26 Burst results for "Plotkin"

"plotkin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:18 min | 9 months ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You That's a Bloomberg business flash Tom and Paul Karen thanks so much Here's the math Paul Sweden is going to bring in our next guest You have a management fee and like 3% as a field goal 1% is stick and now less than 1% is typical where it's like half a percent or 50 basis points et cetera The hedge fund world is different There you get paid 2% and you get 20% of whatever the total return is over a given hurdle rate Like if you make 8% everything already you get 20% If you go down Paul you have a market drawdown and you can calculate to the penny over a beverage of your choice at 5 p.m. how much you have to make back to start getting your 20% payout again And you say why are we doing this Why are we doing this The 2% A lot of that going on There's a lot of that going on because we've got markets down big time and we've got a really high profile hedge fund Why don't you make guests that they are closing their doors Melvin capital this is guy gay plotkin He had about an $8 billion hedge fund shutting down They got crushed last year on some of these meme stocks Let's bring in Chennai bastards She follows all things Wall Street for Bloomberg news and she joins us here in our Bloomberg studio So finale what's happening to the good folks at Melvin capital A very simply they are winding down They're returning money to investors They try to figure out a reboot plan but they had lost too much money I mean they're down more than 20% in the first four months of the year And remember last year they lost a lot of money Yes in that GameStop route This is really the GameStop the poster child And this was a bunch of retail traders bidding up the stock a lot of the hedge funds the quote unquote smart money was short they got crushed And remember gay plotkin used to work for Steve Cohen is kind of a known as a genius and shorting even in tough even in good times He was making a lot of money in the bull market shorting stocks and now because he had publicly said that he was not going to be shorting to that degree anymore he was not really doing that same strategy coming into this year which in theory could have made him Well is Bobby excellent shutting down That's an ask Bobby axelrod You will Damien would love to have a moment with you but seriously we see it on billions And that's all great and that but this is not one guy You're gonna laugh Industry imploding A little bit because I was having that old school Bobby van steak dinner last night Oh there you go Hey you know and everyone was joking Did you order a decaf park In order to decaf coffee I had one glass of wine Tom But you know the joke here is that yes I mean this is bad times but it's worse for a lot of worse for some than others So I do want to point attention to the Tiger clubs here Mister Robertson's offspring Exactly His offspring remember chase Coleman was one of the most famous at the offspring He had ran Tiger global that really got started in the wake of the dot com bust really finding cheaper technology companies that had sold off And now if you look there down about 44% in the first four months of the year that's a $17 billion loss And the question now is can a firm like that claw their way out of it some of their investors are really holding on tight and believing in it but you gotta wonder is Gabe plot get alone as some of these hedge funds started Okay but jump in here Paul with Chanel She already knows the story and you know the numbers It's simple as I can is anybody made money in hedge funds over the last three years or 5 years Versus the Vanguard standard Boris fund Yes is the answer There's definitely been some performance I personally this is just a personal analysis When I looked at the long short equity hedge fund which is what a lot of sell side animals would go to as I left a south side looking for greater riches My conclusion in 2004 5 6 was the game was over Over I would never pay two and 20 for long short equity There's just not enough alpha out there And I think we see that in the numbers every year And if I were a hedge fund investor I know that when a markets go up I'm not going to go up in line with the S&P because I'm quote unquote hedge but when the markets go down I don't want to go down as much as the market We don't see that in long term And some funds are doing very well this year His value strategy is actually paying off this year after this tight with John boggled Does he just own the Vanguard you know S&P fund No These are the quants over at AQR They're machines are turning And this year they're doing very well And he's done a lot of presentations with investors where he showed you the dispersion between stocks that are so called value stocks and so called growth stocks Versus expensive The other kinds of funds that are doing well this year Tom commodity hedge funds are up 20% in a year Sure And a macro funds are also doing very well but where will they be I just don't get the three or 5 year thing You know the other thing that's interesting is a lot of these funds use leverage The cost of leverage is going up Well the thing is this is actually not a small item Yeah not at all a small item because if you are depending on leverage and the cost of leverage is going up how much does this strategy work How much are they leveraged They're not leveraged two to one They're like about four to one 8 to one like some serious Sometimes more yeah sometimes a lot more And it depends on if what you're buying especially if you did I don't mean to drop God Some of the easy trades the spac trade The stack arbitrage is called kind of a lazy trade on Wall Street these days That's sell off They return the money to investors if they don't find a deal That's again you're pretty much dead If they do die As they die If feels like it boy 'cause again when I first thought about life can you see exactly a spac to me is a great investor like a Doctor John Malone Do you want to raise some money to put it to work in TMT Okay John I'll give you money because you're a proven investor but do I give it to Jay-Z or a rod Taylor amber mason went over from Bobby's shop over to cliff as can you get would you talk to Taylor and mason She's got some insight there.

Melvin capital Bloomberg Paul Karen Paul Sweden plotkin GameStop Bobby axelrod Bobby van steak Tom Mister Robertson chase Coleman Steve Cohen
"plotkin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:51 min | 9 months ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"For our crypto report And it's been a brutal market sell off in digital currencies Bloomberg's finale Bassett with us but we thought we get into digital assets to ask you about Melvin capital management's plan to wind down Yeah truly add remember this is an amazing scoop by Bloomberg's hammer parmar Gabe plotkin really the poster child here of that GameStop short squeeze Even after recouping some of the losses that he had in early 2021 is now down again for the year and telling investors that he is returning money and winding down funds Remember this is right after he initially tried to reboot the fund in a different fashion scrap those plans and now remember I've got to say Wall Street for a while now has been expecting some casualties in the hedge fund industry and it starts here with Melbourne capital All right Charlie give me a quick update on the markets in the world of cryptocurrencies as well Yeah absolutely Something interesting here Ed is that even though you saw that brutal sell off today in the market more largely especially in the NASDAQ 100 with a 5% sell off you're actually seeing Bitcoin even though it's trading below that 30% level only falling about 3% over a 24 hour period So not selling off as steeply as the market you are seeing it also holds steady as opposed to other coins Altcoins in this downturn So when you look at Bitcoin to what extent is it the relative safe haven compared to the other crypto assets All right thanks naughty Stay with us Let's bring in our next guest honey rush one who's the cofounder and CEO of 21 shares of crypto exchange traded products issuer There's been making waves in Europe for the past four years and it's now marking its U.S. entrance with the launch of two new funds simple question to start with honey Why is the U.S. okay with ATPs but not ETFs So thank you for having me I'm really excited to talk about our launch into the U.S. market We're launching private funds today So we're not yet launching ETFs or ATPs We are working on an ETF in America and that's public as well But nothing has been announced yet on that we're still working very very closely with the regulators on all of that Why is it that this is the time to launch new products in a down market especially when there's a lot of questions about how comfortable institutions will get with these types of products in such a downturn So there are a couple of reasons When we first launched in 2018 the world's first physically backed ETP which was the first crypto ETF on the Swiss stock exchange It was a bear market And I remember that the initial seat capital of 5 million went down to three and a half two days later It turns out that building during bear markets if you're focused on the long term ends up being a pretty good bet The other way of looking at this is nothing fundamental has changed with any of the underlying technologies And we're seeing this across the board both across every crypto asset as well as more institutional investor interest One of the things that should be very very comforting is that despite the market sell off and what happened with the Tara ecosystem last week we only saw a couple of days of outflows and we've seen consistent inflows today yesterday the day before and Friday as well While you're on it how does what happened last week I guess more than a week ago now the Tara breakdown really draw into question the broader crypto ecosystem And the place of other coins stablecoins in the ecosystem So we had the world's largest Luna Terra ETF which was listed on the European exchanges including Switzerland So we've been following this very very closely On the product itself considering that Luna is now operating intermittently we've obviously suspended quoting the product However there seems to be a potential rescue plan And we'll keep that up and running while we monitor that I think it's important to just take a step back and really look at Tara as what it was which was a grand experiment that was supported by some of the world's largest and most notable investors both in the crypto space and in the traditional financial space to try and build an algorithmic stablecoin How they succeeded which obviously they did not It would have had huge positive ripple effects And so it was a worthy experiment to run that built a vibrant ecosystem with a lot of risks And our research has shown that the risk for there as well as the opportunity Honey we see on our screens you're in Florence Italy Lovely That's a wonderful place In the heartland of the European Union talk to me about the regulatory landscape the difference between doing business in Europe versus the U.S. your experience of launching these products in each market It's different geography by geography What regulators are looking for and what populations are looking for can be different We just launched Australia's first Bitcoin and Ethereum ETFs And that was due to answering very very different questions than we have in Europe both in the EU and in Switzerland where we are active Switzerland jumped ahead of the pack by trying to create a crypto nation And so we've been very very supported from the beginning out of our Zürich base But as the asset class has become too big to ignore other regulators around the continent and actually around the world.

