like, I feel like the place would maybe be like he does take a lot of floaters, right? Like he takes, probably mm, there's a game, something like that. Maybe if he just became like a 55% floater shooter and like he's not that far off of that like he's at 49 right now. I feel like it would really put a different amount of pressure on defenses to where they would have to guard him and like a real tangible way because like here's the thing about floaters, like Tyrese Haliburton has probably been one of the more effective players in the NBA this year with the floater, you know, 49% on floaters the Sea Shack. Young players that have taken fifty floaters this season, let's say which not a crazy amount. Like, sixty six, guys, he's actually 22nd league. So, like, well, above average in terms of office, just the amount of like the efficiency in terms of floater. Also his scored the 10th most points in the league off of floaters. So there are a few guys who have been as effective with it, as Halliburton this year maybe like fifteen guys in the league, but it's just a really hard shot. Like you shooting 49% on those floaters and that's like, that's okay. It's just, it's not good enough. I should be like, wildly efficient, you know what I mean? Like that's a that's a last resort shot. Unless you're richaun, Holmes, been shooting 62% on them, which is frankly at his volume where he scored the second. Most points off of floaters in the entire NBA this season. Just frankly might be the most Bonkers statistic in the entire NBA like Brandon, Brandon Clark's was pretty high off. Last year, wasn't it? It came way back down to earth. I feel like he was shooting like 70% or something at one point on floaters and like all his shots were floaters but like it wasn't, it wasn't home, volume like richaun, Holmes is taking which, by the way, the fact that tires halliburton's taken to floaters were shot homes to taking for floaters a game, like, hard way to run an offense if you're Sacramento off, but we're selling homes is so good at them. I've never seen someone make that many floaters at that. Volume. Point Blank and by-the-way. Luka doncic is like almost the almost the like tape sample that you want to watch if you're Tyrese because, yeah, you know, Lucas making 56% of a slower than its the 3rd, most points in the league off of the floater. This year's so like, I think that might be the move become like a super high volume, super-efficient floater guy because like, I don't see the crazy explosiveness, I don't see him getting really good.

Tyrese Haliburton Brandon Halliburton Brandon Clark 62% 70% fifteen guys Lucas fifty floaters 49% 56% 3rd Last year Holmes 22nd league 49 halliburton second richaun Sacramento
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"Employers. They were one of the worst offenses in the league. I don't think that it was surprising at all that he comes in there and immediately as like we can't keep this guy you know off the floor to Borrego kind of busted his job about the turnovers in the effort early. But you know he's short some of those things up. Before he got injured, I had him in the range of I thought that he would be just sub All-Star like wage at, you know, I thought that he would be somewhere in the like 35 to 60 range as a player like quality starter. Where did you have him item number one in the class and about the same? I would have said like somewhere like 3250. Yeah. So we, yeah, we were kind of in the same spot I but I mean, I thought that he was overwhelming. I mean, he's some some of his gifts are. We're, I don't want to overstate it but that gives you an idea of kind of where I was thinking. I don't know sometimes when I had these wild reactions to players, I have to spend a few days off Pacing in my backyard to make sure that I haven't gone too far which applies to another player that I think we're going to talk about. But lamelo is like one of the best live dribble pass or handlers that I've ever seen. Like, I mean like his his touch, his overhand touch. And I think something that people don't always think about I was talking with combo. Do you know combo at all on? Combo, 6, on Notre, good guy. Former former pro player has a good podcast and we were just talking about the fluidity from shot to dribble. Like that's something about Steph Curry that people overrate like that, that time and sink and sink, synchronicity sink. I don't know. Between those two things is something that's really important in the speed of the NBA. And I think that like, lamelo's fluidity from dribble to pass is Thursday at 4 for a player. His age, I was trying to think of a player who was better and I couldn't think of many if any. Well it's It's the Rhythm that he plays with its. Yeah. Yep. Has this just unnatural feel for the pace of a basketball game and for like the pace of the way that he's supposed to play and game, boys, and a patience, and a comfort level. While also being well also being exceptionally reactive to the defender in front of him. Like, do you ever watch the movie Finding Forrester? It's been a long time. I know we have a mutual friend that loves that movie. Like I don't like I can't even say that I love the movie like having thought about it. Like it's a white savior movie that is seemingly very problematic. Yeah, that's true. Having thought about like the way that this shit worked but there's a scene in it where like the main characters like wage explaining how he's able to like just naturally read the hips and like the belly button of a defensive player and understand how to react based off of that job. And it feels like lamelo is like the Superhuman like basketball player in Finding Forrester, right? Who can do whatever he wants because he has has this unbelievable ability to read, whatever a Defender is going to do in an unnatural ability to be able to get by that guy. Despite the fact that he doesn't have like, incredible thoughts, you know what I mean? Like it's not like he's yeah, overwhelmingly explosive. He's not overwhelmingly strong, he just understands in a very in a twitch hey how to get by guys. And then once he does like you said it's he has an incredible amount of control over the ball..

Steph Curry Finding Forrester 35 60 two things Thursday lamelo one Borrego NBA 3250 item 4 6 Notre
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"Don't know that. I want to focus too much on lamelo cuz we're going to get another viewing of him coming up soon. Like he's questionable for their game today or maybe tomorrow, I didn't see when they play. I'm not sure if they play today, may be honest, but he's questionable. So he's going to be back at some point for the last seven or eight games of the season. I mean, were you as excited about lamelo? As I was like, I think he clearly was better than anything, we've seen from Edwards this year and like, that's no disrespect Anthony Edwards. I mean, he's been on a tear. And by the way, it's worth noting to like we kind of shit on Anthony Edwards. Pull up game over. The last Twenty Eight Games, since the All-Star break, he's shooting. 33% is a pull-up shooter. That's still like extraordinarily low. Given one of the volume is like, genuinely among the players that have taken in the among the players in the top 50 of pull up shooting attempts since the All-Star break. It's like, Edwards Immanuel quickley, Jordan Clarkson who's been pretty cold actually as well. Yeah and Devonte Graham or the guys that are near the bottom of the page rankings in terms of field goal percentage off of Pull-Ups. So yeah, in general, I would say that Edwards has been better. He's no longer like historical bad. He's just like near the bottom of the league right now and I feel like that's a more more recoverable place to be, you know what I mean? Yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean, I think that. Yeah, looking at it here, it's his, his volume is, is really, really out of kilter with his, with his, with his efficiency. Yeah. Like, eighty eighty-six percentile in terms of attempts, so he's taking a hundred, twenty two years and then 17%. I'll percentage. You know, you want those things to be close to each other, you know, you don't want to be too high in a chance and you're not good at sure. Typically, yeah, it's like I do write a song. Cuz I'm not like a great writer. So I leave that to other. I'll leave that to other writers. Generally, I do write a lot, despite not being a great writer and it just does not work out for me all that. Well off people, I disagree with you. Number one, I think you're a great writer but I think, you know, people people are hungry for the details and you give it to them, Sam. I would say, I would say you with lamelo. I mean, coming in I think compared to our other draft people. I was the highest on him. You know, I had done even video in 2019 about lamelo before the MBL and I honestly had been the first time that I had ever really checked in on him in a detailed way. I watched a lot of T know I watched a lot of spy or the Spire games made me want to dive face-first into a bed of spikes. Like it was like they were the worst wage. They were the, it was some of the worst basketball I've ever watched. Like and I I love Isaiah Jackson. Like I mean, he's one of my favorite players in this upcoming draft but I it was just unwatchable..

