18 Burst results for "Poetry Foundation"

"poetry foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 6 months ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Statues. A cz well as others, but including Confederate statues. Is that relevant to your letter? That is completely irrelevant. And someone like Donald Trump is not a good faith actor. He's not a good faith participant in the kind of debate that, um, speaking for myself. I was trying to participate in that I'd imagine any of the signatory is attempting to participate and Confederate monuments are not being canceled. There shouldn't be monuments in the United States of America to, um aside that fought against the country to two traders of the republic that But to me is false equivalency with the kind of thing that we're talking about here when Colin Katherine it cannot work for having a political opinion that he expressed freely when You have people like David Shore? Um, who get fired for sharing simply for tweeting or research? You know, that was one of the most egregious examples that happened recently, You have the chairman of the board and the president of the Poetry Foundation, forced to step down because their statement in support of black lives matter. In support. I stress was not Considered strong enough. They have lost their jobs for what was deemed to be too tepid of a response. You have the same situation on the board of the National Book Critics Circle. These are neither worrying examples of a kind of authoritarian ing on DH intolerant. Drift in our nation's cultural and media institutions. Thomas Chattered and Williams on July. 8th. Joining us now are a signatory of the Harpers letter that he organized new school professor Claire.

Um Donald Trump Colin Katherine David Shore Poetry Foundation United States Thomas Chattered chairman professor America president Williams
"poetry foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:40 min | 7 months ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And not this one that's full of generalities and serve, lumping in private citizens with public figures. Thomas. You know you heard him say that you heard gave say that he had took issue with your use of willful misunderstanding. Quick response to that. Absolutely. Let me give you an example. One of the things that I was thinking about when we began drafting the letter was the resignations that were demanded that the poetry foundation in early June so you have the party foundation is this incredibly well endowed organization with the $257 million endowment. And it releases a statement after the horrific death of George Floyd, saying that the organization stands in solidarity with the Black lives matter Movement. Immediately. 29 poets on many of the supporters issued an open letter. Demanding the resignation of the president of the foundation as well as the chairman of its board and also calling for many different things to happen, such as redirecting where parts of the large and down Go into finance projects into Teo Filter into subsidiary organizations. These two gentlemen did, in fact, resign. And the message of that sense is extraordinarily chilling. It means that you cannot just do what gave was trying to say is the realist you which is say something terribly racist or homophobic. It means that you can say something that's actually correct, and it can be considered not Fervent enough and you can be the recipient of a letter that says during a period of black genocide, which is actually what the open letter said this insult is tantamount to violence. This is the climate that we're dealing with. And if you think that it high high profile example like that doesn't have ramifications far beyond just the two Gentlemen involved. You're wilfully misunderstanding. What's going on? We're also hearing a lot from our listeners. One email, Dustin said Cancel culture means the end of free speech. People should learn how to ignore things that trigger them. Another writes to us to me cancelling is a form of protest in response to specific behavior. I'm removing my attention and money. If it's not a grotesque violation, like Bill Cosby, Harvey Weinstein, R R. Kelly. I'm open to re subscribing of sincere, sustainable corrective action is taken now. We should note that with regard to these letters that were talking about they did come out in the same week. The Harpers Letter was on July 7th and the response Published on July 10th. I want to read a few lines from the Harpers letter. It is now all too on. It is now all too common to hear calls for swift and severe retribution in response to perceived transgressions of speech and thought. Editors. Air fired for running controversial pieces Books are withdrawn for alleged in offense inauthenticity. Journalists are barred from writing on certain topics and the heads of organizations are ousted. Or what are sometimes just clumsy mistakes that gave the response letter that you co authored addresses the incidents in greater detail. Can you talk about some of these incidents and why you felt that they didn't really help prove the original point that the letter was making Sure, if really quickly. I would like to sort of respond to what Thomas said with the poetry Foundation. I think Thomas. I don't think Thomas is wilfully misunderstanding the problem and I just want to say that I do value the discussion here, but I do think it's important to say that what the poets that were responding to the Poetry Foundation said is the poetry foundation released before sentence statement after the death of George Floyd. And the authors of the letter, sort of challenging the poetry foundation told the foundation. You haven't invested in black leadership. You haven't meaningful E invested in black communities and the's air all problems to us. And I think that Teo say that I willfully misunderstand. Thomas's argument is sort of disrespectful in a free and open discourse. I think we're having a pretty reasonable conversation. But I think when it comes to these specific examples, and the Harpers letter, it's It's hard to say right, like we tried to pull apart all of these examples and say, Okay, well, this this sort of general example of I don't know. Let's say editors are fired for running controversial pieces. Let's try to figure out what they mean by that. But I think you would think in a in a letter composed by so many popular writers that they would try to specifically call out all of these examples that they're talking about right so that folks can better understand what's happening, but they don't do that in the Harpers letter. They don't tell us what they're talking about. They try to use generalities to prove that there are trends. And they don't show us what the trends are any specific examples? I'd love to delve into it. But I I honestly don't know We tried our.

