35 Burst results for "Plato"

The Hills are Alive

Your Brain on Facts

04:58 min | 6 d ago

The Hills are Alive

"It was an ambitious project that though it failed would become part of the iconography of a decade in september nineteen ninety one the first term residents moved in to biosphere to a three acre volume built to be an artificial materially closed ecological system biosphere one being the earth itself a texas oil billionaire. Funded it to study. How people might one day be able to manage a self sustaining ecosystem for life on mars. It proved to be a lot harder in practice than it was on paper. The oxygen levels would drop too low. The crew didn't really know how to grow crops for food. Their pollinator soon died out and the ants moved in not just any aunts crazy ants. My name's moxy and this is your brain on facts. They go marching to by two. They're the subject of to cgi movies from nineteen ninety. Eight and a picnic wouldn't be complete without them today. We're talking about ants. This topic comes to you by popular demand to social media comments an email. That's a new record. So thanks to rachel. A prodigious and kate from strange animals podcast. We really should think about ants more often than we do considering how many of them there are. I've often enjoyed dropping the fact that the ant population is equal to the human population by weight. But is it. The claim comes from one thousand nine hundred ninety four book journey to the ants by harvard university professor and a german biologist. They based their estimate on the estimate of a british entomologist who calculated that the number of insects alive on earth at any given moment was one million trillion. If ants make up one percent of the insect world that's ten thousand trillion according to the book individual workers weigh on average between one two five milligrams according to the species when combined all ants in the world taken together way about as much as all human beings. So if you're going to play on a seesaw with a bunch of ants you would need about a million of them on the other end to balance you out assuming you weigh sixty two kilos or about one hundred and thirty seven pounds which i will tell you. I don't with around thirteen thousand ant species worldwide. There comes a lot of variety. They range from smallest less than one millimeter long to over fifty millimeters or two inches. That's the aptly named titanic mira gigante so weights vary too but experts seem to agree the average weight of an ant is less than ten milligrams but even among experts. No one really knows how many aunts there are in the world. A bbc documentary claims. There are not ten trillion ants but one hundred trillion though it still suggests that the total weight of the ants equals the total weight of humans. Even by the author's own math their calculations are wrong. If we estimate that the seven point two billion humans on the planet weigh a combined three hundred and thirty two billion kilos or three hundred sixty six million tons and ten thousand trillion aunts weighing an average of four milligrams. Each we get only forty billion kilos or forty four million tonnes or about nine pounds of human for every pound of ants even if we allow for the smaller human population in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and the smaller humans. It's still back of napkin. Math at best one expert does say that the numbers might have inaccurate at one time. Probably about two hundred and fifty years ago. We must also remember that. Humans are getting fatter all the time. We're not just increasing in population we're increasing in fatness. So i think we've left the ants behind another way to try to wrap your head around. How many aunts there are is to look at the biomass of them. One of my favourite weird history and animated rant youtube channels sam annella compared the biomass of several animals and visualized them as spheres literal animal planet's for example. If all the blue whales in the world could be mushed together like plato. They'd make a spheroid about one hundred and forty meters or four hundred and fifty feet across blue. Whales are huge but there aren't very many of them. In contrast the chicken planet is more than twice that size three hundred and thirty meters or eleven hundred feet across their small. But we've read a lot of them. The math was tricky enough. What with trying to come up with a density for each animal. But sam found order of

Titanic Mira Gigante Harvard University Rachel Texas BBC Sam Annella Youtube
Interview With Petter Kukkonen

Physical Activity Researcher

05:43 min | Last week

Interview With Petter Kukkonen

"But so in ancient world we we cannot understand it without mentioning religion but we also cannot understand that without mentioning sophy and you are mentioning that our our hero of the of the story echoes. He lived at the same time as plato and aristotle and and you also have the scenes in your book where where these philosophers appear so would be exciting. You maybe share a little bit about those Those storylines in in the book before olympic games. Cenovate thirty on just Too which was the blaze were. Lotto's gymnasium was located on. They had them exhibition resting much. First alex against the abuse and then what was one of spectators and then he wanted to challenge alex unbuckle. He had a history of of competing in investing in infinite. Nothing olympic games but fee of this highly respected games in increase. So he was in real life also released. Strong restaurant denied. He was already sixty Sixty three years old so they they are they are having frosting matz with Afterwards having some wine. And i'm talking. I didn't bring any new philosophy of some kind of maine lies about his thinking. And then there's so so obvious double in young who'd think there are dates of seventeen or sixteen elected sixty couple of couple of years older than On spending about a pin. Im seven days long. Local mocha pick festival in offense. They're spending like going just the other an underground With wine about philosophy and so roaches or encounters with those two big names. And yeah you mentioned that. You didn't want to go into detail about the philosophy of plato aristotle. But i think it's quite a nice way of kind of tying in those historical figures which brings to the question that i didn't remember to ask yet was that did you have a character. All my historical character dot you draw inspiration from when you are building your your character aliko stories. He like a combination of different stories and sources. Or how how did you. How did he come to be as he is. He's for cirque combination of of different ideas. That are there must be bark of me. Thinking there is part of fiction My biggest hero in Cup all the up. His character person. I would say i have copied a face. He's characters he used in east books. So it's gonna fly combination of these three things. Yeah do we have any any stories that we have available about the athletes of those times. Do we have any sources about we know generally about sports than we know generally about the olympics but do we have any in his threes of those athletes. Who actually doing we do. Have something mostly bow. Stories out you know for some kremlin of millo. lexi's time a little bit cleaner. Howdy highly. it was like the cow in his shoulder and carried it for. I don't know thin stadiums and then drinking litres of wine after up on a leave some some rocks which sweater the weight of seven men at the start being reimbursing the time aura results in that time so interesting to compare results of Weekend we can do it just like fun. Sixers really absolute up spot At the start dates of or eight years something continued to adults for the mandela for fifty years old and For example tennessee. Something about pope sparked story about the guinness. He was a boxer and then also doing bankrupt and bunker weakened call. It's kind of a free fight. Which bills have the time. So he won't doing he sport cab your own or over. The only the big he had was due at one thousand four hundred together so if fast it's If he had liked wendy years don't carrier he had only hit the seventh beat the rockies three year so that was some kind of picture how how much they look a beating so totally professional athletes. Who train and then. They just pat time hopefully folk going for one competition to other. We must remember governor blames. Our cars drives up to use shapes. Our image travel hiked by themselves from from the states to another disincentive.

Alex Unbuckle Sophy Plato Aristotle Matz Maine Lexi Howdy Olympics Sixers Pope Tennessee Wendy Rockies
The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

Short Wave

07:52 min | 3 weeks ago

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

"Colin purring in Pennsylvania wanted the world to know about his accidental fungal experiments involving twinkies. So what happened next? So he posted photos on twitter and they were seen by two scientists, Brian Love it and Matt Casson at West Virginia University, they study Fungi Casson says fungi are everywhere and they have this amazing ability to break down all kinds of substances. Fungi growing on jet fuel. Wow. So he means fungi can grow on pretty much anything and everything. Yeah and in the past their lab has tested how well they grow in peeps. You know that classic marshmallow tree tour hasn't says fungi found the peace challenging because you know they don't have a lot of water in them in a way they're kind of like an extreme environment, right? The food industry has crafted the ability to to make foods that have a long shelf life. You know I could test that out right now I got some old peeps in my house my kid. Kept from Easter like years ago. But anyway back to the twinkies. So these researchers were intrigued by Collins Posts on twitter and Colin was only too happy to mail his twinkies right to their lab. They suspected that whatever had mummified the twinkie was some kind of fungus but they wanted to confirm that and then find out exactly what kind of fungus. Okay. So twinkie mummy gets shipped to the lab obviously, they had to open it up. I'm guessing and as I look at the photo, the plastic wrapping around the shriveled twinkie looks like it's been vacuum-sealed like it sucked inward like. Right right. So the scientists thought maybe the fungus got in before the package was sealed, and then as it grew the fungus was using up more air or oxygen than it was putting out I mean, here's how love it described it. You end up with a document. And very well, vacuum may have halted. The fungus is ability to continue to grow We have the snapshot of what we were sent but who knows if this process occurred five years ago and he just only noticed it now yeah five years that's forty times the shelf life of a twinkie in eternity for twinkie anyway they had expected this horrific smelled hit them. When they opened the packaging, the smell would possibly kill one of us. But because of them of -cation there there really was no smell at all, which was really a pleasant surprise. So twinkie mommy is unwrapped smells like nothing what happened next? Well, they took a quick look with a magnifying scope and Juhasz some signs of fungal spore formation on the twinkie. So that suggested a fungus of some kind and the next step was to take a sample. So casting used a bone biopsy tool to sort of drill through the tough outer layer of this grey mummified twinkie, we certainly hit the marrow of the twinkie and quickly realized that there was still some. Cream filling on the inside. So, the inside was still cream-filled. Yeah that was a surprise they thought it would be sort of hard all the way through of it says, whatever did this to the twinkie it seems that the fungus was more interested in the cake on the outside. Then the filling on the inside see, this is a smart fungus because cake is clearly the superior part of the twinkie same with Orios same with cupcakes. You know what I'm talking about right now I don't know to me. It's like the combination of two things that's key. So I can't really separate them in my mind. That's fair I. Accept that. So the scientists have taken samples from the twinkie, do they go about determining what kind of fungus growing on it? They actually sampled multiple twinkies. Okay. So one was the mummified twinkie we've been talking about the other was the second twinkie from Collins box that was not mummified. The one that was just you know marred, it had that weird little blemish on the outside of it, and then they had this control scientific experiment they need scientific control, which was a what they called an as symptomatic twinkie from the same box. So they put those samples into lab dishes with nutrients commonly used to grow fungi, and from that little blemish twinkie the one. With just the little. Marc, they were able to grow a very common indoor fungus called Klee does sport him common indoor fungus, right? It's one of the most common airborne molds worldwide. Okay. So what about from the mummified twinkie? Okay. So that's where it gets even more interesting. Love. It says, they have not been able to grow any fungus from that particular sample. It may be that we don't have any living spores on store certainly dying depending on the fungus they could I very quickly and remember because the twinkie had been sort of vacuum sealed by whatever was going on there. You know it seems like it couldn't grow anymore inside it's wrapping. So there's truly perhaps no life in this twinkie. Well, the scientists you know weren't going to let that stop them they. Samples from both the marred and the mummified twinkies and he sent off to DNA sequencing company and twelve hours. Later, they got the results back the mark twinkie was a ninety nine point six percent matched to a fungus called close Boreham zeile film. The mummified twinkie was eighty one percent to a closely related clear does for him species. Plato's Boreham Tenuous Sim. CASSON's says DNA from the mummified twinkie was pretty degraded. So they actually probably are the same fungus. I'm so amazed they were able to identify these fungi from these twinkies. It is the mystery of the twinkie over I remain confident that science will continue already one researcher Kate Wallace at the University of Illinois contacted them and asked for a bit of the mummified that she wants to put in a scanning electron microscope. One that can get really really close. Up Images and hopefully you know see something cool and Kasim says he's not turning his lab entirely over to twinkie studies but you know they could still do some more research. We thought about inoculating some healthy twinkies with some cletus forum may be doing some transplants with the bone marrow biopsy tool where we replace a healthy plug with a fungus colonize plug. And see what happens from there. This twinkie line of research is just relentless. There's so many of questions still I mean what's the overall moral of the story here that you can try to hold onto the past but nothing gold can stay not even a twinkie well, that's one moral I mean another moral of the story is that Colin, purring ten should've listened to his mother and had more respect for expiration dates but you know people are really drawn to this myth that twinkies are immortal. I should mention we did reach out to hostess brands for comment on this story and I have not heard back from them at all You know the mummy twinkie is this different kind. Of disturbing vision of what the future could hold for twinkies and you know for all of us I mean Matt and says, this story seems to be gripping for people maybe because the grey mummified twinkie is such a dramatic contrast to this golden iconic twinkie that lives in our memories when those memories are tainted by like a visual reality like the twinkie experiment, we're kind of like caught off guard and we're like wait no, that's a symbol of my childhood. You can't take that from me to. So basically, like you said, emily, nothing lasts forever. You know here's Brian Love again, we're living in a time where we're all really grappling with our mortality eventually, all of us are future fungi. On. Seeing. That is sort of facing the the reality. Of. Holly and Our destination now, I did not expect a twinkie experiment to be a meditation on the human. Condition

Fungi Casson Colin Brian Love Twitter Pennsylvania Hostess Brands West Virginia University Plato Collins Orios Emily University Of Illinois Holly Marc Kasim Researcher
The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

