21 Burst results for "Platz"

"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

05:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

"You'll need to make informed multi-modality choices so you know really getting into the character part and understanding like it's not just like asking. Hey like who are you. And how old are you. But like the difference between like what is fundamental to them like what marginalized groups are maybe they remember of that are influence Their ability to interact with some of these modalities at what perceptions are they going to bring. That's going to influence their ability to like what gestures they're going to think are appropriate for example to the relationship part. I talk about the importance of asking about human-to-human relationships we talk a lot about human to computer and huma company but did we talk about the relationship of your customer to the The people in their home if they're sharing a phone if they're sharing the computer that has an impact on a if you're using the alexa device new switching profiles that that adds a whole layer complexity if your kids using your phone that and switching profile that has whole complexity. You're trying to do a banking app on alexa. They'd have someone in their home. They don't trust that's a whole bunch of dealbreaker and so asking questions broadening the way you ask questions really important and then The objective part is a really good reminder for us all to make sure that we're rounding are a user stories in real human needs and not like tight like technical leads you know. I don't browse a list of virtual machines for fun eyebrows. It because i want to find the broken virtual machine reboot for example but and then the where really important for multi-modality because it's usually the environment that's driving a lot of the changes customers make Whether they're acting with the phone or a smart speaker or a desktop. It's like where is the customer. What devices are in arm's reach. What distractions or their understanding that where more and not taking it for granted that like everyone's home office is the same. Everyone's kitchen is the same will help you make the case to your stakeholders that it's worth investing in.

alexa
"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

04:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

"We're just like hey you know what if you need to do this again. You can just ask versus a law running task where something like listening to music. We can Those those you could pause or attenuate like make the volume go down so we the type of behavior when we interrupted. You was fundamentally different. You didn't have to lose the context of what you were doing. We interrupted you and we had live activities. Which were things like phone calls or like if you were listening to like. They're like watching tv or something. Those you you would lose the context if we interrupted you and so whereas we might if you had an incoming call and we had the caller id information we would decide whether or not to announce the caller id information based on what you were doing so if you were listening to of the weather report we might just interrupt it and say like okay sheriff. Plants is calling. 'cause it's the time sensitive thing and you can get the weather in five seconds. We don't want you to miss this call. If you're listening to music turn the volume down a little bit and say like okay shiro. Plots calling and if you're on a phone call already we would just play the dial tone or like we play the like the incoming call tom. But we wouldn't announce it because you're already in a situation where you would lose context if we interrupt you in that way and then we provide you other ways to get that information if you it like a banner or like notification on your phone and so we're making us that activity model to make informed choices about how we interrupt you in the moment. I'm so if i wanted to dive into this. If i think there's opportunities to go Multi comes multi mode. Oh what do. I need my team. And what's the best place to get started. Like if i have a person who's Mainly sort of got experience in a more like website you x. is that sufficient i mean i guess it will depend on the person. But how do we. How do we like start to dabble in multi metal products. So if you have a designer. Who is familiar with the interaction design. Side of of your accent have visual focused designers in this may be a little bit more stretch for them but if someone is an interaction designer this is a set of skills or thinking that layers on top of their existing skill set and we all start somewhere right. I wasn't a multi modal designer. I we all start somewhere. And i find. It will also benefit from very strong partnership with their product managers. There are program managers because there is a lot of technical constraint. There's a lot of complexity here so you can go on this dirty together. You learn about your.

shiro tom
"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

05:24 min | 3 weeks ago

"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

"I can set timers on it but if my hand is covered in butter. I don't wanna touch the thousand dollar phone. And so that's why. I harp on context so much like when you when you observe your customers when you listen to them it may well be that the things they already have services for are still not meeting their needs in the right way and we have these devices that are capable of so much but are not being used to their fullest capacity. And whether or not somebody who's living with a disability you know the microsoft Inclusive design tool. Kit has a really useful sort of spectrum. Both a permanent and situational disabilities and like they say of talk about like well with holding a child. Minutes situational disability. Where i don't have to use my arms. There's a lot of those things that crop up in real life. And so that's often kind of a key show like a keystone moment. That can help you figure out where a multimodal interaction might make a lot of sense on a scenario that your customer already has a has something for but i'm really glad you brought up attention because attention is a really big part of this to a one of the chapters in my book. I talk about something called an activity model because essentially i don't know if any listeners have had this experience where like you try to open it up and the apps like i've got a load so you're going to have to wait as you go. Try to do something else. You pick you open up an email you start typing and then after a few seconds the app you tried to open i ready now and interrupt you in the middle of sentence like shifts your focus over which is rude. The computer knows you're in the middle of a sentence like you're typing if the computer has all of this information available and yet it's still bonk's you back from the email to the original app. It should know better but we've never taught our devices. What rude means or like what what what a human activity means in which Which the context interruption would be rude. And so that..

microsoft bonk
"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

05:27 min | 3 weeks ago

"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

"Interaction model. You really need it and those two dimensions were number one. How rich is the information that needs to be communicated on average so for example. You might have low information density. You might have things like my customer. Really only needs a small chunks of information like the current temperature or the the result of current timer or a sports score or something like that little snippets versus something. That's much higher information density like they're navigating an entire set of movie times or they're listening to an audio book a or something along the or listen to ten day forecasts on average those those things the more information density we get the less an interaction modality like a audio makes sense because the brain has a hard time processing a lot of information it was from on the audio channel and so then we start to think about like what other interaction forms will help. People work with more information better. Visual is usually better in that sense of so. That's one of the things is like ask yourself like how heavy is the formation. We're working with in this scenario or in this product in general you can do it either way scenario or product and then the other dimension is your customers spatial relationship with device on which the experience is taking place and by that i mean are they typically close to the device within arm's reach so basically three feet or less or are they able to. Are they moving around. Can they be three to ten feet away from the device because if they are three to ten feet away from the device typically you can no longer assume that they are looking at the device in many cases There are a few exceptions but and that starts to change. What you it kind of the things you can build into your sons on the product. Like if i've not been first of all if you're not near the product you can't touch the product so the types of interactions you have available to..