Jordan Clarkson Isaiah Jackson 2019 Anthony Edwards Sam 17% tomorrow Devonte Graham 33% Edwards today this year twenty two years lamelo Immanuel quickley eight games MBL Spire first time first
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"And in the case of someone like Bill as well, if you remember like Bradley Beal has this reputation of always having been a a super high level shooter just like kind of. Right. But he's only Thirty 3% in Florida that one year, he was there from 3 like he was not some like Deadeye Gunner. Immediately. Now when he got to the NBA, he was playing next to John Wall. He kind of made it work, right? Like he was a 38% three-point shooter from the jump then immediately skyed 2:40 each of the next two years back. I think he's always had more latent touch and shooting ability than what Anthony Edwards has had. But I think he also suffered from some of the same shot selection like, pull up stuff and pull up concerning that Anthony Edwards has. So if I was him, I would kind of thought I was Edwards. And if I was to the people around Edwards, I would want to focus on watching how Bradley Beal went from point. A, which was, you know, averaging thirteen points a night next, to John Wall and, you know, shooting a similar percentage to the field is Anthony Edwards and not really being a pastor at a high level to where he is now which is like you know frankly probably one of the ten best offensive players in the NBA at this point. Oh yeah, I agree with you. I'm I was watching for this top twenty-five players thing that we've been doing for for that's going to be coming out on ringer here soon. I was watching deal actually and I think Bill's always been a girl had a little bit more bucket. Get her Gene in him than shooter. You're right, he kind of got, he got typified as this, like, coming off pin downs and taking eighteen Footers, or being a catch-and-shoot off, like a relocating shooter, he is those things. But he, if you watch the really amazing thing that to watch about him is and I'll tightest Edwards, but like his boss conomy of movement is so smart. Like when you watch feel like there's never a moment when I'm watching him try to. He always seems firmly over his skis when he when he's attacking off the off. His hesitation is insane. And I think what we, one of the more coveted skills, I want to do a video about this. At some point is just I feel like deceleration in the NBA has become such a A highly valuable zagging skill away from, you know, I feel like we just have so many Uber athletes, like, your ability to keep people on the hook with your dribble, you know, obviously like, they're like, ball skill, things that go into that. Like, you know, if you, you can have insane deceleration. But if you're not a great ball-handler, you're not going to be able to fully weaponize it, but right page Edwards for him to grow. I feel like in that way for him to grow into that kind of polished really, really efficient type of player. I feel like he's got, he's got a lot of work ahead of him, in terms of just how he's processing the game. Not not just in his own scoring, but I guess just kind of circling it back into overall how I feel about him, I wage at you, in his free-throw attempts to, I mean, he's had some, he said some big ones but he's had some stretches where, yeah, it's like 33301 then he'll have like, 85127 I think he's got, he's got a tough job. Road ahead of him that he's absolutely in control of, but it's just going to be took a lot of work. I guess it's just going to come down to how interested he is and doing that work. Yeah, totally I think that's a hundred percent, right. Let's just kind of move through some of these other rookies. With.

Bradley Beal Anthony Edwards John Wall Florida 38% Bill Deadeye Gunner thirteen points Thirty 3% Edwards Uber one 2:40 twenty-five players 3 eighteen Footers one year three-point next two years back hundred percent
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"Like he's been an inefficient sister who takes a ton of pull up jumpers, who can get to the rim, whenever he wants, still needs to like develop some crafts. But his explosiveness is just so real. That first step is unbelievable. His power to wage like leaping ability. That intersection is just tremendous. Like as soon as he learns craft, I think it's going to be curtains but like at the same token, can we count on him to learn that at this point? I frankly really don't know, I'm not sure, I think that's that's the big question and that the conclusion that I came to in my video is just For the types of players who come, I'm really fascinated in this idea of like players developing that spatial sense and that that spatial that broad spatial problem solving ability. Like I feel like and I brought up this thing that I created for the video just for for to distinguish between types of pick-and-roll players because I feel like, that's his, you know, his ceiling is obviously. He had his Apex. I think he could have an offense built around him that ideally, you know, if he was that type of score. But for him, you know, it's, he switched so late. You know, since he, he didn't really if, if you look at the guys like the Lucca's, the LeBrons, the Harden's, the jokic, the players like that, that have that level of, of creativity that have that level of ability to flip their scoring gravity into creation. It's like, how often do you guys grow into that level of player not very often. I feel like what if you miss out on Thursday? That type of development. If you miss out on that that stage of your sporting career, some guys, it happens, you know, in another sport like they'll learn that ability to play the game, like threes and fours, instead of ones and twos. If you understand what I'm saying, like I mean like Heating and plays the game purely in front of his face when I'm watching him whatever I watch him. He's like I'm either going to be my man here. Like if he played in the nineties he would have got he would have scored 25 to 30 points for ten years, probably and played, probably on a bad team for ten years, but the games different now off and you know, help defense is kind of change the way those types of players play. So for me, I look across the the league and I just see I look for guys that like him. And I'm like, what, what examples are them guys accruing that skill-set, because you've gotta want to do it. Like, it's, it's takes a lot of work. I mean, like, Lovin, Lovin has shown some of that he's grown into a guy who can, who can scream. Create some I mean Chicago's still struggling but DeMar DeRozan. I feel like he's a really good example. He's not as big as the Rosen. Yeah, I don't know if you think of any other examples or you follow what I'm what I'm going to do like Bradley Beal's, always been a much better shooter than what Edwards is, but I feel like that's the Prototype like if you're crafting a player for Edwards home to watch and to try and figure out like while he's training, right? I feel like Bill is the Prototype. Like, I would want Edwards to bring a lot of the crafts that bill has in his game off toward his own game..