Thomas poetry Foundation George Floyd Dustin Teo Filter Bill Cosby Teo president chairman Harvey Weinstein R. Kelly
"poetry foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 8 months ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"By the authoritarian right. There is a danger that the overcorrection can harden into a interest dogma that we have to I guess in the news the last few days has been Trump trying to identify with the critics of cancel culture by standing up for Confederate statues. A cz well as others, but including Confederate statues. Is that relevant to your letter? That is completely irrelevant. And someone like Donald Trump is not a good faith actor. He's not a good faith participant in the kind of debate that, um, speaking for myself. I was trying to participate in that I'd imagine any of the signatory is attempting to participate in Confederate monuments are not being canceled. There shouldn't be monuments in the United States of America to, um aside that fought against the country to two traders of the republic that That's um is false equivalency with the kind of thing that we're talking about here when? When Colin Katherine it cannot work for having a political opinion that he expressed freely when You have people like David Shore? Um, who get fired for sharing simply for tweeting research? You know, that was one of the most egregious examples that happened recently, You have the chairman of the board and the president of the Poetry Foundation, forced to step down because their statement in support of black lives matter. In support. I stress was not And if it's strong enough, they have lost their jobs for what was deemed to be to tap it of a response. You have the same situation on the board of the National Book Critics Circle. These are neither worrying examples of a kind of authoritarian ing on DH intolerant. Adrift in our nation's cultural and media institutions. Thomas Chattering and Williams on this program last week. Joining us now are a signatory of the Harpers letter that he organized new school professor Claire.

Donald Trump Um Colin Katherine United States David Shore Poetry Foundation Williams Thomas Chattering chairman America professor president
"poetry foundation" Discussed on Before Breakfast

Before Breakfast

03:00 min | 8 months ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on Before Breakfast

"Today's tip is to build a reading habit by tackling a poem a day. Poems tend to be short, but can take you to amazing places. And so can help you find space in life for a little bit of beauty. As I talked to people about their schedules over the years I've learned that many people want to find more time to read. Along with volunteering and. Doing reading something that we know would improve our lives. But when life gets busy, it's easy to let it go. And once you let it go. Getting back in the habit can seem intimidating. Most books demand at least a few hours of time. Reading and little bits might not be very satisfying. Hence the beauty of poems. Unless you're reading T S Eliot. Elliott's the wasteland. Most poems are relatively short. You can easily borrow e books of poetry from your library through an APP like Libby, and then read through them on the kindle APP. Or. You can go to a website. such as poets dot, Org or Poetry Foundation Dot Org and find poems selected by their editors. In any case, you can get free poems on your phone quickly. And I'm guessing that you always have your phone nearby. And for the cause of building a poetry reading habit. This is actually a good thing. Notice when you pick up your phone. What do you do? Many people check texts or emails first and then look at social media APPS. As you find yourself doing this. Consciously clip to the poetry website or your daughter instead. In about three minutes. You can read a poem. A whole poem. which will give you at least some feeling of accomplishment? Whatever else you did or didn't do during the day you are the sort of person who reads poetry. Now, of course some poems are better than others. I've read through volumes from some of my favorite poets like Mary Oliver. Billy Collins Classic poets such as Emily Dickinson, and sometime stuff is awesome, and sometimes even with the vaster. Sit doesn't always speak to us. But. Poems do have away of going places that pros can't always follow. Dunwell upon can conjure up an image and a feeling. You can ponder that image and feeling as you go about your day. That image and feeling can take you outside your life for a few minutes. An elevate your experience. Putting a little beauty and to the moment. Not Bad for three minutes right. And as you find yourself finding three minutes here and there you'll start to see that you do in fact, have time to read. You just have to choose to do so. And so poetry can become a gateway to literature of all kinds. So today find some poetry. Put, it where you can read it. And, if nothing else, you'll end the day feeling like you put something a little special into your life.

Poetry Foundation Dot Org Mary Oliver Emily Dickinson T S Eliot Libby Elliott Billy Collins twitter Laura P. O. D instagram facebook
Read a poem