"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

04:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

"I like that's great but we're leaving. People with acoustic disabilities potentially behind just as we'd left people with visual disabilities behind at the beginning of the computer revolution right. So what i tell people is a you know. We may be leaving people behind if we focus too much. We save voice. I we may be people leaving people behind who can't process acoustic stimuli. Just like in the beginning of the computer revolution. We might have been leaving people behind. Who can process visual stimuli. And so the more flexible we can be the better for everybody and you mentioned like in the last year and a half our assumptions around the way that people live and work. I have kind been shaken about. Intend upside down and in terms of like how people think about a lot of the different devices ole touch points or interactions that are available to us now in the home is it that was definitely a period of it being quite s- gimmicky and not not kind of actually useful practical but just interesting innovative So do you think we're now getting out of that phase Probably a a good decade to really embed in the norm a people's lives. So do you see that happening a lot. Faster with things like voice and other potential interactions faster. But i think we're at a really important if inflection point right now and what's been really interesting to me is there's been this cliff for voice in it's the productivity cliff. We've as you mentioned. There's been there's been some gimmicky stuff and then there's been some stuff that's genuinely useful but more in the leisure and home space timers and Timers and alarms and reminders super useful but more in the home space. But we talk about like when. I was working on cortana in twenty fourteen. We were working on like emails and calendar and scheduling and. That's never taken. Hold in voice. And i think there's a lot of factors for that. A lot of that was the open workspace and the fact that it's really awkward to talk to a computer when there's eighty people around you. I think we're at this really interesting point now. Now people are working from home. Maybe it is now actually reasonable like actually bark out and say hey you know okay google or whatever. Hey what's my next meeting. What can you put this on my calendar. But we've got this gap where people basically a iced all that work because nobody was nobody was using it this big opportunity but i haven't seen the the industry catch back up again to where we were thinking maybe seven years ago..

google
"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

05:11 min | 3 weeks ago

"platz" Discussed on The Product Experience

"Cheryl. Thank you so much for joining us today. So excited to see your too so for anyone who hasn't read your book or seen you do talks or watch do improv or any of that can you just give a quick intro for us for to tell everyone who's listening. What is it you're doing these days at. How did you get into this. Whole world of products related stuff. Sure so hi everybody again. I'm cheryl plaid's and for while. I was calling myself the twenty sided woman. Because i'm a nerd and if you've ever played dungeons and dragons that twenty sided die. My husband liked to call. Because i have a lot of different things. I like to do as randy sort of alluded to so. I've been working on digital product for my entire career but i also have a number of advocates and those include acting and of those include a creative pursuits like more artistic things that you know that multifaceted set of interest is what got me into user experience design in the first place. I wanted something that combined technology and creativity and a vets. Also what drew me into my first of the what i call my three chapters in my career of video games. Enterprise and consumer software and hardware products. And it's that first chapter the video game chapter where i the i got exposed to a multi modal interface design. Which is when you're working with multiple inputs outputs of a boat modes of interaction with the device and that has influenced my entire career. That is pretty much. What's brought us here today to talk of because in december twenty twenty i published my first book design beyond devices creating multi motocross device experiences. So i went from creating being the lead producer on a game for the nintendo. Yes which was kind of a groundbreaking couple of a couple of ways than had voice had touch had a couple couple of different interesting interaction. Modalities back in two thousand eight and fast forward. I was working on windows automotive. Doing voice natural language in the car and touch in an interesting context then worked on cortana and alexa and a and fast forward to today and all the talks. I've been giving into the content of my book. But i'm also very passionate about enterprise experiences and working with a i am working at scale and so my book is about marrying all of these things because whether you're working on cutting edge like homes smart speaker technology or whether you're working on a website that has to spend from a phone to a to a traditional desktop website you are adapting in the moment you.

cheryl plaid Cheryl randy drew nintendo
"platz" Discussed on Mind Pump

Mind Pump

05:06 min | Last month

"platz" Discussed on Mind Pump

"Just give an example of the difference in size, right? But this particular bodybuilder, his legs, then you put him on a pro bodybuilder stage today, still bigger. And he would still have incredibly impressive quad development Tom platz. Tom platts, if you look up his legs and his quads, his quads, even today would totally stand out. And he's also known as one of the best barbell squatters of all time. His form was so good. Do you guys ever watch the video of him? I think he was competing with Tom Hatfield. You guys know Tom Hatfield was the first man to squat over a thousand pounds. And they did like a squat competition. Oh, I didn't know that. Just so you could squat, I think it was 500 pounds more times and Tom platts blew him out. And then Tom platz has done things like he would squat one 35 for 30 minutes. So he would just put one 35 on keep going. Crazy. Yeah. 30 minutes of squats with one 35. His form was impeccable and his routine oftentimes was all squats. He would do squats with his wide stance, close stance. Heels elevated, like all different variations of squats developed. Look at squads right there. It's insane. And his hamstrings, too, dude. Well, let's get to the hamster. We'll get to the hamstrings next, but let's talk about his quads first. He was, again, all about squats. And if you watch videos of them squatting, what you will see are the most perfect looking squats you've ever seen in your entire life. I've never seen a squat better than Tom platz. Now hamstrings, he also had tremendous hamstring development. And the keys with him with hamstrings were his range of motion was insane. So Tom platz could get into like a half split. He could fold himself all the way in half. He was one of the first bodybuilders to prove that having muscle was okay for flexibility. And he did these stiff legged deadlifts with with his spine staying neutral. So it was almost like a Romanian deadlift. But he would stand on a bench so that the plates could go further than the bench. Really what his thing was was range of motion. Stiff legged deadlifts. And there's famous photos of him like bending over and showing his hamstrings and it's like, it looks like an anatomy. Wasn't he? Also the one who made sissy squats were popular? Yes. He was a very big fan. That was something completely foreign to me until we met. I remember the first time that you showed me a sissy squat and I thought it was ridiculous. I was like, this is the stupidest. I really did. I thought this was the stupidest exercise ever. I thought it was silly. And part of that was I didn't know how to do it properly. So I think the way that obviously form is always important. But in an exercise like that, I think it's even more important on understanding the queues that you should be doing and keeping your hips in that locked position when you go back, but talk about an amazing quad pump. It's now forever been in my leg routine always. When I did sissy squats, I was like, never touching leg extensions. Ever again. Ever again. Why? It's such a, it's such a better movement for muscle hypertrophy and what it promotes for ankle mobility, hip control and strength. It promotes so many other good things and then the fact that if your main goal is to just develop your quads, you know, I'd take the Pepsi challenge all day on it that it's better than your leg extension or any other exercise. The only downside to sushi squats is they're way harder..