Short Wave

07:52 min | 3 weeks ago

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

"Colin purring in Pennsylvania wanted the world to know about his accidental fungal experiments involving twinkies. So what happened next? So he posted photos on twitter and they were seen by two scientists, Brian Love it and Matt Casson at West Virginia University, they study Fungi Casson says fungi are everywhere and they have this amazing ability to break down all kinds of substances. Fungi growing on jet fuel. Wow. So he means fungi can grow on pretty much anything and everything. Yeah and in the past their lab has tested how well they grow in peeps. You know that classic marshmallow tree tour hasn't says fungi found the peace challenging because you know they don't have a lot of water in them in a way they're kind of like an extreme environment, right? The food industry has crafted the ability to to make foods that have a long shelf life. You know I could test that out right now I got some old peeps in my house my kid. Kept from Easter like years ago. But anyway back to the twinkies. So these researchers were intrigued by Collins Posts on twitter and Colin was only too happy to mail his twinkies right to their lab. They suspected that whatever had mummified the twinkie was some kind of fungus but they wanted to confirm that and then find out exactly what kind of fungus. Okay. So twinkie mummy gets shipped to the lab obviously, they had to open it up. I'm guessing and as I look at the photo, the plastic wrapping around the shriveled twinkie looks like it's been vacuum-sealed like it sucked inward like. Right right. So the scientists thought maybe the fungus got in before the package was sealed, and then as it grew the fungus was using up more air or oxygen than it was putting out I mean, here's how love it described it. You end up with a document. And very well, vacuum may have halted. The fungus is ability to continue to grow We have the snapshot of what we were sent but who knows if this process occurred five years ago and he just only noticed it now yeah five years that's forty times the shelf life of a twinkie in eternity for twinkie anyway they had expected this horrific smelled hit them. When they opened the packaging, the smell would possibly kill one of us. But because of them of -cation there there really was no smell at all, which was really a pleasant surprise. So twinkie mommy is unwrapped smells like nothing what happened next? Well, they took a quick look with a magnifying scope and Juhasz some signs of fungal spore formation on the twinkie. So that suggested a fungus of some kind and the next step was to take a sample. So casting used a bone biopsy tool to sort of drill through the tough outer layer of this grey mummified twinkie, we certainly hit the marrow of the twinkie and quickly realized that there was still some. Cream filling on the inside. So, the inside was still cream-filled. Yeah that was a surprise they thought it would be sort of hard all the way through of it says, whatever did this to the twinkie it seems that the fungus was more interested in the cake on the outside. Then the filling on the inside see, this is a smart fungus because cake is clearly the superior part of the twinkie same with Orios same with cupcakes. You know what I'm talking about right now I don't know to me. It's like the combination of two things that's key. So I can't really separate them in my mind. That's fair I. Accept that. So the scientists have taken samples from the twinkie, do they go about determining what kind of fungus growing on it? They actually sampled multiple twinkies. Okay. So one was the mummified twinkie we've been talking about the other was the second twinkie from Collins box that was not mummified. The one that was just you know marred, it had that weird little blemish on the outside of it, and then they had this control scientific experiment they need scientific control, which was a what they called an as symptomatic twinkie from the same box. So they put those samples into lab dishes with nutrients commonly used to grow fungi, and from that little blemish twinkie the one. With just the little. Marc, they were able to grow a very common indoor fungus called Klee does sport him common indoor fungus, right? It's one of the most common airborne molds worldwide. Okay. So what about from the mummified twinkie? Okay. So that's where it gets even more interesting. Love. It says, they have not been able to grow any fungus from that particular sample. It may be that we don't have any living spores on store certainly dying depending on the fungus they could I very quickly and remember because the twinkie had been sort of vacuum sealed by whatever was going on there. You know it seems like it couldn't grow anymore inside it's wrapping. So there's truly perhaps no life in this twinkie. Well, the scientists you know weren't going to let that stop them they. Samples from both the marred and the mummified twinkies and he sent off to DNA sequencing company and twelve hours. Later, they got the results back the mark twinkie was a ninety nine point six percent matched to a fungus called close Boreham zeile film. The mummified twinkie was eighty one percent to a closely related clear does for him species. Plato's Boreham Tenuous Sim. CASSON's says DNA from the mummified twinkie was pretty degraded. So they actually probably are the same fungus. I'm so amazed they were able to identify these fungi from these twinkies. It is the mystery of the twinkie over I remain confident that science will continue already one researcher Kate Wallace at the University of Illinois contacted them and asked for a bit of the mummified that she wants to put in a scanning electron microscope. One that can get really really close. Up Images and hopefully you know see something cool and Kasim says he's not turning his lab entirely over to twinkie studies but you know they could still do some more research. We thought about inoculating some healthy twinkies with some cletus forum may be doing some transplants with the bone marrow biopsy tool where we replace a healthy plug with a fungus colonize plug. And see what happens from there. This twinkie line of research is just relentless. There's so many of questions still I mean what's the overall moral of the story here that you can try to hold onto the past but nothing gold can stay not even a twinkie well, that's one moral I mean another moral of the story is that Colin, purring ten should've listened to his mother and had more respect for expiration dates but you know people are really drawn to this myth that twinkies are immortal. I should mention we did reach out to hostess brands for comment on this story and I have not heard back from them at all You know the mummy twinkie is this different kind. Of disturbing vision of what the future could hold for twinkies and you know for all of us I mean Matt and says, this story seems to be gripping for people maybe because the grey mummified twinkie is such a dramatic contrast to this golden iconic twinkie that lives in our memories when those memories are tainted by like a visual reality like the twinkie experiment, we're kind of like caught off guard and we're like wait no, that's a symbol of my childhood. You can't take that from me to. So basically, like you said, emily, nothing lasts forever. You know here's Brian Love again, we're living in a time where we're all really grappling with our mortality eventually, all of us are future fungi. On. Seeing. That is sort of facing the the reality. Of. Holly and Our destination now, I did not expect a twinkie experiment to be a meditation on the human. Condition

Fungi Casson Colin Brian Love Twitter Pennsylvania Hostess Brands West Virginia University Plato Collins Orios Emily University Of Illinois Holly Marc Kasim Researcher
The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

Short Wave

07:52 min | 3 weeks ago

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

"Colin purring in Pennsylvania wanted the world to know about his accidental fungal experiments involving twinkies. So what happened next? So he posted photos on twitter and they were seen by two scientists, Brian Love it and Matt Casson at West Virginia University, they study Fungi Casson says fungi are everywhere and they have this amazing ability to break down all kinds of substances. Fungi growing on jet fuel. Wow. So he means fungi can grow on pretty much anything and everything. Yeah and in the past their lab has tested how well they grow in peeps. You know that classic marshmallow tree tour hasn't says fungi found the peace challenging because you know they don't have a lot of water in them in a way they're kind of like an extreme environment, right? The food industry has crafted the ability to to make foods that have a long shelf life. You know I could test that out right now I got some old peeps in my house my kid. Kept from Easter like years ago. But anyway back to the twinkies. So these researchers were intrigued by Collins Posts on twitter and Colin was only too happy to mail his twinkies right to their lab. They suspected that whatever had mummified the twinkie was some kind of fungus but they wanted to confirm that and then find out exactly what kind of fungus. Okay. So twinkie mummy gets shipped to the lab obviously, they had to open it up. I'm guessing and as I look at the photo, the plastic wrapping around the shriveled twinkie looks like it's been vacuum-sealed like it sucked inward like. Right right. So the scientists thought maybe the fungus got in before the package was sealed, and then as it grew the fungus was using up more air or oxygen than it was putting out I mean, here's how love it described it. You end up with a document. And very well, vacuum may have halted. The fungus is ability to continue to grow We have the snapshot of what we were sent but who knows if this process occurred five years ago and he just only noticed it now yeah five years that's forty times the shelf life of a twinkie in eternity for twinkie anyway they had expected this horrific smelled hit them. When they opened the packaging, the smell would possibly kill one of us. But because of them of -cation there there really was no smell at all, which was really a pleasant surprise. So twinkie mommy is unwrapped smells like nothing what happened next? Well, they took a quick look with a magnifying scope and Juhasz some signs of fungal spore formation on the twinkie. So that suggested a fungus of some kind and the next step was to take a sample. So casting used a bone biopsy tool to sort of drill through the tough outer layer of this grey mummified twinkie, we certainly hit the marrow of the twinkie and quickly realized that there was still some. Cream filling on the inside. So, the inside was still cream-filled. Yeah that was a surprise they thought it would be sort of hard all the way through of it says, whatever did this to the twinkie it seems that the fungus was more interested in the cake on the outside. Then the filling on the inside see, this is a smart fungus because cake is clearly the superior part of the twinkie same with Orios same with cupcakes. You know what I'm talking about right now I don't know to me. It's like the combination of two things that's key. So I can't really separate them in my mind. That's fair I. Accept that. So the scientists have taken samples from the twinkie, do they go about determining what kind of fungus growing on it? They actually sampled multiple twinkies. Okay. So one was the mummified twinkie we've been talking about the other was the second twinkie from Collins box that was not mummified. The one that was just you know marred, it had that weird little blemish on the outside of it, and then they had this control scientific experiment they need scientific control, which was a what they called an as symptomatic twinkie from the same box. So they put those samples into lab dishes with nutrients commonly used to grow fungi, and from that little blemish twinkie the one. With just the little. Marc, they were able to grow a very common indoor fungus called Klee does sport him common indoor fungus, right? It's one of the most common airborne molds worldwide. Okay. So what about from the mummified twinkie? Okay. So that's where it gets even more interesting. Love. It says, they have not been able to grow any fungus from that particular sample. It may be that we don't have any living spores on store certainly dying depending on the fungus they could I very quickly and remember because the twinkie had been sort of vacuum sealed by whatever was going on there. You know it seems like it couldn't grow anymore inside it's wrapping. So there's truly perhaps no life in this twinkie. Well, the scientists you know weren't going to let that stop them they. Samples from both the marred and the mummified twinkies and he sent off to DNA sequencing company and twelve hours. Later, they got the results back the mark twinkie was a ninety nine point six percent matched to a fungus called close Boreham zeile film. The mummified twinkie was eighty one percent to a closely related clear does for him species. Plato's Boreham Tenuous Sim. CASSON's says DNA from the mummified twinkie was pretty degraded. So they actually probably are the same fungus. I'm so amazed they were able to identify these fungi from these twinkies. It is the mystery of the twinkie over I remain confident that science will continue already one researcher Kate Wallace at the University of Illinois contacted them and asked for a bit of the mummified that she wants to put in a scanning electron microscope. One that can get really really close. Up Images and hopefully you know see something cool and Kasim says he's not turning his lab entirely over to twinkie studies but you know they could still do some more research. We thought about inoculating some healthy twinkies with some cletus forum may be doing some transplants with the bone marrow biopsy tool where we replace a healthy plug with a fungus colonize plug. And see what happens from there. This twinkie line of research is just relentless. There's so many of questions still I mean what's the overall moral of the story here that you can try to hold onto the past but nothing gold can stay not even a twinkie well, that's one moral I mean another moral of the story is that Colin, purring ten should've listened to his mother and had more respect for expiration dates but you know people are really drawn to this myth that twinkies are immortal. I should mention we did reach out to hostess brands for comment on this story and I have not heard back from them at all You know the mummy twinkie is this different kind. Of disturbing vision of what the future could hold for twinkies and you know for all of us I mean Matt and says, this story seems to be gripping for people maybe because the grey mummified twinkie is such a dramatic contrast to this golden iconic twinkie that lives in our memories when those memories are tainted by like a visual reality like the twinkie experiment, we're kind of like caught off guard and we're like wait no, that's a symbol of my childhood. You can't take that from me to. So basically, like you said, emily, nothing lasts forever. You know here's Brian Love again, we're living in a time where we're all really grappling with our mortality eventually, all of us are future fungi. On. Seeing. That is sort of facing the the reality. Of. Holly and Our destination now, I did not expect a twinkie experiment to be a meditation on the human. Condition

Fungi Casson Colin Brian Love Twitter Pennsylvania Hostess Brands West Virginia University Plato Collins Orios Emily University Of Illinois Holly Marc Kasim Researcher
The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

Short Wave

07:52 min | 3 weeks ago

The Mystery Of The Mummified Twinkie

"Colin purring in Pennsylvania wanted the world to know about his accidental fungal experiments involving twinkies. So what happened next? So he posted photos on twitter and they were seen by two scientists, Brian Love it and Matt Casson at West Virginia University, they study Fungi Casson says fungi are everywhere and they have this amazing ability to break down all kinds of substances. Fungi growing on jet fuel. Wow. So he means fungi can grow on pretty much anything and everything. Yeah and in the past their lab has tested how well they grow in peeps. You know that classic marshmallow tree tour hasn't says fungi found the peace challenging because you know they don't have a lot of water in them in a way they're kind of like an extreme environment, right? The food industry has crafted the ability to to make foods that have a long shelf life. You know I could test that out right now I got some old peeps in my house my kid. Kept from Easter like years ago. But anyway back to the twinkies. So these researchers were intrigued by Collins Posts on twitter and Colin was only too happy to mail his twinkies right to their lab. They suspected that whatever had mummified the twinkie was some kind of fungus but they wanted to confirm that and then find out exactly what kind of fungus. Okay. So twinkie mummy gets shipped to the lab obviously, they had to open it up. I'm guessing and as I look at the photo, the plastic wrapping around the shriveled twinkie looks like it's been vacuum-sealed like it sucked inward like. Right right. So the scientists thought maybe the fungus got in before the package was sealed, and then as it grew the fungus was using up more air or oxygen than it was putting out I mean, here's how love it described it. You end up with a document. And very well, vacuum may have halted. The fungus is ability to continue to grow We have the snapshot of what we were sent but who knows if this process occurred five years ago and he just only noticed it now yeah five years that's forty times the shelf life of a twinkie in eternity for twinkie anyway they had expected this horrific smelled hit them. When they opened the packaging, the smell would possibly kill one of us. But because of them of -cation there there really was no smell at all, which was really a pleasant surprise. So twinkie mommy is unwrapped smells like nothing what happened next? Well, they took a quick look with a magnifying scope and Juhasz some signs of fungal spore formation on the twinkie. So that suggested a fungus of some kind and the next step was to take a sample. So casting used a bone biopsy tool to sort of drill through the tough outer layer of this grey mummified twinkie, we certainly hit the marrow of the twinkie and quickly realized that there was still some. Cream filling on the inside. So, the inside was still cream-filled. Yeah that was a surprise they thought it would be sort of hard all the way through of it says, whatever did this to the twinkie it seems that the fungus was more interested in the cake on the outside. Then the filling on the inside see, this is a smart fungus because cake is clearly the superior part of the twinkie same with Orios same with cupcakes. You know what I'm talking about right now I don't know to me. It's like the combination of two things that's key. So I can't really separate them in my mind. That's fair I. Accept that. So the scientists have taken samples from the twinkie, do they go about determining what kind of fungus growing on it? They actually sampled multiple twinkies. Okay. So one was the mummified twinkie we've been talking about the other was the second twinkie from Collins box that was not mummified. The one that was just you know marred, it had that weird little blemish on the outside of it, and then they had this control scientific experiment they need scientific control, which was a what they called an as symptomatic twinkie from the same box. So they put those samples into lab dishes with nutrients commonly used to grow fungi, and from that little blemish twinkie the one. With just the little. Marc, they were able to grow a very common indoor fungus called Klee does sport him common indoor fungus, right? It's one of the most common airborne molds worldwide. Okay. So what about from the mummified twinkie? Okay. So that's where it gets even more interesting. Love. It says, they have not been able to grow any fungus from that particular sample. It may be that we don't have any living spores on store certainly dying depending on the fungus they could I very quickly and remember because the twinkie had been sort of vacuum sealed by whatever was going on there. You know it seems like it couldn't grow anymore inside it's wrapping. So there's truly perhaps no life in this twinkie. Well, the scientists you know weren't going to let that stop them they. Samples from both the marred and the mummified twinkies and he sent off to DNA sequencing company and twelve hours. Later, they got the results back the mark twinkie was a ninety nine point six percent matched to a fungus called close Boreham zeile film. The mummified twinkie was eighty one percent to a closely related clear does for him species. Plato's Boreham Tenuous Sim. CASSON's says DNA from the mummified twinkie was pretty degraded. So they actually probably are the same fungus. I'm so amazed they were able to identify these fungi from these twinkies. It is the mystery of the twinkie over I remain confident that science will continue already one researcher Kate Wallace at the University of Illinois contacted them and asked for a bit of the mummified that she wants to put in a scanning electron microscope. One that can get really really close. Up Images and hopefully you know see something cool and Kasim says he's not turning his lab entirely over to twinkie studies but you know they could still do some more research. We thought about inoculating some healthy twinkies with some cletus forum may be doing some transplants with the bone marrow biopsy tool where we replace a healthy plug with a fungus colonize plug. And see what happens from there. This twinkie line of research is just relentless. There's so many of questions still I mean what's the overall moral of the story here that you can try to hold onto the past but nothing gold can stay not even a twinkie well, that's one moral I mean another moral of the story is that Colin, purring ten should've listened to his mother and had more respect for expiration dates but you know people are really drawn to this myth that twinkies are immortal. I should mention we did reach out to hostess brands for comment on this story and I have not heard back from them at all You know the mummy twinkie is this different kind. Of disturbing vision of what the future could hold for twinkies and you know for all of us I mean Matt and says, this story seems to be gripping for people maybe because the grey mummified twinkie is such a dramatic contrast to this golden iconic twinkie that lives in our memories when those memories are tainted by like a visual reality like the twinkie experiment, we're kind of like caught off guard and we're like wait no, that's a symbol of my childhood. You can't take that from me to. So basically, like you said, emily, nothing lasts forever. You know here's Brian Love again, we're living in a time where we're all really grappling with our mortality eventually, all of us are future fungi. On. Seeing. That is sort of facing the the reality. Of. Holly and Our destination now, I did not expect a twinkie experiment to be a meditation on the human. Condition

