22 Burst results for "Plessy Plessy"

ROE GONE! What's Next?

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:40 min | Last week

ROE GONE! What's Next?

"Is now in an interesting determination. There are many who feel that roe V wade was one of the worst decided cases in the annals of supreme courts up with plessy and dred Scott and just so many other cases that were wrongly decided by a court. And it is needed to be changed. The Dobbs case makes this premise a very real because the Mississippi case with the exception of a life of mother set this at 15 weeks. It said it below the threshold of what is determined, the courts have used his viability. But then the question became is it an undue burden if you said it at 15 weeks. Now there are many who frankly for the prolonged community are not crazy about 15 weeks. It allows 15 weeks in which states could allow abortions. But if they kept under the rogue concept, I think what is more being pushed here and what Stewart the attorney general from Mississippi is saying is now it is time just to start over. It is time to get the courts out of this decision making process. It is the time to get the courts out of this process. And send it back to the states in which you will then have the discussion of elected officials representing people that they see and know every day to decide is this where we want our state to be. Do we want our state to be a part of allowing abortion? Do we want to be a part of it and how much do we want to allow how far do we want to allow it? And you know, even going back into you want to allow just as Colorado and the District of Columbia and some recently have passed laws that say that abortion is legal up until the before birth. I

Roe V Wade Plessy Dred Scott Mississippi Dobbs Stewart District Of Columbia Colorado
The Supreme Court Is at an Interesting Crossroad...

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:40 min | 2 months ago

The Supreme Court Is at an Interesting Crossroad...

"Is now and in an interesting determination. There are many who feel that roe V wade was one of the worst decided cases in the annals of supreme courts up with plessy and dred Scott and just so many other cases that were wrongly decided by a court. And it is needed to be changed. The Dobbs case makes this premise a very real because the Mississippi case with the exception of a life of mother set this at 15 weeks. It said it below the threshold of what is determined the courts abuses viability. But then the question became, is it an undue burden if you said it at 15 weeks? Now there are many who, you know, frankly for the prolonged community are not crazy about 15 weeks, it allows 15 weeks in which states could allow abortions. But if they kept under the rogue concept, I think what is more being pushed here and what Stewart the attorney general from Mississippi is saying is now it is time just to start over. It is time to get the courts out of this decision making process. It is the time to get the courts out of this process. And send it back to the states in which you will then have the discussion of elected officials representing people that they see and know every day to decide is this where we want our state to be. Do we want our state to be a part of allowing abortion? Do we want to be a part of it and how much do we want to allow how far do we want to allow it? You know, even going back into you want to allow just as Colorado and the District of Columbia and some recently have passed laws that say that abortion is legal up until the before birth. I

Roe V Wade Plessy Dred Scott Mississippi Dobbs Stewart District Of Columbia Colorado
"plessy " Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:47 min | 6 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"But the plessy opinion, and its embrace of separate but equal, let African Americans know once and for all that, despite the constitution's guarantees, their fundamental rights would not be protected. The separate but equal precedent wouldn't be overturned until 1954 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Brown V board of education that racially segregated public schools violated the equal protection clause, paving the way for other successful challenges to segregation and galvanizing a new wave of the civil rights movement. Among those growing up in the segregated society that plessy V Ferguson facilitated were two now 64 year old descendants of figures closely tied to the case. Keith plessy, and Phoebe Ferguson, the great great granddaughter of the New Orleans district court judge in the case, Homer plessy died on March 1st, 1925, at the age of 62. Both remember childhoods and segregated New Orleans, Ferguson was not able to sit next to her black babysitter in a movie theater, while plessy couldn't enter certain restaurants through their front doors. The Jim Crow era of segregation following plessy V Ferguson left a deep and painful legacy that we are still dealing with today as Orleans parish district attorney Williams puts it. And we all can see it in social inequities, whether it's housing insecurity, food insecurity, poverty, violence, and certain communities, how the criminal legal system is used in certain neighborhoods based upon the wealth or complexion of those people. Plessy and Ferguson only found out about their connections to the Supreme Court case when they were in their 30s and 40s, respectively. Their families had never talked about these ancestors growing up, they were introduced to each other in 2004 by Keith Weldon medley, author of we as Freeman, plessy V Ferguson. I reached my hand out to shake Ferguson's hand and she started apologizing for slavery, discrimination, separate but equal Keith plessy recalls, and I said, we weren't born then. We're not responsible for this. It's no longer plessy versus Ferguson. It's plessy and Ferguson. In 2009, they together founded the plessy and Ferguson foundation, a civil rights education nonprofit aiming to help schools teach the history of the case and its dark legacy. And thanks in part to Keith plessy's efforts, Louisiana has been celebrating the day of Homer plessy's arrest as Homer plessy day since 2005, a strip of the street, where he was arrested was renamed Homer plessy way in 2018. This past fall, local civil rights attorney Mary Howell was brainstorming ideas for future foundation programming with Phoebe Ferguson and decided to find some way to mark the 125th anniversary of Homer plessy's prosecution. Howell made the Orleans parish district attorney's office aware of the anniversary, and it was then that a staffer found the law that allowed them to pursue the posthumous pardon. The state pardons board approved their application unanimously on November 12th. The approval was a long time coming, says Keith plessy. I'm so happy that there was something that we could do to make a different ending to the story. Phoebe Ferguson ads, noting that her tie to judge Ferguson has always felt like a burden..