Melvin capital management Gabe plotkin Bitcoin Bloomberg Melbourne capital U.S. crypto exchange GameStop Charlie Ed Europe Switzerland Luna EU Florence Italy Australia
"plotkin" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"John so which means bitterly and the real medicine as they watched the chimp together. She finished peeling the bark and began chewing on the stem. She did not swallow it however but spit out. The chewed remains only ingesting. The bitter sap huffman doubts. The sap is quote an acquired taste consumed for gusta tori purposes. The flavor is exceptionally foul. Jane goodall wants performed an intriguing experiment which probably has some bearing on huffman's observation when she gave sick chimps bananas laced with the antibiotic tetracycline they readily devoured them however when she offered the same drug late and fruits to healthy chimps they refused them huffman and kalindi continued to follow the chip which made a rapid recovery prior to consuming the plant sap. The chimp was suffering from constipation. melas and lack of appetite a day later. She made a spectacular recovery. The researchers had trouble keeping her insight as you began climbing ridges at a rapid clip. Of course a single observation of a single. Sick chimp cannot be considered convincing proof in and of itself yet. In december of ninety one the research team made similar observations added credence to the theory. Huffman day observed another sig champ eating bologna and managed to test their hypothesis as they tracked the chimp. They collected samples of her droppings for laboratory analysis. At the time of the first collection the stools contained one hundred thirty nematode eggs per gram less than twenty four hours later. The egg level reduced to fifteen program and the chimp had resumed hunting an energy intensive exercise that she appeared unable to perform the day before when the researchers calculated exactly how much of the plant. The animal had ingested. They found that her dosage was almost identical to that taken. By ailing tribes people the period of recovery twenty four hours was identical for both people in chimps and though the plant was a common and available year-round chimps tended to consume it only during the rainy season. When parasite infections are most prevalent working with japanese colleagues. Huffman had the plan. Chemically analyzed lab work revealed two types of chemical compounds that accounted for the plants. Medicinal uses the plants. Orig- incestuous turpin lactones chemicals found in many botanical species known to have anti worm anti amoeba an antibiotic properties new sesikwe turpin lactones found in. These plans demonstrated significant activity against leishmaniasis. It common into figuring tropical disease as well as drug resistant fell sip rim. Malaria appropriately the first commercial. Use of these for nonni extracts may be for animals rather than people. Huffman has collaborated with colleagues both denmark and tanzania to determine the efficacy of vanilla extract and killing nematode by the scientific name of st augustine stephanos. Dome another instance. In which the scientific name is longer than the creature itself these nematodes and their close relatives caused significant loss of livestock particularly in the tropical world current treatments while effective or often expensive by third world standards and simply an accessible but quality of livestock husbandry and the tropics could be vastly improved by providing farmers with a plant. They can grow and used to kill parasites effectively..

huffman kalindi Huffman Jane goodall John leishmaniasis st augustine stephanos Malaria tanzania denmark
"plotkin" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

10:48 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Decades studying the howler monkeys of Central America and reach conclusions that parallel those of Karen stryer. Lander hypothesizes that the howler monkeys eat a selection of plants that allows them to determine the sex of their offspring. He notes that female hollars consume certain plants before and after copulation that they do not eat at any other time. Over decades of study, Glenda found that some howlers bore only male offspring, while others produced only females and outcome unlikely due to chance. Females firm, that as those that carry an ex chromosome, do better than males sperm, which carry a Y chromosome in an acidic environment and vice versa, could female hollers be controlling the chemistry of the reproductive tract and if so why? Glanders suggests that plant derived estrogen like chemicals may be responsible. He notes that males in a monkey troop often pass more of their genes to the next generation than females were able to do. This would explain why it is often advantageous for female to produce more males or if they're already exist in overabundance males, why female offspring would be preferable. The study of how animals use plants for medicinal purposes has been termed zoo of pharmacognosy, the spelling is in the show notes. But our observation of this phenomenon is without question an ancient practice, who has not watched a dog swallow grass to induce vomiting when the animal is eaten something unhealthy that it wishes to regurgitate. And the thought provoking and classic research paper, the brilliant ecologist, doctor Dan janson at the University of Pennsylvania wrote, I would like to ask if plant eating vertebrates may consume plants on occasion as a way of writing their own prescriptions. And sometimes animals teach us by their wisdom, but other times by their mistakes. Fatal culinary errors made by North American cows in the early part of the 20th century, for example, led to the development of several blockbuster drugs. One Saturday afternoon in February 1933, in the middle of a howling blizzard, a Wisconsin farmer appeared in the office of chemist doctor Carl Lincoln, carrying a bucket of blood. The man had driven almost 200 miles from his farm near deer park to seek help from the state veterinarian headquartered at the university of Wisconsin in Madison. It was the weekend, however, and the vet's office was closed so the desperate farmer wandered into the first building he found where the door was not locked, the biochemistry building. The blood in the bucket he carried would not clot. Several of his cows had recently hemorrhaged to death, and now his bull was oozing blood from his nose. He had been feeding his herd with the only hay he had on hand, spoiled, sweet clover. This hemorrhagic disease had first been reported in 1920s from both North Dakota and Alberta Canada. While specialists determined that feeding the animal spoiled sweet clover was the cause of this malady, they were not able to cure it nor were they able to isolate the compound in the clover that caused the problem. Their recommendation destroy the spoiled forage and transfuse healthy blood into hemorrhagic cattle, the same advice offered by link. Unfortunately, however, the farmer lacked an alternative fodder to feed it herd, and he was unable to perform blood transfusions in a snowstorm in rural Wisconsin during the depression. Troubled by his inability to assist the poor man. Link mentioned the problem to German postdoctoral student, Eugene Sheffield, Sheffield, and educated and idealistic fellow fond of quoting Goethe and Shakespeare, undertook the spoiled clover conundrum as a personal crusade. He and his colleagues analyzed the clover for 7 years before identifying and isolating the cause of its lethality, a chemical they named dicumarol. They correctly hypothesized that if too much caused a hemorrhage, a minuscule amount might prove to be a useful anticoagulant. Today, tycoon, and its synthetic analogs are commonly employed in humans as anticoagulants, particularly for the prevention and treatment of pulmonary embolism and venous thrombosis. The clover analysis serves as an example of a single species yielding a multitude of useful products. Noting that one of the synthetic analogs seemed to induce particularly severe bleeding in rodents, link proposed testing it as a rat poison, thinking it might lack the obvious dangers of more toxic rodenticides like strychnine. Research on this compound was bankrolled by the Wisconsin, alumni research foundation, acronym W a RF. When it proved effective, it was named warfare, despite the bellicose connotation, the name comes from the acronym of the alumni group, not declaring war on rodents. In early 1951, an army inductee tried to commit suicide by eating warfare. He failed to kill himself, but did manage to induce a classic case of hemorrhagic sweet clover syndrome. The unhappy soldier was successfully treated with transfusions of normal blood and coagulants. This bizarre incident, however, led to studies and eventual approval of warfare then named coumadin as an anticoagulant for human patients. How many cardiac patients realized that their physicians are prescribing rat poison for their ills? Yet another aspect of animal behavior has led us to other therapeutic leads. A surprisingly wide variety of creatures ingest and store toxic natural compounds in their own bodies. They do this not for medical purposes, but to employ the poisons for their own purposes, either to equip themselves with the ability to deliver a poisonous bite, or to deter predators from eating them. This is the case with the poisonous puffer fish. The deadly nerve poison known as tetrodotoxin occurs in dozens of pufferfish species. These fish concentrate the poison in their internal organs. Though the logical correlation is that humans would go to great lengths to avoid these toxic denizens of the deep, pufferfish are considered a delicacy in Japan. Chefs must undergo special training and then be licensed by the federal government before being permitted to prepare the sought after delicacy for consumption. Despite the rigorous preparation, accidents do happen. Every few years someone is poisoned. The result, general numbness, loss of muscle control and unless treated, death. Intrigued by the numbness typical of tetrodotoxin and animation. Japanese physicians have used it as a treatment for pain caused by migraines or menstrual cramps. Scientists were surprised to find that the deadly bite of the blue ringed octopus also contained to trot a toxin was it possible that the puffer fish and the octopus were creating the same poison. They found that neither the fish nor the octopus actually was capable of producing the poison. It was a bacterium known as Vibrio that manufactured it. The fish and the molluscs were ingesting the microbe and then storing the poison in their internal organs to deter predators. In a way, the puffer fish and the octopus had done our research for us. Of the millions of microbes or billions of microbes in the sea, they had found one of the deadliest with potent medical applications and brought it to our attention, albeit in a most fatal fashion. The method of filtering a poison from another species and using it for protection has helped us understand how poison dart frogs become toxic. Tropical American dart frogs contain myriad fascinating chemical compounds until relatively recently, however, we were unable to determine how the frogs made the poison. When raised in captivity, these tiny amphibians often failed to produce the same toxins. Specimens captured in the wild and placed in captivity may keep their alkaloids. That is the chemical compounds that were so poisonous, but their progeny had fewer and fewer of these alkaloids and in some cases none. Hawaii produced an even stranger phenomenon. Poison dart frogs were released in the minoa valley on the island of Oahu in 1932. When the descendants of these amphibian immigrants were tested in the lab 50 years after the original introduction, scientists found two of the same types of alkaloids that are found in the original species, which is native to Panama. Another type of alkaloid found in the Panamanian specimens was entirely absent. And scientists found an entirely new alkaloid in the Hawaiian frog that does not occur in the Panamanian version. What's going on? Poison dart frog authority John Daly, hypothesized that one, the amphibians made the alkaloids themselves. Two, they made the alkaloids from something they consumed or three, they collected and stored the compounds from a component of their diet, much as the puffer fish does with tetrodotoxin. The answer to Daly's hypotheses seems to be a combination of all three. Some of the compounds are their precursors are found in poisonous insects eaten by the frog. Alkaloids are taken in and stored from beetles, ants and millipedes, but it was not just a question of ingesting and sequestering any and all alkaloids. When ants containing two different alkaloids were fed to the frogs, the little amphibians stored only one alkaloid in their skin and apparently excreted the other. How's that for tiny chemistry? And in some instances, the frogs were observed seeking out and consuming particular species of insects that harbored compounds that the frogs typically stored in their own skin. As with the octopus and the pufferfish, these little frogs were finding new and useful chemicals in nature long before we did. In terms of intentionally using plants for medicinal purposes, the great apes of Africa are the most sophisticated members of the animal kingdom. Harvard primatologist.