Fungi Casson Colin Brian Love Twitter Pennsylvania Hostess Brands West Virginia University Plato Collins Orios Emily University Of Illinois Holly Marc Kasim Researcher
"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

05:22 min | 2 months ago

"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

"Make a wonderful impression on our memories for I'm not sure that I could remember all the divorce of yesterday, but I should not be surprised if I forgot any of those things which I've heard very long ago. Hm. So basically you're saying I probably I probably forgot some of the stuff we talked about yesterday with the ideal stay home. But only just told them I remember when was ten years old. Yeah fourteen years old or whatever it was. Yeah, so in the thing too just as far like memory cuz a lot of this has to do with like people will say a lot of this has to do with criticism memory and how how like good his memory is and this an old man and this kind of gets into it's just maybe we should talk about real quick Plato's idea of knowledge. So in the dialogue, meno Plato introduces off this concept for him, he introduces the concept of immortal soul and he does it by having he has Socrates walk a slave through solving a geometric problems and his like the moral of this whole story is that the slave knew this information all along. He just had to remember it he knew it because the soul was Immortal his soul at some point learned this information at some point in the life of the soul and the boy just had to work remember this information from his soul so Using reason right? He's using by using. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah or just buy like thinking and like thinking about your memory and then like looking into your soul. Yeah, but like to play no knowledge of memory in some way. It's right like like the the ability to recall is what can lead to knowledge. So some people will will latch onto this idea of critias maybe not having a good memory as maybe kind of throwing a wrench into the story and I think from Plato's point of view the fact that he had to think and remember the story may be seen as like a virtue for the story like right like he's saying this is a story that this person actually holding the knowledge. There are pulling Knowledge from themselves. Yes, I think that's kind of what he's saying. They're at least that's my boss. Okay? Yeah. My take on the on the knowledge thing was that by using reason like you would use like Socrates would use the the question-and-answer thing to kind of like the witness in a way but but using the witnesses own reason so that ultimately by asking a series of questions the witness would or I would say witnessed but the person who's questioning dead arrive at the right answers, even though previously he didn't actually know that information. He was just LED there and having to use his own reason and answering the questions arrived at the at the right answer Choice. Yep, and wonder who's going to convince a person of a thing themselves or someone else? Yeah themselves..

Plato Socrates
"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

04:55 min | 2 months ago

"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

"So if the Egyptians were referring to somebody as larger than liberate a game, It might have meant more powerful than our two longtime enemies put together. Oh gotcha. Yeah, I mean point so there's there's so many different ways to read this whole section. Yeah and and the surrounding thing I've always thought, you know, because you thinking about it on a map, but if you put this if you put you put your image on a globe, you know, cuz I'm not flat earth right wage the image on a globe and then you do see that the North American continent pretty much literally if it's on the globe is surrounding the Atlantic see the Atlantic Ocean. Yeah, right so suck it it but you're right that you know, there's all kinds of issues here on what what do they mean with size? And what does he mean by surround and when we're talking about C does he mean ocean is this like a euphemism, you know, so yeah. Yeah, I take your point that there's interesting problems and questions with this section. Yeah, I guess that's my only point is I personally just for full disclosure. I don't have a like favorite Atlantis location. I don't have like a spot. I think that so I don't necessarily have a preferred way of reading all this like it could be the Atlantic Ocean he's talking about but I also don't think it's out of the question. He's talking about the Mediterranean either. So, you know, if the levels or lower the Mediterranean could even present itself as like different even if you look at the Mediterranean now it almost seems like different sees there's like a western scene and Eastern suit. Yep. So out of it, I don't know it's just there's a lot of different ways of reading this particular ocean. Another thing it would be like, what would the Mediterranean look like? If the Seas were four hundred feet lower? Yeah. Would it be even took have water in it? Yeah. Well would they be connected between East and West yeah, exactly. That's yeah. Yeah. Yeah, you know, these are all I'm pretty sure. I don't know a ton about Iraq. During the last ice age. I think they're the last item added traded went through like a salinity crisis because the levels kept getting lower. Yeah, cuz it wasn't getting water inflow from the ocean. Yeah, I could be misremembering that but yeah, I guess this is one of those things where I seem to remember I thought I remembered something where there was the idea that it might have been dry at some point and then there was an inflow and inflow basically like that same thing collapsed. Yeah. Yes. It was lower than sea level. Yeah, but dry and then whatever the Overflow from the rising oceans eventually just took it in. Yeah. I'm trying to remember what that was. I remember. So anyway, so another another thing and this isn't a translation issue..

Atlantic Ocean Mediterranean Iraq Eastern suit
"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

05:31 min | 2 months ago

"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

"You are welcome to hear about them salons to the priesthood for both for your sake and for that of your city and above all for the sake of the goddess who is common Patron and parent and educator of both our cities she found in your city a thousand years before ours received from the earth and Hephaestus the seed of your race and afterwards she found in ours of which the Constitution has recorded in our secret registers to be a thousand years old as touching your citizens of nine thousand years ago. Briefly inform you of their laws and of their most famous action the exact particulars of the whole we will thereafter go through at our own Leisure and the sacred registers themselves. So I'm just real quick the the part about there's one thing here first, which is that he's he's he says that the Constitution and our sacred registers off the 8,000 years old one common misunderstanding about the the Atlanta story is people will often think that Plato says Egypt was found at eight thousand years ago, but the way I read this is saying would you say syas or say us? What's the price her? Sorry. Yeah, the way I read it is you're saying size was founded a thousand years ago cuz he specifically talking about she founded your city a thousand years before hours. Yeah, and then she found it ours. Yeah. Yes. So a lot. I don't know. see a lot of people saying well Plato says Egypt was founded after Athens, Georgia. Sing and to me I'm not I don't read it though. read it as he's saying that size was founded after Athens. Yeah, that particular city is 8000 years old and and Thursday is 1000 years older than that. So nine thousand years. Yeah, that makes sense to me. I see an additional that Plato himself and other works and dial zero called laws talks about Egypt being more than ten thousand years old. Yeah Egypt itself not size. So, you know cuz he talks about like there aren't staying the same for like, you know vast period of time or whatever..

Egypt Plato Athens Atlanta Georgia
"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

02:43 min | 2 months ago

"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

"That's not actually a tree a tree is one thing our perception of it is something else so that that's kind of what it made me think of there is the real thing itself which we can't actually fully perceive fully understand because we're dealing with perception, you know in a physical world. So yeah. Well, that's I think that's mean, that's exactly we're I guess she gets in there like his sort of unified theory of whatever but the soul is is part of that. So the soul can observe these pure forms, but the soul in the body. Yeah, like it's being filtered through these perceptions and in the end the what he saw the forms as is like like math. So the only way you could actually represent them pure idea of the forms would be through numbers through the purity of numbers. And this is like you're talking about rush like the geometric like you can draw something or you can can conceptualize something perfectly but You draw it out and it's not going to be perfectly if I can be perfect. Right? So the only way the thing it can be perfect is the conceptual pure mathematics version of the form and that's kind of what I think that's what I get from his theory of the forms essentially is like the only way you could have the pure thing is to get down to the actual mathematics of it there actual representation of it off. Yeah, that's interesting. Especially if you start thinking of things like Souls I mean or virtue like, how do you what's the math to describe virtue? Yeah. Exactly. Yeah, that's those are questions. He actually never got to the point of answering but yeah. No, I mean those are all it gets into this whole other realm of essentially. Yeah, like no phone number based philosophy. Yeah, and that gets into like the Pythagorean influence on Socrates and Plato as well. So the Pythagorean stuff it off. For a long time like Aristotle who was Plato's went to Plato's disciples Aristotle talked about Pythagoras having an influence or worth being influenced by the Pythagorean School. Hm but that have kind of gone out of style more recently just because there isn't necessarily a lot of talk of Pythagorean specifically in the dialogues. They're here there. There's some talk about the public and then to me it says a lot of it but it's not it's not necessarily like Plato is always talking about the pythagoreans. But if you if you kind of and I'm not certainly an expert on Pythagorean stuff at all, but I've read a lot of stuff on people who are and they when say when they look at Plato's dialogues from a Pythagorean perspective..

Plato Pythagorean School Aristotle
"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

02:40 min | 2 months ago

"plato" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

"The height of this Athenian post Persian War boom. We're Athens is you know, they're building stuff all over the place. There. They got wealth coming in all over the place. And so Socrates are seeing like all these, you know, all these different things things changing plus all this art happening to there's just play as being written all over the place. It's just it's this whole boom time of Athens, Georgia. Basically Classical Greece is Kris. This is the birth of Classical Greece is after the after the Persian War. So Socrates gets this, you know reputation as this sort of you know guy who's just always going around talking to people about stuff and you know, but the conception most people get up an hour that that's presented by Plato and presented by Academia is that he just asked questions. So he was interested in virtue primarily questions of virtue converts should be taught what is virtue different elements of virtue like Faith courage these things but there's other thoughts on that as well. You guys listen to a podcast about as Tiffany's the clouds. Yep, which presents Socrates in a completely off lights. Yeah for some Socrates as someone who very much as interested in you know questions concerning the cosmos questions concerning, you know, the origin of Life questions concerning the soul. So this kind of thing about who is Socrates is sort of a big question in Socratic and platonic stock studies. So Plato was a disciple Socrates. So to speak Socrates died in like 399. Plato was born sometime in the four twenties. So he didn't spend that much of his life with Socrates before he died, but he was certainly a you know, one of his one of his disciples before that happened and he picked up a lot from Socrates, but the question I always kind of is What part of the platonic dialogues are Play-Doh and what parts are Socrates right like Socrates is the main character essentially in all the dialogues. So, you know is Plato just using this as a mouthpiece so that he can you know do his own philosophy or is these things that Socrates Plato and that Plato's now kind of passing on Plato's dialogues them selves get kind of divided into three three different types of dialogues and there's sometimes considered these sounds like it's sometimes considered a chronology. There's there's like early dialogues middle of dialogues late dialogues and it's possible. They are chronological but there's really no evidence for when the dialogues are written..

Socrates Plato Athens Greece Tiffany Georgia Academia
"plato" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

07:26 min | 2 months ago

"plato" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

"How we could kind of rain an appetite in a productive way plato really took this metaphor. Seriously, he saw it as illuminating because he recognized what contemporary science has recognized, which is a big part of human beings is non human beings that is a big part of ourselves, our animals. So Plato basically recognized that the best way to deal with the parts of ourselves that are like animals is by dealing with them in the way that we deal with things that are animals. So imagine you have a dog and you don't want the dog to eat some delicious kind of food. The best way to keep the dog from eating that food is not to put the food in front of the dog. The second best way might be to put a muzzle on the dog and you're very last choice is going to be to try to train up your dog so that he doesn't give in to that temptation supply Plato had the same insight with regard to human beings themselves if you WANNA keep. The horse of uptight the part of yourself it's tempted the best ideas to avoid temptations if you can't do that. Then when you're in the presence of temptations, you should keep yourself from looking at them and only in the most difficult situations where you can't keep the temptations away and you can't keep your attention away from the temptations only then should you try to do it through certain kinds of self control and this? Is Super Important, right because I think one of the things that Plato is saying to us is that it's not gonNa work to try to control our appetite just through reflective processes alone right like just repeatedly telling myself like I I'm unhappiness expert like I should get up in the morning like work workout like that doesn't work as well. Right like I need cues to remind me to work I need to have. My shoes out I need to have my gratitude journal where I can see it. I need to pretend like this appetite part of me is like a dog that I'm basically trying to train in the simplest way. Possible right and eighty is in many ways literally true that is the things that are attracting you to food smells tempting are the exact same features of your brain that non human animal has that's attracting it. To food that smells excellent and in fact, there's a very good reason for it. We've evolved to be responsive to food that provides nutrition to us, and Plato's point is in many ways. There's nothing you can do about the fact that you will feel tempted. So your job is to figure out to the extent that you can reduce the temptations, use the cues, and if you can't only then do use the willpower. Of the chariot here, you'd have enough strengthen the reins to do it. Always by the rains, you've got to get the horse to cooperate and what's amazing is that there's like thousands of years ago but basically Plato is foreshadowing everything we know about the modern science of habit formation, right like the easiest way to kind of get yourself to like control your appetite is to get rid of the thing that you don't WanNa. Be tempted by you know whether that's your phone or the internet or you know fattening food or whatever it happens to be is just to get that out of there and by the same token if there's something you want your brain to do make it really obvious in this situation, right you know put your gratitude journal out there like make your gym shoes available. That's right the easier you make it for yourself. To do it automatically the better off you're going to be in fact, there's a famous Greek story that's in a book by homer called the Odyssey and it's the story of this Guy Ulysses. He's trying to get home and he's going past and island where there's really tempting music and he knows that if you hear that music, you're inclined to jump off the ship and joined the singers because the music is so beautiful. And in the story home, we're tells two ways of getting past that. The oarsmen were rowing. The boat blocked their ears so that they can't hear the south. And Ulysses who wants to hear the sound but not be able to act on it. Has His soldiers tie him to the mast of the ship. So that story is like Plato's story of the Horse. The horse is always going to be tempted. So if you have a temptation and you haven't put a mechanism in place either to take it out of sight or control yourself in the face of it, it's GonNa be really really hard to avoid it but all the strategies that you're describing make the alternate activity salient rather than the one you want to avoid or take. Away access put your phone in Ziplock bags. So you can't touch it turn off the Wi fi on your internet don't have chocolate in the house. All of those are exactly the strategies that the ancient Greeks were using in homers case that stories almost eight thousand years old all these strategies even though they're so ancient like what sciences finding is that if you use them, you're going to actually be successful at regulating your appetite. It is a recognition of something that is so deeply part of. Human Nature and human experience that basically every world wisdom tradition tries to describe it. In some way the Buddhist tradition has an analogy of a wider and an elephant and it's the same idea. It's the idea that part of you is pulled in one direction and there's a huge set of desires and passions which pull in other directions and many world religions are about building structures that help you regulate those forces and energies and a lot of the things that modern science shows to be. Effective mechanisms are actually there in religious traditions. You build rules around what kind of food you can eat when in religion, and it's exactly the same insight that you see in the modern science in addition to the modern science saying that these are really good strategies. The other thing that we know scientifically is that people who are good at regulating their appetites. They do that because they use these strategies. Yeah. One of the things that's really interesting is that people who are best at self control. Are Actually, best at setting up situations in which they don't have to exercise self control. So a kid who's good at doing homework. Isn't good at not looking at the phone. That's right in front of them while they're doing homework what that kid is good at is setting up their room in such a way that they aren't tempted by the phone in the first place. The more effective somebody is at what we think of self control and self regulation. The more likely it is that they seldom put themselves into situations where the even feel tempted, and that's why I love the Jerry to your metaphor and why keep telling my podcast listeners about it in this season is that I get that intuition so much from the metaphor, right? Like it's a pain to be holding onto these rains as this. Appetite horses going crazy like that requires a lot of work. But if you just put blinders on the Horse, you know if you can just help the horse, then you don't have to worry about holding onto these rains super hard because the horses just going to be behaving correctly anyway it's exactly right. Set yourself up in situations where you don't have to expend all your cherry to your energy controlling.