plessy V Ferguson Homer plessy Keith plessy plessy Ferguson Phoebe Ferguson Brown V board of education New Orleans district court attorney Williams U.S. Supreme Court Plessy Keith Weldon medley Jim Crow plessy and Ferguson foundation New Orleans Orleans Mary Howell Freeman Orleans parish district attorn Louisiana
"plessy " Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:02 min | 6 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Louisiana governor pardons Homer plessy, 125 years after scotus separate but equal ruling by Olivia B waxman. On January 11th, 1897, Homer plessy pleaded guilty in a New Orleans district court for sitting in a whites only train car, 8 months after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Louisiana's separate car act and a doctrine of separate but equal legislation that made way for segregation laws across the U.S.. Now nearly 125 years later, plessis conviction has been wiped from his record. On January 5th, Louisiana governor John bell Edwards signed a posthumous pardon for plessy during a ceremony in New Orleans. The stroke of my pin on this pardon while momentous, it doesn't erase generations of pain and discrimination. It doesn't fix all of our present challenges. We can acknowledge we have a long way to go. But this pardon is a step in the right direction, Edward said. I am beyond grateful that I have a small part to play, and ensuring that Homer plessy's legacy will be entirely defined by the rightness of his cause and undefiled by an unjust criminal conviction. Keith plessy, Homer plessy's first cousin three times removed, said he experienced a wave of emotion when he first heard that Edwards would sign the pardon. My left eye gave up and a tear just rolled down the side of my face. He tells time. It felt like I was not standing on my feet. It's surreal. The Orleans parish district attorney's office submitted the application for a pardon on November 5th. And what's believed to be the first use of a 2006 state law, which allows people as well as the descendants of people convicted of breaking state or local laws designed to maintain or enforce racial separation or discrimination to apply for pardons. The application comes out of the office's civil rights division, which has been tasked with looking for wrongful convictions. Although my predecessor, many years ago, prosecuted plessey, he should not have Jason Williams Orleans parish district attorney tells time. I think it's really important that we talk about the broad discretion that prosecutors have, because the ability to prosecute someone under the law does not always mean that district attorneys and prosecutors and state's attorneys should. The history behind plessy V Ferguson on June 7th, 1892, Homer plessey, a mixed race shoemaker, was arrested for sitting in a whites only east Louisiana railroad car and violating the state's 1890 separate car act, which said that railroads had to have equal but separate accommodations for the white and colored races, plessy had boarded the train as part of an organized effort by a local civil rights group called the citizens committee to raise awareness about the law. 5 months later, on November 18th, 1892, judge John H Ferguson ruled that his actions had broken it. The case was appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, but four years later, on May 18th, 1896, the justices ruled 7 to one to uphold Ferguson's decision in favor of segregation, ruling that facilities that separated the races didn't violate the equal protection clause of the constitution's Fourteenth Amendment. Faced with the choice of spending 20 days in jail or paying a $25 fine on January 11th, 1897, plessy pled guilty and paid the fine. The effect of the decision was long-lasting, providing a legal basis for segregation laws nationwide throughout the first half of the 20th century, as imani Perry, Professor of African American studies at Princeton University explained to time in 2020, since 1876, the courts and Congress had steadily eroded the reconstruction amendments promises to African Americans, suffrage, equal protection of the law and due process before the law..

Homer plessy plessy Louisiana Olivia B waxman New Orleans district court John bell Edwards Keith plessy Orleans parish district attorn U.S. Supreme Court plessis plessy V Ferguson east Louisiana New Orleans Jason Williams Edward Edwards judge John H Ferguson U.S. citizens committee
"plessy " Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:05 min | 6 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on WTOP

"D.C. it's 39°F square 39 Laurel 33 and we're headed down to the upper 20s in places ten 40 on WTO new tonight President Biden will renew a push for federal legislation to protect voting rights next week in Georgia You might recall a new law there limits how and when people can cast ballots Biden will be joined in Atlanta this is on Tuesday President Biden joined an Atlanta by the vice president Kamala Harris who's the administration's point person on voting rights issues A bill in Congress aims to set federal standards for state elections but GOP opposition has stalled that bill in the Senate where Democrats lack the 60 votes needed to overcome a filibuster Meantime the Senate's top Republican says he's open to reforming the electoral count act one year after Senate and House Republicans objected to the certification of President Biden's win That 1887 law allows members of Congress to dispute election results Today Mitch McConnell told political that the law quote obviously has some flaws and that reform is worth discussing Senate Democrats plan to hold votes on broader election reforms by Martin Luther King Jr. day They want to pass anti gerrymandering legislation make election day a holiday and beef up early voting but doing so would require two key democratic swing votes Joe Manchin and kyrsten sinema to agree to weaken the filibuster and clear the way for a party line vote Howard University found itself dealing with a bomb threat yesterday and it was not the only historically black university to get one Someone called D.C. police late yesterday afternoon claiming that a pair of bombs had been placed inside Howard University's administration building on 6th street in northwest An explosive ordnance team from MPD arrived and evacuated the building and police in school public safety leaders searched the premises by 5 p.m. and all clear had been given Similar threats were made to HBCUs around the country including schools in Norfolk Virginia in Durham North Carolina All were hoaxes D.C. police say they're still investigating the threat here John Doe and WTO P news Louisiana's governor has pardoned the black man whose 1892 arrest led to a Supreme Court decision that allowed racial segregation in the U.S. for nearly 60 years There's never a bad day to do the right thing Louisiana governor John bell Edwards said signing a posthumous pardon for Homer plessy is something that should never have been needed In 1892 the 30 year old shoemaker part of a group trying to overturn laws against equal rights after the Civil War was wide enough to buy a train ticket in New Orleans but black enough to be arrested for refusing to leave a whites only railroad car When he lost his case before the Supreme Court plessy versus Ferguson ushered in an era of unabashed racism and segregation that was considered legal until Brown versus the board of education in 1954 The pernicious effects of plessy linger still At a ceremony near the spot where plessy was arrested bell Edward says he was beyond grateful to help restore plessy's legacy undefiled by the wrongness of his conviction This part is a step in the right direction I'm Jennifer King A devastating fire in Philadelphia's fairmount neighborhood this morning He claimed the lives of 13 people 7 of them were children It was around 6.

President Biden Senate D.C. Martin Luther King Jr. Atlanta WTO Howard University kyrsten sinema Kamala Harris Congress Biden Mitch McConnell Joe Manchin GOP Georgia plessy John bell Edwards Homer plessy MPD Louisiana
Louisiana governor pardons Homer Plessy, whose segregation protest went to the Supreme Court

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

Louisiana governor pardons Homer Plessy, whose segregation protest went to the Supreme Court

"Louisiana's Louisiana's governor governor has has pardon pardon the the black black man man who's who's eighteen eighteen ninety ninety to to arrest arrest led led to to a a Supreme Supreme Court Court decision decision that that allowed allowed racial racial segregation segregation in in the the United United States States for for nearly nearly sixty sixty years years there's there's never never a a bad bad day day to to do do the the right right thing thing Louisiana Louisiana governor governor John John bel bel Edwards Edwards said said citing citing a a posthumous posthumous pardon pardon for for Homer Homer Plessy Plessy is is something something that that should should never never have have been been needed needed in in eighteen eighteen ninety ninety two two the the thirty thirty year year old old shoemaker shoemaker part part of of a a group group trying trying to to overturn overturn laws laws against against equal equal rights rights after after the the civil civil war war was was wide wide enough enough to to buy buy a a train train ticket ticket New New Orleans Orleans with with black black enough enough to to be be arrested arrested for for refusing refusing to to leave leave a a whites whites only only railroad railroad car car when when he he lost lost his his case case before before the the Supreme Supreme Court Court Plessy Plessy versus versus Ferguson Ferguson ushered ushered in in an an era era of of unabashed unabashed racism racism and and segregation segregation that that was was considered considered legal legal until until brown brown versus versus the the board board of of education education in in nineteen nineteen fifty fifty four four the the pernicious pernicious effects effects of of Plessy Plessy linger linger still still at at a a ceremony ceremony near near the the spot spot where where plus plus he he was was arrested arrested bel bel Edwards Edwards says says she she was was beyond beyond grateful grateful to to help help restore restore plus plus he's he's legacy legacy undefiled undefiled by by the the wrongness wrongness of of his his conviction conviction this this party party is is a a step step in in the the right right direction direction I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer king king Louisiana's Louisiana's governor governor has has pardon pardon the the black black man man who's who's eighteen eighteen ninety ninety to to arrest arrest led led to to a a Supreme Supreme Court Court decision decision that that allowed allowed racial racial segregation segregation in in the the United United States States for for nearly nearly sixty sixty years years there's there's