Tom platz Tom platts Tom Hatfield Pepsi
"platz" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:53 min | 2 months ago

"platz" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Scott Reese, John Platz, troy clarity, helping us out here with the, uh, currently spotting duties Troy back in the booth and good to be watching live football again for the second time this season. Amen. Stanford with a seven lead. Trojans driving 11th player this drive coming up after the break the quarter break huddle. Daniel Pete, with an 87 yard touchdown run in the first quarter accounted for the only score thus far in the game, But SC is inside the red Zone have a third in three I understand for 12 yard line. We'll see if But I anticipate Scott will be a throwing play for Slovis, who 79 for 80 yards. Thus far, it's got you know, I think the USC brave dress play held etcetera when no huddle to try and get slowest into a rhythm in the first couple series. He just was destroyed it well, he was very much in a rhythm until this until the quarter stop. So we'll see if, uh if Lance Anderson, the Stanford D coordinator, can dial something up pressure area. To disrupt, but again when I can well be it Slovis effort toward his favorite target friendly Drake, London. Other Pac 12 teams in action. BYU leading Utah 10 Nothing. 8 20 to go second quarter. This is surprising. Early score. So is this. UNLV 10, Arizona State seven. 8 25 to go second quarter. And there is some time left in that Michigan game. I think it's about six minutes to go. It's still 24 10 Wolverines leading the Huskies..

Daniel Pete Lance Anderson Scott Reese 87 yard 12 yard John Platz Scott 80 yards BYU Stanford 79 Stanford D second time Arizona State 11th player USC 24 Slovis Wolverines 20
"platz" Discussed on Homes and Hops

Homes and Hops

03:29 min | 9 months ago

"platz" Discussed on Homes and Hops

"Want to.

"platz" Discussed on Homes and Hops

Homes and Hops

08:22 min | 9 months ago

"platz" Discussed on Homes and Hops

"Really assemble the dream team. We really did. I mean yeah it is it is in in. We've got one. We've got a a senior exempt from josh. We've got computer down. We've got another business guy. I mean so. We've got that we've got a team of folks in in the cool part is we're all pretty much in sync we all in. That's that's why in everyone in sync to do what we want to do. In the coal part is it's it's our group in. It's kind of fun to be a part of in when we when we announced that we had bought the landmark property in boardman the feedback on. That was so it was it was we knew. We had something with combine brothers. You know. obviously it's a thirty four year business the That combine family has just been wonderful to work with us to use their main in their their brain in their trade dress and they just have been great folks But but when we made that announcement it was it was crazy. I mean right now and feeble. When's the door. it's going to open exactly i. I mean i still get text. One has opened and we we have So we we. We took control the building in february We've been given preliminary approval from Township for our plans and our we've got ta building permits and we're waiting on finding final architecture drawings from moscow gemini. Okay have something Finalized with the drawings and whatnot over the next probably three to five days and construct. Yeah i mean after construction began to. It's pretty quick. Should go fast. Hopefully hopefully it will it. Will i know be all smooth. Oh yeah all and no surprises. They'll be like oh. We didn't use your contingency budget here. You go we'll give you the money back exactly so you're talking about soft opening around july so you think like the doors will be opened around that same time as well or august. We're hopeful that a couple things weren't working patty on the rear of it. You know gonna ask that question with everything out. Listen even before the pandemic i. I'm a huge advocate of outdoor usable outdoors days So an i remember when i first started in commercial real estate back in dc. So this is two thousand seven going to the museum of architecture in dc and seen around the world exhibits of what they were doing of showing how they were recreating outdoor space and making it usable. So it's not just it's not just greenspace that's actually usable space in outdoor seating for for food with huge and i think we're ohioans than we can endure a little bit of cold at times and still sit outside. I'm really a huge of that. I think i'm sure your husband and your life is my wife. And i if it's is able to move Want to sit outside. Yeah sunny in in so we We're adding a patio there. We're adding a patio hermitages. Well oh nice. And so so the Not because of that people wanna sit outside. They do and especially after this last year. I mean you just wanna be outside. You want to be hanging out going in What we sell comfort food in so if we can not good ball a line did food are bread is homemade every day. I mean it is. They also have homemade pasta on sundays. Right correct see. I see i do pay attention and i listen. I'm very excited about sunday's homemade pasta us to us too. And i love any carb really that i may do dry january but i will never give up car ever carbs ever bread and pasta. I love it too much. I will not give it up. it's a steep. Is i mean those are true energizer for your body and the amount that we're constantly moving we need it. That's how i justified in my mind. So i cannot wait. So do you when you start the hiring process and everything like that. So we We are blessed We are able to hire general manager for the boardman location. We hired her. Name is stephanie. shank local eighty Excited hafer runner team. She started training so some are brother-in-law being the guy he is. He brought her over major start waiting tables. Then we're open at twenty five percent in hermitage okay She got to wait tables. Bus tables work in the kitchen in. She's working through the process so she's in hermitage now and In in getting set to start a higher were looking just a little advertisement. We're looking for supervisor. Shift supervisors and waitstaff as we speak because we want to get them on board some now to maye okay training process gallons so i make sense. Yeah so yet. Welcome to give us a call. Linda in yeah we would call that platz. That's right so actually. When you were just matching the twenty five percent by july. I think were fingers toes crossed that we will be able to be at full capacity place. And that's what we're anticipating. A we drug are fee. We we hope to be. We had pretty much targeted. What we were gonna do a year ago and we Drug our feet on this. Because we really didn't as everybody's seen in read and heard in the news about russia. Businesses are hermitage business. We we started with being closed. You know pandemic it's announced. Kobe gets announced forty hours later. We're locked now. And then two weeks later they let us open for up. Carry out in in that one for few months. Mpa was a lot stricter that we breezy on the am in. So we said you know what we want to see how we get to the other side of this and We think that we were Last friday open this up to seventy five percents. That's kind of a big deal. Huge salient But our carry out drama. Business has been amazing that the folks that have. We've got a bunch of people from here but obviously hermitage and sharon and whatnot. The the folks over there have just really supported our our efforts We've got you know our waitstaff it. I mean they'll tell you people over there have been very generous in tipping you know just to get carry out their ships and so that's that's really coal and so we we think that We think we're going to hit this thing just about right and down. Yeah we were just about right. I think that one of those things that i mean. The pandemic sucked end. It is still alive game. I know there's no there's no way around it by those there. Are those people in those businesses out there. Such as yourself that did absolutely and and learn new skills and how to to work this new environment and sustain a i'm not saying flourish but sustain and with that when we do get back to our capacity like we've seen this with the brewers and bird. Fish is phenomenal. Drive through fear pickup and everything like these are things that hopefully and their distribution expanded many of them so hopefully with this pandemic such like it'll be a combined the both the traditional with the nontraditional mp just blow up. We see we see a change in the dining in our business but it's the dining business in john in so the the the Twenty something to thirty something demographic those folks they wanna they wanna go in. They want pick the food up and they wanna go to their friends house in. They want to open a good bottle on and they wanna have you know they want to have home cooked cooking. I wanna do it in a different atmosphere. Where like my generation. We wanna go. You wanna sit. We.