Karen stryer Glanders Dan janson office of chemist Carl Lincoln Wisconsin hemorrhagic disease Eugene Sheffield alumni research foundation Lander Glenda clover syndrome Central America deer park University of Pennsylvania university of Wisconsin venous thrombosis blizzard Goethe
"plotkin" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Parallel those of karen stryer glenda hypothesize that the howler monkeys a selection of plans that allows them to determine the sex of their offspring. He notes that female hollers consume certain plans before and after copulation that they do not eat at any other time over. Decades of study glenda found that some howlers bore only male offspring while others produced only females and outcome. Unlikely due to chance female sperm. That is those the carry. An x chromosome do better than male sperm which carry a y chromosome in an acidic environment and vice versa. Could female hollers be controlling the chemistry of the reproductive track. And if so why or suggest the plant derived estrogen. Chemicals may be responsible. He knows that males in a monkey troop often pass more of their genes to the next generation than females were able to do. This would explain why it is often advantageous for female to produce more males or if they're already existed overabundance of males why female offspring would be preferable the study of how animals us plants for medicinal purposes has been termed zo pharmacognosy. The spelling is in the show notes but our observation of this phenomenon is without question. An ancient practice who has not watchdog swallow grass to induce vomiting when the animal is eating something unhealthy that it wishes to regurgitate and the thought provoking and classic research paper the brilliant ecologist dr dan jansen at the university of pennsylvania wrote i would like to ask if plant. Eating vertebrates may consume plans on occasion as a way of writing their own prescriptions and. Sometimes animals teaches by their wisdom but other times by their mistakes. Fatal culinary errors made by north american cows in the early part of the twentieth century for example led to the development of several blockbuster drugs one saturday afternoon in february nineteen thirty three in the middle of a howling blizzard. Wisconsin farmer appeared in the office of chemist. Dr karl link carrying a bucket of blood. The man had driven almost two hundred miles from his farm near deer park to seek help from the state. Veterinarian headquartered at the university of wisconsin madison it was the weekend however and the vet's office was closed so the desperate farmer wandered into the first building. He found where the door was not locked the biochemistry building the blood and the bucket he carried would not clot. Several of his cows had recently hemorrhaged to death and now his bull was oozing blood from his nose. He had been feeding his hurt with the only. Hey he had on hand spoiled sweet clover. This hemorrhagic disease had. I been reported the nineteen twenties from both north dakota and alberta canada while specialists determined that feeding the animals spoiled sweet. Clover was the cause of this malady. They were not able to cure it nor were they able to isolate the compound. In clover did caused the problem. Their recommendation destroy the spoiled forage and transfused healthy blood into humor educational. The same advice offered by link unfortunately however the farmer lacked alternative fodder to feed is heard and he was unable to perform blood transfusions in a snowstorm in rural wisconsin during the depression troubled by his inability to assist the poor man..

karen stryer glenda hypothesiz dr dan jansen glenda office of chemist Dr karl university of wisconsin madiso university of pennsylvania hemorrhagic disease deer park Wisconsin north dakota Clover alberta canada wisconsin depression
"plotkin" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Wailer boys and girls. This is tim ferriss. And welcome to another episode of the tim. Ferriss show this special episode features. Dr mark plotkin. He is a very popular guest. He's back by popular demand on many levels mark. You can find them at doc mark. Plotkin pilo t. k. i n. On twitter is an ethnobotanist who serves as president of the amazon conservation. Team or act. Act done a lot of work with act. They've partnered with roughly eighty tribes in south america predominantly to map and improve management and protection of roughly one hundred million acres of ancestral reinforced. His best under the general public as the author of the book. Tales of a shaman's apprentice. Which is one of the. Most popular books ever written about the rainforest. His most recent book is the amazon subtitle. What everyone needs to know and you can find my first interview with mark where recover his bio his amazing amazing resume his adventures with richard schultz with indigenous tribes. Everything he's learned from western science and the various compounds. He has firsthand experience. Using at teamed up lug slash mark plotkin. He's also host of the plants of the gods podcast through what you can learn about everything. Hallucinogenic snuffs to the diverse formulations of qra. Each episode basically covers a given plant qra by. The way doesn't just relax the muscles of the body and lead to fixation. If used for hunting for instance it also led to modern anesthesia in many senses. So there's a lot to to check out plants at the gods. Today's episode focuses on how animals use medicinal plants and it has some wild stories related to what we can learn and what we can use from the behaviors of cows. Penguins picks frogs and everything in between. There's a lot of hidden wisdom in nature and this particular audio is both from chapter in mark's book titled medicine quest subtitle in search of nature's healing secrets. I read the book. I loved it and i asked mark if he'd be willing to record this chapter audio to share with you all so he made some updates made some tweaks. He agreed and here. We are so thaw that said. Please enjoy this. Upset is brought to you by block. Five block is building a bridge between cryptocurrencies and traditional financial and wealth management products..

Wailer tim ferriss Dr mark plotkin richard schultz Plotkin amazon mark plotkin south america mark twitter Penguins
"plotkin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

14:25 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"He's been abandoned and there was no more shipping and there was no mondays and and the people in english creeping when they figured out that last bank was actually closing down. They couldn't even have a bank anymore. What they did was incredible because they all they all. These volunteers got together. The retired ill attrition was doing stuff and and he's a node it's going let's get some knife in the in the in the main square of it was creeping. You have this incredible place at a bar restaurant shop a beer brewery. They have the most perfect beer you can give just a new energy for sculptors the doing whiskey. I mean and all that again brought more people and things happening. So let's see what's happening down the generation. That's the and i understand. There's some special that attracts a lot of people for their wedding. Yeah what's going on there because there's a lot of you see a lot of wedding parties there. Well you can do that. You don't have to do that. In richest areas such a romantic setting. But it is easier to get married. And then magi you from two different nationalities. so if you have different analogies you don't have to come with fifty different documents and you know going back in so you have you have generations right. You have the kiss wedding. The kiss wedding keep it. Subdued beat simple company go to denmark and it was figured out because he's such a romantic setting. Why don't we have this whole waiting. You know enterprise eighteen so this is part of regeneration aids. There's hundreds of wedding hundreds of meetings. I don't remember how many nationalities but it's really interesting. You ask anybody in coming to this remote island in denmark so fascinating. Nsf was that he thank you so much for look at arrow highland endesa. Because we're all going to go see hans christian andersen and we're going to all go to copenhagen peace come to go over the visit to the island of errol yes. Oh yeah tucson. Tucson tech Tweak owns our next steps. Are in italy fred plotkin. That's been celebrating the magnificence of italian food and culture all his adult life. he'll tell us which region above all others is. The pinnacle of what makes it so special for him. And a pair of italian tour guys share a few reasons why they enjoy going to the island of sicily as much as foreign visitors. Do we're at eight seven seven three three three rick at travel with rick steves. Italy is so popular and everybody seems to go to the same places. Venice florence rome. Tuscany the rivi on more and more important is to challenge to leave the crowds and amelia. Romania might just do the trick. This is one of italy's and europe's wealthiest regions emilia-romagna as part of italy. That includes two of italy's great university cities. Lots of address can history some top notch cultural and culinary pleasures italophile. Fred plotkin joins us now and travel. With rick steves to tell us why. Emilia romagna is one of his favorite places to visit. Let only in italy but anywhere fred fund. Giorno thank you so much for joining us. Well thank you for asking me to talk about emilia-romagna it's the region. I've spent the most time in italy. I went to college in bologna. And when i came back to the states after living in italy for many years i wanted to write a book about it. This was about nineteen eighty one. And i said. I want to write a book about emilia-romagna and the editor said is that your girlfriend. They do not even know that it was an italian region. Things have changed radically in that. Thanks to you. Thanks to food writers. Thanks to me. People know that italy has twenty regions. This region is one of excellence every single thing touches whether it's cinema whether it's opera verdi with from their fellini with from their georgia. Money is from there. It's a that level of quality and most people say to you that the best food in italy is in their home town plus bologna. It's fabulous. I just love talking with you because While i love your book you wrote to italy for the gourmet traveller and much as i am passionate about learning about a culture through the history and the art you are the man for learning about a culture through its cuisine and of course. That's a big part of. I would imagine you're attraction to emilia-romagna we'll talk about food in a moment. First of all you call yourself a pleasure activist. What does that mean and then does that have something to do with. Why you appreciate amelia. Remind so much. They're definitely connected. If i did not realize that myself before certainly happened in bologna when i was twenty pleasure activism to me is about the fact that we've been given this fantastic gift of our five senses and most people barely used them. We taste wheat. We eat but we don't savor we here but we don't listen we see but we don't absorb we'd touch what we don't feel my lightning bolt realization was. Let's take advantage of these gifts and in bologna in the million romani. In general all the senses are activated activism for me comes from activation of the senses and pleasure is a good thing hedonism. We can talk about. But pleasure is a good thing and is one of god's gifts that we want to take advantage of and bologna emilia-romagna seemed designed for that. Okay so let's talk about this regional emilia-romagna we know venice. We know tuscany and florence. This is the area in between right. It is in fact. The rail line goes florence bologna venice but in the other direction near. Milan is the via emilia. Which is a roman road that went from basically the po river. All the way down to the adriatic seat linking important city such as piacenza parramatta reggie amelia modina bologna and then out to the sea. Rimini is on the sea. they're great towns especially fit out of which i love which is not on the via emilia and throughout the region or small. Duchy's town that i love. You may have been there cold custom. Fill out of cuarto in the province of potenza. You have these gyms everywhere. These little towns that are rich in culture rich in agriculture and food tradition and the level of cooking in this region to me is unparalleled anywhere on earth not japan not france. No gathering of places that i can name has better quality cooking day in and day out the million remind you so you're talking about cooking. Is that different than the quality of the ingredients or the Tradition of the cuisine Or do you mean all of that well. The quality of ingredients is essential. Julia child said that great cooking eighty five percent shopping and to me. The greatest food markets know anywhere in the world or in bologna. It's not fancy But for example. If i were to go to market and salad like that tomato in bologna they would not say. How many do you want. They would say what are you using it for and i would say to make sauce and they were sitting. No you want this salad. You want that tomato for sauce. One that tomato to put up to age for the winter would ever every single ingredient that they could point to. I didn't know the fennel could be male or female and how the flavor is different how to select a fish had to cut a fish how she should be served. They're so passionate about every ingredient that they automatically assume you are too and they want you to know everything they know so my education really in cooking and knowledge of ingredients happened in bologna. Now fred does that present. You a little frustration when you want when you want to enjoy something that's Bullen as or parmesan or something. And you're not in emilia-romagna and you can't get the same quality of the ingredients that makes the magic hand made pasta melia. Manja is one of the great gifts to our culture and knowing how to do that is like learning to make strudel in vienna once learned. You can never accept anything less so therefore bologna and emilia manja for me. Turn me into a home cook. And i won't eat out italian food terribly often. I eat out foods that i don't prepare. I don't know how to make indian or japanese food. So that i will dine out with but i would rather cook italian at home and the great thing in italy all over but certainly in bologna and manja. You take cooking classes you learn how to make volume. They're incredibly proud. And frankly they want to maintain the tradition. And if italian young men and women won't learn it. But if people from asian north and south america american elsewhere in europe are willing to learn it better that way we maintain the tradition. This is culture maintaining the tradition in italy in small towns. I've seen there's that passion for this. I'll never forget going to forget the tomba's little town and there was a festival where the older kids were teaching the younger kids how to make a good ravioli and it was designed to pass the the passion and the and the expertise in the flare down to the next generation so it stayed out of my have been recco and liguria where it was destroyed in world war. Two in the only legacy they had was their food and every child in enrico were raviolis are taught to make it so that they will teach the next generation. There you go. this is travel with rick. Steve's we're talking with fred. Plotkin and fred written this marvelous book if for anybody that wants to appreciate italian culture through the cuisine. It's called italy for the gourmet traveller. Our phone number is eight. Seven seven three three three seven. Four to five cates on the phone from austin texas. Kate thanks for your call. I thanks for letting me call in. I'm a big fan of both of you I lived for a year and bologna and it completely altered my relationship with food. I felt like everything shifted in my eyes with food. When i um i got there just in the way you eat food the way you prepare food the way you will sit around the table and it's an event. I was lucky enough also to live with two italians. one was local. And i asked her sister for her recipe for ragu and she looked at me and she said don't do recipes the recipe and she just sort of described her process. And that's still the the same quote unquote recipe. I use today for my ragu which takes several hours and his worth every minute of those hours. But i also wanted to say that. I feel like a lot of people. Don't appreciate bologna as a spot on the tourist trail and it's really a city of hidden beauty in other words things to see rather than to eat right now. One of the things. I think is really remarkable so you know tuscany. Florence and venice. Everybody knows everybody goes but if you walk under the age of bologna you'll see incredible beautiful history that just sort of jumped out on you. Like the piazza couple. The garden the park Margaret does a really beautiful parks on. Domenico is a beautiful church which has to tiny little michelangelo's sculptures in there and people. Just don't go they. Just don't think about when you teach by the way those not cheap if i'm correct that's the famous arcade. Walkways that bologna's noted for sat right there about forty kilometers of them in the city and they are lifesaver in the horrible winters. And then the horrible summer spring and fall the most beautiful time go to bologna so even basing yourself in bologna. It's an hour to florence. It's two hours to venice. It's easy to get everywhere from there. The connections are are very very easy. You know. I think florence and venice are getting tougher and tougher just from a masses of tourism point of view. And you're just part of that you're part of the mob whether the elected or nut in so many ways but in bologna i would imagine. It just feels more italian. Does i feel like. I was forced to learn how to live like an italian because i was living in bologna lie. Sister studied in florence for a semester. And she didn't come back with a word of italian then. I spent a year in bologna. I had to learn italian. I had to negotiate in the market and the food market It was a much more italian experience. And i think getting an apartment living there shopping in the market and making some meals. It's really a remarkable city that i think falls off a lot of people's radars when they think i'm going to go to italy and i'm going to see all the spots but it's just for the food alone. The year i lived in italy. I had one bad meal and that was entirely my fault. Thanks for coming in along with the. Thank you eight. Seven seven three three three seven five and martinez coming in from atlanta eighteen. Hey rick hey fred. I'm a huge fan and thanks to your book. I made a food pilgrimage to amelia. Remind ya a few years ago. I thought i knew everything about it. My grandmother piedmontese. And i know about that creasing but after reading your book i really was a food pilgrimage. I went to modina. I wanted to see how amoco deniger happens and boy. It's nothing like what we have in the stores here in the us and i also visited bologna and it is a beautiful city and it is a city where i felt like i was living as a temporary local i went to the google bossy market And just marveled at the quality of the food. There that martina because i just think these markets in that part of italy just are. They're hard to appreciate unless you're actually there. What's what's an experience you.