Plato Guy Ulysses homer WanNa Jerry Wi
"plato" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

04:26 min | 2 months ago

"plato" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

"Me to sleep in. That's what he's talking about right. That's what he's talking about an in fact, the the reason he tells the story is that he wants to set himself up to make the general point that human beings are set up inside in such a way that even if their best self wants to do something, they're always gonNA feel tensions they're always going to feel polled in many directions. It can be an email that pops up that sends you down a rabbit hole on the Internet and Plato's point is that human? Beings inevitably find themselves in situations that they feel pulled in multiple directions. One of the reasons plato was really obsessed with this is that he realized that you can't just be a rational self because we have these other parts of our mind. You actually have to control the rational self to figure this out and he had this awesome metaphor that I've actually been telling my podcast listeners it throughout this whole season about this that involved a chariot ear, right? Yeah. In fact, he uses different metaphors to describe. It in different books in the Republic, which is the book that has the land his story he says that human being is made up of three parts there made up of a human being basically their head they're made up of a lion and they're made up of a many headed monster and the ideas that the human being is reason and the lion is the part of you. That's kind of proud and that the many headed beast is the part of you. That's interested in base passions like food and sex. But in another one of his books book called the fetus. He gives an analogy that I think is even more vivid, and he says a human being is like a charioteers driving a chariot with two horses. One is a noble horse and one is a wild. And the noble horse is the part of a human being the aspects of ourselves. That's interested in honor and social interaction and what other people think of us if I'm supposed to sit home and do my podcast but I, go out because I give into peer pressure because I care what my friends think about me or I spend a Lotta. Time focused on appearance because I wanted to impress somebody that's the horse of spirit whereas the wild. Horse is the part of ourselves. That's interested in fundamental desires that we share with other non human animals like the desire for food or the desire to sleep or take physical pleasure in things like sex, it needs to take in nutrition and it needs to ensure that their future generations. Those are the parts of ourselves that he describes the chariot analogy but the cherry ideas like any journey where on towards better flourishing any journey where on towards. Becoming happier people, one thing we have to do is we have to deal with these horses that are kind of out of control in running around. It's not just that we have to deal with these horses. Basically, what moves us is the fact that we have fundamental passions and desires the metaphors really a powerful one because it says, it's not like oh if we could just have the person part of ourselves, we'd be done with things the. Story says human beings of the kinds of creatures who are propelled forward by physical desires and by social desires and the key to human flourishing the way to move fast on the path through life is to make sure that you are in control of those horses that the parts of you that are passion and energy are pulling you in the direction that you want to go instead of in some wild other direction that they are being hold. And so if we want to become happier people, we need to figure out how to deal with this chariot system. We need to get our charioteers to rein in these horses until let them bring us on our journey in a really productive way, and we'll deal.

Plato
"plato" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

06:41 min | 2 months ago

"plato" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

"One of the things I've realized is that I am inevitably going to be tempted if I work with my phone next to me, I'll be getting tax. This is my friend and colleague tomorrow Ler when I sit down at my desk to write I, actually turn off the Wi fi receiver on my computer so that I won't even be tempted to look at the other things while I'm getting the work done tomorrow and I often trade notes about how to stay happy and productive as busy academics. But tomorrow brings something very special to these conversations. She teaches a class at Yale, called philosophy in the science of human nature and Plato's ideas are central to her curriculum. So I asked him are to give US PLATO WANNA one. So Plato was one of the really cool ancient philosophers in. Athens. Who gave rise to the Western philosophical tradition and he ran a basically a university which was called the academy where young men from Athenian families would come and engage in unbelievably. Intellectually interesting conversations with one another and with Plato with Plato's Teacher Socrates about the deepest questions of the age and one of the students at Plato's Academy was a guy named Aristotle. So. This was like a pretty legit thing to do if you were like a rich Athenian guy and wanted to get educated. It didn't have the formal structure of degree granting. It wasn't that you would go there for four years but it was the place where people went if they wanted to understand fundamental ideas if they wanted to think about literature or philosophy or politics or mathematics, those were the kinds of topics that you could explore at Plato's academy and Plato was of the Guy to learn from in part because he thought so deeply about so many different topics. But today we're going to kind of focus in on Plato's ideas for happiness and how we can control the self which was something he thought about a lot, right? Yeah. So one of the things that's interesting about ancient Greek philosophy is that they connected. All sorts of topics that we think of as distinct from one another. So the question of how can you be happy was a fundamental question in ancient philosophy because they were thinking about what's the appropriate relation between the individual and their society, and what's the nature of beauty and what's the nature of truth and so plato would be teaching all of those things everything from mathematics to metaphysics, political theory but part of the reason for exploring that set of topics was. So that you could understand how is it possible for an individual human being to flourish? How can they best align themselves so that they understand the nature of the world and are most receptive to the world's excellence, and so plato didn't just think about this are obviously he was a writer who created lots of influential books on this. So talk to me about the importance of one of the books that we're going to dig into a little bit today, which is. The Republic. So Plato wrote all his books in the form of plates and they were plays where his teacher socrates was the main character and then various young men who were students at the university were in conversation with socrates about questions, and so one of the most famous of the dialogues or books that Plato wrote is a book called the Republic and it has ten chapters and it's kind of a theory of everything. It describes what's the fundamental nature of the Universe. How come into being it talks about how mathematics underpins all of physical reality than talks about physics. It talks about how we understand truth but it does all of that by telling the story of what the ideal society would look like what would a society look like in which human beings are best able to flourish that's the question that Plato asks and it turns out that in order to answer that he has to explore everything from mathematics to political theory. And in those stories, Plato tells one of my favorite stories from ancient Greek Times, which is the story of Leon. Was the story of Leonti and why was it so important for thinking about human nature? So let me just start by telling the story using Plato's words from the Republican. Then I'll give you the more eleven. So the story goes like this lay on this was walking along the North Wall of the city. He saw some corpses lying at the foot of the wall. He had an appetite to look at them but at the same time he was disgusted and turned away. For time he struggled with himself and covered his face but finally overpowered by the appetite, he pushed his eyes wide open and rushed towards the dead bodies saying look for yourselves you evil is take your fill of this beautiful sight. So, Plato tells the story at point in the republic where he's trying to have his listeners understand that within every human being there multiple parts pulling the person in multiple directions he wants to show you that you like everyone else are filled with. The strife, and so the story that he tells US basically the story of a rubber necker on a highway Leonti is walking home right he's supposed to go efficiently into the north gate of the city and instead there's a dead body on the side of the city wall anything like that's disgusting don't look at that but part of him, it's just fascinating trips in the part of. them, that's fascinating. Curious keeps pulling him towards the wall and so the story is about the internal tension that land is feels his effort to try to control himself and then the phenomenology the experience that feels just giving in I can't control my appetite I can't control my desire to these dead bodies and as many of us do when we're driving past an accident, he turns his. He looks at the dead bodies any slows his walk, but the reason I love this story so much I mean it's kind of Morbid but the reason I love the story so much as this isn't a tail just about rubbernecking that seem internal strife that Plato's talking about is what I experienced in the morning when my alarm goes off and I know I want to be committed to getting up and hopping on the elliptical or getting up for my morning meditation but my appetite wants.

Plato Plato's Academy The Republic Yale Wi Leonti socrates Athens Aristotle writer Greek Times
Anthony Davis and LeBron James propel Los Angeles Lakers to Game 4 win over Houston Rockets

KNBR Tonight with Drew Hoffar & Kevin Frandsen

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Anthony Davis and LeBron James propel Los Angeles Lakers to Game 4 win over Houston Rockets

"It on the night where you had in any playoff game, which was a must win game for the Los Angeles Lakers, I know there are two games the one I know this sounds silly, but the Clippers already have three games to one of the Denver Nuggets. If you're the Los Angeles Lakers you could ill afford. To be in a knockdown, drag out battle with the Houston Rockets, and they went out there and they just took this soul away early, late and often, Rondo one on one against Jeff Green. Now they get a tan Thony Davis. Top of the key you go. Davis, with their Gordon on, Davis turns leans, shoots ahead. Rondo Rondo, running at the basket Alley Oop slam dunk a little risky. Through an alley oop off the backboard, and LeBron almost didn't see it, but he caught it in late and dunked it likely. I'll say What Plato find LeBron no doubt about that. ESPN 17 the Lakers be the Rocket's once in the 100 Day Na ve 31 Siri's lead

Los Angeles Lakers Rondo Rondo Thony Davis Houston Rockets Lebron Denver Nuggets Clippers Espn Jeff Green Gordon
Boston - Kyle Dugger Impressing Bill Belichick In First Patriots Training Camp

WBZ Midday News

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Boston - Kyle Dugger Impressing Bill Belichick In First Patriots Training Camp

"NFL season. They practice this morning. But before that coach Bill Belichick spoke to the media, and he was asked about the progress of the team's first pick from the 2020 draft. Kyle Dugger calls a smart kit and he works really hard on DH. You can definitely see improvement will say not only from day to day, but in some cases from Plato play. There's some things that he just hasn't seen that might take a little longer to explain to him just because he's not familiar with him, but he's very coach. Boyd picks up things quickly. Bruins with a 3 to 1 in

Kyle Dugger Bill Belichick NFL Plato Bruins Boyd
2020 Ruby on Rails Community Survey with Robby Russell

Ruby on Rails Podcast

05:10 min | 3 months ago

2020 Ruby on Rails Community Survey with Robby Russell

"Today will dig into the results of the twenty twenty ruby on rails community survey. So. Robby. Great to have you back and I'd love to start off by asking you why planet Argonne conducts the survey. Questions. So when I have to answer every few years, even to my own employees, like why are we doing this and so the the origin story isn't the first several years of employees, Plato Oregon being a part of the ecosystem we part of our service offerings was hosting for rebels, applications and. So two thousand I think it was two thousand eight to give or take we. We were we were realizing that we're lagging kind of investing and keeping up with some of the new ways of how servers and such were being managed how applications would be deployed, and so we really let's write a survey of the community to get a sense of how people were currently hosting how much they're spending on hosting and what versions of rails. They're using a bunch of other little tidbits related to that. So that kind of like help and we promise that we would share all the results of everybody minus everybody's email address. So that way we could be okay. Here's kind of like the state of the industry when it comes to deploying rail. So that was our first version of that survey and through. That survey admittedly, we realize, okay, we're way behind on a number of these kind of advancements in the deployment world. So we ended up saying we're going to basically kill off our hosting part of our business and we ended up selling that to another organization in we're just GONNA focus on coding related projects and consultative services there. So that's how it started. and. So two years later like Oh, let's do it again but we're going to modify to be a little bit more inclusive, just the broader community and we got rid of some of the questions related. We still keep that in their some of that in there, but we don't get into like budgets in the same way we used to we done so became. There weren't really any other surveys around the time that were really pulling the rails community to kind of get a sense of Persian rails you're running and how large is your team, and where are you and what gems are you relying on and which ones are frustrating to work with in what's keeping like, what are some of the challenges your teams having, and so it's became a thing. We started running every two years so that we could then share back with the community. And just to kind of get a pulse on where things were moving which tools. Use things in their related to what database servers you're using. And we can see trends over the years like their their services if you go. Over that time you could also, you can put the new survey results. You know you can go back to two thousand nine and compare every couple years and see that there are services that existed back. Then the no longer exists and nobody's using there's also scenarios where like I one point say squall was largely the most popular database in the community, and now it's completely flipped around where post grass is the most popular and I have some I understand why that's happened but. It's interesting to kind of see those trends over the over the years, and so it's more of a curiosity that we have in a way that we can every couple of years interact with the community and and kind of like catch up on a few different ways than than share that information back with the community again. Well. I. Think it's a fantastic project. You do a really great job of gathering the data and then turning around and displaying a very nice site in order to view that data. Of course, we will link all this in the show notes and listeners I suggest pausing the episode and reading over the results, and then we are going to dig into some surprises that I came across. A lot of the results were what I expected as Robbie noted post Gretzky while continues to dominate. The defacto performance monitoring tool and the folks that did take the survey which was over two thousand people wholeheartedly agreed that raises their server side framework of choice. So, for the one question, you are primarily building monoliths are micro services twenty five percent answered hybrid. and. So Robby, what circumstance would you take hybrid approach? So? That's a good one the. I'm always curious about. Work in the consulting world where we inherit and work on a lot of other people's projects and so quite often most rails applications likely unless they've started maybe in the last five take years. Are Likely to start off in kind of a Monolithic Forum. In Oh, let's move into a more of a micro services approached and so they start maybe. Breaking off pieces of it that way so I think it's it's. Just inherent in the kind of well, we WANNA start experimenting with micro services. So here's a segment of our application. We're GONNA break off. Move into do micro service. So I think that's that's how that comes about. You know I don't know if the I don't know what I expected. The numbers look like they're. In some ways I think I'm surprised that bashing maybe more not the more common answer like a higher number in some ways but. It's but I don't. I can't speak for everybody but it's kind of like my theories because a lot of evolution of iterating on an existing application like, okay. How do we start moving in this direction and then whether they're going to go like full micro services or Ni-, you know basically like strip back the core part of the application what have you but. I think that's someone of my theory

Robby Plato Oregon Argonne Robbie Gretzky
Hasbro Troll dolls almost broke the internet