Supreme Supreme Court Court Louisiana United United States States Plessy Plessy John John Bel Bel Edwards Edwa Homer Homer Plessy Plessy New New Orleans Ferguson Ferguson Brown Brown Board Board Of Of Education Ed Bel Bel Edwards Edwards Orleans Jennifer Jennifer King King Lo
"plessy " Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:38 min | 6 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Like your age and your overall health So for example Davis is if you're over 65 even with overcrowd your risk of being admitted to the hospital is still 5% That means one in 20 people in this age group infected with omicron are going to end up in the hospital And if you have heart disease or overweight that risk is likely even higher It's not as if you get off Scot free just because you happen to be in the time You get up in the older age range as we saw earlier in the pandemic You know it's nasty disease Even if it's less than the delta So she says they are still going to be many many people who are hospitalized and are in the ICU and she urges everyone to get vaccinated and boosted to cut that risk That message at least is consistent Get vaccinated get vaccinated get vaccinated And Michael Lee do cliff there with some of the first data looking at how severe omicron is here in the U.S. Michael Lee thank you Thank you Today in Louisiana the governor granted a posthumous pardon to Homer plessy In 1892 plessy a black man refused to leave a whites only train and was arrested The eventual Supreme Court case plessy versus Ferguson led to the separate but equal decision permitting decades of laws keeping black people segregated Bobby Jean mysk of the Gulf states newsroom reports When Homer plessy pushed back against his conviction the plessy versus Ferguson Supreme Court case didn't bring the change he and others had hoped for Here's southern university law professor Angela Allen bell Home.

plessy Michael Lee Homer plessy Davis heart disease ICU Bobby Jean mysk Gulf states newsroom Louisiana U.S. Ferguson Supreme Court Ferguson Supreme Court Here's southern university Angela Allen bell
"plessy " Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:25 min | 6 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on WTOP

"In many spots We've got 40 in annandale college park also at 40 and in Aldi we've got 36 here on WTO P It's three 41 The CDC's latest COVID-19 isolation guidelines have been causing a lot of head scratching So the agency's director is trying to clear things up The CDC shortened the recommended isolation time from ten days to 5 Many are still confused at what to do at the end of the period because they aren't requiring you to retest But CDC director doctor Rochelle Walensky said getting a test can provide an added layer of protection If that test is positive people should stay home for those extra 5 days And if that test is negative people really do need to understand that they must continue to wear their mask for those extra 5 days Stacy lyn CVS news Meantime the CDC is expected to recommend Pfizer's COVID booster shots for kids 12 to 15 after a meeting today Christie king talked with one local pediatrician about just how effective boosters have been Many of our teenagers were vaccinated over the summer So with the high numbers and the community now the best way to protect them is to get the booster Doctor Christina Brown is a Kaiser permanente pediatrician and white marsh She says data from adults show boosters helped dramatically If you've had two doses but not had your booster the vaccine is only about 33% effective But if you've had your booster it rises it up to 75% against this new omakase variants Free vaccine is available all over the place Christy king news Three 42 More than a hundred years after Homer plessy refused to leave a whites only railcar Louisiana governor John bell Edwards granted him a pardon Plus he's arrest that day for challenging segregation wound up before the Supreme Court And instead of ruling for plessy who was black they ruled for segregation saying separate could be equal Governor bell Edwards Well this pardon has been a long time coming We can all acknowledge this is a day that should have never had to happen Descendants of plessy and plaintiff John Howard Ferguson are now friends who advocated together for this pardon Up ahead on WTO P we'll talk about the Washington football team it's three 43 Let's be honest You don't need a roofer that often But when you do.

CDC annandale college park Rochelle Walensky Stacy lyn Christie king Christina Brown WTO Christy king plessy Homer plessy Pfizer John bell Edwards Governor bell Edwards Louisiana John Howard Ferguson Supreme Court Washington football
"plessy " Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:57 min | 6 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on WTOP

"More than half children I'd say about 6 30 I just started here on screams Sure enough there were flames immediately just pouring out of the second floor 18 people were living in one row home alone the smoke detectors not working Attorney general Merrick Garland has just spoken as tomorrow marks one year since the capital insurrection proceedings in both chambers were disrupted for hours interfering with a fundamental element of American democracy the peaceful transfer of power from one administration to the next Those involved must be held accountable Louisiana governor John bell Edwards has granted a posthumous pardon for Homer plessy His refusal in 1892 to leave a whites only railcar led the Supreme Court to uphold state racial segregation laws in what's considered to be one of its most shameful decisions There's never a bad day to do the right thing right But it's also a great way to kick off the new year and perhaps a new chapter in the state of Louisiana This Justin the recording academy and CBS say this year's Grammys set for the 31st of this month have been postponed because of COVID The Dow was down two ten This is CBS News Never miss a moment top news from 24/7 360 five Listen on air on Alexa and on the WTO p.m. Rio three on P on this January 5th 2022 cloudy skies warmer than we've had it recently You are at 40 You're good afternoon I'm Sean Anderson I'm Hillary Howard our top local story is on Macron now the dominant COVID variant in Maryland Nationwide the variant accounts for 95% of cases and as its surges the average proportion of COVID-19 tests coming back positive in Maryland is higher than at any point during the pandemic Governor Larry Hogan says the state does have a sufficient supply of PCR tests but he adds the state is still working on getting more at home rapid tests as the nation deals with a shortage We're currently working on numerous emergency procurements to deal with the multiple emergency actions related to the crisis including the acquisition of as many of these rapid tests as we can possibly acquire from multiple different sources And hospitals are struggling to care for a record number of COVID patients They're treating over 3100 people after eclipsing 3000 yesterday for the first time The governor says the next four to 6 weeks will be the most challenging of the pandemic Well now to the aftermath of this week's winter storm and the traffic debacle on interstate 95 95 and other major roads nearby are looking much better than they did yesterday but Neal Augustine tells us the snow clearing is far from over It's only natural when it snows you wonder when your neighborhood will be plowed The fleet that generally goes into subdivisions is a physically smaller fleet You'll see some of the smaller pickup trucks Ellen Camelot is with V dot says the first pass is often an 8 to ten foot wide path not curb to curb or to bear pavement We're not going to be bringing heavy trucks in We're not going to be putting a bunch of chemicals down to degrade the asphalt or go into the watershed or anything like that Neil oil can stay in TLP news Let's be clear there was a lot on 95 that happened that just was not good but there were a couple of good deeds including one from a Maryland company Chuck pad arrakis owner of Smith baking company out of Baltimore got an unusual call during the I 95 mess one of his trucks was stuck on the highway and images of bakery on the truck were making other people hungry He heard from one of them so he gave the driver permission.