bologna italy emilia romagna rick steves arrow highland endesa fred plotkin Fred plotkin fred fund denmark amelia reggie amelia cuarto hans christian andersen Emilia romagna rick Manja Nsf emilia manja
"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

Men, This Way

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

"To the <Speech_Male> brilliant <Speech_Male> bill plotkin <Speech_Male> find <Speech_Male> bills books <Speech_Male> events <Speech_Male> and more information <Speech_Male> about him and <Speech_Male> his work at <Speech_Male> www <Speech_Male> dot <Speech_Male> any mass <Speech_Male> a n <Speech_Male> i m a <Speech_Male> s dot <Speech_Male> org. <Speech_Male> Of course this link <Speech_Male> and any other resources <Speech_Male> mentioned <Speech_Male> we'll be in the show notes <Speech_Male> at brian. <Speech_Male> Reeves dot com <Speech_Male> slash men. This <Speech_Male> way podcast. <Speech_Male> Brian reeves dot <Speech_Male> com slash <Speech_Male> men. This way <Speech_Male> podcast. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> if you were served by <Speech_Male> this and think others <Speech_Male> should hear too. <Speech_Male> And yes. I think <Speech_Male> other should definitely here. <Speech_Male> This is a such <Speech_Male> important work. That bill <Speech_Male> is up to <Speech_Male> please share this episode <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Or just write <Speech_Male> a review <Speech_Male> so that you too <Speech_Male> can lead more <Speech_Male> men this <Speech_Male> way and <Speech_Male> truly <Speech_Male> you know. A lot <Speech_Male> of work goes into <Speech_Male> these <Speech_Male> Podcast at <Speech_Male> work <Speech_Male> and money <Speech_Male> and passion <Speech_Male> and energy and time. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> this is something <Speech_Male> that i <Speech_Male> give to the world <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You don't <Speech_Male> have to pay for these <Speech_Male> episodes <Speech_Male> Mrs just <Speech_Male> a a work of of <Speech_Male> of of <Speech_Male> art from my heart <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> in made <Speech_Male> that it may serve <Speech_Male> others <Speech_Male> such as yourself <Speech_Male> and it <Speech_Male> would mean the world to me <Speech_Male> if you would <Speech_Male> just take a moment <Speech_Male> to write a review <Speech_Male> on your <Speech_Male> podcast <Speech_Male> app <Speech_Male> so truly <Speech_Male> your your <Speech_Male> your words make <Speech_Male> a difference <Speech_Male> and your words can <Speech_Male> indeed <Speech_Male> bring more men <Speech_Male> and more women for that matter. <Speech_Male> I know a lot of <Speech_Male> women listeners. As well <Speech_Male> but you can <Speech_Male> lead more men <Speech_Male> This way <Speech_Male> if you think this <Speech_Male> work is worthy <Speech_Male> please do that. <Speech_Male> I greatly appreciate <Speech_Male> it. And i read all <Speech_Male> the reviews of course. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> if you're not already <Speech_Male> a subscriber <Speech_Male> please do subscribe. <Speech_Male> You really help <Speech_Male> this podcast <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> you do so so <Speech_Male> i thank you. <Speech_Male> I'm your thriving <Speech_Male> life and relationship <Speech_Male> coach. Brian <Speech_Male> reeves bryan with <Speech_Male> a y. Reeves <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> until soon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> keep your head <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> up your breath <Speech_Male> relaxed <Speech_Male> and your <SpeakerChange> thoughts <Music> inspire.

"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

Men, This Way

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

"We'll have more and more people become true. Doubts elders ultimately. That's what gives me. Hope is the sole which is nature. I think that's a beautiful place to to conclude. I do want to ask just one final question we'll just have one one key takeaway today. Okay and that is essentially what is what is the practice a simple practice or a simple step that somebody can take who might be listening to this podcast right now that they can take in the direction at least in the direction of their own encounter with soul or their own journey of soul initiation. Whether they're already on that journey or not like what would you say to the average listener. You do have a practice on that we used very commonly are animus emergence and it's It's deeply transformative for people. Whether they're in the oac's stage the cocoon stage and by the way one of the things that does his practice about to tell you. Is that for people who are in early adolescence. It helps them address the unfinished business for middle childhood. Which is the nature oriented task of learning the enchantment of the the wild world and becoming fully at home in that world which is one of the biggest developmental deficits that most contemporary humans have no. It's what richard liuw was alluding to in his wonderful book. Last child in the woods he called it nature deficit disorder. I love that term nature deficit disorder. Love that kinda tongue-in-cheek as like psychological diagnosis okay. So this practice is you can call it. Praising the other human world can just about guarantee you if you take up this practice in use it. Ideally every day for a few months that will transform your life in your consciousness and what it is is the go out into the world could do this urban places like a city park but really anywhere. Our backyard suburban backyard or a nearby state park the the wilder place. The better bet. Maybe in general but you can even do this in the city and you go out maybe you start with some deep breaths. Maybe you start with a little ceremony. Were you cross some threshold like you step from a sidewalk onto into a forest or something and but you linger at that threshold and you remind yourself What what you're about to do and while you're going to do it and then you wander in a place where there are natural things again. It could be in the city with birds and trees and so on or even gravity. Which of course is natural immune just over your perceptual south your senses and your heart and you open yourself semantically and just notice what are the non human things that you wonder about that. You have curiosity about that. Catch your attention. It could be anything. It could be a piece of grass growing up through concrete..