Take it or Leave it

06:16 min | 3 months ago

Hasbro Troll dolls almost broke the internet

"Figured we talk about a couple of stories because I've gotten I have gotten questions about both of these topics, email to me and message to me. So we ran a story over unfiltered free parents last week about the Hasbro troll doll. Did you see this tiffany? Yes, I did. Okay. So this troll doll, which is based on the character poppy. Basically it it has a button on the belly where the belly button would be, and it sings and it has like ten different phrases and sings different songs and then what parents noticed was when they opened up the doll box and they looked at the doll, there is a second button betwixt poppies legs in the. Spot and when you push it, she squeals and giggles. And that is not noted on the box. That anywhere. hoppy has a special upside down mix up park button where she's giggles and squeals. But this mom just Jessica McManus started this petition online saying. This isn't appropriate for a lot of reasons. She started a petition on change dot org where she got well over two hundred, thousand signatures at this point she says, this troll doll is basically conditioning kids should we do a trigger warning trigger warning? D. Say. Those words that could be triggering to people in regards to abuse. Okay. Is that what you have to say I? Think I. Don't know if we're GONNA talk about it. We should at least put it like on the caption of the thing when we post it is all in Oh for the for the episode. Yeah. I thought you meant right this minute we'll. Yeah, it doesn't hurt. Okay. All right. Do it now to they'd call I didn't think that near correct. But what they're basically saying is this doll and the placement of this button and the sounds at the dollar makes when you touch the button. are conditioning our kids towards A. Pedophilia being okay with being touched or molested or pedophile pedophilia, and they're saying that that's okay and some parents on the other side of this or saying we're really were really reaching. This is such a canceled culture. This is such a this. This is such that, and then there are lots of parents that are saying, well, why are we putting a button in that spot? Anyway. Like what is the need for a child's toy for a button to be there? So I just thought we'd have a conversation about that. Well and from what I understand. There isn't an actual button correct me if I'm wrong. There isn't an actual button on the dolls stomach. Like there's no, it's inside. So you so her stomach is flat and you touch it. It's right. It's like a squeeze I, guess. Yeah. Whereas on the CROTCH. It's an actual protruding it is there is. There is a cut out. You can see the button it looks it's a circular button. That's exactly what it looks like that. You would rise and so that's my point is that why I don't know anyway so I was interested in what they had to say about it. They said, this feature was designed to react when the doll was seated, but we recognize the placement of the sensor may be perceived as an appropriate. Does like what does that mean like when you slam it down it goes When you sit down at does it like gasps and giggles? and. So. It begs a few questions for me personally number one I'd like to know how did it get through? So many marketing and production meetings that nobody was in the corner raising their hands saying hey. Quick. Question why are we putting a button on poly? What's her name Poppies Vagina like why are we doing like? Why would we put it? They're like why? If we want poppy to sing an extra song or doing extra giggle? Do we not put it on the hand? Are we not put like like you know what I'm saying like there was nobody in any one of these because you have to think. I don't know much about big business but what I can tell you. Is that there had to have been how many marketing and production meetings and prototypes built of poppy prior to going to production and being in the local Walmart and target Right. There have to. There's no way because I I just know how many times I have to get a sample of t-shirt when I'm just printing my own t shirts where I'm like, you know what I don't like I don't like the way the t looks there. I don't like the this or that, and you play with it and you go back and forth how many meetings did they have? Where people were sitting around a table and looking at a prototype and think note the vagina that's where the button should be, and even if it was for sitting how often in reality are you actually like sitting? Adul- down I'm trying to think like I feel like when my kid plays with dolls, they're standing and just be beep and then thrown like it's never like. Seated so much that there needs to be or it would make sense. It would make sense if it was one of those, like, do you remember the dolls that the ones that you feed the Plato or the bottle with, and then you sit them on the toilet? That makes sense to see to have a seated position for the doll because I have I have taken a bunch of Plato out of out of that dolls. But before because what was it baby alive? That's stupid. Baby alive was you'd feed it Sophia would feed it. There was little plato things where you could make it look like peas or carrots or baby food or whatever, and then it would eventually make. Its way into the diaper but mostly, I was just pulling plato out of dolls but right. But it would sit on a potty and you could make p you'd push its belly and the P. would come out. Yes. So that would make sense for a seated thing.

Hasbro Tiffany Jessica Mcmanus Crotch Walmart Adul
Impact of Biden's Choice of Kamala Harris as Running Mate

Bloomberg Markets

05:59 min | 3 months ago

Impact of Biden's Choice of Kamala Harris as Running Mate

"Just dividing Picking California Senator Kamala Harris as his running mate. Let's get the what this might mean for the Democrats as they head into November for the election. Marty Shankar, chief content officer for Bloomberg News, joins US Marty. Thanks so much for joining us here. What's your initial takeaway of Kamala Harris as Joe Biden's running mate? Well, I think you know, and it's been spoken about all morning and yesterday afternoon. It's a historic pick. She is the first Whom the person of color to be on a major ticket advice. Presidential candidate and you know, it solidifies what some Think was a somewhat of a vulnerability for Joe Biden. That's with the with the black voters. And I think that you know it was an excellent choice. Well, Marty, you say that. But will there be any pushback from black voters given her record on criminal justice reform and as a prosecutor Yeah, You know, I think that's been a problem for her. If this came out Bloomberg another George stories about her role in as attorney general in California. Oh, and as a district attorney in San Francisco. She has Been criticized for being Dick really aggressive in her prosecutions and resisting remuneration for those wrongly prosecuted, But that was you know, decades ago. Um, I think that you know, it will be a line that GOP uses against her and they've already started. Um, but I think her attributes will probably be able to overcome those What do you think This means? This ticket here the way this potential campaign may unfold in the next couple of months means for financial markets here. Well, you know, I think the important thing you know no one's really talking about it. But Pamela Harris and Joe Biden. Their policies really are dependent on what happens in the Senate if the Senate remains in Republican hands. They're going to have a really hard time getting any of their policies through so I think the focus really needs to be on those important Senate races, their number of them That were supposedly safe for Republicans who are now in tossup territory. And I think place like main on Arizona. So you I think that that's really going to be a pivotal thing for markets. But I do think that if you didn't see it the other day, Ed in the former editor in chief of Barons wrote a piece in The Wall Street Journal saying that Biden presidency is going to be great for markets. Yeah, absolutely. And I think you know, market participants are already saying that we had marked as Reon yesterday. Who, you know, obviously. Is it a financier, too? The Biden campaign and so he obviously was very pleased with the comma Harris choice to It would have been his choice. Marty, what happens between now and November in the sense that Joe Biden can be a little bit unpredictable? Is there a way that he could throw this? Well, you know, when people asked the what my thoughts are on the election coming up by continually say it's Joe Biden's to lose. And there is and I think the debates coming up the three debates and the debate the vice presidential debate this just one could have A really important role in how this election place out. So yes, Bonnie. It's quite possible that Joe Biden could say something or perform. Poorly and that may have a real impact on the race, which, despite the polls, I believe is pretty close. Marty, How do you think these candidates for the president and Vice President Biden How will they campaign over the next several months is it just could be a serious of television interviews and things like that? Yes, And I think you know, like today they will do a a century a small audience of participants so she'll be distant with I'm sure with mass And that's the way it's going to be until November. I mean, Donald Trump certainly would like to make it a more on the GOP side. Would liketo have his huge rallies, But I don't think that's gonna happen, so it's going to be as usual and unprecedented campaign. Virtual events on on video and that actually made Plato Bidens and ban it because he's much better in Hello. Prompted characters rather than life. Yeah, Marty, what makes you say that? You think it's closer than the polls suggest right now? What votes? Is the pole missing? Well, you know, we did a story about a theory that when potential voters are speaking to Pollsters. They may say that they are voting for the Democrat when in fact they are going to vote for Trump. I think that the There is this phenomenon and people just not willing to tell what they're That they support Donald Trump to pollsters. So I do think that there's that element of undercounting Trump's support. Fascinating. It's going to be just amazing. Several months. It feels like every presidential election in the United States brings up some new constitutional challenges and debates and difficulties, and this one's going to be no different. Marty Shankar's chief content officer here Bloomberg News. And of

Joe Biden Marty Shankar Donald Trump Senator Kamala Harris Chief Content Officer Bloomberg News GOP Undercounting Trump California Senate Bloomberg Pamela Harris Arizona San Francisco Prosecutor United States
Washington D.C.-area forecast: Hot today, and turning hotter the next few days

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Washington D.C.-area forecast: Hot today, and turning hotter the next few days

"Draper with us tonight. And Amelia, You've got one heck of a hot forecast force from the weekend. Exactly, Shawn. We're talking about dangerous heat moving in for the weekend, especially Sunday and then staying dangerously hot Monday Tuesday, potentially even Wednesday as well. I've also been mentioning that isolated storm chance here throughout the afternoon and evening hours on W. G. O P and seeing that materialized now into parts of southern Maryland down into Charles County, saying some really heavy rainfall just to the south of the low Plato area. Ah lot of lightning as well starting to develop so we could see some heavy rain, some strong, gusty winds out around the Hughes Ville. Sorry. This does look like it's slowly moving on into ST Mary's and potentially portions of Calver and the southernmost point of Prince George's County, so some isolated storms out there Tonight. Most of us do look to stay dry with blows, though, on ly in the seventies area wide high temperatures tomorrow warming into the middle Upper nineties. Humidity levels are slightly lower compared to today. That being said, though our heat index tomorrow afternoon, it's still above 100 degrees, and then Sunday afternoon, Middle Upper nineties and tropical Community make our heat index feel like 100 to 107 degrees, so we could certainly have a heat advisory out there as we look to Sunday and then Monday if we hit 100 which I am Gore casting, it will be the first time Reagan National has hit 100 in almost four years. The last time was in August over 2016. Since scattered lately. Thunderstorms are possible Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday as well with the extreme heat and humidity in the area. But again with the Moving in. This is that you want to take seriously drinking lots of water, taking frequent breaks, avoiding long hours outdoors. That thing said currently temperatures across the area right now. Bigger sounded 91 95 degrees in Arlington, and we're at 93 leaves for for alright, alright, thanks thanks

Charles County Hughes Ville Draper Amelia Calver Shawn Arlington Gore Prince George Maryland Reagan W. G. O P
Isaac Newton

5 Minutes in Church History

04:19 min | 6 months ago

Isaac Newton

"On this episode five minutes in Church history. Let's talk about a scientist Sir. Isaac Newton. He was born in sixteen forty three. He died in seventeen twenty seven he was actually born in the exact same year of the death of Galileo. He was born in originally humble circumstances. His father died three months before he was born in sixteen sixty one he went off to Cambridge. He had a grasp of Latin and a very curious mind. He would pass the time sketching clocks and windmills and other kinds of gadgets. Once he got to Cambridge he studied astronomy. This was the era of Copernicus and Kepler and of course he studied the classic Philosophers Aristotle and Plato. He kept his notebooks and in one of them. He wrote amicus Plato. Amicus Aristotle's Maga's Amici Veritas. Plato is my friend. Aristotle is my friend. Truth is my best friend. And he also let Cambridge embarked on studying mathematics. In fact he would come to the way in this field he is credited for inventing the study of Calculus as he called it the calculus of infant hassles and it was also while he was at Cambridge that he studied the motion of the moon and the planets and he recognized this force. That was acting on these planets orbit. He was discovering what would come to be called the law of gravity. He would go on to publish. His books is famous book in Seventeen. O four the book called optics and in There. He puts forth his theory of colors. A very interesting a young student in the colonies at the College of Connecticut. We know it as Yale. University would get a hold of Isaac Newton's book optics and he devoured it. This of course is Jonathan Edwards. And he wrote his own little scientific paper he called of light rays and this was all from. Reading Isaac Newton and Edwards draws this corollary from just being amazed at how the actual physical human eye processes light rays. This is what Edwards had to write hence the infinite art that was exercised in the formation of the eye that has given it such an exquisite sense that it should perceive the touch of those few rays of the least fixed stars which enter the eye which all put together won't amount to the million million million million million to part of the least moat of such an exquisite sense that it should distinctly perceive an image upon the retina that it is not above the eighty million millionth part of an inch wide. That has so nicely polished the retina that it should receive so small a picture upon it when the least pro Tuba Rinse or an evenness would utterly destroy and confound it here's Edwards amazed at the human eye but far more amazed at the God who created the human eye and the God who created the universe and it was Isaac Newton who unlocked this for Edwards and it was Isaac Newton who unlocked this for so many other people as Alexander Pope. The poet has it that nature and nature's laws lay hidden by night. God said let Newton be and then there was light Newton as the father of modern science. Believed that no way would science give us less room for God or somehow make less space for God and understanding of him? In fact it was the exact opposite for Isaac Newton. The more he studied God's universe the more he was led to acknowledge and worship God. Newton once said gravity may very well explained the motion of the planets for the can't explain who set the planets in motion. God governs all things and God knows all that is or all that can be known. That's the Great Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton Jonathan Edwards Cambridge Aristotle Scientist Seventeen Kepler Yale College Of Connecticut Alexander Pope
Building Your Coping Kit

Therapy for Black Girls

04:28 min | 7 months ago

Building Your Coping Kit

"Last week's three for Thursday chat. I talked about how to manage dealing with the break-up in the midst of Cova eighteen one of the strategies I talked about was building a coping kit and I thought it would be great to share more information about that here on the podcast. So the basic idea behind coping kid is having a collection of things all together in one. Police that can be useful to you when you're feeling overwhelmed by emotions and needs some ways to distract yourself when I do this exercise with clients as typically suggest they other purchase a nice decorative box or spend some time decorating and beautifying a box that you already have at home decorating the box can actually be a really meaningful and fun part of the process. The purpose of having the box is so that all of the items in your coping kit will be together in one easily accessible place. It's also important to note. That is probably most helpful if you build your kid before you really need it so that it's there for you when you do now that we have boxall. Taking care of here are a few things you might want to include in it number one a journal. You've likely heard both myself and guests on the podcast discuss how helpful it can be to have a journal to write down how you're feeling in any given moment it's especially helpful in tracking any patterns that might exist in your feelings and can't give you information about potential triggers. That might need to be attended to. I want you to try hard. Not to approach the Journal as an academic assignment. It's not at all supposed to be that. Feel free to write in bullets. Draw pictures whatever helps you to get on paper. What's currently happening for you? The second thing you might WanNa including your box is some kind of puzzle or puzzle book something like a Word Search Book. Maybe a collection of crossword puzzles are other brain. Teases that you've enjoyed in the past your coping. Kid is not the time where you WANNA try some kind of puzzle that you've never done before that will leave you feeling frustrated and upset. That's not at all what we're going for here. You want to include some kind of puzzle like activity that you've enjoyed in the past and might enjoy doing again. The third thing I would including your coping. Kit is something that you can hold in your hand so maybe something like a stress relief ball some silly putty or some Plato. Having something that is tactile that engages your sense of touch can be really helpful in grounding you in the moment the fourth thing you might wanNA including your coping. Kit is a playlist of your favorite soanes. Our podcast episodes that has typically made you laugh or made you feel good in the past it will be helpful to go ahead and make the playlist on your phone or whatever device you typically listen on and then just have an index card in your box that reminds you to play your playlist and then the fifth thing that you might want including your coping kid is a list of shows you like to watch or rewatch or a list of books. You'd like to read again. You can use an index card to write out the list of shows are you can add them to a Q. On your favorite streaming service and just have the index car there to remind you of the list. You might also buy copies of certain books that you know you'd really enjoy and save those just for your coping kit. That way you know you'll be engaged and it's almost like a treat you forget you giving yourself some other things you might. WanNa consider adding to your coping kit or candles or lotions in your favorite since old pitchers that help you to recall. A happy or fond memories are a collection of quos or prayers. That have been helpful to you in the past again. The idea is to make this a collection of things that will help you to be distracted and engaged in something else so that your thoughts feelings are less overwhelming for you. If you're able to engage in one or all of these activities usually you will have given yourself enough time to allow the intensity of whatever you were experiencing to come down a little

Journal Cova WAN
"plato" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:21 min | 8 months ago