Linda february thirty four year josh stephanie january august three twenty five percent Last friday two weeks later five days a year ago first last year One Kobe both forty hours later thirty
"platz" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

03:42 min | 11 months ago

"platz" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Couple of seconds and so that's where my work sort of coalesced and so the book talks about. There's two chapters upfront. Chapter three talks about what's called an activity model. Which is the representation of what your customer wants to do or is doing with the system. Essentially ideally you do a bunch of customer research and you figure out what those patterns are and in the case of alexa that shakeout to There's there's sort of the passive which doesn't mean the customer is not doing anything but you. You're with your relationship with the customer. They're not. They're not actively engaging with you then there's agrees distinction and then there's a there's the ongoing tasks like listening to music. Sustained is what. I call those We have. there's the opened my book. 'cause i don't want to give you the wrong words as i was saying to you earlier. One of the reasons you write a book is to get the things out of your brain. You have room for other things. And i am thankful to remember everything right. Yeah writing. The book was great for me because i told my husband. It was like unplugging a rock tumbler that was pulling all of pulling a ton of energy in my brain all the time. So let's see. Where do we go. Yes yes so. Discreet is an at an activity. That has a very fixed beginning. Endpoint and is is limited. In time. One of those things you could wait for so with the example of alexa. That's a asking for the weather. So if i'm interrupting you. Especially if. I am alexa. I know how long that's going to take. I can wait. And then there's the focus tasks where the country's engaged in something like they're filling out a voice form or something interrupting them might have consequences Or if they're like they're they're they've got timers going. They might be doing something. That matters emmy interrupting them. Might not be. It might not be a good idea. Like i should be careful about the way them and then there's live tasks like i'm on a call with you right now. If i if somebody interrupts us we lose whatever sentence we were saying. The context is gone forever. that moment's gone forever. So you have to be really circumspect about that interaction and so those once you have those then you can create a pattern of interruptions and just math those two things together and you have sort of a guide to etiquette for your system and so the rules like if i have just music playing i could maybe come in with more information and be less passive aggressive and hey a package is coming today but if we're in this call just a very short time if i'm engaged in listening for the weather hold the chime until the weather's done because the package is still gonna be there in thirty seconds so that can you know once you have those two things you can. You can come up with really intelligent ways of interrupting the customer that Don't come off as as as sort of happened like we didn't want to cut the the computer to come up is ignoring. The human beings needs right. I'm glad we talked about yeah. I'm glad we talked about this. Because i this is a perfect encapsulation of why design is important in and what you should be striving for. It's something that seems like a cul de sac of design for these digital devices digital interactions. But it's actually representative of sort of care in the thought that you can take as you design so that you're just building a a a comprehensive experience at also.

today thirty seconds two chapters two things Couple of seconds One Chapter three One of the reasons once ton of energy alexa
"platz" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

05:48 min | 11 months ago

"platz" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Well not three thousand these days but it was like large pieces of glass for three way mirrors the transport for them. The they're they're paying expensive so this ended up serving two purposes and not just the first one the wardrobe management. It was a fun. A surprise to find out that the people who had the messy est closets or the most fashion engaged because they're constantly taking Trying things on taking them off against they'd like point to. We'll be like oh. Where's your favorite clothes. And they point to a pile in the corner like oh my god. That's that's that's all your designers stuff like. Yeah yes over there in that wrinkled pile. It's a surprises. Customer experience. researches is important. That was very interesting so to say it was just a very interesting time because echo came out a few months into that project so it also changed our approach. We originally were just going to just have a couple of commands and we had to read. We had to assess whether or not it was worth putting the entirety of alexa which largely did correct. I mean we. We almost anything from there. We were technically the i i at the time we were calling. Its second party alexa experience where we weren't on the alexa team but we were so essentially kind of using alexa voice service but internally right but i think you became first party yes sir absorbed the echo team. Yeah the device team. Yeah so we still use that terminology. It's actually very useful terminology. I think for a lot of people to to understand but So echo look a lot of fans for it. Do you think the reason. It didn't make it is because it's just too small market too big of a behavior change. Incomplete product was it i have. I don't know if these are controversial thoughts or so. There were two two markets for this product. And it's interesting because like even we got surprised. This is an interesting product team because it was largely female. You don't see that a lot of technology and the reason we even got this product light was we were very intentional about making sure our pitch materials and are all of that was was gender neutral so that we could bardsley males stakeholders along on the journey and like help them project themselves into our customers shoes without other in the customer. But what was really interesting. Was one specific. Stakeholder one very high play stakeholder who loves vests he he he wanted he really really really wanted the product to tell them what to wear and that was not our original intention wanted the original version of the product to help you manage your wardrobe and you know help you show you what i show you what to wear. And it would have come out a lot more quickly. Had we not had the ai. Challenge of the sil- check but instead we were given a blank check and said this product ships.

alexa two three thousand first party second party echo two purposes first one three way one two markets
"platz" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