Before Breakfast

03:00 min | 8 months ago

Read a poem

"Today's tip is to build a reading habit by tackling a poem a day. Poems tend to be short, but can take you to amazing places. And so can help you find space in life for a little bit of beauty. As I talked to people about their schedules over the years I've learned that many people want to find more time to read. Along with volunteering and. Doing reading something that we know would improve our lives. But when life gets busy, it's easy to let it go. And once you let it go. Getting back in the habit can seem intimidating. Most books demand at least a few hours of time. Reading and little bits might not be very satisfying. Hence the beauty of poems. Unless you're reading T S Eliot. Elliott's the wasteland. Most poems are relatively short. You can easily borrow e books of poetry from your library through an APP like Libby, and then read through them on the kindle APP. Or. You can go to a website. such as poets dot, Org or Poetry Foundation Dot Org and find poems selected by their editors. In any case, you can get free poems on your phone quickly. And I'm guessing that you always have your phone nearby. And for the cause of building a poetry reading habit. This is actually a good thing. Notice when you pick up your phone. What do you do? Many people check texts or emails first and then look at social media APPS. As you find yourself doing this. Consciously clip to the poetry website or your daughter instead. In about three minutes. You can read a poem. A whole poem. which will give you at least some feeling of accomplishment? Whatever else you did or didn't do during the day you are the sort of person who reads poetry. Now, of course some poems are better than others. I've read through volumes from some of my favorite poets like Mary Oliver. Billy Collins Classic poets such as Emily Dickinson, and sometime stuff is awesome, and sometimes even with the vaster. Sit doesn't always speak to us. But. Poems do have away of going places that pros can't always follow. Dunwell upon can conjure up an image and a feeling. You can ponder that image and feeling as you go about your day. That image and feeling can take you outside your life for a few minutes. An elevate your experience. Putting a little beauty and to the moment. Not Bad for three minutes right. And as you find yourself finding three minutes here and there you'll start to see that you do in fact, have time to read. You just have to choose to do so. And so poetry can become a gateway to literature of all kinds. So today find some poetry. Put, it where you can read it. And, if nothing else, you'll end the day feeling like you put something a little special into your life.

Poetry Foundation Dot Org Mary Oliver Emily Dickinson T S Eliot Libby Elliott Billy Collins
"poetry foundation" Discussed on VS

VS

12:27 min | 11 months ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on VS

"She's the author of isolated coughing gone for any Choy. And they're the author of Homey alone too. And you're listening to versus the PODCASTS. Were poets confront the ideas that moved brought to you by the Poetry Foundation and puzzling welcome versus listeners? to the dosage tones of Mike's our apartments here broadcasting live from Massachusetts and Minnesota. This is such a surreal experience to be Shirtless in a my ugliest leggings. If I say so myself we reached that part of it. Yeah I had..

Poetry Foundation Mike Massachusetts Minnesota
"poetry foundation" Discussed on VS