richard liuw today one one final question one one key takeaway
"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

Men, This Way

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

"Vision fast. Could be a way for me to help. People weave cocoons of transformation for themselves from analysts to adulthood. So i studied with stephen mammoth for a number of years. And that's that was my early adulthood. Boy it really is just so Of the right word but antithetical to our western cultures drive for us to get out there and make your make your money make your mark. Yes do you. Are you hopeful for us. Collectively bill for humanity for for for mankind humankind. I am amazingly enough But we have to start by separating. The word hope from this from the idea of predicting success or even.

stephen mammoth
"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

Men, This Way

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

"It's uses symbol myth archetype dream images and so forth to convey to us what our adult ego form is. So i've had several selling counters in my life but my the first one is always the most profound one for everybody and my first one was at on my fourth day of my first vision fast in which Long story incredibly briefly. The i had a conversation with a spruce tree that had become a zen monk by the fourth day and It introduced me to butterfly that a literal physical butterfly that flew towards me. Brush the left side of my face went by. And i heard in english the butterfly saying cocoon weaver. So this was I had no idea what happened to me in the moment but This idea of weaving cocoons. It became clear to me. This was an image by my first myth poetic image. That would help me understand when i was born to do but i want to emphasize here that a sullen kunr is not primarily information. Said like you get. I got this information. Okay bill what you need to go out into the world and weave cocoons. Whatever that means like the tablets come back with tablets with written written text on them. Yeah i had some written text but yeah but the what assoc counter primarily does is like being struck by lightning in his starts some l. chemical process in which our egos start getting shape shifted. And that's the fourth phase. The phase called metamorphosis. And that's when the solid counter the vision starts doing its work on our ego and it takes for most people several months where the adolescent ego is reached fashioned reshaped into an adult ego just like for the caterpillar awhile to go from caterpillar soup to a butterfly body and those imaginable cells. Turn out to the architects and they can take the recyclable materials of caterpillar of a former caterpillar. and turn it into a completely different creature with wings that's phase for metamorphosis and then the fifth phase for the caterpillar cocoon breaks open or the butterfly. Moth breaks out of the corner of the christmas. And it can't fly at its wings are so new. They can't fly so it just sits on a branch where the cocoon had been and it has to pump fluid through those new wings and then it has to slowly start to flap them and learn how to fly wings and only then can it fly so the fifth phase for humans. We call enactment when a person who's gone through their ego has gone through. A metamorphosis begins to show up in the world as their mithra poetic identity. But this is even before they're capable of serving anybody or bringing the gift to the world so that's the next face and then sometime after that a person is thrown by mystery from the cocoon into the first stage of adulthood which i call the soul apprentice at the wellspring. And that's when we look for summoned to study with to learn a delivery system that will be an effective way to embody their mitha poetic identity for me. It was To lead teachers. Stephen foster and meredith little of the school of law supporters in california. Who have been for some years. Reintroducing.

Stephen california fourth day fifth phase first one christmas first fourth phase english first vision first stage one
"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

Men, This Way

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

"The human version of nature and I've already implied what. I mean by soul here with you brian. But i'm gonna give an explicit definition which will help answer your question. It's a simple definition. But it's unlike anything. You'll find in spirituality religion or psychology and. I could go on for quite a while about why i felt. It was necessary to do this. But let me just defy. It's an ecological concept. It's not a psychological or metaphysical one are metaphysical on exactly or religious. Yup yup And we we try to use the word soul in those other domains psychology metaphysics and so on we get confusion. I would say so. It finally dawned on me. Maybe just fifteen or twenty years ago that it's really an ecological concept and so i define soul as a things. Unique ecological niche initial courses in ecological concept. And the idea. Is that every thing. Every species has its unique niche. That's something any ecologist. Any high school ecology biology student could tell you we all know that every species has its unique niche traditional countries will step further and say every individual every species has its unique niche within that so just consider the possibility. I know. it's a wild idea that we unions are not different than everything else on this planet and that way at least in that way that we too are born we as a species we've evolved to take a particular place in life and what we know from ecology is every species except possibly as Is succeeds exists exists because it has found a way to get the rest of life so every healthy species every species that that lasts is a life-enhancing species that has a life of its ecosystem. What we know about us humans and least certainly last few hundred years is that. We're not even life. Sustaining where life destroying. Everybody knows that now. We are destroying life at the rate of two hundred species a day on this planet and we're undermining and polluting every habitat on the planet. Okay people know about that. We've lost our way as as the species so okay so if the soul if we will embrace this idea that the soul is unique. Ecological niche than the soul is nature. It's our it's our particular nature so when we go looking for a so once mystery initiates this journey of soul initiation for us we are wondering deeper and deeper into the world is mary. Oliver says looking searching for who you were born to be. And it's not something that can be defined by a social or vocation and so that identity looking forward not gonna find it in the human village best place to be hanging out is an as wild places as we can get to and by the way it's not necessary that people can go through the journey of cylinder and never leave the city. That's entirely possible but it will probably go quicker and deeper if we can have some time In wild places so. I hope i've done it and we started to answer your question..

Oliver brian fifteen or two hundred species a day twenty years ago every species every years few hundred
"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

Men, This Way

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

"Adolescence and caterpillars go through profound changes. A third healthy caterpillars and those changes have called maltings by biologists and a molting when a caterpillar sheds its skin and then grows another somewhat larger one and depending on the species happens for five six seven times for caterpillar. these profound changes. And you could say. They're changes in identity for the caterpillar but before that change their caterpillar in after that change her caterpillar while free for humans. We also go through something that corresponds to maltings in early on lessons. So for example. We have a certain social scene. The certain persona are haircut away of expressing sexuality we have and then there's some profound experience we have and we realized that's not really who i am doesn't expressway as fully as i could and so we might change our social. We might change your primary romantic relationship. We might move from ohio to california. I mean might take a different job. Because i'm not just talking about teenagers because the in most contemporary humans are early adolescence at least through their twenty s enough and through their eighties or hundred year. So out of here. Yeah so okay. But back to the caterpillar at some point. The caterpillar has multiple as many times as it either can or needs to then this mysterious thing that happens that it finds itself if it's a moth. Caterpillar weaving a cocoon. Who knows if the caterpillar even knows why if it's a butterfly caterpillar. it its own body starts turning into something like a cocoon which courses called a christmas. And what's going to happen in that. Christmas cocoon is this form. Caterpillar is going to be morphed into a butterfly it's a caterpillar before they transformation and it's not after its butterfly. That's analogously is what happens for us. Humans during the journey of initiation which may be only ten percent of temporary people at the most ever even start. Yeah that we are gonna become this different kind of being like as different as a butterflies to a caterpillar. that's lecturing i. i love what you said to. At the beginning. D- does the does the caterpillar even know why it begins to undergo this process. Does the cat or that such a rich observation or or inquiry. Because i same why go back to my military that moment of leaving the military. I knew without a doubt there was no question i had to go. Not for a second. I remember getting an offer from Lockheed martin the big boss at lockheed martin with lincoln and odd brian. If you need a job. I got you not even for half a second that i consider saying yesterday that bill but i had no idea where i was going otherwise none. I had no idea what pain was coming from me. No idea what loneliness was awaiting me. What do you say to. Let's just say again for the because of this audience for this podcast to a man or woman for that matter. But what do you say to someone who starts to starting to see themselves. They've lived a life. They've had accomplishments meet a lot of my listeners. I i see this a lot. Bill where where men especially start to hit the walls of their adolescent way of being in their late thirties early forties. Now a lot of men will push through that moment and as you said they'll make it all the way to their eighties in their death without ever doing anything different. But i'm seeing more and more men late thirties. Early forties start to go. Okay i need to do something ain't workin. Something's off whether they've they've made the money they've got the house they've got the the family they've got all the things or maybe they don't have those things but still what do you say to that man..

ohio california hundred year yesterday eighties Bill Early forties five ten percent twenty s christmas lincoln brian Lockheed half a second bill six seven times third healthy caterpillars late thirties early forties Christmas
"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

Men, This Way

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

"Is profound. And we're only gonna take short stroll on the tippy top of the massive iceberg. That is his life's work near the end. Just before i ask him for one key takeaway one key practice that you can do every day to move further in the direction of your own journey of soul initiation. I ask bill whether he has hope for humanity given our collective resistance to creating more mature adults and his answer will surprise. You maybe frighten you. He does have hope but not in the way you might think so. Definitely stay tuned all the way through to the end of this episode of men. This way all right. Let's dive mr bill plotkin sir. It is an absolute honor to have you on men this way. Thank you for being here. Thanks for the invitation brian. Great to be with you and all your listeners. Yeah i've i've been absolutely enraptured by your work For about the last year now and it was introduced to me by a group of men who Likewise men's group that i'm in of of of just you know how beautiful heart centered men in the doing the personal growth work whatever that means In your book has really lit a fire in us. When i say your book i'm talking about nature in the human soul and i know today we're going to be talking about The journey of soul. Initiation your new book. Thank you when. I when i say it is an honor and i'm excited and i mean that full-on out mask you. Where are you in the world right now. You look like you're in a cozy cabin somewhere I am an cozy house is my home. It's on the edge of the animas valley and southwest colorado at seventy three hundred feet. And i'm looking right over the top of your head right now to the l- applaud mountains. Which go up to thirteen thousand feet and then some right outside my window so in.

brian bill thirteen thousand feet seventy three hundred feet southwest colorado one key practice last year today animas valley one key takeaway applaud
"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

Men, This Way

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"plotkin" Discussed on Men, This Way