ten years 25 DeMar DeRozan Thursday Bradley Beal Edwards 30 points Lovin twos first step Harden Bill nineties fours Chicago Lucca ones threes Rosen bill
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"Yeah, I don't know how DeAngelo is going to play. I just kind of want to say a couple of things about Edwards for you get to that. I think the big thing that sucks is translated for him that we all expected to translate, but it's really important to see. It have translated is that when he does choose to drive, the way that he kind of changes explosiveness into power and power into explosiveness. He initiates contact and goes through guys. When he wants to wage It's not just like oh yeah like you know I'm going to I'm going to try and absorb a little bit of this contact here. Know he's like going into guys and going up through like real life in protectors and part of the problem is he hasn't really have any craft yet around the basket for drawing fouls but I think that that's the kind of stuff you can learn like it's really really hard. Kind of like you said at the table here to find guys that have this intersection of explosiveness and power that also have this level of body control and can decelerate, right? Like off all three of those things together make it so that if he ever does learn to shoot, it's going to be curtains. I think like it's going to be unbelievable if he really learns to shoot, but you're right. Like right now, he doesn't shoot it. Well, he's taken 321, pull up, jumpers this year and half court settings, he's made them at home. 28.3% clip like that's gross. Yeah, that's I went back. It is gross. I went back actually and went year-by-year looking at the players who who finished off that shooting volume 30% or below. And there were only like two or three examples of players climbing out of it was like John Wall climbed out of it and had a couple Seasons. This is I'm just trying to remember off top my head. I think Ricky Rubio usually if you shoot at that volume early in your career and at that bad and efficiency. You just basically just don't get to do it ever. Again, that's kind of the way it works. You're either like a topic that they really need your high out outcome to play out or you just don't get the opportunity to do it again, but I think you're absolutely right that. Like the the sort of template that he's shown in terms of like getting to the basket like his shot, allocation has really improved from from Georgia to to hear. Yep. To Minnesota and I think that the, the free-throw production is, I don't even know what cap I would put on it. Like, he could, he could become a major, major producer at the line, for sure. Yeah. But just kind of frankly, doesn't you know what I mean? Like, it's it's kind of maddening the way that he chooses to play the game, which, you know, is what it is. And it's always been a problem. Like, I was watching the NFL draft yesterday and I was watching The Bleacher Report coverage with Adam lefkoe and Kyle Rogers in Aqib Talib wage in one thing that they said, they kept saying it over and over again. Was, you are in college, you are in the pros. What you are in college. And I think that that's, like, not quite true with basketball because college players in football, get to the NFL at 21, 22 years old, oftentimes. Whereas in basketball, they're getting they're like, nineteen bucks. It was kind of interesting to think about it in the context of someone like Anthony Edwards, who basically has been the same guy that he was a Georgia last year..

Anthony Edwards Adam lefkoe Kyle Rogers DeAngelo John Wall Ricky Rubio 21 Aqib Talib nineteen bucks last year 28.3% two yesterday 30% 321 Georgia Edwards three three examples NFL
"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

Game Theory Podcast

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"poku" Discussed on Game Theory Podcast

"In terms of him as a player, you know, it's been he he's had some things working against him, you know, obviously everybody said the code would weirdness working against him, the flux of that, you've got a coaching change that happens in in February. They bring in Chris Finch, and, you know, Ryan Saunders is out D. Angelo, Russel and Karl weren't playing early in the season. I think that that's affected efficiencies in his scoring game, but, you know, early on, I was just kind of like this guy has the, the template to be a floor, razor in an NBA offense, but his his efficiencies, in terms of like being seeing the entire floor and mapping it as a playmaker, like letting his scoring interact with that, he, you know, he's so he shows flashes of like play making sense and things like that and I thought that it could happen for him but to speak to what you were talking about. You know, lately, I do think that the dog, Changing up of the offense especially, you know, as it relates to, you know, Chris finches philosophy on how he uses big, guys. I think that he has benefited a lot from from Carl's shift in Chicago, and I can really hear my Kentucky accent when I say Carl, but I think that he's benefitted from that as a gutter Carl, I've been kind of monitoring this all home all season. You mentioned the shooting Synergy has they're like total jumpshots statistics, you know. He's he's I'll say too he's the most, I've had some Minnesota fans, get back with me and I'm just like look, I'm he was the number one pick, I'm grading him on that, on that curve, he has a lot of potential. I'm holding him to a high standard. He's next to Jim Jackson. He's the most inefficient volume rookie scorer, we vet we've had in the 3.8 era. It just is what it is. And and some of that is like eliminating the types of shots that he takes. Yeah, but I've been Mangia In this, in the in synergies total jumpshot, statistic metric thing here, in terms of players who have attempted at least 400 jump shots, he is dead last place. Still buy a good him and Russell Westbrook her down at the bottom, and he's still five percentage points behind Westbrook. So it's a part of his game. We knew that at Georgia, we knew he loved the dribble. Pull-up game, Athletics enough to go get it whenever he wants. His deceleration is off the charts. Insane. I mean, so I screenshotted some some clips, I just took some some frames off. Like how low to the ground he gets on some of his on some of his like uphill to celebrations when he, when he pulls back his dribble. I mean he gets almost flat like seriously. He looks like he looks like the centrifugal force of like like a piece of clay like that has just totally flattened out. So he's like an insanely gifted in that way. But, you know, the pull-up game, Like you said has been better. I think that he's he's been a little bit more of a dynamic scorer in the last month you know his pick-and-roll reps have gone up and up and up so they obviously care about developing him. And that way I am more encouraged than I was, it's kind of what I'm trying to say in a roundabout way. I think that he is interfacing with Carl in a way that's encouraging me. The real question for me, is name is Russell, you know, how does how is Russell going to play out in this? What do you think about that?.

Russell Westbrook Jim Jackson Chris Finch Ryan Saunders D. Angelo Russel Karl Russell Chris Westbrook February Chicago Carl Kentucky last month Georgia five percentage points at least 400 jump shots Minnesota NBA
World Class Beatboxer vs AI with Harry Yeff, Artist in Research at Nokia Bell Labs

Inside VOICE

08:44 min | 2 years ago

World Class Beatboxer vs AI with Harry Yeff, Artist in Research at Nokia Bell Labs