"plato" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hey rain stuff lauren. Vauban here all of Western philosophy said the British mathematician and philosopher. Alfred North Whitehead is quote a series of footnotes to Plato. This Greek philosopher who started as a young devotee of socrates laid the groundwork for more than two millennia a philosophical thought Plato's dialogues including republic required reading for every serious student philosophy and his academy in Athens set the model for the Modern University. So who was this guy? Plato of Colitis was born around four hundred twenty eight. B C E in the waning days of the Golden Age of Athens. He met Socrates as a young man and was a close follower of this provocative street philosopher who confounded politicians and prostitutes alike with his unrelenting questions now known as the socratic method. Plato was around twenty years old when Athens lost the disastrous Peloponnesian war to its rival Sparta. He served briefly in the war. After considering a career in Politics Plato grew disenchanted by corrupt leaders and the tragic execution of socrates has hero and mentor. Plano came to believe that only right philosophy could end human suffering and ensure justice. Plato turned his energies to education studying vagary and mathematics and traveling through Sicily Italy and Egypt in his early thirties. He returned to Athens and founded his academy in an open. Air Grove open to men and women. It drew the best and brightest from the Greek speaking world to learn mathematics and natural philosophy. Aristotle came there when he was seventeen and stayed on teach. The KADEMI continued for almost two centuries after Plato's death closing in seventy BC. Plato never married or had any children. He died in his early. Eighties Butt lifts on in his captivating pros and thought provoking questions recorded in thirty lively and challenging dialogues reading Plato's dialogues as like eavesdropping on a fascinating rambling conversation. The dialogues are constructed like intellectual dramas with socrates playing the main character in them. Socrates teasingly interrogates implies answers out of his fellow Athenians revealing the elusiveness of simple truths. Plato'S EARLY DIALOGUES. Are Heavily indebted to socrates who left no writing of his own. But Plato's own ideas emerge in middle and later works like socrates though played out doesn't beat the reader over the head with his philosophy but prefers an indirect approach. The tasks the reader withdrawing their own conclusions. We spoke with Eric Brown philosophy professor at Washington University in St. Louis. He explained in his dialogues. Plato doesn't say here are the answers and here are the reasons accept them. On my authority a plateau wants to inspire people to do philosophy and think it through for themselves. The dialogues do that. They leave a lot of questions. They don't settle everything I think. That's one of the reasons why Plato has found so many readers over the centuries. He leaves a lot of the work for the reader to do which may be. We find inspiring if Plato could be said to have a central doctrine it's the concept of forms The idea that the world we perceive with our physical senses is flawed but there also exists a separate world perfect eternal forms beyond our perception. Those perfect forms are abstract ideals like beauty. Equality Goodness being and knowledge. This core philosophy is called plagiarism. End Philosophers who have ascribed to it over the millennia are known as plate nests. Brown said. Platon ISM is the idea that there are truths causes or principles that are abstract and not available to sense perception but only to thought and that when we access these were in a better position to understand the way the world is and in a better position to live a good life. Two of the most popular dialogues are symposium and Fito Symposium Discusses Love including. What's come to be known as Platonic love a term? Plato never used and which is far more nuanced than simply a non sexual relationship. Plato distinguishes between Divine Eros and Vulgar era as a divine eras is a love that goes beyond physical attraction which vulgar eras to supreme beauty or makes one think of spiritual things meanwhile fito explores the nature of the soul. However the most read of. Plato's Works is Republic. Brown said it covers so much ground you get little. Plato's thinking about politics a little bit about the soul about what it is to live a good life. What is to understand the world how it is to teach and what teaching really is in republic. Plato puts forward a number of bold proposals including the claims. The ideal city would be ruled by class virtuous male and female philosopher Kings Brown thinks. Plato is clearly trying to push his readers. Philosophical Buttons he said Republic was plainly written to be provocative. The idea that no city is well governed unless it's ruled by philosopher. It's nutty one of the most vivid and enduring passages in republic is socrates extended allegory of the cave in the allegory a group of captives chained up inside a dark cave lit only by Faint firelight. They're only knowledge with outside world. Are The shadows? The play on the cave walls and garbled bits of echoed conversation one of the captives manages to escape and discovers. There's an entire reality outside of the cave. The brightness of the Sun Burns is is but the pain is worth knowing the truth when he returns to the Cave and offers to free his fellow captives they mock interpretations of their beloved shadows and decide to kill him here again. Plato is returning to his notion of truth. Existing outside of our limited perception Brown believes the cave. Allegory is specifically talking about the true nature and function of education. Brown said. Real education is not being filled with information. It's a transformation of your soul a reorientation of your values for Plato. When you stop taking the world as it seems to you and when you stop believing other people's opinions on what's valuable and he starts searching for what's beyond those mere appearances that's when you're being educated. Brown teaches plato every semester at Washington University and says that students continue to have their minds open by. Plato's dialogues which readers to wrestle with some of the biggest questions how to know and how to live. Brown said he asks questions. They're still worth asking and he asks them in. An engaging and provocative way that still one of the best literary representations of how to do philosophy or how to get into doing philosophy for those two reasons he will always matter stays episode was written by Dave Rou and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other curious topics is it has two forks. Dot Com. Green stuff is productive. Iheartradio more podcasts. In my heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

Plato Socrates Brown Athens Republic Alfred North Whitehead Eric Brown Kings Brown Washington University Aristotle Fito Symposium Egypt Modern University Plano Air Grove KADEMI apple St. Louis Sun Burns fito
White vs. Wheat: The Food Fight of the Centuries

Gastropod

08:52 min | 8 months ago

White vs. Wheat: The Food Fight of the Centuries

"To make white flower. You have to get everything brown out. That's the brand or the outside part of the wheat kernel as well as the Brown inside part called the wheat germ. What's left is the stuff in between. That's white white. Flour might seem like something modern and industrial. But actually people have been separating out the wheat bran and the wheat germ for a really long time and people had the the ability to sift and separate brand from flower for a long time if they had the power to command the Labor that it took so there are mentions of something like shining white bread going way back in history. This is Aaron. Bob Ro strain. He's a professor of politics at Whitman. College and the author of a book called White Bread. A social history of the store bought low. Farren says back in history. It took a long time and a lot of human power to manually Diaz colonels and sift flower to get it fine white so why would rich people bother? What was great about white flour so if you look back in time white bread white flour was an elite product. Because it meant there weren't sticks and rodent droppings and dirt in it things like that and say and Steve Jones is a wheat breeder and head of the bread lab at Washington State University. Okay so if you are rich in the past your flower might be hand cleaned while it was being hint sifted so there would be nowhere for rap to hide and all that shining whiteness but would it have also tasted better. We know Steve is creeped out by white flour but AARON SAYS WHITE. Bread has some advantages. Well I mean some people would argue that. It tastes finer. You can get a softer later loaf. As a result of that rich people could and did make white bread but it wasn't just fluffier and cleaner whitebread quickly took on a bigger symbolic meaning. It very quickly goes from being a question of taste to being a question of how bread mark certain people as affluent or powerful. And for as long as there's been white lower there's also been a debate about it not just what it means but also whether or not we should be eating it. White versus wheat is one of the first recorded. Food fights in history. Plato and ancient Greek philosopher had students debate whether the ideal city should be fed on refined white bread or gritty whole grain porridge. The debate wasn't really about what's for breakfast. Of course it was about whether city-dwellers somehow lost something important. Some essential grit just by living in a city and these debates around bread have been going on so long and so intensely because the stakes are so high. The Biblical phrase bread alone is not far from the truth. Aaron quoting from the Book of Matthew. Here man cannot live by bread alone. But actually the only thing matthew suggests that you need is a top up for your all bread diet is the word of God so really most of your calories. They're still coming from bread. In Europe. For example it would vary by time and place but people in Europe got between say forty to sixty percent of calories from bread from at least the sixteen hundreds to well into the twentieth century in the United States in the Nineteenth Century early twentieth centuries about a third of calories came from bread so it's an incredibly significant food product and even the English word. Lord it's demolished goes back to the phrase bread giver in Old English. The word layoff meant loaf and Boardman Guardian and together. The two words formed Love Board which eventually became Lord the one who ruled over the bread even the word companion is to do with bread and social hierarchy companion comes from Latin the word com which means together with and puffiness which means bread so your companion is the person you're able to share bread with because you're in the same social class so bread has been incredibly important for thousands of years and throughout that time the color of the bread. Signified your social standing. If you were rich you could afford the Labor to make that flower white. The very richest had the very whitest bread and the poor. You're the darker your loaf. Which means that for most of history for most people bread has been brown and it's been pretty damn rustic. Aaron says that was true all the way up to the mid eighteen hundreds in the US and at that point about ninety percent of the bread and the United States was baked at home by women and maybe ten percent was baked All mostly urban bakeries throughout the seventeen hundreds and early eighteen hundreds. The world was industrializing but bread. Pretty much stayed the same until some enterprising. Engineers invented mechanical rollers in the early eighteen. Hundreds Roller Mills meant that bakers could produce white flour and lots of it with minimal effort. These steel rollers were a huge leap forward compared to the old stone mills which really couldn't get wheat very white without a lot of human effort to sift it. Steve showed us a mini roller mill. He hasn't a room in his bread. Lab TURN IT ON. This is basically peeling a kernel of wheat. Like an apple and this type of meal that meant that white flour was no longer just an elite product but the mid eighteen hundreds the masses could afford it to the eighteen fifty s was also the last time the majority of bread was made at home in the US. Just like in. Plato's time people immediately started arguing about whether we all should be eating. This well sifted flour at the same time as those roller mills started coming online. Amandas name you know better. Attached to a similar started to fight against the spread of white bread. Servicer Graham I guess. Today we had maybe Remember him because we associate his name with Graham cracker that some followers named after him crackers aside Silvester was immoral Crusader and food reformer who gathered a huge following during the first half of the eighteen. Hundreds you saw white flour. As denatured product that was out of harmony with creation than would devastate the bodies and souls of those who ate it in flaming their joints and fibers and unhinging their their moral rectitude and call Sylvester Graham America's first significant whitebread critic and his followers certainly bought his argument and avoided white bread at the time the US was going through a major cholera epidemic. And people were desperate for anything to keep them. Healthy and Graham offered exactly that path to health based on. What you individually eight and didn't eat something you could control. As opposed to the public health approach of shared investment in prevention and sanitary water systems. The cholera epidemic eventually ended not because people eat Brown bread of course and while Graham's followers might have continued to eat whole wheat bread the rest of the country. The majority were into this newly inexpensive white flour. Meanwhile white flour and white bread had some big shot advocates of their own so progressivism was a social and political movement of the late Nineteenth early twentieth century. And it believed in the possibility of perfecting the nation. It was a moment. When scientific expertise was rising importance and when there's great concern about the upheaval of the nation. That's produced by massive urbanization. The United States going from being a largely rural country to being largely urban country at the same time that there is large scale immigration happening. The progressive movement was made up of a lot of middle class white women and this was the time when everything was becoming quote scientific babies to be born with doctors and midwives. Home Economics was a science said. Not all of America's newest citizens knew about these modern scientific ideas for domestic hygiene that surgeon immigration that Aaron mentioned those people were coming from eastern and southern Europe and there was a widespread fear in the middle classes that these poor people would bring their traditional ways of baking and running their households with them the progressive reformers thought that new mechanized white flour and newly mechanized bakeries making white bread were pure and safe and a huge step up from uncleaned immigrants who were baking most of the nation's bread at the time and so in that moment and the kind of the production of anxiety around bread and food in general the shining white loaves turned out in by gleaning white factories offered consumers are reassuring sense of safety. Steve Jones the Breeder. Who's so creeped out by any form of white bread that he doesn't like to be in the same room as it. His Own Immigrant. Great uncle ran one of these gleaming white bread factories back in the twenties. So my great uncle's bakery in Newark New Jersey was called the up today bakery years ago. I thought well that meant. He looked in the Polish American dictionary. Modern set up to date the up to date. Bakery was a franchise what it meant and their tagline is human hands. Did Not touch the dough. The human hands were southern and eastern Europeans in many cases so my uncle was to not put his thirty in quotes hands into the

United States Aaron Steve Jones Europe Graham Cracker Cholera Bob Ro Professor Lord Matthew Whitman Plato Farren Newark Diaz New Jersey Loaf Bakery Sylvester Graham America Apple
White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

THINK! America

08:20 min | 9 months ago

White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

"With us and we're gonna talk about that you know the fussing and fighting vet says going on in the White House and don't think for a second that that's exclusive to Donald trump's administration you know it's kind of interesting anytime it's its whatever you're closest to write in history and other things they have to be the worst you know and so Donald Trump his administration's wise it just has to be the worst all the fussing and fighting in in fighting that's going on like no other president before well before you really jump that shark and think that that is the case then you start believing you're hyperbole I once you get your hands on this new book called White House from doctor Tevye Troy bestselling author and former White House adviser okay he's been on the inside he's known as and researched and studied this and he's right about now with his book White House rivalries in the White House from Truman J. trump Dr Troy welcome to the show good to have you with us thanks bill Bradley on talk about played out hello this is this is it this is exciting you know that you know to put this out because you know this conversation has come up from time to time and you always hear from you know the hyperbolic that downhole trump is the worst ever and then you you start bringing back some of the the stories and histories and now here it is you've documented it I imagine if you wanted to go back even before Truman we we have to do episodes inch you know volumes of all the fussing happening in the White House right no absolutely and and we know that they were fighting before experiment where we are perfect I mean you look at the administration of Washington and Hamilton and Jefferson murder each other's throats but the difference is they were cabinet members and when I try to get that in my house how the dynamic change once we had the creation of a White House staff there was no real White House staff before Roosevelt and Truman the first person to enter the White House staff and make change the dynamic in that certainly you have the people who are close to the president meaning in the same building advising him on foreign policy and economic policy and then you might have a treasury secretary or spectators biggest ticked off that somebody else is inviting in his area that was one thing that changed in that that meant that I wasn't quite interesting to note that that the dynamic in the entrance of more humanity just because the more issues right yeah look and government was growing mistake became higher and then also you have this right the best celebrity White House aide the whole idea of a White House staff was supposed to be people with a passion for anonymity but that went away pretty quickly especially in the Kennedy administration when he hired people who are already famous like orcas lessons or to work in the White House is suddenly how celebrity White House they had its own reputation has long ties to the craft and they they could get their word out there if the policies were not going their way and to suddenly you have this idea of leaks and counter leaks you can make you look good in the press and that also at the White House right now make that I talk about the book in the course that is continued and become almost like a to the degree of a tender green black belt when you talk about all this and leaking and stuff going on you know but bad enough that it happens in DC but now of course with the most recent refill we understand that even ambassadors in our state department is running rampant with it as well yeah well you talk about ten degree black belt and that that was Henry Kissinger I'll tell you one great story that's been quite how's that Kissinger was dating Jill St John a very attractive bond girl actress Mandy comes out in the papers that Kissinger's dating this woman and Kissinger ghost and extending complains that his rival Christy William Rogers leaked the information about your retaining but the truth is that your lease it because a he wanted everyone to know he was dating that the truck the bond girl would be he wanted to hurt Rogers any internal wars and bribery deposit so what happened what was it what was the conclusion that well well written exam would rail about all the leaking that happened at the state department and constant complained about it but just not your fat it but at least some of the time we know the kiss your will the guy doing the leaking and then blaming the state department and of course everybody knows because your date of birth second longer up there with a win win corrective measure like you would can degrade black belt in Plato's exactly so he gets the he gets the reward and the award let's talk about president Truman we touched a little bit on that I mean he he he was I guess the modern era of the expanding the staff and and really kind of bringing this into play and of course it's just been kind of kind of a a monolith that like the blob is just been growing unto itself right yes Sir but instrument you have the right there were just unbelievable I don't I'm a presidential historian I've been putting this stuff for decades and the story behind in spite house were were things I'd never even heard of and one breaks during the ministration is that the secretary of state George Marshall as opposed to the recognition of the state of Israel which is flabbergasting to update the business interest on July especially right there at that critical time because it was true and that led the battle for inferred knowledge meant of Israel that would that would be very fight with marshals on the wrong side of it Clark Clifford a junior White House beat it on the right side of it make an argument in front of Clifford Clifford and Truman and Marshall are all arguing out in the White House Clifford wins the argument Truman recognized Israel Marshall is still mad that he never again the clippers or mentions his name for the rest of life right yeah right because so it's pretty petty but yeah such as such as you can't be the government the illusion of the Kennedy Camelot regime you said was not devoid of conflict as well of course in Kennedy do you have this notion of Camelot music wonderful people sitting around a table can you never even heard the term Camelot elections administration that comes from our interview that took place after the administration after he was dead yes but even in the administration there was fighting taking place especially between Lyndon Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy canteen was the product any would be turned general and the president brother Lynn Johnson vice president that you hated each other going back to their time in the Senate together when we can't even the lowly staffer and Johnson with the Senate Majority Leader and they had these nasty nicknames for him brought Robert if they reported Johnson is ruthless corded phone and get a canny referred to by Johnson as bunny boy really didn't like each other and they're always trying well anyway and we've known that that that tension what is it was pretty extreme there between them what else within the Kennedy at Camelot compound anything else that you discovered yeah there was a a a a rivalry between artists less intervention before they collect their prize winning historian who came to the White House when the first intellectual ever worked in the White House and then there was Ted Sorensen it was not as well known but he was closer to Kennedy and there was tension between them that continued even after the administration because the two of them we're kind of bracing to get their books out first hand stories then asked her to stop and stop writing his books but it's different in different book out first plus you're obviously would not agree and there were and the race was on and it it colored their relationship there's tension between them that went on for a long time and I got to imagine especially after the assassination these rivalries it would increase all the more would they not yeah and if there is one great story that dean Rusk with the sector state did not like that Slazenger called him brutalized in silence in meetings during the Kennedy administration implying that he wouldn't say anything that's a rough put it out there the only reason he was silent in meetings this lessons are within the facilities are respected leaker and we would talk about everything that he heard needing three wins Mr this is this is great fun Dr Chevy try I'd say it's good fun because you know the politics is just right for comedy it's it's when we take it too seriously like at times we're doing right now in this current environment then we deprive ourselves of of the little bit of humor in thank you Dr drive for presenting