"This episode is like no other. Bill is one of the most genius and inspired visionaries. That you've probably never heard of. He's the author of a few books that have been rocking my world. The last few years notably nature and the human soul and now his latest book the journey of soul initiation a field guide for visionaries evolutionary and revolutionaries and. I'm serious wanna say listen up. This may be the most important podcast episode. I ever create. I love all my guests and what particularly excites me about bill. Plotkin is that. When i first read his book nature and the human soul. I felt like what the israelites must've felt like. When moses came back from mount sinai with the ten commandments. Bill is brought back. Commandments of any sort but through his works spanning probably five decades now as a depth psychologist wilderness guide and founder of western colorado's any must valley institute where he led thousands of women and men through nature based initiate tori passages. What he has brought back is a map of human development that i believed to be as all encompassing as any map modern day humanity has discovered building on carl jung's work and the work of countless other brilliant hearts and minds spanning a myriad of human cultures all over the world. When i read bills work our. I should say when i read bills work i understand more clearly the adventure of my own life. The story arcs that of played out over years. The excruciating bottoms. I've hit at critical pivotal moments of my life and what the real tasks of the different stages of life are that. if. I don't accomplish those tasks then i don't truly grow or evolve. Even though my body may age in fact this is one of the major themes that throughout bills work. Which i assure you is a master work. His books are just masterpieces of wisdom and insight impractical information but a major theme he explores and that we talk about in. This episode is the overwhelming lack of true adults in the modern world. The state of humanity is one currently made up of Largely of people stuck in adolescent ways of thinking being doing it certainly not hard to make the case for that these days. Just read the news or scroll through your social media feed. You may not be able to quite put a finger on it but something constantly nags it you that the world around you is largely devoid of real wisdom and nuance and maturity bills Bills bill masterfully explains.

carl jung Bill bill first mount sinai one thousands of women ten commandments five decades Plotkin one of israelites last few years colorado themes
Robinhood-GameStop hearing will scrutinize how brokerages get paid for trades

Wall Street Breakfast

01:19 min | 2 years ago

Robinhood-GameStop hearing will scrutinize how brokerages get paid for trades

"Game stop hearing on capitol hill stock market versus casino and news from down under leading. Today's news grab the popcorn. Robin hoods vlad. Tentative melvin capitals. Gay plotkin rutted steve. Huffman and citadels kenneth griffin and keith. Gill are also to testify. Before the house financial services committee at twelve pm eastern lawmakers will get their chance to grill the executives and hearing focused on short selling online trading platforms gamification and their systemic impact and our capital markets and retail investors. Also making an appearance is read it trading star known as warring kitty who is credited with helping start the game stop mania though his actions are being pro by massachusetts regulators since he was a registered securities broker an army of day traders following wall street bets the red at forum dedicated to quote making money and being amused while doing it up ended some market dynamics last month by taking aim at some heavily shorted stocks they ran them up as a group triggering short-squeezes and causing some hedge funds like melvin capital to record billions of dollars in losses. The party came to an end after brokerages restricted trading on stocks like game. Stop an amc entertainment. Though robin hood took the most flak due to its communication about the events and delay and taking curbs off of a meme trading

Melvin Capitals Gay Plotkin Kenneth Griffin House Financial Services Commi Robin Hoods Huffman Gill Keith Steve Mania Kitty Melvin Capital Massachusetts Amc Entertainment Robin Hood
"plotkin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"plotkin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some fans believe she's reaching out, for example, by writing a message in tiny print on her hat, So I went in, and it's like to read it, and I think it spells help. No, I think this is an age. This is an E and L and this is probably a Pete. But last year, Spears made her feelings about the conservatorship plane. No zooming in required. It actually started filming this reckoning with the media piece around Britney. And while we were filming that all these court filings started happening, Samantha Stark is the director of The New York Times documentary framing Britney Spears, which has brought renewed interest to her legal predicament. As well as her treatment in the media and those court filings. Spears requests that her father be removed as conservative. And so as we were filming the free Britney fans who had been really written office. Conspiracy theorists are made fun of a lot because they were operating on this gut feeling that something was wrong with the conservatorship that Bernie wanted something to change. All of a sudden have this vindication Because now she does want something to change. So we were able to capture that. And then the film really took off just for a little background after some all too public meltdowns. Today. I think we'd see them is obvious Cries for help. She was forced by a judge to surrender the control of her person and her money to her father, even as she continued to make millions. Yes. Conservatorship is this unique legal arrangement where a person is considered unable to make decisions that are in their own best interest. It's most often used for elderly people with Alzheimer's. That's what it's primarily meant for. It's not unheard of for a young person to be in it, but it happens not very often at all up until very recently. 2019. Her conservator of her person was her father, Jamie Spears and the conservative of her estate was her father with Lawyer name Andrew Wallet, If you can believe it, Yeah. He also refers to the conservative ER relationship as a kind of hybrid business relationship, which Talk about unusual right that you can both regard people as incompetent and develop a business relationship because this incompetent person is generating millions of dollars a year. As a performer exactly with a grueling schedule. Exactly. So that's the central mystery of you know what's happening now and why people are so fascinated by it, and also what the free Britney fans have been trying to point out for a long time. Her conservatives have the power tol access all her medical records, choose medical care for her, oversee all her money sign business deals for her restrict to comes to visit her. Decide where she lives. There's a lot of basic decisions that Britney has been deemed incompetent of making. And yet at the same time, she's jumping through fire in Las Vegas being a judge on X factor TV appearances, albums tours, all while being told that she is constantly at risk. It seems impossible to imagine this happening to even the most out of control. Hollywood male actor You know, One of the reasons is called framing Britney Spears is there's these very popular photos of her one where she's shapes her head and one where she is brandishing this umbrella that she I'm used to hit a car of a pop a rod so, and those still images you know there's no context around them. They were on the cover of tabloids. With headlines like Shocking Meltdown. Britain, you blows up. I had this theory that those still frames Have followed her. And so one of the things we wanted to do with the film is really to pull out outside of those frames and give more context. One of the big things we found was that while this was all happening, this quote meltdown Britney was in a really Heated custody battle over her kids with Kevin Federline and she loses custody but has visitation rights in early January, 2008 and then mid January, she loses visitation and the end of January. She has a police escort while she's in an ambulance going to the hospital to be under a 51 50 medical health hold. And her father files for the conservatorship while she is still in the hospital. Her father doesn't seem to require any credentials to be a conservative beyond that familial role, But he wasn't much of a presence in her life up until that point. On. DCI fought more than once to free herself of her father. The film points out that she always knew that she would probably lose in the court. So she offered to submit to other conservators basically, in order to see her kids right during this custody battle, and she's losing visitation. There's a lot of speculation that she May have felt that submitting to the conservatorship would allow her to see her kids and she does get visitation rights very soon after she is in the conservatorship. You weren't able to secure interviews with her family. But you did see some tape of her brother from a podcast called Has not seen on TV. The interviewer was Drew Plotkin. Have you ever seen anything that led you to be concerned that your sister was being held against her? Will Every day, you know, just e mean like it with the women in this family are very, very strong minded. Have their own opinion, and they want to do what they want to do. And as much as I admire that, as a guy and being like one of two guys, this entire family, it kind of sucks that they're strong minded. They want to do what they want to do. Kind of constitutional e mean? Yeah, and they have a right to do that. The moment the interview with Brian Spears, Brittany's brother came out. It was so huge because no one in the family was talking about this at all. There's this cone of silence. It seems around Britney's conservatorship. And so when this interview came out, I remember where I was standing. That's what how big deal it was that Brian spoke. The interview was really shocking because you know in it, he makes this joke that his sister's been held against her will every day. Was there another Eureka moment for you when you were making the film one of the most surprising things that I found, Actually, that seems like it shouldn't be surprising. But it was, is how in control of Britney's career she was when she was young. Um, you know, I think there's this kind of assumption. Probably because of all this media coverage of her that Britney was a puppet that was over sexualized and she didn't know what she was doing. And she just did Whatever the you know, male executives told her to do. Um, that is kind of what I thought going into it. And now I'm examining. Why did I think that Because Every person that I talked to who was with her in her early career made a point to say Britney was the boss. When we were there she was in charge. She was very creative. She had creative ideas for her music videos and her shows and did.

Drew Plotkin Kevin Federline Jamie Spears Brian Spears Brittany Brian Las Vegas Samantha Stark Andrew Wallet 2019 Bernie early January, 2008 mid January Spears last year Britney Spears Britney Today millions Shocking Meltdown
"plotkin" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"plotkin" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Because theaters were shut down, right? And they're going to lose $5 this year. So last year was $33 loss this year $5 except they're losing $5 a quarter in the most recent quarter, and, of course, there's almost no revenue. And there's dead. The debt is 400% of capitalization, or it's 400% of equity. It's a E. I mean, bankruptcy is a good option for a company like that, right? Yeah. And There was they raise some capital, which started this back to your point. So it was about 300 million in a convertible unsecured bond. This is a Warren Buffett move on the part of a private equity down. So they loaned him the money with a call option. Of course, they've are with a convertible option. Like like a warrant, like a Warren Buffett warrant. And Of course, they decided to exercise you know there. Yeah. They probably got their warrant at Less than $3. And when I got to 15 of it, they were like, Hey, it's there. So AMC was one of them. If you can't play it like that, then it's probably not worth You know, betting a turnaround. There were a lot of people that called us on J. C. Penney. Ah, and that didn't work. Longer Term. Yeah, There's some people that Had some pretty strong conviction that G. C. Penney would turn it around. And, Yeah, sounds good trading lesson Read. It's Wall Street bets, message boards. That's a new force in trading, okay? Yeah, it is it. Here's Here's the zero hedge article. Okay. Okay. So first casualty of the big short squeeze. Melvin Capital. They've got picture of Melvin right here. Okay. Melvin capitals, Gabe Plotkin. We'll just call him now that he's famous now, uh, in a bad way massive losses on its shorts set to receive a $2.75 billion capital injection. From Citadel, one of the big guys and 10.72 investors. It's a bailout s o. He could pay is margin call. Which okay so alternative investing sometimes doesn't work. Um, and the long short strategy. Think is dead for a long time, because the results weren't that good for the category, right? Um they weren't that good. You know, the high yield index was better. If you take it is a category and now it's proved to be extraordinarily dangerous because you've got a whole group that realizes if a bunch of people bet the stock goes down in short, it Then then, here we go. Um, this is interesting. Neo AMC plug power, Blackberry bed bath and beyond. Papa Dean mentioned bed bath and beyond. He was He was having some fun with this, By the way, was he? Yeah. I don't know how much I don't know how it how he did. We can ask him because he'll be on later in February. Okay? Okay. We don't have to ask him because he's had that for for awhile. Had me Yep. That Z. Well, and he had done. He had done something with options, but I don't want to. Well, I don't know if you want to talk about if he didn't make money at it, Okay, You know, maybe he does. I don't want I don't want to scare him off. Okay? All right. What's next? Michael Burry calls game stop. Unnatural and insane. The rally. Okay, so next economic growth. Let's get to some. Let's let's get to some economic news here. We've got important forecasts, too, so economic growth came in at 4%. Atlanta Fed was wrong, They said. It could be a size 11, but you had the additional shutdowns. Yeah, now. California, New Yorker reopening Well, I think you get first quarter numbers and they're probably 10 or 11. Okay, Well, that's good. Yeah, OK, but that's coming off a pretty weak comp. If I look at last year's Q one and cue to actually mean we're gonna We're gonna get some pretty good numbers, I think. And so that says, first two quarters. Good. Yeah. Okay, So let's get to John Hook on institutional research source. Yeah. Somebody who's a lot of fun and He's been on the program from his Manhattan We'll call it a penthouse. I don't know if it's pretty house or not. But anyway, you get gets a lot of money for his research, and he was spot on on this thing so Um, give us the takeaways, and then we'll take him apart. All right. Dominant force for stocks is likely that the stimulus near record large rally for at least two quarters. Then he says, crash later, probably from inflation, He said. What crash from inflation from inflation? Yeah, it's a bold statement. Well, I'm not email him right now and say OK when Uh, exactly what.