"Would I fell in love with using my voice to compose and write quite young age age of fourteen and it was for a few reasons like I was actually in a really musically rich environment in terms of early electric Techno grime which has shown that will kind of exploding in London. When I was growing up and it was the ability to instantly Ri- obviously anyone that speaks uses. The voice sings the very established. This idea of singing Medea or doing some light. Percussion just to write. I immediately for the fact that I could not just do some light. Mcconnell sing I could start to internalize music theory. I could start writing beats and white phoned ideas using just my voice. I became absolutely obsessed with the instances. I just didn't have to wait to get to my instruments enough to wait to get to a computer. I just thought it's a composed on right in a way that no other tool or instrumentation really automate and it just continued to grow from there and the goal was to break boundaries and Jonathan had ownership over something new. Did you take lessons? Are you just were self taught you watch videos like? How does somebody even learn how to be box? No it was very strange serendipitous story. It was pretty youtube. Which is crazy. And I seen some like elements of sound making before because it's so important to just like establish people cool so of composition with voice. They can go to be boxing. Sound making and voice our oldest humanity itself. It's not a new thing like to compose and write with. Sounds with your voice has been a a music making for as long as music as existed and it was the experimentation and seeing vocalist Kinda go beyond traditional techniques. I found it so fascinating but in terms of like applying it to Electric Music because I wasn't really a hip hop head. It was more about the experimental of music making. That was something that just happened almost by chance and it came very naturally to me so no lessons no guidance. No help just kind of an obsessive desire to make music instantly and not feel like I have to rely on anyone else. That was the main thing I didn't like feeling like I had to go through my secondary school to access to my drums. And I had to kind of go to friends. Houses to use like Music Quinn and light laptops. Because it's something that I personally didn't have access to myself. And it was the impatience the impulsiveness to always creates or he's made is what made me so focused and I just love story from the very beginning the obsessive nece and the joy it brought me it started with just myself but then people started to react around me in produces tied to kind of say like how you making the sound. How you doing the sound design and people wanting to dance as well and that was one of the key moments to me is. My friends would dance to me boxing. Yet from there it's just continued to grow spiral out of control in quite an exciting way. Yes I love that. I think it's great when people are self taught and you're based on your own creativity and one of the things I know you like to say is that our voices are most precious tool and that we must give the world of voice. What does that mean to you outside of my own musical compositions? I believe there's a lot of communicative thinking and pushing of how we actually connect with each other. That directly connects to our voice. The voice is synonymous with the human condition. It's such a fundamental to- used in our day today again. If we leave music behind there is an issue that many people don't feel like they have a voice. Many people do not feel like that. Is THEY HUNT? And they also feel like the rounds of their expression is established. Like this sort like a glass ceiling on everyone and I really believe that to experiment with the voice to push off always as far as we can is to push the mind as far as we can is to push human condition as far as we kind of is the push consciousness as far as we come. I think that there's a universally accessible expressive nece. That is there but his massively untapped and all of the what I do outside of music on installation lectures working with technology is just the fundamental expiration to trying make people see the voice in the new line and the aim is to not make them saying perform we'll make music is to literally make them express and feel alive and voice can do to express and the Catharsis of expression through the voice. It wakes people up and that goes way beyond arts music. It's it's humanity so it sounds like a huge mission but I sat on a three full years ago to explore the narratives around voice the innovation around voice Beyond music making and it's so insane the benefits you see innovation. You see in new ideas around. The Voice of how universally accessible is something that everybody has they. Don't push it to the Max so I WANNA change global perspective on voice and in doing that hopefully give the world voice make people feel Hud make them express and make them shaft simple idea on a huge scale. Yes we've spoke the first sign a few weeks ago and you said that. I got excited except like off. That is so much of what I personally believe. It's a personal goal that I have and I'm curious how you know you're working to kind of do this. You had done something at a wired magazine event where you had showed you had made some sound and then on an image it kind of created these like sculpture like art pieces which is very cool and you told the story about how a young girl did it and she got so excited to kind of see her voice in a visual perspective and she got louder and excited to kind of share her voice and I was like. Oh I love this story in the important summit so yeah I love free to talk about how. You're kind of working to do this on a larger scale before we get into the technology piece because I do think voices more than just waste technology. It is about connecting us. Making people feel heard so. Yeah I'd love for you to talk more about how you're doing that on a large scale. I think does really make sense to kind of speak about that story. And because that was the beginning of this like the scope where I've obviously crepe directed and been involved with a number of different tech based creative projects and that project you mentioned that it was a project called C. Sounds and is was in collaboration with the mill. Who's incredible post production company in New York and Creative Director Back Rama? Alan and we had a conversation at South by South West. Where this idea that every voice is precious. Every voice is like a fingerprint. And it's like a Red Joel and that time. The voice is like a red jewel started to such in conversations more and more so we assist them which allowed people to digitally sculpt with voices precious metals and structures. So think of it almost like a broach or very read natural structure. You can build that with your voice missing different tones and textures and it will create this Completely unique structure and they're absolutely stunning. Obviously it's hard to communicate over Poku The project manifest installation. We invite the public to comand. Use the peace and this young girl that you mentioned it completely. Change my approach to augmentation working with technology but it was a puff. It's example of how the voice can lead to a flowering of oneself can lead to an opening of expressive interests and capacity. That can literally change the way you move the way you feel about yourself your confidence because she was extremely shy. I cannot say she was like a tiny little quantity attached to a bothers leg when she walked up to the peace of the microphone. She said these tiny utterances debt and she saw those sounds become something that looked physical on the wool these kind of growing crystal structures and when she saw that she made that connection and she started to shout and scream eventually law and again. She augmented with this tool which encouraged her to expressing tests have voice and she flowered and that was the beginning and this was clean case study of how experimentation an untraditional ways of exploring ourselves can lead to an introspection which she's so

Music Quinn London RI Youtube Medea Mcconnell Jonathan New York South West Alan Director
Q&A | Your Questions Answered.

The Emma Guns Show

09:09 min | 2 years ago

Q&A | Your Questions Answered.