VS

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on VS

"She just asks a woman on a date and boy her u-haul tired Freddie Choy and they're protesting the trump administration by having no walls at all. Didn't that you're listening. Verses were poets. Who brought the ideas that moved by the Poetry Foundation and Post loudness is one day? I'm sure that we're just going to say something with the podcast is going to end because we both just say something. So offensive bitch. We can't move on to our. We're we're happy about it. We're totally excited and then like the Lgbtq community comfortable you are we own you. The most racist homophobic is by by UH Cinder Queer black lessening couple of. Gw's yeah again social. How's it going next? I'm doing pretty good. I'm doing pretty good. I'm so excited to present this conversation with Tulsa. We've already had now young though I'm doing good I was going to be in Chicago. Of course of course last time we were here. We got to go see the big slam slam. Which is the poetry. Show that Toaster along with H Jackson Season Two guests. Yeah it was good to see that like one because it's a eighteen plus poetry show and there's not a lot of it's actually weird like this kind of a gap and poetry When you're when you're like Oh over. Eighteen on twin one can actually access that right when you've aged out of youth poetry slam but you're not old enough to go into the twenty one plus venues. Yeah Yeah for sure. Yeah and also toaster somebody that I slammed with and loved a lot when I was so slamming. Heavily is beautiful to see how I think he is still like activating folks in the Genera. But it's like completely done away with a lot of the bullshit sexism. Lot of the reasons I left right as a thoughtful writer and teaching artists and facilitator spaces and who thinks about craft and also an excellent host. Yeah yes such a good show pop. We hosted a Lotta Shit organized slams and open before what is like the number one thing that makes you like pull your armpit hairs out about host. Like what can somebody do? I know well. We'll send me immediately into a bikini wax. Yes yes like a pet peeve you like what really waxes my crotch about hosting is like win. There's somebody that's like you know so passionate. And they're feeling and they really mean what they're saying but you told everybody to go for five minutes or less and they are going for fifteen minutes or more and then you have to do that. That slow like creep up to them. It's like hey I know you're like unfolding your parental trauma. But I really need you to like shut the fuck up for now. That's a hard. It is so hard as a host to be like everyone is welcome. But like you gotta kind of you know not be dumb. Yes about this the rules. I WANNA hold space but I also WANNA choke you. It's a tough balance. Yeah Yeah there was this guy in. It always starts. There was this guy. This one guy bless his heart. I suppose Who was at a regular for whatever reason at a poetry slam venue that I used to host? I won't maybe I won't name. What is Providence? Otas I'm shocked. Province voters love Providence Poetry Slam. But he would often come in with the same poem. Every time is an oldish or white gentleman and The poem was like Parodying Slam poems. More like it was like you're critiquing. How like people will? Just you know clap for you as long as you like. Say something I mean. It was basically saying like poems about race or like funny poems are like are the snippy ones. Those are the ones that get the love and like what are you know just like why did you come out on a Thursday night to insult everyone else and it has a host to be up there and be like her? Aa Everyone is welcome. Thanks Mike for Coming back. And that's the only poem you're doing come to the poetry slam to say. I hate poetry. Slams brought literally. You could have watch how to get away with murder. Go home do anything. Yeah shouts toaster hosts in the world mainly spaces that because they're so beautiful. Yeah and also. There's always somebody who maybe shouldn't come back. Hey what do we look forward to in this conversation with toaster for any speaking of excellent hosts known? We're so looking forward to getting to talk to toaster about Not just facilitating this. Amazing space of the beacon slammed but also about his own history as a writer. Who's working on a manuscript and exploring be kid like vulnerability and how to manage that responsibly? In his work. So yeah. We're so excited to talk to toaster. Toaster is the CO creator of Big Slam. He has formed formed at every level of poaching slam from the youth to the old becoming the Grand Slam champion of Berkeley in two thousand twelve admiral graffiti in two thousand and sixteen and a finalist for the Individual World Poetry Slam also in two thousand sixteen and he was the winner of the national underground poetry individual competition in two thousand fourteen Actually that's a lie. He was two thousand fifteen. I one two thousand fourteen. Sorry toaster correction. fills hated rap graffiti and poetry workshops across the country for over ten years and recently accepting a teaching artist fellowship at Young Chicago Authors toaster has been featured on many media outlets including button poetry off digital so far sounds National Public Radio and SF. Weekly if you would like to learn more about toaster asses mom. She put a scrapbook together. Oh that's cute Let's waste no time. Let's get into this insightful. Deep and Oso delightful interview with Tosa. Who's going to start us off with a poem? I'm going to read. This poem is Entitled Transit. So I got to the train a minute late which meant I was fifteen minutes late unless the train was late. In which case beyond time so I looked for the next two rival which said thirty minutes which I thought met forty-five minutes late unless the arrival sign was wrong so I asked the next person at the station. The train was later already. Came and he said doesn't matter you're going to die soon anyway. Because part of me thought he might be the one to do it and I didn't want to wander my afterlife wondering I asked what and he said. Eventually you'll die and if you die here they'll pick your body up off the ground. Put your parts in my office. And I'll clean you up for your family and they'll cry over you or they won't and then we'll put you in the ground and I'll be right back here the day after eating a sandwich just like this one until I die. And they'll hire someone to fix my body for casket and they'll bury me and someone else will sit here waiting on the same train in probably won't never come fuck show. Thank you Telstar thanks so much for G go dark ash humor on our humor or if it's dark and we laugh at it 'cause yeah who broke you my first question. I was a I was runaway for for a thing for work and I was trying to get all my shit together and that actually wasn't the worst interaction I have within that five minutes. I got to the train met that person. That's most of most of what I said was how he said it wait. That was really. Yeah he was like and then you'll die and then they'll pick your body off the ground and I'm like explain to me what happened. Die Like from the sky or somebody murder me who murdered me. He was like basically it was just like and then I'll pick your body up. I'm like oh he's like a like you handle bodies okay. We're person to ask about the train time and then immediately after I was like Jesus walked away and I like a flash because I was on my way to work thing and that sounds stupid. There's a work party anyway. Point is it was one of those rare moments where I was like. I'm GonNa hit this flask and somebody walking past me was like you don't want that. I've been there before and I was like okay. All these people Negroes. This jess all only baby and literally. It was the second. I literally just like drop-off last like ours. Purgatory one of the weirdest like but I thought like that moment. Was this real important. Because even though he was real dart like. Is this really beautiful? That in that moment he was just like. It'll be okay you MRS train and also you're GONNA die someday and I'll probably touch your body. It was weird. It was weird interaction but love. How in the poem? You just sort of leave it there without the sort of flakes and I walked away from that understanding this new thing about like you know like it's it stays it stays right there. I don't know I love. I love that about that. And it's a really foul poem because there's not that much exposition situation. Here's what this Nigga. Fuck concern I experienced it. I get to say it again no long. Did you take for you to know that? That was a poem immediately. That was probably like looking at him. I was like either. This is going to be one of the scariest moments in my life. Or be one of the scariest moments my life. I'M GONNA write about it but it was just the way. He said what he said. It just like really hit me so this phrase Memento Mori no it just like a thing that people right to be like remember. Death I think is what Just remember that you're going to die as a as a reminder to use the the day or live fully you know which is like Morbid but you know. It's like that APP that foty our friend. Fatty lustrous uses. That is that you use the crow. We Croak Yeah. It's just an APP that once a day reminds us this night. Five Times a day reminds me five times a day alarm five times a day five times a day. It tells you you're going to die and then it gives you a beautiful quote like about what I heard from. You just was. It tells you you're going to die and then and then it's my father. No Oh sorry. Yeah my dad was. Yeah now my But Yeah like tells you gives you this beautiful quote that like is like sort of the other side of you're going to die so live well like here's this little tidbit right. It's a mindfulness practice. Right yeah I mean how much comfortable with comfortable with you're going to die. I think I'm a little bit more creeped out by your diet. I'm going to prepare you another level. The Stranger sitting in a train at the muny eating a sandwich. Okay see I had this place in Chicago and you said Muny and like I'm in the bay. I thought it was story. Makes Complete Sense niggers are always on some shit and the dangerous things you'll running haunted by living people show van. Thank you for your dark found poem. Oh.