Attorney general Merrick Garla John bell Edwards Homer plessy Sean Anderson Louisiana Hillary Howard Larry Hogan Maryland CBS News WTO Supreme Court CBS Neal Augustine Justin Ellen Camelot arrakis Smith baking Neil
"plessy " Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:10 min | 6 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on WTOP

"The cause of the fire under investigation It's a day at home for Chicago public school students CBS and Stacy land reports teachers raised concerns about rising COVID case numbers The Chicago teachers union had voted to transition to remote learning President Jesse sharkey we want to teach and we are prepared to do that remotely Brianna Hamburg halls and elementary school teacher We wanted to shift to remote learning just for a little while until the surge goes down But the school system said no and canceled classes altogether Parents like tanika Griffin Lindsay aren't happy So you tell them that no class nose instruction is better than something When France medics and other health workers who are COVID positive but have few or no symptoms are being told to keep treating patients rather than isolate No twist in a high profile Washington investigation CBS's Catherine herridge The select committee investigating the attack on the capitol now wants to hear from Fox News host Sean Hannity about his text messages with The White House before the riots Hannity's lawyer told CBS News they are reviewing the committee's request On TV Hannity has condemned the violence while being sharply critical of the committee The head of the capitol police told Congress today forces will not be caught unprepared again A posthumous pardon today in Louisiana for a man who challenged segregation laws in a case that went down in Supreme Court history This is so historically significant Louisiana governor John bell Edwards pardoning Homer plessy a black man who was 125 years ago convicted of boarding a whites only train in New Orleans something that should have obviously never ever been a crime New Orleans district attorney Jason Williams spoke on plessy's be happy before the pardon board and says they should have happened a long long time ago Dave Cohen for CBS News New Orleans Wall Street right now the Dow is up 69 points This is CBS News Never miss a moment top news from 24/7 360 five Listen on air on Alexa and on the WTO PF.

Chicago public school Stacy land COVID Chicago teachers union Jesse sharkey Brianna Hamburg Griffin Lindsay CBS Catherine herridge Hannity CBS News Sean Hannity capitol police Homer plessy Louisiana Fox News France White House Washington John bell
"plessy " Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

05:13 min | 7 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Who have probably spent the last decade of their lives litigating this reproductive rights issue to use the left's terminology there right Maybe we can keep in mind It's the right not to reproduce That's what it really is right It's not reproductive rights It's the right not to reproduce and to terminate the life That's what it really is But these legal geniuses on the left especially the ones we heard in this court case today the Supreme Court Has spent their entire lives training for this moment And their arguments boil down to inanities and just stupidity Well what's the viability standard When's viability Liabilities when I say it is well what about what medical technology gets better and the viability goes back to say maybe three or four weeks That doesn't count I mean that's the essence of the argument When does life begin No I don't know When Tony and Bobby said who's totally Bobby I don't know I don't know Somebody told me that was a Tony Bobby That was the whole argument Some of you sort of by yours argument was well because roe was a really crap decision and Casey wasn't even bigger crap decision It's been a crap decision forever and we've lived with this crap decision So let's creep the creep the crap decision God forbid we change it And the other justices are like wait wait that's what we're doing here So we're just making a bunch of stupid calls Plessy a dread Korra matsu all of these cases We're making a bunch of these calls that Kara matsu case and others over time Better bad calls at which you're supposed to stick with them because that's just what we it reminds You know what it reminds me of Jim but my prior line of work right One of the death sentences in when you're a Secret Service agent is if someone tells you that's the that's the way we've always done it Ask any agent you know They'll tell you Here's what I mean You go out on an advance and somebody's doing something you know is stupid Let's just say do something easy You put the sandbags on the on the bike rack You know the president works in rope line You put the sandbags on the wrong side of the bike rack Decide the president's on Well why would that be stupid Well be stupid because then the president is going to trip over the sandbags They keep the put them on the other side You don't listen to anybody's got a trip It's got to be someone else Not the president You got to put the sandbags on somewhere You put them on the other side you tell people to watch out Well we spent sandbags on the president's side And I guarantee you when someone asked why we doing that somebody said oh because that's the way we've always done it We got really good the service and when I was there over time at not doing what we always used to do because some of the stuff we always used to do was dumb Some of these court decisions like roe are stupid There were basic questions asked today like clarence Thomas who's a genius The finest legal mind of our time A man I have the deepest utmost respect for Clarence Thomas has a very simple question and the lawyer for the pro abortion crowd had a fascinating response Clarence Thomas is like listen when we're arguing Second Amendment cases I know what we're talking about We're talking about clear language in the constitution Protecting the right to bear arms He says we're talking about that I know exactly what we're talking before Fourth Amendment cases I can read the text He's like where's abortion in the constitution Again the answer The devastation of the flux capacitor this is what they do She just spun her wheels the whole time inventing a right in the constitution that doesn't exist We're talking about the right to privacy and liberty You mean for the child that's getting killed What about their right Privacy liberty liberty what about them What about the privacy to not have a toxic deadly substance injected into you to kill you What about that That's kind of sounds like a right to privacy to be The lawyer had no response There is no right to abortion in the constitution Anywhere Anywhere The word abortion is not in the constitution It is a made up fabricated thing It's not real And these arguments by the left also are hysterical and legally inaccurate If roe is overturned abortion will not be illegal What will happen is when we turn back over to the states and you'd have a different cornucopia of laws throughout the country on abortion I'm sure some liberal states would codify it and some conservative states that care about life in the womb Would say no we're not going to do that here It was a whole principle of federalism Was it not I thought that's what we were supposed to do There is nothing in the constitution about abortion That is made up that's fabricated That's not real And I can't emphasize to you enough the whole listen I was very active in the pro life cause when you know when I ran for office because it's just matters I mean.