05:16 min | 11 months ago

"platz" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Sheriff platts welcome to the voice by podcast. Thank you very much brett. I'm glad we finally got a chance to do this. Yes we've been trying to arrange this for some time. I don't remember when we first did this. In fact you recommended to me. I can't remember who it was. Somebody in the design community said. Oh you should definitely get to know cheryl. She's some really interesting things. What's your youtube and linked dan. I'm like oh yes echo. Look i need to talk to her. R.i.p echo look. Yeah that's down this year but you know what what like healed my heart. The most was on instagram. And for those who haven't heard of it. It is a now defunct fashion camera that had <hes>. Alexa built in that. I was the first designer on for over amazon and amazon. Shut down the service. After three years this year and i felt like three years was a pretty good run because the camera was only five megapixels in it but but someone on instagram posted like r.i.p and they made a little coffin for it with like a little satin lining and flowers and a little tombstone and they were supposed to see it. Go oh actually. If you look at the reviews which i did. Because i looked at a lot of different things about that products that it was interesting. They were very positive and and we're going to discuss it. I definitely want to get into look. I wanna get into your background. Because i think that's very interesting. But i thought we'd start out talking. Improv improv is experiencing improv a potential superpower for designers. oh absolutely of i've seen. It's a potential superpower for any human. Although i never wanna push it on people because i understand like being that <hes>. Being that vulnerable is not for everyone. I totally get it. When i teach intro level improv i try to create a safe space where people can be vulnerable safely so that they can explore kind of how that shift in mindset effects them but absolutely the now i'll i'll be blunt so like as a professional improviser. It took me many years to understand. What parts of improv were. Helping me like. I sort of understood that it was helpful. But it took me a while to like <hes>. It's these parts of my mindset. That are actually making my approach. To design fundamentally different. Everybody understands fundamentally like it makes you better at presentations. But the underlying mindset part is the more you improve just like a muscle. It changes the way you approach problem solving you. Start to approach every problem as solvable. And that's really powerful for a designer absolutely and i suspect it's a lot more than just yes and yes. It's funny because yes has really complicated to teach right around the two hundred level where we're performers are like but what if my character wants to turn down the marriage proposal. You're like okay okay. So it's it's it's it's supporting the spirits the offer you can say no on stage and in fact you have to maintain the right to say no state but it's altering the spirit but <hes>. It's definitely a lot more than than than yes and it. Is that like the thing that you don't want to happen happens on stage or the thing that you don't something you never expected happens on stage and you blake for a second. You're like whoa <hes>. The and you know maybe one tiny part of you. Your instinct is just like the. I can't do this like i don't. I don't know how to solve this problem or or i'm not comfortable with my character is like this is going to get really deep and emotional and or but you're on stage and people pay eve in class. Maybe people haven't paid to see you but like for my this point in my career. My perspective is i'm standing on stage. People pay to see me. I can't walk off like this. Has to be a solvable problem and you just you accept it and you're like okay. I'm going to pretend like there's a solution to this. And i'm just gonna keep acting like we're working towards it and and most times you find it and every once in a while it's a spectacular failure but i've learned that y- sounds like something in one of the many <hes>. Adult coloring books. People give me when i have my many surgeries but like the things that go wrong on. Stage are often the reason. The scene exists like the weird quirks. If you treat them as interesting if you pursue them and you try to like. They're often the interesting part of what's going on stage. You could see eighteen different scenes about like a husband and a wife but if something goes wrong on stage and you pursue that suddenly. That's the reason we all came together in that theatre <hes>. So so yes a lot more than yes and tap the way you you describe it. It sounds like the experience of every product manager ever. Yeah there's there's a lot a lot in common. And and i feel a lot of empathy for my fellow product. Managers having spent four years video game production like this. I feel like always have the soul of a product manager. Trapped inside a designer have sometimes been counseled by managers. Hey maybe less product management in your design

amazon five star Today today microsoft apple Kryptonite this week echo couple benefits every week ted Shell
"platz" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"platz" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Hey a quick shadow too. Deep bushnell from soapboxes labs. Many of you know her and she left us a review and apple. Podcast saying quote really. Enjoy listening to these podcasts. With brechin sela. They're engaging energetic well-paced super informative even for people who are already and the voice space. That's what we try to do. So i've always pleased when we get five star reviews for this podcast. And i appreciate it. If you wouldn't mind heading over apple podcasts. Or other podcasts player. Drop us a five star review. We put a lot into this bringing great guests and amazing insight. So the payback. You just give us a review and that's always gratifying for us. I was also really pleased to see thieves comments that this podcast is super informative even for people already at the industry we take great care in selecting our guests and preparing the question so the artists hearing the same things that you already know or maybe here elsewhere. My goal is to go deeper with people have depth and bring that to you often. The results are really provocative and bring out new insights. That i know personally find valuable and i suspect you do as well so enjoy the podcast. Today every week and give us review it only takes a couple benefits and we appreciate it. Okay onto this week's conversation. Shell platts has a really interesting background to learn about that today. At amazon she was on the team. That designed and launched echo. Look we go into detail about where it started what worked and what did not. She doesn't work for totta. At microsoft azure earlier in her career. Show was a game producer. Kryptonite work on ted. Oh titles she was at ea working on the sims she's also a cast..

amazon five star Today today microsoft apple Kryptonite this week echo couple benefits every week ted Shell
"platz" Discussed on UX Podcast

UX Podcast

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"platz" Discussed on UX Podcast

"Talk to you in the heat of the interview. I realized i call the little green men from toy story. Millions i mixed up my kind of animated digital animated film references in one sentence. Sorry not okay james. Not okay must do better. I have to say that. I mean even though i myself i avoid smart speakers a lot i know you james. You don't even smart speakers either and for me. I'm i'm more wary of how they can be misused even for abuse and stuff so that's probably why i avoid them a lot but it's also one of the reasons i'm hugely appreciative of cheryl's attention to human messiness in her book where she also talks about how people are not predictable how they always exist within a space that can be noisier quiet or space where they're holding off for other things have their attention or their capabilities or constrained and so being able to observe and understand and map all that that's the essence of doing work that's necessary to make technology that technology to adapt to humans and not the other way around so for me that's the absolute imperative stuff to unethical designer prototypes really being communicated shed digital experiences is really tough because we'll top is talking about normally traditionally in computer interaction you have a user singular and a computer singular was much of this we're talking about now is multiple users and multiple interfaces and switching between individuals switching between users and doing the seamlessly of course it's complicated. Yeah it's it's bound to mess up doomed to fail. Maybe at that point where. It's too complex to get it right. Well i suppose the whole thing about racing along so busy racing and running but you don't have the time to stop and think about getting it right. Yeah and some of the frameworks and tools. Charles book is there to help you try and get it right given the experience..

james cheryl Charles book
"platz" Discussed on UX Podcast

UX Podcast

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"platz" Discussed on UX Podcast