"Hello Hi and a particularly warm welcome to the Emma Gun show. I'm your host Emma and we're GONNA wardner and it's time for an ask me anything the Osmania that I asked for questions back in November and December. Just a couple of times. Because I thought it'd be nice to have a conversation with you and also I am publishing this in the middle of the corona virus crisis and a lot of my sheduled poku awes- have been postponed. Don't worry normal service will resume soon but as I put this off because I'd had so many guests recently. I thought actually this is the perfect time August. I'll chat to answer your questions. How lovely how brilliant my most ex. Mrs? I can have a chat on this particular episode. These questions have all come from the facebook. Group linked to join is in the show notes. And I will just say this. I do get asked quite a lot on social media or on email. Where do I find the show notes if you are listening to this episode you all already within the platform the service the provider the website that has the show notes in is just a case of if you're in a particular Internet Internet service provider. Po. 'cause platform you have to click three dots or go to more INFO or swipe the screen or whatever. But you already there. That's why you can find the hyper links with anything mentioned so just a side note. I do hope you're keeping well. I have done a sense check in the facebook group and I said let you still want me to keep creating content. Does it matter if it's not super serious and the overwhelming response has been. Please keep doing it. Please keep doing what you do. We appreciate the destruction. So that's my green light and that's what I'm GonNa keep during the pleased. I think being insensitive and I understand how freaking serious the situation we are in is but shall we go straight. That was taken fingers. Shall we go straight in and this one actually from Nora is quote quite timing? I think she posted a couple of months ago. But the question is hi Emma. My question is about day-to-day Sanity. I guess I don't care much about products and stuff but I'd love to know what you do for clearing head each day and getting rid of or ignoring the build up we get from social media and everyday life. I just learned this week. That climate anxiety is a thing which I now obviously have. What do you tell yourself every day to stay in a positive mood overall? Sorry if this is too vague or something I own only I have. I will admit I'm a bit tipsy nor you in a safe place. Welcome to the group. Welcome to the family. You are definitely Amos decks listener. It's such a good question. I guess we'll say really timely how to not get bogged down mentally how to not think that things how to not get bogged down with negativity how to keep a positive outlook and mindset. When maybe you're dealing with things whatever they might be work life relationships friendships. Whoever whatever I can definitely and I think that's one of the things I talk to. All of my friends had periods of depression or anxiety. All of us who have worked hard and feel like we are able to manage it now will say that it feels like actually having something of a superpower because you can see it coming a mile off which means that you can deploy all relevant tactics to make sure that it stays a good distance and doesn't doesn't want you to put it mildly and actually. I was listening to a podcast with Dr Doctrine. Judge Dee he obviously has been on the show. He had rich role. He was a mega mega focused in the states on his podcast and he was talking about how he was in alcohol recovery and he had a lot and he had a relapse for a few hours but it was quite a significant lab so we had to literally dial back. After thirteen years he had to dial back to zero. His sobriety installed start again and he used the expression which I've since land is is quite common in the fellowship in twelve step programs but he used the expression of. I thought that in recovery I was getting further and further away from my addiction. But what I didn't realize is that my addiction was just doing press ups in the dark waiting for that moment to pounds which I thought was I found quite meeting. I was driving when I was listening to that and I found it quite arresting. It sort of made me go. Wow Gosh and I think that's the same about positive and negative mindsets if you've been through a low period if you've been depressed if you've struggled with your mental health and you feel as though you're through it you sometime you sometimes worry that is it is going to come back quick and fast. Which is why I think you sort of. Almost you have the superpower and you on high alert to see it coming in the distance and as I say deploy all relevant tactics. I know I went up one of ramble. That but what I mean is. I think whether you've had mental health issues on not whether you suffer with depression not with your pessimist or not. I think it's good to check in with yourself just every morning and to say how am I feeling today truth be told I am on day? Eight of south isolating to protect others may not symptomatic. And it's getting to me. Yesterday evening I go to Migraine. My jaw is incredibly tight. I woke up this morning. I was weeping. I really want to count this morning and I felt am. I could feel right. Day has the potential to be one of those days. I could let drive me Rothman. I-drive it so I wrote my Yoga Mat. I did a latest stretching. I stretch my neck out. I did look deep breathing. I spend a Lotta time in childs pose and I was able to actually lessen the how the feeling of the Migraine and then just get going but it was because when I served it systems check when I woke up with all yeah. Something's definitely wrong. You know that chipper today so I did what I thought would be the right thing. I didn't work out sometimes working out the answer. Sometimes it's not intuitively. I felt like being really gentle with myself was the answer this morning. I have contact lenses in. I haven't put makeup on blow dry. My Hair I've done a bit of Yoga and now I'm just very gently sitting at my desk token to you. It's very very easy to consume social media. What's the news and failures are? Everything is Blake. I do feel like especially with the news. I don't often have news television on so when I think about I say don't often have it. I've never really had the news on. I'm not one of those people who engages in televise news that way. I've always really when using the newspapers bought. I remember if I think about significant events. I think about things like nine eleven or elections and that was when I would watch televised news and the screens would be breaking news. This that and the screens would be very automated. That'd be lots of Red. That be lots of you. Know the thing scrolling across screen going up in so you can't be stimulated and then on a normal news cycle. Those things wouldn't happen and recently when I've engaged in news channels not just in recent times maybe in the last couple of years or so. I've noticed that they the the way that the television screen the laid out is in a similar way to win what we used to associate with really really big news events. And it's just it's just to keep watching because let's face it TV channels businesses. And they have the things are so. I tend not to engage in those sorts of televised news channels too much because I find that breaking news thing. It takes me back to other instances other periods of history. That perhaps went so great so my advice to you is particularly around the time now. I know we're not going to talk to you much by the coin virus but my advice now is watch Your leaders daily address. We've forced onto during every day in the UK look at twitter. Don't re tweet or re grammar anything. They'll get your news from there and just look at trusted resources and I did a podcast recently on some really good sources of information on what's going on at the moment they're not sensationalized that with epidemiologist who are experts in infectious disease. So not only is it. James Elles doing brilliant content at the moment where he just keeping everybody updated by speaking to experts analyzing the data on a week by week basis. But also there's some brilliant stuff with Joe Rogan with an expert in infectious disease called Micro Asta home that really kind of explains the genesis of all of these sorts of things and one of the things he says during the pause because Jerry says he's you're making me nervous Michael and he said I'm yeah and by the end of this episode. We'll talk about how not to be nervous. So I feel like they're more helpful resources so in terms of clearing your head and ignoring the bill that we from social media and Everyday Life. I would really choose carefully. What it is that you can see what media you consume and who you listen to and who you

Facebook Migraine Infectious Disease Emma James Elles UK Joe Rogan Nora Twitter Judge Dee Amos Relapse Dr Doctrine Depression Rothman Blake Jerry Michael
The Legend of Pokou