White House Donald Trump
Ali Alizadeh

Published...Or Not

11:20 min | 9 months ago

Ali Alizadeh

"Offers an intense perspective on the issues and feelings most prescient in the poet's mind to that end Ellie Ellie Sada's latest collection towards the end challenges a range of concerns troubling our contemporary world today. So Ellie welcome back to three. Ci Thank you. Thanks for having me Nev- it. The title here. Seems a little ominous towards the end leading to the end of the world as we know it but the world as we know it I you know I think as I was. Finalizing the book Earlier in the year. And I'm thinking well. This is a bit of a melodramatic title. And then I turn on the news now. Actually I just step out at you know to the back yard and I can't breathe because of the ember storm you know. This is interesting learning new language. Courtesy of the Times. We live in so there. Is You know parts of Australia. Burning soon have another of the horse. Men of of the apocalypse disease being unleashed in Wuhan China. At exact same time we had you know trump trying desperately to start the Third World War by by killing that Iranian General I thought well the four horsemen are here so my title was in to a to an in some ways necessarily see the physical demise here. It's it's more for the values and concerns that we hold dear if I may I'll just read the first poem and we can discuss it in a little more detail. It's called the singer. This is how I croon my son singing Humpty dumpty a melody. He screams out in the absence of my song. I wasn't nearly as loud toddler. My voice vanished from the void of my father's car father's es sorry. I remember him having vaguely while driving wrapped up in his own world in mind. My son's medley moves onto Jack and Jill recalling the tune. I whistled yesterday. Did it ever exist? Did I ever have a voice? Even as an infant to seek to mit a whimper. Our member dad crying out the lyrics of an old Persian. Dirge wobbling from the speaker's not long after moving to Australia homesickness. Haunting his larynx like ghost howling in a haunted house. So much for parenting the loss of the music I never could muster. I'm here for my son's nursery rhymes to enact the presence unsung words now. My interpretation and this is the thing about poetry. It's open to all sorts of possibilities. The music the music of the child the music of the father and the music of your father and your music seems to get lost in there somewhere and your voice. Because there's your father recollecting purge at the music is a wider connect with these past life your son Humpty Dumpty Jack and Jill vs the medleys all Utah of the future. So but this is my interpretation. But I'm just wondering if that coincides with your intention but also then the question Your Voice. Your music Great I just want to say that you read it very well and I think I would like you to do all my readings from here on if that's okay look into. I guess I wouldn't call it an ironing. It's too weak word but I guess the contradiction is that it's actually written in my voice. The whole poem is actually in my voice. It's a little bit like Plato in the Republic. Saying all this nasty things about art but the Republicans written as a play with characters. So you know there's that sort of again i. I guess this is paradox. I guess is the word so so here is a Paul supporters. You know saying I don't have a voice but it's actually nothing but the poet's voice I think that that's sort of the lost there and it's something that identify in the rest of the collection is not so much for voice of personal you know emotional autobiographical identity. But one of something deeper something more more meaningful which are identified to be the voice of universal human subjectivity. Now that's one of the oldest things that poets tried to do scene at a time of the great epic poets. They want. I wanted to speak on behalf of humanity. Now this is something. A modern poetry mob has certainly rejected strongly beginning with romanticism. Which says look you know. It's just you the lyric I expressing your feelings. All the way to sort of like postmodernism and which says the lyric is bad but any mention of we is also not okay. Only he only express the immediacy of language. And that's all you ever do and I kind of feel like well. I don't I mean I I mean that's a tall these traditions but the quest that I guess I felt as I was putting the poems in this book together on a road some additional poems and arranged upon where particular wide at Kinda tells of sort of a story and is not so much about finding my personal voice. You know how do I how do I express myself? But it's about well. What is the voice? That's is needed for our times. And I think that's the kind of the big universal question which is perhaps even a political question. Wouldn't you raise some very mighty topics vertical philosophical social There's one called saga the more obscure and undesirable the more palatable. Ice Scowl still bothers me. And she's been dead for at least a decade. Her husband comically defendant. A downtrodden man wants a Communist. How much more fascinating radical with? My grandparents emigres escaping style and coming to Iran to found a trotskyite cell instead of Banal Matriarch and dull ethics patriarch immersed in gossip and religion. As a child. I hated any a few things more than being left alone with him. He once believed in the dictatorship of the proletariat when he died. I couldn't some in a single tear from my added on to his grandson. He'd being so simple meaningless as for Anna perhaps not really possible that she migrated as a teenage girl from Baku to Iran for more exceptional reason than giving birth to a son. Who'd made a woman who didn't give birth to me? Jeans are poor substitute for the fable of revolutions that universal family. Thank you but this notion of needing a viable needing a sag that's momentous and yet the irony or the opposite is the sort of mundane Mundane missive life Yeah totally I mean. I think you know this is my third book of poems. I kind of exhausted. That's sort of like Again reflection on the personal and familial and the mundane I know. That's what a lot of poets do and they do. Well you know since I mean who's to say that William Williams was wrong to talk about her red wheelbarrow on K. Good not yourself that and I've done that but I kind of feel like especially the Times though was writing this collection of putting it together and I kind of begins around the time that I live into by and this is two thousand and eight and I see the global financial crisis at that really impacts me and I feel like perhaps there is a tradition of poetry that is much more easily impacted by what's happening in the world by the economic social and political. Then there are other traditions. You know the the great sort of I mean this is this is again. It is also paradoxical thing we think about romanticism. We think well. It's the poetry of you know some some English Dandy wandering around and looking at daffodils. Okay it's that but it is also the poetry of the same Dandy as a young person going to be a part of the French Revolution. So so you know that sort of again. I feel like there is a a traditional poetry. That is more public. That is more We can talk about its political. Buddy and what what sense of the word is as as people listening to this and listening to your excellent readings of my poems that. I'm not a preachy person. Nevertheless these are poems that express a desire for universality of the human experience. I mean you've got some lovely lines at times. I mean the economy's manifest destiny and that juxtapose -sition manifest destiny was part of the American agenda expansion prearranged by God over an indefinite area and yet now applying that to the economy as that he's now want is determining allies those sorts of images and juxtapose that you've created. I forget which one that was in their alphabet city Alphabet yeah so that. That's sort of those the images that you're able to provide to make us think more profoundly more deeply. Yeah thanks I I mean I mean you know it's Yeah it's a kind of again referenced. Historical things look as you said manifest destiny but that that particular Isabelle a cafe. They used to being in North called alphabet city. And and and you know I mean I. I was away from Australia for some time. Then I came back and didn't move back to Northcote. Couldn't afford it but but eventually when I went back and also well I go to this cafe where I used to hang out and it's just not there anymore and and I will on why you know what what is happening here. Look really and I thought well. It's there is to concreteness of the city. Being being pulverized due to the forces of capital and nobody I mean. It's it's an absurd thing to say what I don't want this old. You know cafe to be knocked down and replaced by auto residential flats built with you know to to enhance the value of capital for investors. Who Am I to say no to that? But I mean that's a very symbolic and visible way in which our lives are being impacted by this extraordinary juggernaut of capital to use a Marxist term the jagged of capital in many ways destroys the spirit of a place. I mean one of the things I've noticed in my son is that when I first moved in the dwellings were sort of seventies style and such like and now they being pulled down and two story brick mausoleums going from fence. Lan Events Line What is the old quarter Acre block and the veggie patch in the back? But it's it's a Y Y of how life is represented we see as leading allies and it's being destroyed in many

The Times Australia Ellie Ellie Sada Humpty Dumpty Jack Jill Wuhan China Donald Trump Iran Baku Paul Utah Isabelle Anna William Williams K. Good
"plato" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

12:08 min | 10 months ago

"plato" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"If you like what about the physical strength one the one way Plato. Single women can be guardians on one hand but on the other hand if physically weaker than men and that matters I actually think the physical difference in strength that Plato is talking about between men and women is probably a secondary concern when he goes through what it takes to really qualify you to be a leader in the ideal society that he is setting up. Physical characteristics are never pointed out as one of the central ones so in particularly in this argument. He gives a list of three things that you need to be really well qualified to be one of these leaders and two of them are definitely just intellectual characteristics. The last one is physical. But it's phrased as that. You need to have a body that doesn't get in the way of you intellectually accomplishing a lot. Which again sounds like what's primarily of importance is cognitive abilities. We think about that. Broader background word. These people are supposed to be leaders in war. Of course it makes sense to think that physical abilities are going to matter to some degree. You might think that they are going to be generals. They're going to be people making strategic plans. Maybe it's less important for them to be physically strong than for soldiers on the front line to be physically strong at any rate. It seems like that physical disk thing although not irrelevant is not the primary thing. He's most concerned about for selecting leaders in society for selecting leaders in this society. He really cares about really intellectual ability. And then this personality characteristic that you are friendly towards the people in your country and fearsome to people who might be invading your country or something like that and he thinks that that's sort of a delicate balance of personality that you need to have and maybe the ideas that it's actually harder to find someone that's really smart and has that good personality type than it is to find someone that's just really fast and strong on our end you'll listening to the philosopher's zone with me. David Rutledge and my guest this week. Is Emily Hume Cozy from the University of Melvin? We're talking about the role of women in Plato's Republic and in other places where philosophy is given the respect. It deserves a lot of discussion around the role of women in the Republic the issue of whether or not a biological sex differences make you better or worse job but what about the question of whether or not biological sex differences. Make you just different at your job. It's an interesting question to bring to Plato. But also to the issue of women in philosophy today one thing that students often point out to me this tax in it is true. Is that Plato? So you know. He gives rain to this idea that Or He gives some credibility to the idea that women are GonNa be worth their jobs than men and he never gives any credit to the idea that like maybe women are better at different parts of the job or something like that. A student mind pointed out once we were talking about the metaphor with the dogs. And he said you know there's actually some reasons why people prefer like female guard dogs and you never see that sort of idea. Immersion this tax that there would be like some other way where women made up for their putative. Shortcomings in other domains in terms of philosophy is practiced today. Of course there are people that think that women think different ways or it could be that women you know. Pay attention to different sets of facts. Their life experiences impact. What they think are philosophically important issues. In different ways you can imagine certain books it seems to me not Unlikely that a woman would write this book or not that book. I mean the example. I think of right away. Kate Man's book down girl that feels like the book where it's like. It makes sense that a woman wrote up But of course that's not you know some sort of necessary condition about that's necessary truth about the world That's just something that you see tendencies with so one connected with what is being laid out in this dialogue that I think is most relevant to. This sort of question is that you do see in this dialogue. The idea that philosophy is not just something where some spiritual genius or some inspired figure comes up with philosophy and Sorta come down from the mountain and tell the world about it but rather it seems very technical. It seems like the sort of thing that you do as you progress through an educational regime that has sort of a straightforward trajectory and has an examination regime which determines whether you've made it as a philosopher or not and for at least some women in recent and continuing history. One thing that is very attractive. I think in certain sub fields of loss is that it feels like there's they're either really technical or they have some seemingly very objective standards or something like that were women might feel more comfortable in terms of slotting themselves in and saying I can accomplish things in this field that will be recognized as clearly. Well done work versus. Some women will feel that in philosophy where people are being more praised for being geniuses where they're being more praised for having deep insights. That couldn't be expected that women are never really GonNa win at that game because we have a society which still on some level thinks of philosophy on a model of these male geniuses that come up with their ideas in terms of like great breakthroughs rather than as that progress of hard work. That just leads step by step to this more In a way more quotidian but in another way and another way more technical idea philosophy has just sort of that moisture for oppression so division get of philosophy in this text is that philosophy is not the product of inspire genius. It's the product of basically hard work and for some women that seems more like a game they can win. They can definitely put in the hours. They can definitely put in the hard work. They can definitely get technical chops versus trying to participate in a narrative of a genius. They think they might never be identified by society or by the philosophical community. More widely as a genius on the model of a victim Steiner Russell or something like that so interesting. I wonder just personally you know. Has THAT FIT in your own professional choices today. Your own decisions about what philosophy to do and how to do it as a woman in academic philosophy I think I probably like a fair number of women would feel pigeonholes. Somehow if I just worked on feminist philosophy I think that's probably a pretty common reaction been have of that if you do that sort of subject especially if you exclusively do that subject people read it as if you have a personal vested interest in it or something like that rather than it just being an equally legitimate field like all of the other ones and so I didn't come for example this subject. I think because of that perception which I think is totally licensed anyway but because that perception. I didn't even come to this topic thinking. Oh I'm a woman so this text speaks to me personally. But sort of in a back door through a different interest in the economic Regime Related Plato is setting up and realizing that this text had a lot of enlightening material on how that economic regime would work and especially the role of nature and assigning different jobs to people on the other hand. I think that it is true that I probably fall into the people that think that a good model for doing good work in philosophy is more like this technical model and probably I think that looking at this tax of Plato's feeds into that because it seems to me like the idea. He's putting forward in this text to me matches some instincts that I have about what good work looks like in philosophy right. But what about the argument? The everything we do is embodied and that means something you know. There's been a good deal of energy. Spent in feminist philosophy arguing that philosophy should not be thought of as a sort of a cerebral technical abstract sort of something that proceeds from an embodied perspective agenda really counts for something and again you know from from your own perspective. Where's that means? How's that inside function for me? It seems like the experiences you have can't help it. Impact the sorts of philosophical questions. That you think are interesting and for me the way that Plato is looking at philosophy in this text where it's again not this idea of sort of some external inside but goes via this process of lengthy experience. I think feels somehow right because of maybe just that aspect. Do you think that there is a perception in academic philosophy tonight because there was certainly a time and not all that long ago when it was the case that women would just held to be Inferior philosophers and whereas I think can be few men in the in in the game tonight. Who would openly espouse that view? There are still try. Says all the people who who will say that there still is still very strong. Traces of that view at work in professional academic philosophy. What do you think about that? Sometimes I feel like people also miss out on how clear the discrimination against women and other groups West historically so in the case of academic philosophy both win men would openly spouse that view. It wasn't just that they said that. And then all the women fled because they were like. I'm being discriminated against via the obvious. Bias that someone is stating to my face and also was that they would limit the number of training spots and PhD programs or that they would have jobs where you couldn't be a woman in half that job so actually the job. That I have here was one where you couldn't be a woman or intact a married man. It was specifically for Bachelor's in order to have that role and so you saw of course massive throttling of the number of women that were in philosophy historically and then somehow that was again just like not taken into account and then men would say things like women can't be philosophers because where are they without taking into account the fact that they had prohibited them from being trained or employed in that field so nowadays of course like you say There's been a lot of change on that. Another interesting convergence at a certain way with this text is that you see this conversation between all men in this text and there's no women in the tax and you still get feeling today sometimes about the things that men will say behind women's backs and I think a lot of women still have that sense that sometimes things are said in conversations which we are not a party to that do imply that women are less skilled in philosophy or undeserving of the table. So to speak what you do have a lot of. I've certainly experienced a lot of is where you're the only woman in the room in philosophy. this is less true. Probably every five years but it still will happen that sometimes you are the only woman conference presentation or something like that and the earlier part of my career. I used to find this incredibly intimidating and to always think you know if I say something not very well put or stupid that then it will be like not just being judged about like all women are going to be judged as inferior philosophers because of some silly comment. You made or something like that later in my career. I've actually found a silver lining to this. Which is that when you do say something. People remember it because it somehow gets tagged in their mind as like all women saying this or something like that like you somehow outweigh multiple comments. Which as I've become more confident in my participation these discussions. That's actually a great thing that you get to feel like you get to have a stronger voice because somehow it.