"Just take a step by moment and the question which no you'll have been several times before is is wo- is multi modal multi modality. Yes yes it has so many meanings <hes>. Which i it was funny. It's it's always been kind of clear. My head and then when i went out and looked as many designers have encountered multiple times in their career was not as clear as i thought at. Its most basic in non-formal multi-modality as this book operates is a system that supports multiple modes of or modalities of interaction. Both <hes> output and input usually. It's both both output input. Technically you could have a multi modal system that only has a screen and support touch and voice. But the thing about it is like if a system <unk>. You could also have the converse where system speaks to you but you have to take to it but especially when you get into things like voice <hes>. There's a lot of research indicates that our brains interpret speech as another human talking to us and so not speaking back and forth violates a social contract so that's a whole other thing <hes>. So usually if voices involved. You're probably doing some kind of visual and voice like technically the echo is multi modal because there's an led and and that's <hes>. That's not always you can't always assume someone's looking at it and so that's one part of what i call the multimodal interaction model. You need to take into account if you're totally hands free it's important what you can and can't assume like i can't assume a hands free system. I'm looking at a device. And i can't assume that it's an arm's reach so that stuff can be bonus like the echo has button on it where you can like make it. Stop the alarm noise. So if it's near me. I could do that but i can't assume that's the only way people are going to interact with the system and same with the led's like it can give you reinforcement. But that can't be the only way we impart information to you. So multi-modality is that that bidirectional and not infinite but assistant with many possibilities. Yes you can be many ways of inputting and the can mean many ways of output saying book. They don't all have to be in use at the same time or in the same period of time. yes. And i'm glad and that's a really good question too because it gets. There's different types of multi modality like different different approaches. So you could do sequential multi multi-modality where you're kind of like okay. I am working with keyboard and mouse now. And i'm going to switch modes and now we're going to talk to the machine and it's just talking and then gonna go back to keyboard and mouse. You could do a simultaneous multi modality which we were trying to experiment with an windows automotive where you say. I want to go to there and at the same time. I'm literally touching point on the screen which which corresponds to their <hes>. That's a lot more complicated. And it's more costly and you need to know what the cost benefit is for doing that. It's like holy grail. But i understand. It's costly so we need to know why we're doing it and then there's sort of orchestrated modality where you let people you make it really easy for people to do whatever they want. In the moment the sequential model usually isn't super flexible. Like people let you move the way. I see that a lot of the time is like early echo. There were parts of the out of box experience. You had to do from an app. So it was multi modal because they didn't have a good way to do wifi passwords <hes>. So you just. That was an. They may still do that. I haven't set up an echo in a while. That's that's a sequential thing you had to. You can do voice and then you have to go to the app and then you come back. <hes> orchestrated experience would be like they have multiple ways to get you through the box experience. You could do voice or could touch. And it's up to the customer to choose what's right for them in the moment

cheryl carnegie mellon palm
Multimodal design with Cheryl Platz

UX Podcast

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Multimodal design with Cheryl Platz

"Just take a step by moment and the question which no you'll have been several times before is is wo- is multi modal multi modality. Yes yes it has so many meanings Which i it was funny. It's it's always been kind of clear. My head and then when i went out and looked as many designers have encountered multiple times in their career was not as clear as i thought at. Its most basic in non-formal multi-modality as this book operates is a system that supports multiple modes of or modalities of interaction. Both output and input usually. It's both both output input. Technically you could have a multi modal system that only has a screen and support touch and voice. But the thing about it is like if a system You could also have the converse where system speaks to you but you have to take to it but especially when you get into things like voice There's a lot of research indicates that our brains interpret speech as another human talking to us and so not speaking back and forth violates a social contract so that's a whole other thing So usually if voices involved. You're probably doing some kind of visual and voice like technically the echo is multi modal because there's an led and and that's That's not always you can't always assume someone's looking at it and so that's one part of what i call the multimodal interaction model. You need to take into account if you're totally hands free it's important what you can and can't assume like i can't assume a hands free system. I'm looking at a device. And i can't assume that it's an arm's reach so that stuff can be bonus like the echo has button on it where you can like make it. Stop the alarm noise. So if it's near me. I could do that but i can't assume that's the only way people are going to interact with the system and same with the led's like it can give you reinforcement. But that can't be the only way we impart information to you. So multi-modality is that that bidirectional and not infinite but assistant with many possibilities. Yes you can be many ways of inputting and the can mean many ways of output saying book. They don't all have to be in use at the same time or in the same period of time. yes. And i'm glad and that's a really good question too because it gets. There's different types of multi modality like different different approaches. So you could do sequential multi multi-modality where you're kind of like okay. I am working with keyboard and mouse now. And i'm going to switch modes and now we're going to talk to the machine and it's just talking and then gonna go back to keyboard and mouse. You could do a simultaneous multi modality which we were trying to experiment with an windows automotive where you say. I want to go to there and at the same time. I'm literally touching point on the screen which which corresponds to their That's a lot more complicated. And it's more costly and you need to know what the cost benefit is for doing that. It's like holy grail. But i understand. It's costly so we need to know why we're doing it and then there's sort of orchestrated modality where you let people you make it really easy for people to do whatever they want. In the moment the sequential model usually isn't super flexible. Like people let you move the way. I see that a lot of the time is like early echo. There were parts of the out of box experience. You had to do from an app. So it was multi modal because they didn't have a good way to do wifi passwords So you just. That was an. They may still do that. I haven't set up an echo in a while. That's that's a sequential thing you had to. You can do voice and then you have to go to the app and then you come back. orchestrated experience would be like they have multiple ways to get you through the box experience. You could do voice or could touch. And it's up to the customer to choose what's right for them in the moment