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:12 min | 3 years ago

The Legend of Pokou

"Are stories today highlights leader whose life was surrounded by legend magic. She overcame significant. Hardship stood up to an army and eventually established a new homeland. Let's let's talk about Queen. Pokou Poku was born around seventeen hundred likely in what's now Ghana to a noble family of the Ashanti People. They were a centuries old African tribe with roots dating back as far as the year thirteen hundred poku was the niece of. Oh say two known as has the greatest Ashanti King because the Ashanti monarchy was matrilineal Poku was included in the line of succession during his rule. Oh say to united in many smaller kingdoms into the larger Ashanti Empire when in seventeen eighteen he was ambushed and killed Howard passed onto poku brother their day. Calm during day Khan's rule who selected a husband an attempt to produce an heir. It didn't get pregnant. Who was quite brave? Leave one day when day Khan and the army were away from the Ashanti. Capital enemy troops ambushed the town and killed all the royal princesses except Recoup Kuku arranged for others to escape but decided to stay behind and defend the town however she cut the enemy. Warriors took her hostage. d-conn soon returned from war furious to discover the besieged capital. He appointed a warrior named Tano to lead Loku's rescue party. They successfully successfully defeated the enemy group and got poku back Tano and Poku then got married. The new couple had a baby boy together. The heir to the Ashanti anti thrown Dakin fell ill when Poku son was still only a baby so we attempted to appoint an older air but day. Cons choice was murdered by his rival. Who who hoped to seize the throne himself after killing the chosen heir? The rival tried to gain favor with Poku to secure his place on the throne but she refused to endorse him. He was determined to seize power regardless so poku left the shontae capital altogether to establish her own kingdom. She invited anyone anyone in the Ashanti Empire to come with her and many of the smaller kingdoms previously united by her uncle Osa to to decided to follow her to a new land. The story of Baku's peril filled adventure to a new land has been passed down in legend. For centuries in many ways echoes the story of Moses and the Hebrews escaped from Egypt and Pokou and her followers fled the capital city with the soldiers of the guy who wanted to be king on their trail. They had to navigate a treacherous jungle filled with snakes panthers and giant elephants many of them also fought illness through the hazardous journey coup and the fleeing subjects reached an impasse. Thank thank Komo River which was to deep and violent across. According to legend the group decided they had to make a sacrifice to the river gods in order to make the crossing crossing possible Poku that she would have to sacrifice something hugely important to her in order to save for people in anguish. She sacrificed her son to the river. Ever different versions of the legend claim. A variety of magical means helped Pokou and her people cross the river including an enormous tree bridge and the help of crocodiles and hippos regardless the refugees cross. The river narrowly escaping pursuit. When Poku Oku safe she cried Bali which means the child is dead because of this new group of settlers came to be called the bow? The the exodus from the Ashanti capital occurred sometime between seventeen thirty and seventeen fifty. Migration took the ballot into what's now Cote d'Ivoire their err poku conquered territory established a new homeland for her people. She was known as a leader and an expert mediator not long after establishing doing this new settlement around seventeen sixty folk who died per legacy lived on and in the years following her death. Ola Influence continued to grow

Pokou Poku Ashanti Poku Oku Ashanti People Ashanti King Komo River Khan Army Tano Recoup Kuku Baku Ghana Moses Pokou Howard Bali Dakin Egypt Loku
Help I'm Surrounded By Naked Posh Boys

Help I Sexted My Boss

14:15 min | 3 years ago

Help I'm Surrounded By Naked Posh Boys

"I'm more deal deal your more dire yes in my all my God we we have a producer on his feet here he's just shelter power was shot so ben is back from his holiday on his own shut so foul of his CIA and yeah the good one that's one of the best ones shall we have already started a a needs to stop all this I don't Santita them Tom Yes please I had been kicking around for smells like just monitor that been that's an I think that's on the turn anyway two just depending on punching smells like a pro sandwich sandwiches so I think one right who we tasting today to tell us to bonfire night phone finite finite finite it's fine I mean I prefer it to Halloween Halloween is Halloween has celtic origins is predominantly the American T. fast whereas at least bonfire night is a bit of historical clout to it because of the boom fine this time of year is a young challenge the best isn't it CALC- phone plays it was very important test for my mother because the the local council have agreed to build four hundred and fifty houses in the fields opposite talk family house and everybody said Oh the bloody who oh I feel for the about every been knocking on every door around yours get petitions going on yes him over that with a white long gloves darling Washington Cold Sarah Good Sarah from thirty two and so Sarah from I love that that you think we live in a house that has a number oh well she cows go oh yeah just give out the address darling it's just Hanson manner I can and do the best Williams Darling and Saturday from hunts and monitor I'm so sorry to knock on your door like common but I've I've heard that building four hundred yes stalling four hundred and fifty houses across the field from US would you like to sign my petition and please Dahlan can have a stiff if one I need a drink it's only August ten right so let's move on j James Williams President listened to the podcast I'm sorry I'm jokin actually caught wait to meet you wound up meeting team and I can't believe I've known that you moment that what does that says a lot about our friendship you keep me hidden away I'm like a secret boyfriend audio moving even know about me so if you want to help with something you can take y you can send your towns of trepidation to help my don't come rude you you can send out I can't believe they do know view do they I've never met them I don't right now on the edges I just worry what you'll say yeah but don't let what you say on might yeah but don't forget like when when we do the podcast I play update wind you all the time like you really don't really are like this in fact this is a sanitized tossed as I went to tell you I went to a little bit longer than what Williams like where have you been sorry I dropped the kids off also and you'll say that to my parents because you'll think hilarious and that you see you find it funny Sara sorry I just dropped kids off in downstairs downstairs Lou they don't tell you about two piston not trump darling come to notice darling trump trump darling get your mother never drank it's ten o'clock in the morning darling I WanNa meet my they love you because you brought them to show I talked about y'all tax darling it's so nice to meet you Jordan tally me whereabouts in the country are you from darling okay how's your week pinch has been really good actually I've been back home back home that's nice he's just a really good time your parents have moved yeah like you know just check the handgun yeah got stuff to do okay okay good didn't you get recognized on the train when you come back up North Oh yeah is in a peculiar way I'm GonNa say well it would have to be peculiar recognized you yeah it was really because I also think with with radio presenters when you recognize radio presenters mean I would say probably two thirds of the people that listen to you don't know what you line thank because radio yeah you have to actually have gone onto the website or follows you on a social media platform to no you look like and that third is automatically clean wit so for us to be recognized you all being recognized generally by Weirdos some of us that do t television it's relevant feel like we've changed as a sous he's got on always talk about Al how great career anymore officer this anyway but yes you got nine right first of all it's very what you said and when people see me for the first time they say they expect me to look like Ashley from Konate History got from this England fat really skinny and Ginger it was really weird so on the train speaking this lovely go and when you say go what she was sixteen sorry a lovely lady called Hannah she was titled Lady She's Lady Offer Oh I if I was next to a woman on the pitching train who had a dog with a call the dog the dog was called Noman is he sir Norman Norman Norman the dog she's actually a lovely lady she really nice and we were just chatting away about less than our intelligence I was reading reading my book and she was ready Tonight Volk and she said Oh you're at just look after Norman I said yeah sure and I looked hope on this pogo she'd gone a shade of white she was Paler than you you want to talk she looked like a ghost and I've seen it goes before a gay ghost ghost like k. and she she was shade of uh-huh set your eyes feel really sick and she can't travel quits but it was really busy we facing backwards well why did she sit there because there's Nova seats it's available okay so I had I went to shop and bought a bottle of water and it got some very kind of you got some keep the receipt bloody two pound hound up those balls of war and and you know those paper bikes they wanted you to six six hundred pounds overdrawn all those paper bags that they put you yes in the shop so it's not that and she started being in sick no given the wall and I should be sick she was like Avon's watching and I was like your eye she turns me mouth went oh my God he's your baby Oh yeah that's me yes you do lou itself as I after you've been sake yeah but it's not the first time I've been recognized that waist really yeah just before on weird look weird just before started working on said radio station England then how can how can I explain why I know this story I think you're about to say I had to go for a routine checkup a routine gene check hope and this specialist right east straight out Younis is not much older than me and I got that will make you could smalto he could tell you a nervous fellow bill so I'm talking to him I don't like making the most awkward small talk about the weather about the cycling in all this kind of thing that he says right in its papillon occur and I'm gonNA give you a prostate exam I said yeah that's fine totally fine he said just get you down to your knees and putting as t- chest I am that Canadian behind in the global literally like a fulfilled in this league and he's finger we still talk about impeaching cycling in the weekend all would smalto opens boom shake soon as he sticks his finger up it goes I agent radio at the weekend I went the joke an air lock down that these days I capability he's having a full on chat with me about radio one career while he's fingering me ours so what does the girl on the train it's the BBC and if you do guys have any problems get yourself checked out I was at the doctors over the summer and everything was fine it was I remember I was there and I I thought I was being recognized derived checked in went to the to the Lou and came out in this young ish guy came up to me uh-huh and when excuse me you will and I only here we go properly poku snow like one of ours and puff chess down yes yeah you've been cold because how dare he can try my name did I tell tell you what else told about me when is it not rocket fan dot com with my face on the bag yes basically at a car was examined local the name on the side of the car and it was in the gym anatomy I'd phones in this gill short do you work for them off off the I'm sweating me now you've left you break because rolling down literally finish Mr Foe Watson yourself you all have you ever had prostate takes them not sufficiently speaking of doctors and is it ever okay 'cause I do this all the time and way moves is that what okay to rip the pages of my no is out without permission mission of the of the receptionist thing I always say stuff magazine's knitting patterns I'm starting to mood board Oh I'm buying a house in the New Year are oh you why have you and I'm I'm talking about this later I'm starting a mood board for like I did some some medical and my interior on a sofa magazines ripped out a written out really loud noise and everybody waiting room we're looking the council Christmas with that I was going what was was the page it really inspiring a cellphone off from DFS the fabric leather fabric it was my skin like scandi style right yeah this woman Game Eagles giving me looks like a lot well so we all thanks thanks Linda Balka so anyway how how's your week been it's all about me Joe Weeping yes fine I guess what I went and so for the fourteenth time we've just been told you don't need to keep this bit long so he's going to be guess what I saw for the fourth time Mary pissing poppins Yes yes I am I was having a very bad day last week and I wasn't planning to see it and I was in town and walk past the print side with hr and I walked into space you happen to have any Stacy's returns and they said no but come back in a few hours we might do so I did and and and they did they had one so I bought it it's cheap and not telling you so not any and it it was it was in the stools let's put it that way and that's you know the Labor bitch about the seat I mean there could but it was pretty good and I found myself sitting next to Mary poppins mother this was the mother of the actress playing Mary poppins when I saw it the week before on its opening I have noticed that Mary during two scenes drinks tea from a teacup and had been holding a teacup with little finger extended which we don't do is we Do because as I think I have explained on this podcast before can you remember it's because they used to do it in the fridge olden days what was it the Court of Louis Fourteen fifteen sixteen and it meant that you had the club if you get drunk you take a little pinky oh P- yeah it was a code for saying I've got the KLOPP up you've got the club yeah we can have into 'cause well yeah you it was not polite to sleep someone without letting them know that you had syphilis so you put your little finger out when drinking tea at court of an evening the other school of thought because that particular strain of syphilis was so strong at the time it made your joints stiffen up so you physically couldn't wrap your fingers round so either way gets it's syphilis related so I was having chat with easy Stalin's mother and during the interval and we were chatting about one or two things and she said Oh some of the costs went shore if they they should be saying mammal mom and I said Oh it's definitely Ma'am and she don't we do not get things rights and at that point I thought well here is my opportunity Yep so I said I just point point one other thing out could you pass this along I don't think we want to syphilis Mary and I think we probably want the little finger touch and I explained to her and she was she was made all the right noises so very interesting when I go and see it next week to see if that fingers touching how can you go and see a show so I honestly got gingy visit stress how obsessed this Mondays