Chicago writer murder Poetry Foundation Tulsa Freddie Choy Gw Young Chicago Authors Tosa Telstar Mike SF Berkeley Oso Muny Memento Mori Point
"poetry foundation" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on The Slowdown

"I'm Tracy K Smith and this is a slow the slowdown is a production of American public media in partnership with the Poetry Foundation

Tracy K Smith Poetry Foundation
"poetry foundation" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on The Slowdown

"I'm Tracy Case Smith and this is the Oh down is a production of American public media in partnership with the Poetry Foundation

Tracy Case Smith Poetry Foundation
"poetry foundation" Discussed on VS

VS

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on VS

"She's the Duchess of Insomnia branch choice and they're the high priest of the booty calls and that Smith you're listening versus the podcasts or poets confront the ideas. I got brought to you by the Poetry Foundation and Post loudness k possible brandy how you doing. I'm doing great vine Do me ban on my friends in college. WHO said I spoke didn't Espanol the whole time we live when we studied abroad. They were like your accent is awesome. It's okay. It's okay good. You know I'm like amazing grace. I was lost but now I'm yeah yeah. I mean important to take an l. once in a while yeah it's been a season of els. Actually it's I have a good I mean I feel like I had a low season for a little bit at the early part of this summer and I think it was a good and necessary low point select sort of lose myself in order to like actually find them that I wanted to find again. You know what do you mean by that. I mean that I got super depressed in a way that I feel like I haven't in a while but difference was like in the bottom of this. I was like well yeah. I don't WanNa die so suicidal thoughts on an option so like what is it that gets me out of this and it was a lot of like you know really saying like okay like if I feel too heavy to lift myself out of this. Would I need to leave behind in order to climb back up and I think it's been part of Saturn's return turning thirty and all this other kinda stuff to be like there are things as that you have been meaning to shed that she's still holding onto for so long and so there. Are these things that maybe you've you upon on his wins or at a certain point they were medicine. They were helpful which needs to lose it. You need to leave him behind and continue on towards a if not an actual victory towards a actual actual explain of stability examining in a real way my relationship to sobriety leaving behind a lot of like ego things that I have going on and you know and like part of that tuition. I feel a lot of anxiety about my next book coming out because my last book did so well and I'm like very nervous but also kind of excited I guess about the impending L. Maybe I want to l like with this next one wow you know it felt like not myself like a lot of the world and even the way like certain folks. Were talking to me. It was like oh he does win win win win win and I'm just like yeah but like losing also good you know losing reminds us who we are grateful for the Times that I've lost the you know whether material or not yes success is great heaton but not necessarily the best teacher moments might it makes you believe sometimes the lie of yourself to write and like buys you into that American lie that you've done it that your success is like this thing that your community celebrates actually really like. Sometimes you need to L. Somebody else can get a win. and that's you know and sometimes you need a l just to make you realize that like winning was never it you now now forget. It was never the point of the work. You're doing or the life that you were living and so here's an L. Remember that your human NB well with that for sure but I don't know you know I don't know I'm GonNa the rest of this for the therapist but later for later you know yeah we'll go. Get some chicken wings and talk about some els feeling some els or well okay so I think that by the time I'm this podcast comes out. It will be announced. I mean that I won a Russillo from the poetry foundation which is really moving to me and really like emotionally overwhelming honestly for a lot of different reasons but I think one of them is that ahead like a few years early in my poetry career until early in but whatever where I was nominated for a finalist and then didn't get it. I was like okay cool. Then was a finalist and like okay. Maybe this time then didn't get it. I was like okay cool and then I wasn't a finalist them and then I wasn't a finalist and then I wasn't you know and so it seemed as though oh I had been on a trajectory to some sort of like success and then something had fallen off if fucked with my head. It's hard it's it's I I mean we want to be really real with it because a lot of folks that were community with like had gotten so I can imagine it's like well what is different and like I was so excited for everybody but who got it but it was still like a strange thing but I also have been realizing recently that like I was really different writer at that point and and if I had just gotten everything then I don't know if I would have had to really interrogate my work and say what am I doing and what do I really want to to my Mo- Dri. What do I want to stick to outside of the idea of whether or not it'll bring me success and I think asking that hard question. I don't want to say that the lead me to like who knows what lead somebody to get an award but I think it at least pushed me to be a better writer scores so I don't know it's weird. It's really talk about once unsuccess- in in the context of a price but I think it's it all comes back to struggle without like the promise of triumph. Am for the ultimate teacher about ourselves about like where we are struggling in about like the project project of America and that's something that we got a chance to talk to our guest today Cathy Park Hong about. I'm really excited to get into this.