Tony Bobby Plessy Kara matsu Clarence Thomas Bobby roe Supreme Court Secret Service Casey Tony Jim
"plessy " Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

03:00 min | 8 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Journey toward racial integration. And hey kudos to her freshly admitted to the bar. Twenty four year old lawyer. He's a friend of ours from episode. Ninety-one future us president. Chester arthur. Okay so from minstrel shows to we now know jim. Crow actually has some rather northern routes a. Why haven't i been talking about the south. Well the system of slavery actually could require a great deal of interaction between enslave. Her and enslaved. This means that to some extent co define social practices in drawing. Stark legalize didn't actually make sense in the south until after the slavery ending thirteenth amendment now reconstruction held these floodgates back initially but by the eighteen eighties southern democrats those redeemers as they call themselves. Have the power. They soon begin to pass. Jim crow laws at the state level. One of these laws as we know from today's open is the louisiana separate car active eighteen ninety which requires railroads in the state to have separate cars for white and black passengers so then democrats are thrilled as evidenced by the time democrat newspaper reporting in favor of it quote. A young lady of the city had two or three days ago to travel from new orleans to austin texas. The only sleeping accommodation on board that was to be had was the lower birth in a section of which the upper birth had been secured by negras. The city and accommodation was as much crowded as that for sleeping and the young lady had to occupy seat in the section in which she passed the night with the same negras the instance which we have just narrated without comment goes to show that the date for the louisiana separate car act. Going into force will not arrive a day too soon. Close quote if i may provide one word of comment damn well civil rights loving americans do not see what the times democrats sees. Black-americans challenged louisiana separate car act as well as similar acts across new south. All the way up in michigan black clergymen and leaders rail against the separate car act at a civil rights league meeting held on november nineteenth. Eight thousand nine hundred one professor d. Augustus straker proclaims to his black and white audience. We are supposed to be enjoying the same rights that are claimed by the whites but that is not true. In fact in short he and the other speakers contend that segregation isn't only immoral. It's unconstitutional a violation of the fourteenth amendment's guarantee of equal protection of loss. Sounds like they'd get along with homer plassey. The man whom we met in the cold open as he defied the separate car act his homework plus he joins the ranks of a new generation of black leaders like ida b wells w. e. boyce and booker t. washington we mourn the loss of one of the greatest leaders. The nation's ever seen.

Chester arthur louisiana Crow Jim crow Stark jim Augustus straker new orleans austin texas us michigan homer plassey ida b wells boyce booker washington
"plessy " Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:28 min | 8 months ago

"plessy " Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"We've met the gilded ages dreamers inventors and titans of industry in recent episodes but much of that history is concentrated in the north. Today we head south of the mason dixon line for the gilded age story of the new south a land of industrialization and increasingly these racially segregated. Jim crow laws will start by exploring the economic side of things with a visit to a cotton mill. Then old cotton plantation or share. Cropping is the order of the day. But how different is it from slavery. That's a question that will likely sit with us. As a protesting group of agricultural workers meet a deadly outcome and louisiana from there. We'll learn more about jim. Crow before bidding a hard farewell to an old friend. We've met in many a past episode. The fierce abolitionist frederick. Douglass in the wake of his death will explore the erez constitutional thought as southern states adopt new constitutions and the supreme court examines homer pluses case which will lead it to decide whether separate equal considered constitutional. I'm sure you can already tell. But i'll say it anyway. This episode is not one of the lighter ones. We've got some truly hard material here. This is one of the heartbreakers so with that heads up. Let's leave homer temporarily and head back to the end of reconstruction set the stage as we enter the gilded age's newsouth rewind so the end of reconstruction. We saw this era. Come to a close in episode seventy six with the presidential election of eighteen seventy six. But here's a quick refresher amid a contested outcome. Democrats yield the white house to republican referred. Me hayes in return. Republicans agree to end federal attempts to reform the south. This includes withdrawing its muscle those federal troops the white league and other white supremacist groups. Welcome this news. They see this as return of what they call home. Rule or southern redemption. Many southern democrats will even call themselves quote unquote redeemers as they seek to rest. Power from the black southerners white carpet bag. Northerners in whites scalawags southerners that comprise the south's republicans to what extent can these so-called redeemers restore the antebellum. South much has changed since the war. Not just legally with new laws and constitutional amendments. Make a straight up. Return impossible but the gilded age itself is a very different world. Even the cotton industries changed since the civil wars economic disruptions other producers bike india and egypt have taken a significant share of the south's former cotton export game. What is the land where cotton his king to do. It has little choice but to lean into the gilded ages industrial economy by wrapping up. Its own share of local cotton textile mills. It's in this context that the georgia newspaperman editor of the atlantic constitution. Henry w grady gives a speech at a meeting of the new england club in new york city on the night of december twenty first eighteen eighty six in doing so. He proclaims the old south of slavery and secession to be dead from there. He goes on to assert the old south rested everything on slavery and agriculture. The new south presents a perfect democracy a social system. Compact closely knitted less splendid after surface. A stronger at the core a diversified industry that meets the complex needs of this complex age. So which version of the post reconstruction south is right. Will the south's democrats stomp out the progress of reconstruction or is the new south shaping up the image that are georgia journalist picks for as northern audience. Could it be something in between we shall see and we begin with a peek into the life. at one of the south's now many and booming cotton hills. it's an unspecified date likes. Lean eight hundred. Eighty eight or eight hundred eighty nine a relatively poor white north carolina family has just moved to darlington south carolina. And yes bruce springsteen fans. This is the same darlington. The boss will later sing about in his hit born in the usa. But we're century away from that today. We're here with nine year. Old fanny whose maiden name won't be recorded in her much later interview actually starts her first day of work coming downstairs. Fanny feels strange and lonesome lack. And honestly who wouldn't be she and her family including nine siblings have moved here to give up farming to work in darlington's new cotton mill. Young fanny doesn't know a soul and it's her first day of work in a way of life far different than what she's ever known since fans discomfort for aging white-bearded grandpa picks up the nine year old and gives to one dollar bills. Take these to your mother and tell her to buy you some pretty dresses and make a nice for you to wear this mill. Yeah times may change but grandparents sneaking gifts to their grandchildren. That's timeless fanny. Makes her way to the middle where she other. Children comprise a sizable minority of the workforce. Yes the practice of hiring children and industrial factories which as we know from episode nineteen has been going on since the start of the industrial revolution is still in full swing right now. Eighteen eighties. Roughly one quarter of the cotton manufacturing industries workers are kids the children up north laboring another factories. Many in this progressive era will tell you child. Labor is simply a necessity of life but more and more americans are coming to disagree and they find. It's practice in the new south to be worse than north. Allow me to quote the poet. Edwin markham's vivid condemning description in the southern cotton mills. We got goblin army of children. Keeping their forced march on the factory floors. An army that watches the sun by day. In the stars by night a spectral army pygmy people sucked in from the hills to dance behind crazed wheels children complete dangerous tasks these mills and they're inexpensive to hire one eight hundred eighty seven north carolina millworker will write quote the employment of children in the mills at low wages keeps a great many men out of employment quote so it is with fanny for her first three weeks on the job. The middle managers teacher. How do we ve day in. And day out once she learns to. We've the mill as a roughly twenty five cents. A day that's about average for child labourers. Textile mills make roughly ninety dollars a year. Compare that to the adult men and women who make two hundred forty five dollars in one hundred fifty nine dollars per year respectively fanny will work in the mills over a decade bouncing all around south carolina and georgia is new railroad lines and cotton mills sprang up throughout the south. So it's clear then that cotton continues to hold a place of importance in the southern economy. It now does so. However with a more industrial slant. As one thomas nast cartoon in harper's weekly depicts the old south's king cotton has been replaced by the industrial new south's queen cotton mill and the twenty years between eighteen. Eighty nine one thousand nine hundred. The south's number of cotton hills will jump from one hundred sixty one to four hundred in case that doesn't sound significant. Consider this just twelve mil- surrounding charlotte. North carolina produce over two million dollars worth of goods every year but his poor white southerners increasingly leave their plows to take these dangerous exhausting factory jobs. Someone's still has to harvest the raw cotton for the most part This remains black labor under a new system share cropping..