The head of AAdvantage shares how you can make your loyalty more rewarding

Talking Points

08:04 min | 2 years ago

The head of AAdvantage shares how you can make your loyalty more rewarding

"Today I am Sunny Fort Worth Texas at the the absolutely beautiful new headquarters of American Airlines. I am so excited to announce that I have bridget blaze Xintai. Hi As my guest today bridge. It just so happens to head. The world's largest loyalty program advantage excited to talk to her today about all things advantage advantage. And you know working at American Airlines. Bridget thank you so much for joining us. Gosh Brian thanks for having me and welcome heartily to sky view here here in Fort Worth Texas. We're delighted to have you here. New Headquarters let's just talk about this headquarters. I mean it is truly when you walk in. There's a huge engine in the ceiling. It will oh engine sort of design this is like an aviation geeks dream headquarters and actually. It's just so lighten area. Even if you're not a plane Geek you must love working here right right. Well said Brian. I think it really can Does draw in those who are aviation enthusiast with a whole host of sculptures or wall treatments or ceiling treatments. In the in the space of the engine. That you're referencing. And then those who may be decided about the industry but don't necessarily have to have a seven five seven engine in the walkway or the oversized oversight seatbelt. Do find it also superindent fighting and it's open space in the white walls and the the use of glass that allows the sun to come in just all very you know motivating even more so so. Let's talk about you know the American culture over the years has changed so you know several what is it six years ago you know merged with the US US Airways you were legacy American Airlines correct. That's right Brian. How do you describe like what is the culture of the twenty twenty American Airlines? So what I would offer you know as the A. L. Where you know am are in. US came together and formed this wonderful company. We are really striving to create an environment. Meant where we've got all hundred thirty thousand employees film like we're moving in one direction and that direction is upward in twenty nineteen the advantage program. Graham it's so much more than just rewarding people for X.. Flights that they take. How do you describe you over six hundred employees? You're running a massive business within the airline align. I sometimes joke inside. They're not frequent flyer programs anymore. They're frequent spender. Programs are frequent buyer programs. How do you think the advantage program is today versus when it first distorted in I? I love the question because so much about. This industry has evolved dramatically over the last couple of decades. And now that I think the evolutionist genesis is set to even accelerate and really at the heart of it. I think he's wonderful wonderful program in this case the advantage program which is really proven not not necessarily identified back then but certainly now as this means to engage loyal customers. And how you can keep this relationship going Wayne through the program and you do that in part through flying and how that is in terms of their personal professional needs and then hockey may engage further. Yes listen more. Commercial capacity that requires spend might be on credit card or hotel stay are coronal that a way to do that to keep engagement of customers it to me. It's not just about being customer. It's about being engaged in loyal customers to your brand when we think about evangelist. Several years there have been like the other major the airlines you know rewarding flyers based on how much they spend adding in a League qualifying tears. I know a lot of people. If we're GONNA Flyer community were very upset about at that. This is the end of the programs but it hasn't quite been that. Has It from your perspective. Like how have these new changes at reward. Frankly hire spenders in the changes changes and upgrades and things like that. How has the program changed in the last three years or four years? Would you say so. That's right Brian. So you know we all had programs that had been set a bit ago and during that period of time from when they were initially designed to really the airline models we were all running lots had changed and yet the programs were still pretty static in their design. So you know a few years ago you saw this introduction of some sort of minimum on the revenue side and do you know folks thought. Oh Gosh you know. I'm not being rewarded. It from my time. What we found is not only did our customers stay with us? The size of early poppulation grew quite handsomely. And so you know I can only describe it on what we're seeing through the data through the actual behavior of our customers and so I would conclude. It's it's all worked out for all the parties And and so you know. On the upgrade side. A lot of that really was the result of feedback we had received from customers. You know we had a really a timestamped approach to this right right. And so those who may have been able to travel further out before the reason we're actually rewarded in the queue for the upgrade A lot of our high value customers book pretty close to departure. I mean I know I never booking events because I know my travel always change. That's right so you have a fair booking. Even within their upgrade window and really they were kind of cut out from the opportunity opportunity so we really felt the need and obligation to action that feedback from these customers and then we moved to something. That's much more reflective of relative value value of our customers over a rolling twelve month period of time. I think one of the big things that has happened is like the multibillion dollar investment of most of the major airlines in the product. Right right so you know lie flat seats. There was real value their input into the product. And then frankly people have started paying more for those seats which I think ten years ago when I first started the points sky upgrades. I don't know what the percentages were airline but I'll especially domestically at Tanah people most of those flights or a lot of those people on those planes were we're getting a lead upgrades and Do you feel squeezed running the loyalty program. Now that there are more people paying for those seats to deliver on that promise to the members. I think we're in a good spot. Actually we've got first and foremost these are seats. That are for purchase right and really. The proposition has always been that if they should not prove to be sold that they're really the provided to those customers who have earned the benefit of the upgrade through consolidated into trouble with American Airlines and so while in certain cases really there's more more demand than there is supply of remaining seats without any argument. We feel like we're getting an ever better balance on being able to the direct purchase by customers because candidly. I get a lot of feedback. When we're sold out on the premium cabin and the customers I just want to buy it? And there's nothing available alongside those who would have loved to upgrade upgrade and it just wasn't there turn this time but when I look at results of upgrades Bryant remains quite lofty on success rates across all of Tares an executive platinum. One thing I do here talking to exact Platz is the system white upgrades and being able to use them. And we just saw united We just had luke bonder on this podcast. The day they announced plus points. which gives you know if you WANNA use double the amount of points now? You can confirm in advance. I would think think for exact plots confirming an advance a top priority and people have seen the availability in advance kind of dry up. Is that something that's GonNa Change or what. What are your insights on the exact system wides in so I- Offi? This upgrades have really been benefit. That really have outpunched their weight. They really Are Attractive and motivating to our customers and so for our system winds. They are quite different in industry-leading really in their design. And that you you know the may be available as soon as book them in all fair class types are eligible for the upgrade and alongside that. If you wish or choose to you may bestow that upon anyone and so we'd like the fact that they are transferable so you know for us Because of the importance of upgrades and how customers really do enjoy them even expect them. You know we're always underway with. How should we be thinking about this Again as the airline model itself continues to

American Airlines Brian United States Bridget Blaze Xintai Fort Worth Texas Graham Wayne Hockey Luke Bonder Bryant Executive
What's next for WeWork?

FT News

04:47 min | 3 years ago

What's next for WeWork?