Melvin capitals Gabe Plotkin Warren Buffett AMC John Hook J. C. Penney Melvin Capital Melvin Michael Burry California Papa Dean Manhattan Neo Atlanta Fed
GameStop Stock Soars as Reddit Investors Take On Wall Street Bets

Squawk Pod

07:17 min | 2 years ago

GameStop Stock Soars as Reddit Investors Take On Wall Street Bets

"Stop the video game retailer. Stock has rallied over six hundred eighty percent this month and in the last couple of days the stocks volatility has pretty much everyone talking. So what's going on. First of all game stop is for the average mall going consumer dying brand a relic of simpler times when we used to have to physically go to the store and wait in line for the newest call of duty or for the latest harry potter book. So it's no surprise. That game stop has been a target for wall street shortsellers its demise has been foregone conclusion. So short and game stop. That is betting that game stop would continue to. Depreciate could have been a good bet except short-selling is risky and your losses if you lose that bad or basically limitless since there's no cap on how valuable the company has bet against could become so even riskier if stock you've shorted starts going up. You can essentially cut your losses without getting too in the weeds market mechanics here. When a lot of short seller's designed to cut their losses on a shorted stock. That's now suddenly going up it triggers. What's called a short squeeze. Demand goes up. Supply goes down. Price goes up more shortsellers. Try to cut their losses. It's a vicious cycle and one that can result in massive losses for their shortsellers and giant prophets for those who've invested in the stock on the way up which is when a popular reddit. Forum called wall street bets figured out that game stop was the most shorted stock in the us markets. It wasn't hard to convince reddit users in the forum to buy up enough stock in game. Stop to trigger that short squeeze making retail investors of bundle and sticking it to the wall street big guys in the process. This was all encouraged in many ways by high profile investors with a hefty social media presence. Jamaa only petia tweeted that he'd bet on the stock increasing himself cameron winkle voss of the winkle vi- suggested he might go along on the stock and must only tweeted that he was aware of the situation just aware of the situation in game. Stop took off again. In after hours. Trading and to wall street bets credit. The plan worked amid game. Stops rally shortsellers on wall. Street have accumulated over five billion dollars in losses year to date and that includes nine hundred million loss on monday and one point six billion lost on friday. As you're about to hear hedge fund. Melvin capital took an enormous loss on the bet so much so that rumors of bankruptcy were swirling on that wall street. Bet sub reddit. But the founder of melvin told our own andrew ross sorkin. The rumors aren't true. Here's andrew now some breaking news this morning on this game stop story. We've been reporting all morning. Having talked to gay. Plock into runs. Melvin capital gay. Plotkin saying that. Melvin capital has been out closed out its position in the stock force. That company was Firm i should say with short looks like lost a ton of money but short that company up through Before the end of the close yesterday but Gabe saying that They got out yesterday afternoon. Of course the question is what happens now. Game stop a game. Stop shares Melvin capital had to take in an additional close to three billion dollars in new capital citadel. Coming to the rescue along with point seventy two. This is a remarkable saga With game stop so many of these investors no really no longer really investing on the fundamentals of what's happening against up but more just continue to push up the stock and we've seen so many folks like you on musk. Go take to twitter about it. Chihua- polly fanning the flames. So there's a lot of fan fan. Flame fanning taking place right now big questions about regulators where they are what they should be doing a lot of criticism and critique online as saying that if you think manipulation what do you think wall street is doing everyday to us the retail investors so. There's a sort of a pop psychology dynamic at play. And i think we're all we're all learning and try and understand what it means but also what it means in the future for the ability of retail investors to get together on places like read it and other places Form an army of sorts and try to push up The stocks in in certain cases like this. So i'm at a loss for words. Joe i really am where are the regulators and is this just the beginning situation. We all do have a lot to say on this but you you obviously have a lot to san. That's interesting but obviously the plane with the calls. And you're you're seeing calls that are one hundred dollars out of the money going for nineteen dollars and things that you've got markups going from two billion to twenty five billion. Obviously everything you're saying we understand. This is this is a game obviously and these guys. When i put five dollars on a ncaa game that. I don't care that much about that's the same as jemaah putting a couple of hundred grand on some calls or lan or any of the guys were talking about this. I think it's kind of responsible. The kind of laughing about it laughing all the way to the bank. But you know there are market makers that have to take. How'd you like to be short some of these calls. Can you imagine being short some of these calls. Especially if you're not covering i mean you can lose. You can lose ten times your money. Unlike a regular investment where only lose one hundred percent. I mean this this this makes this makes bitcoin look like t-bills if you think there's speculation and crypto when you when you look at something like and now they're looking for the next mark right they'll find another game stop once they're done with game stop but in the meantime there's gonna be blood all over understand why i understand why elon musk is doing it. He hates the shorts. They've you know he's right. Thinks it's a game where he's playing a game to understand he's playing the game too. I don't understand why tomatoes doing this. I don't understand why the winkle loss guys doing this. I mean this is i. It's nothing about me. Said too much money it and if you if you think people look unkindly at the wealthy at this point like wait till you see what happens with with the retail investor who gets sucked into thing and gets caught in the trap with who can't afford to lose the money like these guys are doing. I'll tell you the thing there. There really is a merry band of retail investors. Out there both already but increasingly and this is what i think even more concerning i spent a lotta time night reporting this out but also spending time on the in some of these rooms there are places people are going out into encrypted rooms onto telegram onto signal where they where they effectively are planning their next raid. Where they're trying to look to say. Okay where can we do. You know who can we take down next. In this case it was capital that they were seeking to take down. That's why i think the news today that they're out maybe potentially a turning point. I don't know. I don't. I don't know what turns this stock back into some kind of a normal

Melvin Capital Reddit Jamaa Petia Cameron Winkle Voss Winkle Vi New Capital Citadel Chihua Polly Fanning Andrew Ross Sorkin Harry Potter Plotkin Melvin Gabe Andrew
Science, Economics And Vaccines

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:32 min | 2 years ago

Science, Economics And Vaccines

"Dr Stanley Plotkin develop vaccines for some of the world's deadliest modern viruses. He's very familiar with the cost and the process of producing vaccines, and he says the process tends to be slow and ferry expensive developing vaccine is likely to cause something on the order of five hundred, million dollars five hundred, million dollars status is today's indicator five, hundred million dollars to get a vaccine Stanley, says. For drug companies and universities and labs that monumental cost is often one of the biggest obstacles to creating vaccine after all at the end of the process, you don't know if you ever will actually debt vaccine some viruses like HIV still don't have successful vaccines even after decades of trying and billions of dollars invested if covid nineteen vaccine can't be found or if it takes decades the social. Economic and cultural impacts would be devastating. So the White House has done something pretty unheard of it's created a plan called operation warp speed to try to speed up the vaccine process. The White House says it's already invested more than twelve billion dollars in the plan and how the plan works. The White House is basically created contracts with drug companies like Pfizer Novak's Moderna Therapeutics and AstraZeneca. Few others and those contracts promise these companies billions of dollars if they can get a vaccine ready to go and have a hundred million doses at the ready by the first part of next year with so much money being funneled toward the problem I'm wondering if that will do you think speed up the process of getting a vaccine or does it just take the time it takes or? It definitely speeds things up. Stanley says with a strong cash incentive like this and so much support companies can out a bunch of different tactics in their search for a vaccine. He says, there are more than a hundred different approaches that scientists know of, and they can try a bunch of them labs all over the world flooded with resources racing for vaccine that should help speed up the arrival of the vaccine at least that is the hope but that is as yet. a hope. Nothing nothing is certain is certain. if everything goes well. I think having a vaccine by the end of the year is not impossible, but it's based on everything going. Well, Stanley says even with all the money in the world getting a vaccine ready for the public quickly is really hard. The Rubella vaccine that he developed was a relatively quick process in terms of vaccines. It took him about two years to discover it to develop the vaccine itself, and then five years to tested and scale up the production of IT and just get to the market, and here's why for one thing it's a messy process. You have a biological problem It's a complicated process and there isn't any single wave. Doing that also, he says there are parts of the process that you cannot speed up no matter how much money you have Stanley says trials for vaccines for instance, typically take longer than trials for regular drugs because vaccines will be used on much larger swath of the population. So you have to test the vaccine on all different kinds of people, different ages, ethnicities, people with different underlying health conditions, and that typically means trials involving tens of thousands of people. Also, you have to give the vaccine time to work time to assess side effects. Many vaccines fail in this trial phase, and there is a danger in going too fast of course the. is to avoid making mistakes. While you're speeding up mistakes and research or in manufacturing the vaccine or in not taking enough time to test these things can have. Consequences he says in the nineteen fifties, some batches of the polio vaccine created the contained an active virus the samples at past the safety tests yet thousands of people contracted polio from the vaccine dozens of people were paralyzed as a result Stanley says rushing vaccine is a balancing act between good science and good economics in you you yourself are working on a vaccine is that correct? Well, I know lawyer you know I'm I'm eighty eight years old I? No longer have a laboratory but I'm giving advice left and right so. I'm working in the a sense of giving advice. What kind of advice are you giving? What questions do people have at this stage which? Are Important what have you and responses one should be trying to get. What dosage? Interval between doses I mean the things that one learns with any vaccine. Are you taking dozens of calls like a week. I see why you have very limited time. I. Should let you go but I can't thank you enough for taking some of your precious time to talk with me. By by by conversation is over I, mean I would be hurt but like the man has lives to save, right? Oh. Yeah Oh. Yeah. Impressive Dude. Also fun fact Cardiff. He learned to fly a plane when he was seventy four and you don't do that kind of thing by spending all your time talking to journalists. The man is flying planes and saving the world. So he gets overpass