white league darlington mason dixon Henry w grady new england club Jim crow cotton hills Douglass Old fanny georgia Young fanny Crow louisiana hayes supreme court white house jim Edwin markham north carolina
Joe Biden, Democrat Party, and Their Marxist Agenda Are the Real Threats

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden, Democrat Party, and Their Marxist Agenda Are the Real Threats

"Cut. Six go on screen fair elections. He's just such a threat literally. I've said it before. We're facing the most significant test. Of our democracy since the Civil War. That's not hyperbole since the Civil war. So you're you're listening to a And illiterate. Not a man of words. He's a word of a man of mumbles. Since the Civil War. This is a threat. We have the greatest threat today since the American Revolution, the nation's founding And it's Joe Biden and his party. It's the corrupt media. It is the brainwashing. Colleges and universities. It is critical race theory in the D Growth movement. It is. All these spawned movements. That Joe Biden is embracing. It's the war on separation of powers. That's the world the very constitution where he's staying in the Constitution, the center He's Blaspheming it. And the entire enterprise. The greatest threat to democracy since the Civil War, Ladies and gentlemen. Greater than the Plessy decision. Greater than the car macho decision. It's the greatest threat since FDR rounded up Japanese Americans, Americans of Japanese descent It's the greatest threat since Woodrow Wilson. Resegregated, the United States military And the federal bureaucracy seriously.

Joe Biden Plessy FDR Woodrow Wilson United States
Supreme Court Strikes Down New York COVID Restrictions

The Mock 'N Rob Show

06:35 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court Strikes Down New York COVID Restrictions

"The new Supreme Court has spoken, and it is a much different message as it relates to Covad restrictions from the government. 93 w A. B C. It's the Mark and Rob. Show him Rob Mok is out Abdul in for Mok. And obviously, this came down late on Wednesday. With yesterday being Thanksgiving. We didn't get a chance to get to it. But the Supreme Court essentially striking down the order from New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, putting a limit on how many people could attend certain religious services again simplifying a very complex issue, but basically saying Hey, If you say liquor stores and bike shops can have whatever. Then you can't say religious institutions can't have a two almost soon. You say they got it wrong. Um, not necessarily. I think they got it right. But it was the question Woz. Um Did the rule really apply anymore? Because the mayor of New York City had sort of lift exits. The Governor York had sort of color coded like from orange thread in the synagogue to church. We're back in the orange category. Not the red category. So the question was. Is this really an issue at all? But what this gets, too? And it's going to sound really where I got to get in the weeds for just a little bit Sure, because we should point out the people hearing your voice. You are a man of all you are an attorney license in two states, which means we gotta start paying my annual to send to stop it. It's gonna cost about 350 bucks. There is this issue was called muteness and rightness. Muteness basically means that the issues over and the court doesn't have to deal. With it right. This means the issue isn't ready yet for the court to deal with, And so what? I'm thinking what the Supreme Court did Well said, Hey, technically, the issue is moot in the sense that no. They change the color code. This game and all charges. You got to go back to 50%. But they said this could come back up again. And so we want to make sure that the issue is is sort of settled, at least for right now, and that's why I think that's I think that's why they did what they did because you can't Treat religious institutions differently unless you've got a really, really good reason to do it. It's like it's got. Let's just all the strict scrutiny analysis and I'm like really delighted, said It's truly with the girdle on which is what he said. It's like No, that's that's not it. It's no, that's not it. Um In a nutshell. You you have a situation where I don't see why. I just couldn't remember to everybody the same, which is like a 15% capacity across the board. 25% capacity across the board. You gotta social distance and that'll that'll take care of it. But now we got the mayor. The Governor York City say the courts rule doesn't matter because we're no longer in that red So we're now in the Orange zone. But still, the court could say, Hey, this will come back. We just want to make sure that we know exactly what's going on. Because, well, well, I do agree with with in principle with the theory that hang in the Constitution doesn't stop for pandemic. You still have to You're still you're still in the pandemic. I have so many legal questions off of this. And if you are really ever you see the read these articles and said, But why did you this This is this is writing Abdul's wheelhouse. So the first question I have is when a ruling like this comes down because we've seen people like in the state of Indiana be very upset that the governor and in the early days of the pandemic said Well, religious liquor stores can stay open. But these places have to close and go into a liquor store. But you can't go in here. Does this apply across the country now? Does everybody have to look at this and go? Okay. This is the new law like how do we snow? Because this we're basically dealing with emergency orders, so the emergency order only applies to the emergency. The order. You need actual case X again up to the Supreme Court. So what does that mean? Cause I would look at this and say this is a This is a case. So what? No, it's no. It's Zen emergency hearing. Um For lack of a better term kinda figure how to explain this in like 10, seconds or less. Since keeping relatively simple in a nutshell, The court will hear cases like you know. Plessy vs Ferguson served Kendall versus shabbas or something like that has gone through the district Court, the appellate court and then to the Supreme Court. Then the court will also hear these sort of emergency orders, which is Hey, our rights are being violated. We need to know a quick opinion. Next. Why Z, which which gets to need to where I was going to go? Which is? How does the court decide? I was gonna ask you that question. This seems like it came very quickly versus these cases that sometimes you know, we'll hear an argument in October and they don't rule until June. Or you give it I say that it takes forever to go to go through. These sort of things are for those specific issues. So like Trump may appeal Some ruling related to the election, and that would be just for that specific thing. It wouldn't have some overarching. Apparently it was in the emergency order category, for example. Hey, we need to throw these ballots out right now. Because December 14th, the Electoral college is going to do X Y Z so the court will now the court can hear things on an expedited basis. I'II Bush versus Gore. Which, interestingly, which, by the way only applies to Bush versus Gore. Well, so let's let's let's branch off that rabble by the whites, The mark and Rob Show Mark is out, Rob here of duels in for Mark, We're talking a little bit about this. Ruling by the Supreme Court. Limiting of the governor of New York's ability to restrict religious activities were trying to from a legal perspective sort through what that means. One of the fascinating things for me reading about this is how Gorsuch was sparring with Roberts in their legal written opinions now wouldn't Jerry Springer they weren't yelling at each other on stage, but the different articles I was reading, say, said, this is pretty intense for supreme for two Supreme Court justices. This is basically their version of sniping at each other is that is that unusual for judges? It is not uncommon for judges to take little pot shots at each other. Supreme Court has done it even on that level on that level yet because they're all so they're still human beings. But you know this because I want to lead us to another look, they clearly they are brilliant whether you agree with their their judicial philosophy or not there. They're brilliant legal people, So they know they're smarter than everyone else, right? I mean, that comes off a lot of times when you hear them question the people at the court, But this this is unusual for them for one, the leaders to take shot and another elitist and it is in the sense that you have both know too conservative judges what may be a bit more ideological conservative than the other. But it is not uncommon for judges, too. Occasionally taking taking ticket but sort of a backhanded compliment to each other. So to speak, Okay? I did