Producer CIA Six Six Hundred Pounds Two Pound
Podcast gets conviction overturned

podnews

02:54 min | 3 years ago

Podcast gets conviction overturned

"So it's nine o'clock right now. So the supreme court announced a decision so they reversed they overturned his conviction a US true crime podcast in the dock has been used in court to help overturn a conviction. The US supreme court reversed the conviction of cut is flowers on Friday. His story was covered in, in the docks second season. The ven a non-partisan podcast recommendation newsletter around the twenty twenty US elections redesigning their newsletter this week to focus more on their deep. Dive topics time magazine is reporting on podcasting. Their headline big money is pouring into podcasting. Some podcasters love it, but others are freaked out an interesting snippet of news from the Acosta and Radio New Zealand online survey of podcasting in New Zealand released last week twenty five percent of podcast listeners, do not use apps at. Dole presumably, listening on web pages editor pass me recommended podcast websites should have a bloody big play button last year. If you're curious as to what the Kiwis are into we have a list for you in our episode notes, and our newsletter today, and our editor that's me. Again, is speaking of the power of audio an invite only conference tomorrow morning here in Auckland New Zealand. Did you date covers the efforts from some parts of the podcast tech scene to get attribution for kost advertising? I did this podcast at work, mediaweek, Australia appears to have launched a week people caused column called podcast week. It's discusses Acosta newscast Paul, costing arm of news, cope and Brexit cast eighty four percent of recently released podcasts or MP three says Castro the other sixteen percent of them were a sea is a sea, by the way, if you use it to produce Pocock spillway that Google hangouts on air is going away. Later this year in need. Find something else to use podcast veteran. Rob Greenlee has finally given up his windows phone. He's shifted to an iphone excess max in other news. Hell has just frozen over in the UK. The Sunday Times has a long piece from a self confessed podcast addict hidden behind that pay wall and the second most popular podcast app. Spotify has decided that it paid songwriters and publishers too much in two thousand eighteen and according to a music website would like their money back plays in Poku today, we linked to the real podcast, which launches today show, casting the voices of talented and empowering aboriginal, and Torres Strait island people and coming off the back of that second nomination in a row for best comedy or the Australian podcast awards. Welcome to patchwork, his back for season four

United States Acosta Editor Rob Greenlee Dole Radio New Zealand Auckland New Zealand Torres Strait Island New Zealand Spotify Poku UK Google Australia Pocock Castro Brexit Paul
Unsung Economists: Sadie Alexander