Polio Vaccine Dr Stanley Plotkin White House Polio Cardiff Astrazeneca Pfizer Novak Moderna Therapeutics
Checking on Friends in New York and Italy

Travel with Rick Steves

04:28 min | 2 years ago

Checking on Friends in New York and Italy

"Let's start today's travel through exterior with a call to our friend, Fred Plotkin in New, York City his work on Italian. Cuisine and opera earned him special honor from the Italian government a few years ago. But like the rest of us, he's staying home and Haton Intel. The risk of infection improves. Giorno Fred. Great to be with you wherever you are, Rick. You Fred first of all you call yourself a pleasure activist, I love that term, and it sort of reminding me of your passion for Opera Your Passion for Italy your passion for cooking, and all the lecturing and writing and work you do. Turn people under those joys of life. How was your life like right now in new? York City I'm in the thick of it. In terms of what the epicenter has been in New York. And my philosophy became at the very beginning better six feet apart than six feet under so I've been very very responsible as I encourage everyone to be if people can get to the plays in world, wars and pandemics, the vast. We need to learn from what people did. Or didn't do and that's sustenance to me to study the past at times like this. Because otherwise we feel abandoned. The past there to teach us, and so I've been reading I've been studying I've used the opportunity to begin to work on a book. I've been wanting to write for years, but haven't had the time. Time is a gift. We need to use it very very well, and I tried to. And I've been reminding myself and my friends that rather than spinner wheels and try to do something. We can't do during this period. Find a way to make it a constructive time and a blessing when you think about your passions opera for instance to me I am so saddened by the notion that one of the most dangerous things. This time is being acquire because the worst way to. To spread this virus is by singing with Gusto, making a joyous sound that depresses me frankly that choirs could be deadly now I have to see them in these checkerboards zoom world singing solo right now and you know I have many opera singer friends who are very dear friends of mine, and I feel for them terribly some of the managing and they sing, and they practice, and they steady new music, but others feel that without the sound of applause in the presence of colleagues. It's not their work and my feeling is always been that when we go into a feeder or church where people are seeing where. Action happens and air shared. Is that sharing of the air the electronic current that happens between humans? That's a huge part of. Our experience at alive theater as a communal setting and something that virtual technology just cannot replicate I never. An opera on the radio or on video and operates a report from an Opera House. But I'm not saying. These things are bad and right now I, certainly enjoying audio operas well but communal gathering. Is something fundamental. You talked about the sharing of air I never thought about that, but I've been thinking about it without knowing it. It's the sort of a communion of course when pastors are struggling with. How can we be together at church if you can't have the sharing of the peace or communion or fellowship or singing? There's no sharing of air and when you go to a pub, you want to share that air when you go to a theater when I give a lecture I want the house packed. It's the sharing of the air, and that's going to be an adjustment for us, and we can hope and pray it will come back, but in the interim we can be singing solo and doing it in a community kind of way. I. Suppose think of the word inspiration. That's where that comes from. It's about breathing together. We do breathe together. I I WANNA make a point to that New York City during the complete lockdown. was incredibly quiet and I heard birds and all kinds of things. I did normally here and frankly the air was much. Cleaner city has slowly begun to try to read self up again. The air is kidding dirtier. This is the place you're activists in me that I'm very sensitive to these things. And although I would not wish on anyone what we've been through nonetheless. I wish we could learn that. There are ways to keep the air cleaner

Fred Plotkin Opera House York City Intel New York City New York Italy Rick
In Face-Off With Iran, Escalation May Depend on Who Prevails Inside Washington and Tehran

Red Eye Radio

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

In Face-Off With Iran, Escalation May Depend on Who Prevails Inside Washington and Tehran

"What's next in the Gulf, China bows to pressure? I'm Christopher cruise. It's a tense time in the Gulf of Oman after attacks this week onto oil tankers near the strait of Hormuz, President Trump lanes Iran for the attacks. And he's hoping that indirect threats will force Iran to meet with western negotiators. Correspondent Frederick pike Plotkin his in Tehran this morning, Iranians are the cues the US of fanning the planes of that situation. They've continuously so that they don't want an escalation of situation. But if there is an escalation that they would obviously be ready for the Pentagon continues to date plans to increase its presence in the Persian Gulf if

Iran Gulf Of Oman Persian Gulf Gulf Christopher Cruise Frederick Pike Pentagon Tehran China President Trump United States
U.S. imposes more sanctions on Iran, Tehran decries 'bullying'

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:29 sec | 4 years ago

U.S. imposes more sanctions on Iran, Tehran decries 'bullying'

"At midnight eastern time, the US reimposed the sanctions on Iran that lifted under the twenty-fifth Iran nuclear deal, the one President Trump pulled the US out of correspondent, Fred Plotkin is in Tehran, where he sees Iranians worried about the impact you have a lot of people who are extremely concerned here in Iran about those sanctions, the economy here already very much in a tailspin, and if that oil revenue even a lot of it all the way, many people here fear, what the you distant future might bring for this nations of the finances. Here already in

Iran Fred Plotkin United States Tehran Donald Trump President Trump Twenty-Fifth
Nick Haig, Fred Plotkin and Chinon discussed on America's Morning News

America's Morning News

00:36 sec | 4 years ago

Nick Haig, Fred Plotkin and Chinon discussed on America's Morning News

"Says a recovery team has reached an American astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut, and they're okay, they were forced to make an emergency landing this morning after the Russian booster rocket, sending them off to the international space station failed. Fred Plotkin reports on what went wrong, this rocket took off with Nick Haig, the American astronaut and the Russian asked her out Alexei of Chinon. I would say about three minutes a little less than three minutes into the flight. It was the second stage of the us booster rocket. That seemed to have some sort of technical malfunction the capsule took a hard parachute landing somewhere in Kazakhstan. The crew is out of the capsule and in good

Nick Haig Fred Plotkin Chinon Kazakhstan Alexei United States Three Minutes
Russia, Senate and Microsoft discussed on The Richard Eeds Show

The Richard Eeds Show

00:14 sec | 4 years ago

Russia, Senate and Microsoft discussed on The Richard Eeds Show

"A second day of tearful reunions for Korean families have been separated for decades hundreds of, family members back together for the first. Time since they were torn apart during, the Korean war and their country was divided into north and

Russia Senate Microsoft Frederik Plotkin International Republican Insti Hudson Institute United States
Early returns show Putin re-elected in a landslide tainted by fraud

Safe Money with Marcus Bradford Bray

01:58 min | 5 years ago

Early returns show Putin re-elected in a landslide tainted by fraud

"Putin for president the russia probe i'm anne cates exit polls show vladimir putin has nabbed three quarters of the votes of the russian presidential election today correspondent frederik plotkin says there were other candidates on the ballot seven people running against ladimir putin it seems as though the closest runnerup at this point he's at around eleven percent so from what we can see so far it seems pretty much assured that latimer putin is going to spend another six years in office as the russian president the president is attacking the fbi and special counsel robert muller after his personal attorney called for an end to the probe into russian meddling in the election and any trump campaign ties to moscow senate minority whip dick durbin tells fox news sunday that president trump is straying into dangerous territory is president is engaged in desperate and reckless conduct to intimidate the law enforcement agencies in this country and to try to stop the special counsel that is unacceptable in a democracy ousted fbi deputy director andrew mccabe is mulling a new position congressman mark poke and says he's offered to hire mccabe to work on election security something the wisconsin democrat says is a legit job and seth moulton of massachusetts also a democrat tweeted saturday that he'd consider giving mccabe job saying his district would benefit from the wisdom and talent of such an experienced public servant it's not clear how long they've been affect as mccabe only needs a couple of days on a federal job to qualify for his full pension a spokeswoman for mccabe didn't immediately rule out the idea but said they're considering all options richard johnson washington after days of digging through nine hundred fifty tons of steel and concrete authorities say the remains of all six victims of the pedestrian bridge collapsed in florida have been recovered rescuers have worked day and night to extract the victims and mangled cars after the pedestrian bridge which was under construction crumbled last thursday near florida international university miami i'm ann cates.

Seth Moulton Wisconsin Congressman Andrew Mccabe FOX Moscow Putin Russia Ann Cates Florida International Universi Florida Richard Johnson Washington Massachusetts President Trump Mark Poke Deputy Director Dick Durbin