Supreme Court Rob Mok Governor Andrew Cuomo Covad Abdul's Wheelhouse ROB Mark Plessy New York City New York Ii Bush Government York City Gore Indiana Kendall
"plessy " Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"plessy " Discussed on WJR 760

"Hashtag, eh? My responsibility. Meet Ed. Movie buff, Animal Lover, Safe Driver. Five years of driving an ambulance teaches you a thing or two. If people knew what I know lives could be saved. When I see a car trying to rush past the turning bus. I get concerned, you see when big vehicles turn right. They have to swing wide to make the turn. And that's a lesson. You don't want to learn the hard way. Trucks and buses turn, Let's you and I wait. It's our roads. Our safety visit www dot share the road safely dot gov. The stories that have been breaking while you've been at work, 7 60 W. J. R. Where Detroit comes. Toh talk here. Special Guest host Kevin Dietz. It's Monday, July 27th. Welcome to the Guy Gordon Show. It is also opening day, which is actually opening night for our Detroit Tigers. But this will be a opening day like none have ever seen because there will be no fans in the stands. No fans in the stands. No fans really around the stands. Businesses are reporting that people are not coming down to Comerica Park to be near the stadium for opening day. And really, why should they? If you can't be allowed in, it's just one of the problems facing businesses sports leagues. Amusement parks, ever. Practically everything around the country is trying to figure out how to deal with Kovar 19 and joining us on the phone. Now is Jim Route corresponded for Westwood. One Jim Haria. Well, your tigers left on my hands over the weekend, but otherwise I'm fine way we were 500 after two games, and the Tigers have been 500 this late in the year in a long, long time, so we were pretty happy. I understand that it is that I've been a reds fan my whole life. I grew up in Cincinnati, so I've been here for 40 years. But still I cannot not be a rich man and I was just disappointed over the weekend with a performance. But congratulations. You made some good acquisitions over over the winter, and it's paying off for you. I appreciate that. Appreciate that will will hold on to those thoughts while we can here in Detroit. So you have been keeping an eye on what's going on in Disney world. They what they opened a couple of weeks ago. What do you seeing out there? Well, this is a very interesting phenomenon here because I wanna tell on all the Disney Parks wanted open Disneyland and seven California delivered into opening a Disney world in Orlando moves forward and with a lot of protocol in the hand, sanitizing stations everywhere. Lots of Plessy grass off those masks temperature checks. And while the employees are surprisingly supportive of everything that the company is doing to keep them safe, it's not translate very well into patrons coming to the park early on where they.

Tigers Detroit Tigers Detroit Comerica Park Disney Parks Disney Plessy grass Jim Haria Kevin Dietz Jim Route Gordon Show Kovar Cincinnati California Orlando reds Westwood
"plessy " Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"plessy " Discussed on KTRH

"When eighteen ninety rolled around Louisiana decided to jump into the segregation chain of roles that was spreading across the south of Florida had adopted its segregation laws on trains Alabama that was before Louisiana and Louisiana docked at its own separate called home was eighteen ninety and by eighteen ninety one a challenge was being presented to them to change that law by the citizens committee in order withdraw carjacked or separate car act was a law passed in Louisiana that required railroad companies to provide equal but separate train car accommodations for blacks and whites but how this case is not the first challenge ever Karlos another man who's white passing Daniel day doing boarded first class car traveling from New Orleans to Montgomery Alabama how much less it was selected the state law was being challenged into state law allowed trains outside state Louisiana so didn't apply separate call it didn't apply to those trains but the trains to travel within the state of Louisiana the ones who were restricted by race in each car well if you if you look at the Louisiana law as it was written you had a first class car that was designated for white citizens and a second class car was designated for anyone of color and the system of these the waves at a railroad they would have preferred to sell all first class tickets as opposed to a separate call it it had to be set up say for instance the white call was not full one black citizen comes up to ride the train you have to prepare another call for this guy and you have a schedule to me when you train is taken off it's going to be one from one area to another the delay that process by changing a car having to add a call to the train took off a lot of time in the schedule which resulted in poor service so you know those who want to exercise segregation on those trains have to suffer being late for their appointments so it didn't make sense and you're listening to Keith Plessy and what a story this is and anyone who's ever read the case and you can actually just type in Plessy V. Ferguson and read the opinion is astonishing.

Louisiana Florida citizens committee New Orleans Montgomery Alabama Keith Plessy Plessy V. Ferguson Alabama Karlos Daniel
"plessy " Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"plessy " Discussed on KTRH

"That was a group of eighteen lawyers businessmen and prominent citizens mixed race organization there was some white citizens some African American citizens loan in the battle for freedom I think the history because back abolition long before the civil war the American revolution while also participated in the battle of New Orleans the citizens committee had a deep background in fighting for freedom a lot of those of ancestors of the citizens committee who fought in the Plessy V. Ferguson case at the turn of the century war very much involved in the development of American Homer Plessy himself had a relative that was decorated in the American revolution his great grandfather was a gem about a name of Matthew devote matter devore was decorated for times of battling American revolution which not being recognized as the American revolution because the Louisiana was still the Louisiana territory during the American revolution so his history goes back to the right to fight for his freedom I was born with the country it's it was in his DNA to battle for his rights when eighteen ninety rolled around Louisiana decided to jump into the segregation chain of roles.