"Today. We're taking a look at we work last week. We learned that one of the company's major investors scaled back a planned investment in the shared office provider. Softbank is detailing its bed on we work the Japanese conglomerate announced Monday, it's investing an additional two billion dollars in the co working start up a step back from the sixteen billion dollar investment. That would have given SoftBank a controlling stake. We work also announced last week that it's rebranding itself as the week company. VFAT's Eric Platz spoke with Andrew edge cliff Johnson about the implications of soft bank's decision, which might mean sooner than expected peo-, Eric. Can you set the scene? What exactly is we work? I'm what pitches would be making to investors. And so we work as rapidly growing property company that has really pitched itself as tech company. They now have offices in more than twenty countries. They have more than four hundred thousand office space users they like to call the members, and they're now generating more than two and a half billion dollars in revenue on an annualized basis. So it's nothing to scoff at and they're known for their office with Instagram art boutique, coffee beans, what are infused with grapefruit or raspberries. I've been to a few of them. It's all about kind of the community space and people interacting, and that's what they've the pits themselves to office tenants also to investors like J P Morgan tier price and fidelity that you know, this is not a drab office space or the traditional landlord that. You've message in the past. It will sell as much nicer than orifices. So this pitches clearly worked we works managed to raise enough money to become one of the world's most valuable private companies. But it starts to thousand nineteen with news of another major investment. And yet this one didn't have quite the same response. It seemed to raise more questions than previous rounds. What exactly happened it did? So at the end of last year, they were in really detailed negotiations with SoftBank and it Saudi-backed vision fund where the two were expected to invest about sixteen billion dollars into we work who's going to attain the same valuation of about forty two billion dollars. But what the Saudi backed vision from going to be doing was buying out. Earlier investors, like J P, Morgan Wellington and others. Now investors within the vision fund balked at this. They said, you know, this is a huge investment for what's actually not really a tech company, which is more a property company. At least that's how investors that we spoke to it's seen it. And so what ended up happening was SoftBank kind of started curtailing. Those discussions and at the same time they had an IPO of their mobile unit in Japan that went quite embarrassingly at dropped more than ten percents on its debut. And then at the same time, you saw tech shares broadly in the market declining. And suddenly SoftBank showed a lot more hesitancy than they did at the end of last year. So when they started this year, the sixteen billion dollars got slimmed down six billion dollars and evacuate them down to two billion dollars with really only half of that being a new investment into we work in the primary market where they're actually buying new sheriff's from the company and another billion of that is actually buying out, employees and other investors who are ready for an exit. And so while this did raise the valuation to forty two to forty seven billion dollars, depending on how you calculate it. It actually did raise a lot of questions about soft bank's willingness to invest billions dollars more into the company and so any private company of this scale. And we looks only about nine years old. This point will raise speculation that is going to have to public sooner or later, but particularly given that backdrop of weaker public markets way on soft buying Conway on. Speculations for what's a reasonable some money to put into a company like we would what does this do for expectations of possible? IPO of we would think this definitely changed the discussions within we work about how much runway they had as a private company because if SoftBank isn't going to be pumping billions of dollars more each year for the next few years into it to fund its losses. They're going to need to tap public investors at a certain point, and what they did last year was they raised seven hundred and two million dollars in public debt markets, and that was a way to both familiarize the market with we work and also to give them the kind of rigor of quarterly reporting standards, which is something Adam Newman has derided a bit as not long-term enough focused, but it has given the market and idea of what we work is it's familiarizing them with things like community adjusted EBITDA and other financial terms that they may not understand. And now it looks like just given that there's some nervousness about what SoftBank will keep putting in. They've really ready themselves for an IPO when we talked to sources booth in the company, that's what they've said. Whether they go this year or next year. That's an open question. I think they're gonna wanna see what happens with Uber lift companies, like Pailin tear and slack. That are ready to go before them to see how the market accepts their debut.

Softbank Eric Platz Japan Adam Newman Conway J P Cliff Johnson Morgan Wellington Andrew Sixteen Billion Dollars Two Billion Dollars Forty Seven Billion Dollars Forty Two Billion Dollars Sixteen Billion Dollar Six Billion Dollars Two Million Dollars Billion Dollars Nine Years
"platz" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

Izzy and Spain

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"platz" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

"I guess the most of them are actually like there the car by themselves. They might be like. I think that it's it's you know, it's it's red. If wanted stops being rather than you know deserve to have that anymore. It's really cool to get in the car and hear your song and turn on the TV. Hear your song. And I get the for some people. It's not called out to your hundred times. But for me, I love it. I mean, I don't know. Okay. What about the first time? You hear like the radio you mentioned that everybody talks about that. But the first time you hear your song on TV. That's gotta be a trip like even. Okay. When you have all the things you hear it on TV or you're like or you're like, oh, my own asked me about these things because when it comes on the radio in my car on streaming service is tricky because I do not listen to it. But I also don't want the algorithm to change where you know, someone didn't like our music. So I turned down all the way. I still have streaming. So that I guess. You are songs. The biggest band in the world is water. All the way by keeping going. Stage is often do you guys. Like a lot of people realize you mentioned film earlier Platz like a lot of people don't realize that you record shows from standpoint for whether it's your sound border. Whether it's video how you guys go back and watch your own performances and say, hey, we're we're no longer playing that song. We watched plenty of footage of ourselves. Especially at the beginning of tour. It's really important to watch the show. Make sure that production is like the way, I don't know. Like, it's the worst seat in the house for seeing the production. So we have to rely on video back. I was it was tricky on the road because you know, if you start flooding a little bit with which I will which I will. Events are taking some liberties everybody starts taking liberties, six months later, all of a sudden the songs totally different..

Platz six months
EU privacy law heralds new era in online data protection

All Things Considered

02:25 min | 3 years ago

EU privacy law heralds new era in online data protection

"This is all things considered i'm audie cornish and i'm ari shapiro tomorrow a wide reaching data protection law goes into effect in the european union it boosts people's right to privacy like never before partly by threatening fines of up to twenty three and a half million dollars the aim is to stop companies from exploiting personal data as npr's psoriasis are hiding nelson reports the law could lead to problems for people who like to snap photos with their phones a popular spot for picture taking here in the german capital is the berlin wall exhibited potsdamer platz given crowds you inevitably will end up with a few strangers in your photos to be a problem after friday when an easy law known as the general data protection regulation goes fully into effect especially if you are taking pictures european countries that haven't sought an exemption to include photography lors leak is a hamburg lawyer who specializes in photography law photography in my mind will have a big problem now says the new protection of individual privacy means that anyone who appears in a photograph taken in the eu has an absolute right to refuse to be enough photo especially if those pictures end up on social media and it's up to the person taking the picture to figure out whether subjects want to be in the photo or not if you have the consent of the person on your picture there's no problem you can use the picture but this consent has to be informed as they say so you have to tell the person in advance what you want to do with a picture and also a big drawback this consent can be taken back anytime proponents of the law acknowledged that getting informed consent to prove commerce for individuals will like to take pictures with their smartphones and post them online it's the point of the loss to protect people's privacy says berlin legislators stefan silla he's the green party's expert on digitalization just photos of silla predicts that despite the my law photography will largely continue to be protected as freedom of speech or artistic expression void check the rough ski who is the assistant european data protection supervisor adds that fears of draconian prosecution are overblown you should not expect that deduction prediction authorities will sit on twenty sixth of may.

Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro NPR Nelson Potsdamer Platz EU Stefan Silla Supervisor Berlin Hamburg Million Dollars