Poetry Foundation writer Smith Cathy Park Hong heaton America Mo- Dri
"poetry foundation" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

"With the poetry foundation's nations podcast versus co hosted by poets franny choy and dennis smith lindsay garbage associate editor of poetry magazine teamed up with joy choya smith to interview some of the brightest lights and contemporary literature. This episode was recorded live at the w._p._a. Conference in portland oregon burn louisa amezcua is the author of from the inside quietly and three chat books her poems and translations appear in the new york times magazine the kenyon kenyon review gulf coast poetry magazine and elsewhere. Here's amezcua reading. I haven't masturbated in five days for fear of crying mm-hmm because we know distance too well because the blood bank didn't have enough blood for nanna and her new knee because i see your car no a car like yours parked across the street from my apartment because the same night awaits us all because arizona arizona and the drought and i was seven when it started because nanna used to sleep with a belt tied around her waist so tight to wake like an hour glass because i weighed on you because i want to know the antonyms to every word because we speak to each other in our sleep because i do my best his thinking in the shower so i take long showers because you kiss the parts of my body i hate most because you can love someone and and not remember their birthday because sometimes i want the wind and it is impossible because from the airplane i could see both oceans uh-huh and where they met are.

nanna poetry magazine franny choy louisa amezcua gulf coast poetry magazine dennis smith kenyon kenyon review the new york times magazine arizona associate editor portland oregon five days
"poetry foundation" Discussed on VS

VS

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on VS

"She's the Apple Pie for Choy and their whole road of themselves on the early more than Flight Dennis Smith. You're listening to versus the podcast poets confront the ideas that move them brought to you by the Poetry Foundation and Post loudness COLLO welcome to Sonny Portland Sunny Portland rain. We're in the rainy one over here in Oregon how you doing. I'm doing good native U._p.. pinker hair her yeah the GRUNGE T fit writers do okay so this nineties nostalgia that has been happening for a little fairly a few years. Yes the current move like cute but also like a little weird maybe right is that the era that you have the most nostalgia for is that like your cultural era yes and no right. Surely I'm the stall J- If I make that a verb for the nineties I was raised in it. You know yeah so so I I missed the nineties but it's not the era that I feel like I could go back to. I would want to be like a adult in right you know yeah. It's not adult in the ninety. s seems fine. No I mean you know sure there was a surplus. You know there was a lot of light grow but I don't really want to live there like when I think about like my era I think about the late nineteen seventy so the early nineteen eighty s like that genre and like music fashion like that's for like the culture right. That's what I listen to all the time right when I think about oh I could have been like in New York York of pre AIDS faggot you know just like sleeping with everybody and then go into the parliament Funk concert later that night like the maybe doing some coke earth when fires titties in the back cool that tight that's my era the cool but trying to cope with Chaka Khan back across the city fifty four. That's where you should have been born for music and fashion reasons maybe less oh for political. Maybe civil rights yeah sure sure yeah yeah yeah yeah you know being the Negro sucks throughout history but it's definitely the time where I feel like I even draw the most inspiration artistically like when I think about sort of the spirit and embodiment of blackness and even.

Sonny Portland Chaka Khan Poetry Foundation New York York Dennis Smith Choy Apple Oregon AIDS
"poetry foundation" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