New Orleans citizens committee Homer Plessy devore Louisiana Plessy V. Ferguson Matthew
"plessy " Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"plessy " Discussed on KTRH

"Were three additions to the US constitution amendments the the thirteen the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments those amendments came during reconstruction thirteenth amendment abolished slavery fourteenth amendment's equal protection of the locals and the fifteenth amendment was the right to vote so those three things occurred during reconstruction and Homer Plessy was a young man experience in those changes so it was developing him to not only enjoy the freedoms that came the reconstruction but to defend those rights when they were being taken away and during his childhood many protesters and activist of his time set the pace for him when he became a young man pluses for the young age and home plus it was about six years old when his father passed away his mother re married into a family of called the Dukakis Victor Newport was part of the unification movement and Victor do parts for the law was part of the unification that movement combined white and black workers tested for equal pay and they got it during reconstruction however when Homer Plessy became a young man those rights were slowly deteriorate and Homer Plessy attended these meetings with a step father Victor do and he was familiar with the citizens committee but he was not a member of the citizens committee.

Homer Plessy Victor Newport Victor citizens committee US home plus
"plessy " Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"plessy " Discussed on KTRH

"Some for the worse through it all there have been people fighting fighting for the promises made in our constitution sometimes the battles we fought I've been a loss today Robbie brings us the story of the Plessy V. Ferguson case the Supreme Court decision that solidified segregation for over fifty years it's told by a descendant of Homer Plessy himself Keith Plessy is the story many it's a phrase that haunted African Americans for years the right to separate individuals restaurants businesses train cars buses based on the color of one's skin separate but equal was not a policy left over from the civil war it wasn't until more than thirty years after the civil war that segregation became the law of the land but not all states phone at the same time in New Orleans Louisiana there was a man named Homer Plessy would with help of the country but for the equality that black citizens had tasted for a brief moment my name is Keith plastic I'm a fourth generation descendant of Homer Plessy I defend the Plessy versus Ferguson case of eighteen ninety six all the plus it was born in eighteen sixty three March seventeenth the same year that Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation he grew up and a turbulent time civil war was when he was an infant post civil war was his younger life where he experienced the reconstruction in Louisiana being protected by the union soldiers they were able to attend the same schools as white citizens there.

Robbie Homer Plessy Keith Plessy New Orleans Louisiana Abraham Lincoln Plessy V. Ferguson Supreme Court Ferguson
"plessy " Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"plessy " Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"When are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of this station or its management or Beasley media group they have somewhere under the brick and steel over nondescript building we once again make contact without a leader the end I'm mark Livin our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one you know my first book was called men in black it was about how the Supreme Court is destroying America in many ways the Supreme Court has destroyed America by changing our constitution and there been a couple of courts in particular that have done so the Dred Scott court the Plessy court the FDR court the role the way court and subsequent court decisions but what's interesting is this even if it's not honored in a perfect way at least it gets lip service and what is this this is the political question doctrine hi mark I'm done I'm turning on TV I'm going to get a hamburger no I hope you'll stay with me this is an important matter we are so lucky to have our constitution is not another country in the world that has anything like it so lucky because with the court likes it or not hours are supposed to be limited particularly when it comes to political matters Legoland matters are supposed to be left supposed to be left to the political branches that is the presidency and Congress otherwise.

Supreme Court America Congress Beasley media Dred Scott FDR Legoland
"plessy " Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"plessy " Discussed on WDRC

"Of separate the story Plessy V. Ferguson at America's journey from slavery to segregation I want to go to go back to something you were talking about as we enter the last segment and that was this I think it's kind of morally ambiguous position that the north was taking saying I mean because of the essence of slavery is that you have the right to enslave somebody because he or she is inferior to you based on his skin color that's that was the thinking of the south so we have a right to which should work and working to death and pay enough thing and give you no rights and the north says we don't want to be involved morally we don't want to be involved in capturing people that you're treating this way and send them back but at the same time they were doing that they themselves were treating black citizens as a lesser human beings by separating them and train cars in treating them differently and not according full right to just seems kind of morally ambiguous to say we're taking this the the high road by saying we won't be involved in recapturing slaves but we're still gonna treat black people is inferior in much the same way you do we're just not going to in slave them but we're still going to tell them that you are a lesser kind of citizen than the rest of us and and how that that speaks to a certain amount of of what to intellectual but a you know a more I know inconsistency well you I think allies of your live in that time you've been abolition of I would be I'd be just like Mark Twain I I thought that guy had incredible courage for taking the positions that he did well you know we'll Lloyd garrison who is the man probably the most famous abolitionist the white abolitionists in this period he was the head of the matches that I've played rhesus idea and the editor of the liberator and in eighteen fifty four you did something a lot of Americans probably didn't find to palatable he burned a copy of the constitution wow on July fourth at a picnic to show his contempt for the fact that slavery had been embedded in it and he wanted nothing to do with separate cars he wanted nothing to do with slavery and he was a radical he was on the extreme side there were there were people who were anti slavery but they favored gradual abolition because you don't want to have chaos in the south there's a grin stand those those people it sounds familiar doesn't it I mean to say you can look at any political issue and there are people all along the spectrum it we have healthy debates and arguments and etcetera but it's no different in that time they had a a healthy debate going on there was a spectrum of opinion about it well especially when you say I I want gradual abolition so that is not too upsetting to people even though the price of that is going to be what years or decades perhaps centuries of treating people citizens as less than citizens and and I'm not even sure how the you know the abolition to took a more moderate position if you will use in the language you're using to say well we we want this to come about but let's let's let it take place over decades and in the meantime if some people get did denied their rights yeah that's that's okay because better that than to do something that is that creates chaos or upsets people well you know you you have a political you have the people who are politically there's the pragmatist right they don't think it can happen they don't have the votes for that in Congress or or however it's going to happen and so they take what they consider to be a pragmatic position I don't agree with that in this case because it's as you say it's it's it's morally indefensible but on the other hand this is what causes the the civil war to come about as these in the these positions are increasingly irreconcilable you just can't make but you can't square the circle so the Republican Party comes into existence in eighteen fifty four as the anti slavery party though politics usually don't do well when you are called a single issue party but in in the eighteen fifties the only issue that mattered was slavery and so they've Republican Party the conducting a foothold in the south most people don't realize that Abraham Lincoln was elected president without appearing on a single southern state ballot wow I I would have been did that I didn't know that but there were as it were there were enough electoral college votes in the north that he could succeed and become president so the cells regard him.

Plessy V. Ferguson America