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:28 min | 4 years ago

Unsung Economists: Sadie Alexander

"In nineteen twenty one. But because of a race nobody would hire her as an economist. So a few years later, she got her LA degree and went on to have a lustrous career as a civil rights lawyer Bucknell university professor Nina banks has been researching the career in life of Sadie Alexander for almost two decades. And she's working on a pair of books about Sadie Alexander. But economists have not been really focused on her work because of the I think the the belief that when she wasn't able to practice economics that she really stopped focusing much on ecconomic issues, but I really found that that wasn't the case that for forty years, at least she was giving speeches around the country and all of those speeches dealt with issues that that dealt with the status of African Americans. So we don't have recordings of those speeches. But we do have the transcripts and in those speeches Sadie Alexander had fascinating things to say not just about issues that were relevant during her time. But about issues that still matter now, this is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith. I'm caught of Garcia today on the show. Our first episode of series in which we shine a new light on an economist from the past an economist contributions. We think deserve another look I up Sadie Alexander. Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from WordPress dot com with powerful site. Building tools and thousands of themes that us from users can launch site that's free to start with room to grow. Get fifteen percent off any new plan. Purchase at WordPress dot com slash indicator. Support also comes from ADT, America's trusted home security company can help protect you against the break ins fires and carbon monoxide twenty four seven emergency response when you needed most more at ADT dot com, Bucknell university, economists, Nina banks, recently, analyzed the speech that CD Alexander gave in nineteen forty five at Florida agricultural and mechanical university, and in the speech Sadie Alexander spoke to the audience about the persistence of racial discrimination and the status of black workers as marginal workers and other words workers who were the last to be hired and the first to be fired when. Businesses were letting workers go the year before that speech. President Franklin D Roosevelt had given a famous speech of his own in which the president had argued for a second Bill of rights and one of those rights would be the right to employment for anyone who is willing and able to get a job. In other words that the economy should propential- be at full employment where anyone who wants to work can find work. This would alleviate the economic insecurity of those marginal workers constantly wondering if they were about to be unemployed. Now, it was already understood at the time that win the economy is at full employment workers get paid more. Because when everyone who wants a job can get one then companies have to compete with each other to attract and hire workers and also to keep their own workers from leaving them for another job and the companies compete with each other by offering better wages and working conditions to workers city Alexander's early. Distinct contribution economics was her argument that full employment was also absolutely necessary. For achieving racial equality. So Sadie Alexander believed that having a fully employed labor force would increase workers pay and they're purchasing power. But of course, this could not occur. If whites continued to exclude black workers from having the right to work, so Sadie Alexander said that full employment was quote, the only solution to the economic subjugation of the negro and of the great masses of white labor. Obviously Sadie Alexander was speaking during a time in which segregation was both legally and informally embedded across American society, American institutions, and that segregation extended to the labor market in which many white workers viewed block workers as rivals as competitors for jobs. CD Alexander made the argument that in order to get rid of economic, insecurity, the whole working class people from all racial and ethnic backgrounds were in it together that they would all benefit from an economy at full employment, and that full employment could not be defined as just. Full employment for white workers. It had to include everyone because let's say that white workers were full employment. But black workers were not then not only with the black workers experienced the hardships of unemployment, but also white workers might continue to see unemployed black workers as threat to their jobs. So if everyone who wanted a job had a job there might be less suspicion between workers of different races, which would make it more likely that the white working class and the black working class would work together to bargain for better, wages and working conditions. Another part of CD Alexander's argument win the economy is not at full employment and therefore businesses don't have to pay higher wages than the owners of businesses can keep more of the profits for themselves at least in the short term. But need a Bank says Sadie Alexandra argued that this eventually leads to rising inequality and will become a big problem for the whole economy because if you exclude a big class of workers from having jobs, it means there are fewer people earning the money to buy the goods that were made by those businesses in the first place. Which again eventually could lead to an economic downturn. But you could prevent that outcome by increasing the earnings power of all workers. And again, that's what happens when the economy is at full employment. And then finally Sadie Alexander argued that full employment would free people from material want from deprivation or starvation or from a lack of basic needs. And so they would then also be free to pursue higher goals to realize their potential professionally and personally, and that would make it less likely that workers would become disillusioned with the government itself or with democracy, and like president Roosevelt Sadie Alexander feared that economic insecurity would result in quote, men and women who have lost hope demanding a dictator to take over the reins of government Sadie. Alexander was not a socialist. She believed in regulated capitalism says Nida banks, but she did also believe that the government had an active role to play in a cheerful employment for the economy when the private sector couldn't do that by itself. She. Envisioned a public work programme that addressed pressing needs that would enhance people's well-being she focused on improving housing conditions in urban slums or providing electricity to every form she talked about reducing illiteracy, reducing hunger and making sure that people were properly clothed. That's typically not what we think about today when we focus on public works as part of this goal of cheating full employment for the economy Sadie. Alexander also argued that the government should guarantee a job to people who would want one and professor banks believes that Sadie Alexander might even have been the first economist to make that case. In fact, a national jobs guarantee is a policy idea that is being hotly debated right now something else that communists are debating right now is the question of whether the economy is in fact at full employment, and there is obviously no way to know for sure how Sadie Alexander would answer that question. But here's what we can say the labor market has improved. A lot in recent years and the unemployment rate for black or African Americans has mostly been falling during that time. But at six point eight percent, it is almost twice as high as the unemployment rate for white Americans, which is only three point five percent. And according to the Economic Policy Institute, a think tank, a black worker with the same education as a white worker is only getting paid roughly eighty percent as much as the white worker, and that applies at every educational level, and that wage gap is bigger now than it was back in the year two thousand it. Of course, it isn't just in the economy where there still exist big racial disparities. Another place is in the very disciplined that Sadie Alexander tried to enter nearly a hundred years ago economics to see this. You just have to look at the numbers numbers that Anna Gifty Poku Osman senior at the university of Maryland knows really well, so basically in between two fifteen to sixteen five out of one thousand one hundred and fifty eight doctoral degrees and economics where worth of black women. So that's. Less than half of one percent. One half of one percent. The numbers for black men. Earning PHD's and for black undergraduate economics degrees are only slightly better. But in is trying to do something about this. She co founded the CD collective in organization that wants to create a better environment for black women to go into economics and this weekend. The Sadie collective is hosting the inaugural Sadie TM Alexander conference for economics. Anna says that it just felt natural to Namie organization and the conference after Sadie Alexander, we she was very interested in economic equality in advocating for marginalized groups is so we felt that that was in line with our overall mission sort of equalizing the playing field by giving black women the same opportunities that we've been seeing other people received in the field the conference is sold out which along with the papers and the upcoming books from Nina banks suggests that the legacy work and speeches of Sadie Alexander which had been forgotten for so long. 'economics might soon. Find a new and growing audience. This episode of the indicator was produced by Constanza yard, oh, edited by

President Roosevelt Sadie Alex Sadie Alexander Sadie Tm Alexander Sadie Alexandra Nina Banks Cd Alexander Bucknell University President Franklin D Roosevelt Professor Economic Policy Institute Florida Agricultural And Mecha NPR Stacey Vanik Smith LA Anna Gifty Poku Osman ADT