Poetry Off The Shelf

06:52 min | 2 years ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

"The. This is poetry off the shelf from the poetry foundation criticize this week a popular poet from Russia. Where poetry is actually pretty popular us new view newboy few which more do share McGee. Gus land seem in Russia. Nearly everyone knows a few poems by heart the language rhymes easily kids in school are reciting poetry before. They even know how to read or write. And then there's Pushkin opponent who died in a duel almost two hundred years ago, but who lives on in the national psyche. UB mainly we threw Jim. So poets after the revolution of nineteen seventeen were figuring out what to do some got out of the country as fast as they could many were conflicted Mandelstam, for instance, or pasternack, but one poet was unabashedly onboard led Amir Mayakovsky. My cost was a futurist performance artist who love the hum of mills and laboratories and delivered his versus on the factory floor in front of thousands of workers. But can you really address a crowd with poetry Halina, degroot producer who lives in New York? Looked into this question. Majkowski was a striking man tall unsmiling with deep said is full lips. And sunken cheeks made even more dramatic when he decided to shave his skull. I suspect that it was a kind of futurist streamlining for the romantics the poet road right by candlelight for the futurist Majkowski the poet should be writing by naked lightbulb hanging from the ceiling. They're shaved heads wraps. Resembled naked light bulbs. This velvet incor- a Jewish Russian American poet and translator he was born in Moscow during the bridge enough years, but in nineteen seventy eight with the economy down anti-semitism up his mother and grandmother decided to move to the United States taking six-year-old velvet incor- with them. Vinokourov never much liked the poet of the revolution. As my costs was called. He seems to cozy with the Soviet regime. Why else would there be Mayakovsky subway station in Moscow and statues and the square it was only later when vinegar started translating him. And really inhabiting his words that he felt something shift. It was enormously liberating because I could be someone else I could have more bravado than I normally have. Especially on stage in front of a large crowd. My cough. Ski was magnetic. She would always stand with his legs spread apart often. We would have one hand on his hip ramrod-straight recite poems in front of groups of thousands of workers and tell them, you know, sh my little kittens settle down settle down much of his charisma came from his booming voice, take his poem about the sun. The extraordinary adventure that happened to LA Demeter meal. Mayakovsky one summer on dot com. There's not a whole lot left of my coughs Ke's original swagger on these old creaky tapes. So I asked velvet court to do his best sunset swarmed in a hundred forty sons as summer rolled into July. There was the heat the swimming heat this all happened in the country. Right. It's almost a little ridiculous. But there's a real range there too. I thought that this poem because it begins. Listen to me exclamation point would sound much like extraordinary adventure, but the recording that I heard was something like this. Listen to me, if stars are lit doesn't that mean someone needs it doesn't that mean? Someone wants them to be doesn't mean someone calls. These spills pearls. It's just pleading. It's almost pathetic. And I was so moved in. So surprised she wasn't just as big blowhard? Majkowski believed with all the energy of young radical that the country was ready for a new kind of poetry for a wild ride through images and language like his long monologue cloud in pants. It's a love story. But it's also a diatribe against everything old old art of religion old elites written up in a vulgar, streetwise vernacular. It starts like this washroom weasel. Mitch Dyer sheer not as me action or thought lies dreaming on your mush of a brain like an over fed lackey on a greasy couch as Iraq on its bloody scrap of a heart until I've mocked my fill, nasty and smart ass. Not one gray hair on my soul, and no old school tenderness, either the world's shakes with the thunder of my voice as I go forth a beautiful twenty two year old yet. This is kind of what's going on. Here is like don't you love? Me. Don't you love to hate me? I'm so young. I'm so beautiful. And you're so old and gross. Right. But what's interesting is how much of the Russian literary tradition. He draws on filters here, for example, like an over fed lackey on a greasy couch. I mean that is a stock character from all of nineteenth century Russian literature. Right. But if you've read any dusty Eski, even the lowliest craziest character like the underground man will have a lackey usually on a greasy couch. Right. So here he is comparing anyone in his audience who doesn't get it to this kind of vulgar over fed lackey. But at the same time, he's drawing on this. Venerable literary and cultural tradition was he the first Russian poet to make a topic, you know, sort of the lowly degree see the machine. I think that Russian poetry wrote about the dregs. But with a view to elevating them Majkowski is. He's just in the dregs. Right. He's not trying to suggest that the dregs or some kind of mystical symbol. You know? He's just saying this is where I live. This is where the people live and there's poetry in these dregs themselves.

lackey Majkowski Russia Amir Mayakovsky Moscow Pushkin McGee Mandelstam Mayakovsky Jim LA Demeter New York producer Vinokourov United States Ke Mitch Dyer vinegar Iraq two hundred years
"poetry foundation" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

Poetry Off The Shelf

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

"The show for the poetry foundation. I'm Curtis FOX this week the poetry of Jean Valentine. Jean Valentine was born in nineteen thirty four and she lives in New York City Adron rich once wrote a Valentine's work, this is a poetry of the highest order because it lets us to spaces and meanings. We couldn't approach in any other way back in two thousand nine fanny how and I got into some of the spaces in meetings of a few Jean Valentine poems, which I had recorded the herself reading here's that interview. With fanny how at here are those Jean Valentine poems for listeners who aren't familiar with gene Valentine's poetry? How would you? How would you characterize it? I would say it has gone through stages. It's changed when she first won the Yale younger poets award many years ago in the sixties even rent. Yeah. She would very much part of the Robert Lowell world and with Sylvia, Plath Sexton and her poems in where quite narrative and confessional in that vein. Always a little bit weirder than just that. Her poetry is often political though she says that she is not a political poet. And we're gonna hear one poem of hers that was came on the New Yorker if yours ago that seem political and its content. It's called in prison. Do you want to say anything about that poem before we hit? I think that it's a poem that listened to two ways one is as there's there's an actual prisoner. The other is the sole imprisoned. I thought I was just reading it literally as prison poem. But that's a good point. Okay. Here's Jean Valentine reading in prison. In prison without being accused or reach your family or have a family. You have conscience heart. Trouble asthma, manic depressive, we lost the baby. No mids. No one no window..

Jean Valentine Valentine gene Valentine Sylvia Curtis FOX New York City Robert Lowell asthma Plath Sexton
"poetry foundation" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

Poetry Off The Shelf

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on Poetry Off The Shelf

"Shelf from the poetry foundation Curtis FOX this week. The robots are coming to class. It's that time of year again back to school for teachers and students every year in this podcast. We'd like to check in with the teacher to talk about poetry in the classroom. This year is Carol j go she has taught English in middle school and high school for over thirty years, and she's the author of with rigor for all meeting standards for reading literature. She joins me from her home outside of Chicago. Hi, carol. Hi, good talk, the Curtiss, thanks for doing this. So carry you recently wrote an essay for our website called agents of imagination science fiction poems in the classroom, and at the beginning of that essay, you show how well-meaning teachers can really get poetry wrong in the classroom. Can you walk us through how that happens? Well, one of the most common ways that a teacher. I think inadvertently gets it wrong is to begin by sharing upon with students. Upon she loves and she reads, it with feeling turns to the class and says students, what do you think? Silence. Not a word, not a hand all their eyes are are kind of slipping away, but English teachers hate silence. And so what does it teach? You do begins talking about the poet and the movement to which that poet belong and on and on and Honam unim- up here and eggs on. That's exactly and kids sit there and go for minute there. I thought we were going to have to do something the heartbreaking thing and really I'm not pointing fingers at anybody else. But at myself who's done this way, too many times is it the bell rings the and the students walk out of that room saying MRs j goes, really smart, and I still don't get poetry. And that's the opposite of what any teacher wants to accomplish. We've got to figure out ways to approach. Patry that empowers students that makes them feel that I can do this this. This is good stuff. So one of the problems that happens in the classroom is a poem is a problem that you have to solve as if it's code, and we have to decipher it to explain it where where do you think that notion came from in the first place, why does poetry have to be explained? Well, I think we instinctively want to put a gold frame around poetry, something precious and the highest level of art in in in the supreme distillation of language and in that vein. We create something that students feel excludes them and my goal for every minute. I.

Carol j Curtis FOX Chicago MRs j Honam thirty years
"poetry foundation" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Is the word in silencer you get at a lot of the core issues that are surrounding police brutality and inequality some great stuff in here when it comes to understanding yourself in and race in race relations so how important is the is the written word when it comes to the protest movement 2017 i mean i think that there is a way that i always tell my students one she write a poem and it's out there in the world view are no longer there to defend it to speak up for it and so if you do your job well what she put on the page goes much further than your front door and if it's crafted different people will be able to interpret it ends palau different things that are important to their life and so that's what so powerful for the me about poetry is that that mean something a little different to everyone else but if you've done your job as a poet the central theme our message that's going on the neath the is always there for someone to honor my guest in city awardwinning poet marcus wicker his new collection silencer tell now and she was just in chicago to chicago poetry foundation for reading a lot of the poems have to deal with police brutality we talked about this but what i really like about it in this is on purpose of read about this story is that they're generic stories that if you pay enough attention to the headlines you know you're you're speaking about the situation new york with her garner or trayvon martin even the notes on your website about these bombs but in there you don't mention trayvon you don't say eric guard you don't say the names of philander casteel our other people who have become headlines and people who were affected by police brutality why why go generic as opposed to the specific i think that there is a kneejerk reaction against rhetoric whether that the on the media or on the page and sell riding his poems and silencer were i write about police brutality i write about cases that have actually occurred but strip away some of the names and the.

marcus wicker chicago chicago poetry foundation new york trayvon martin eric
"poetry foundation" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"You can come up with something earthshattering and the same thing happens with words the district partnered with the library of congress which selects the poet laureate and the chicagobased poetry foundation which for the record also supports the news our this remains a small programme and costs have been minimal the school system provides serbs to fill in when teachers have their workshop days with herrera thank you so much to the library of congress latania mcdade hedge the office of teaching and learning and while she admits the district the third largest in the nation faces enormous challenges getting by in for a poetry program wasn't one of them if you look over time at schools that have strong arts programmes you see higher performance and students overall so it's will you show that kind of data you're seeing a higher percentage of students really showing strong academic performance where there is high ours investments the next step magnate says is to measure the impact of the poetry clashes the district has signed on for another year and will track the effectiveness of the program for both teachers and their students thank you plan on us border dynamite what to do ask for one philippa herrera his term as us poet laureate is ending but he's committed to continue working in chicago school's he says poetry's place in the education of young people is needed more than ever in we gotta let our students lives all our life alleged support of their lives express itself and has many ways as possible and we're going to get the openness and freedom and one other area in school maybe this other areas but for sure poetry rare and others involved hope this project can be a model for other cities around the nation for the pbs newshour i'm jeffrey brown in chicago.

congress chicagobased poetry foundation us philippa herrera chicago school chicago jeffrey brown
"poetry foundation" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

02:26 min | 5 years ago

"poetry foundation" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Enjoy making clear to them that is really on that they that they can rose a you know one can go on me go on one smartphone the poetry foundation has an app that will give new a for every occasion in every place and the uh sort of refreshing intellectual exercise but also the sort of mindfulness read the possibilities of just dwelling in exquisitely crafted language that that speaks to something you yourself are experiencing weather is looking at the break brooklyn bridge or suffering a break up or play basketball or play soccer more that that there's there's poetry for all of this and i really like to be reaching all generations us and so i think of myself as a dressing really addressing this were too two audience to to really neglected community suppliers on the one hand these teachers in kids in schools who often think of eating you know englishlanguage arts is what you do so that you can pass a test improve you comprehend rather than a place where you grow skills and confident at making at making meaning and understanding your world an end to say that i wanna reach those teachers in those students that also means those parents wears if those children who were not on on the hand you know the handouts the come home whatever come so now on the ipad they're not seeing the children engage in these exercises meeting making and not having the opportunity road do that with that the say i'll give an online from upon muslim aplomb i really love by ed her this poem will actually be one of television episode is based on so the pom is called fast break.

brooklyn bridge soccer ipad break up basketball one hand