Plato David Rutledge University of Melvin Emily Hume Kate Man Steiner Russell
"plato" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

15:07 min | 10 months ago

"plato" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"This is an ABC podcast. Can Women be political leaders? Can Women be military leaders? Can they be philosophies will for most of us today those questions and no brainer? Of course they can. But if you're living in ancient Greece during the fourth century BC the time of Plato. Then answering any of those questions with yes would have made you something of a radical. That radicalism is on show in. Plato's famous work the Republic where he sets out the ingredients for the ideal state and he has women as well as men occupying the top of the political hierarchy. But even Plato can't quite commit to full gender equality.

Plato ABC Greece
"plato" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

01:57 min | 11 months ago

"plato" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"On <Music> tonight and <Silence> they're not supported. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Silence> So yes I think. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> While <Speech_Telephony_Female> ten <Speech_Telephony_Female> aboriginal philosophy <Silence> <Speech_Female> could be seen <Speech_Telephony_Female> as problematic. <Speech_Telephony_Female> I think it's also important <Speech_Telephony_Female> to us <Speech_Telephony_Female> this stage <Speech_Telephony_Female> and certainly <Speech_Telephony_Female> the conversations <Speech_Telephony_Female> that I've had with <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Female> Does cultural <Music> laters <SpeakerChange> better <Speech_Telephony_Male> appreciate it. <Speech_Male> Is <Speech_Male> there any ambivalence <Speech_Male> there though in <Speech_Male> using that <Speech_Male> the other side <Speech_Male> of this coin if you <Speech_Male> like because I I was speaking <Speech_Male> while back with <Speech_Male> a guest on this program <Speech_Male> we were talking about African <Speech_Male> political <Speech_Male> philosophy <Speech_Male> and he <Speech_Male> talked about the way that some <Speech_Male> African <Speech_Male> political philosophers <Speech_Male> see philosophy <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> part <Speech_Male> of the European European <Speech_Male> colonial <Speech_Male> project <Speech_Male> and they have very mixed feelings <Speech_Male> about adopting <Speech_Male> the language <Speech_Male> and the categories <Speech_Male> of philosophy. How <Speech_Male> do you feel <SpeakerChange> about that? <Music> Of <Speech_Telephony_Female> course I think it's <Speech_Telephony_Male> really interesting. <Speech_Telephony_Female> That quite a <Speech_Telephony_Female> lot of Africa was <Speech_Telephony_Female> calling us by <Speech_Female> the French <Speech_Telephony_Female> and of course the friendship <Speech_Telephony_Female> philosophers <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> and I think African <Speech_Telephony_Female> people have have <Speech_Telephony_Female> resisted <Speech_Telephony_Female> that because in <Speech_Telephony_Female> a way <Speech_Telephony_Female> you could say <Speech_Telephony_Female> I would call analyzed <Speech_Telephony_Female> by <Speech_Telephony_Female> French. fell off <Speech_Telephony_Female> with you know. <Speech_Telephony_Female> The whole rationale <Speech_Telephony_Female> for Calling Association <Speech_Telephony_Female> came out <Speech_Telephony_Female> of philosophy in French <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> whereas in Australia. <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> We were colonized <Speech_Telephony_Female> by anthropology <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Female> and so <Speech_Telephony_Female> the resistance and <Speech_Telephony_Female> some aboriginal <Speech_Telephony_Female> people have been against <Speech_Telephony_Female> anthropology. <Music> A <Speech_Telephony_Female> big problem <Speech_Telephony_Female> that we've got <Speech_Telephony_Female> industry. <Speech_Female> Is that <Speech_Telephony_Male> aboriginal people <Speech_Telephony_Female> whenever educated right <Speech_Female> it. While <Speech_Telephony_Male> in North America <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the early universities <Speech_Telephony_Female> such as Harvard <Speech_Telephony_Female> included <Silence> night. If people <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> it wasn't until <Speech_Telephony_Female> the nineteen sixteen sixty <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> people <SpeakerChange> started <Speech_Telephony_Female> to get educated <Silence> at

"plato" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

10:36 min | 11 months ago

"plato" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"Now hands up. Who'd like to hear a story? Everyone everyone loves the story and we have one coming up but a word of warning now story for today is a Buddhist story and these have a way of confounding narrative expectations. We do do not have anything like character. Development we very rarely have crises of conscience or moments of choice choice and regret and agonies and and all that rich emotional stuff the imperfect people do indeed make bad choices and they feel sort of the common emotions whether it's envy or desire for tribute in or whatever it might be but we don't follow characters toes through any kind of trajectory of moral development and we aren't invited to enter into their own agonies binny's of moral metrication now storyteller is an MBA carpenter who teaches at Yale in US college in Singapore and she works primarily in ancient Greek philosophy and classical Indian Buddhist philosophy. Two very different traditions. Ayukawa was in Melbourne. Awhile back giving keynote address. Risk at the Australasian Association of Buddhist Studies Conference at Deakin University. The title of the address was ethical ambitions and their formation of character in in Plato and Buddhist thought and it struck me as it may strike you that at a glance at least platonic and Buddhist philosophy. Don't seem to have a whole lot in common into really conspicuous ways. Plato shouldn't have anything in common with The Buddhist outlook one of them is this talking of the soul talking in terms of Seoul. Of course the Buddhist famously deny that there is a self although of course so a long discussion. What exactly that means? They're different views even within Buddhism. Second really conspicuous difference is that Plato. Thinks reality is intelligible. He thinks intelligible reality is unchanging but its think everything is transient there is no unchanging reality and correspondingly. Our hope that there's some kind of fundamental intelligibility or good order to the universe. This is a misguided one we'd do better to give it up so there. Are these really profound differences actually between the platonic outlook and the Buddhist outlook. Where I see the similarity is in this prior commitment to turning towards reality as our fundamental ethical task from which everything else followed right feelings right actions all the rest of it will follow along only when we are aiming to understand? Reality T. A. Right so that's one way in which I think. They are really singing. Being from the same hymn sheet and a further step of specification in their similarity is that they both think that the reality we turn to do that. We need to try to understand as it is is an impersonal one. It's one that doesn't come ready. Fitted with the categories of person Jason Hood whether that's Action Agency or choice or deliberation and so with the first of those similarities. You saying that there's a presumption shared share their In Plato Ending Buddhism that to correctly grasp reality is is a moral imperative. Perhaps first and foremost yes. Yes yes that is a moral imperative. That's our task and that undertaking. That task will transform as will shape our character and improve our character. Victor Characters interesting term to bring into this and we certainly find this in Aristotelian ethics this idea that I am the one who is certain traits certain responsibilities but in Buddhism. As you say there's no self. So who is it that can be said to strive for these clearer. Perception of reality and what is the Buddhist Conception Awards Abe Buddhist conception of character that we can work with him. I it's true a Buddhist conception of character will have to be something like a bundle title of traits that are highly interconnected and mutually dependent on each other mutually informative each other Then it's not a substratum MM theory at interestingly. It's not clear that Plato doesn't think maybe something the same of the Self That we have this sort sort of sack. Corey are this sack of competing desires and impressions and capacities and so on and that they are all Interconnected and mutually Sort of playing off each other and forming each other. And how they do that and whether they do that. The kind of unit to your disunity. That they create that they co create Can Be named our character and this is very different from an Aristoteles in style conception of character of where you've got a substratum and it's a trait bearer. It bears certain traits. These are dispositions or virtues or something thing like that but I don't think that it's incoherent talk of character. I think there's a perfectly coherent way to speak of character but you have to understand it differently. From the original Chilean substratum way so although aristotle does indeed enumerating explorer a number of different virtues according to the different modes or dimensions of feeling and action that we have he lays particular emphasis on what is up to us the voluntary and what is up to us is that which is a worthy of praise and blame. This is what distinguishes the moral realm from other things and this move gives a kind of priority to deliberation and choice of which aristotle has quite specific kinds of discussions. I think that in platonic ethics and Buddhist ethics both You don't have this priority. Given to choice and deliberation as demarcating the special moral realm distinct from some other Sort of realm. Of course there's action and choice and of course it matters what sorts of deliberations and thoughts We engage in but the citizen player. Both are very highly aware that these deliberations nations and these choices are always always formed by and taking place within a context of perceptions and recollections shins and all kinds of other prior commitments. That are standing ready at the artificially isolated moment of choice. That's that's really interesting. So in terms of moral salience if you like then this kind of transformation turning of the Saul towards reality it takes thanks choice will not out of the equation but the really interesting stuff. You're saying that all happens before we get to the exercise of choice precisely precisely choices is what happens in virtue of the impressions memories desires categories. We have for thinking in particular our ways of connecting thoughts. All of these are what go into making a choice. Arise as it does or go a certain way so one consequence of this recognition that the Buddhists and Plato both share of the way that decision points. It's always happen. Further downstream from the impressions recollections categories of thought that we're using beliefs that we've formed a perspectives that we already behold and things like this One of the consequences of recognizing this is that for both of them this is their deep similarity for both of them. If you want to improve morally okay what you really need to change is the categories in which you view reality the beliefs that you have about reality the way that you understand the various experiences that you encounter and so that's what it means to make something like perspective or outlook or orientation towards reality a moral matter and moral discipline so then the question is how do you actually change these more fundamental basic outlooks wchs am perspectives and categories that you reach for when you want to describe and understand the experiences that you have. Buddhism is a religion. It's not just a philosophy and one part of it includes practices that are mind training practices. That are deliberately designed to you. Make you more mentally. Agile more. Able to disconnect from disassociate from any kind of distracting or confused sort of impression that arises they also have culturally in most Buddhist cultures a very rich tradition of storytelling. There's tons of these stories are they're all over the place where there's Tales Tales of the previous lives of the Punta to these tales are told an all kinds of circumstances there told By monastics to lay people by Monastics monastics by lay people to lay people and they're very widely spread and some of them are fun they involve human and non human lives and so on they convey an ethos and one one of the important things that you realize. When you read these stories is that they invite you to look at the world the way the accomplished person sees the world so these are the two sorts of practices that but ISM has four orienting us changing our perspective active giving us a new categories more correct categories in which to interpret through its to interpret our experience a better understanding of what reality is really like in light of which to interpret our everyday experiences? I'd like to talk more about stories at just a little later in the conversation but first first of all I'd like to stay with this this idea of reality if we're talking about a turn towards a better comprehension of reality. I mean we know that in Plato. There's sort capital our reality or a capital T...

Plato Australasian Association of Bu aristotle Yale Melbourne Ayukawa Singapore US Seoul Aristoteles Saul Jason Hood Deakin University Corey Action Agency
Extra: Show stoppers

Monocle 24: Section D

04:52 min | 1 year ago

Extra: Show stoppers

"So. I'm I'm a designer that is based in the Netherlands in nine eleven. I just made I think fifteen doorstops that are very a specific to each of the doors in detail. I basically made him from waste so they are all kind of different colors and patterns so to be provides the big range of these doorstops. Did you go around and have a look at the doors. or how are you gonNa try and respond to each of those doors actually quite the list of just the size between the floor and the door I had the size of the handle and that was it. I didn't knew what the space look like. I had not that that mini formations which was also quite fun to just go crazy and Not Be Limited by certain expectations that I would set somehow and then the materials they title they look almost cartoony. Happy Mac that I use some kind of Plato that I discovered in Asia. It's some kind of children educational tool so it's not toxic. So you get all you can eat it. It makes really really soft and it just covered them and the ad layers of layers layers and then to finally arrive in to certain pattern that I'm just going to add to bring even more that and fund into these objects. My name is boss Coyne. I'm half of the studio from Saddam. I worked together with my partner. Say Okay I'm Amato. Auto debris was I would say almost like a list of requirements in this case which was also quite interesting. We were asked to create screens as you could see as well they were supposed to be used or they should have been possible to use both indoors and outdoors. There were certain scale restrictions. And that was Morris it and they should be mobile as well like so. The screens are called the great outdoors and inspiration came from the outdoors. Anything from while on one hand like the more individual side like this mountain ridges and like justice line indoor Isan overlapping screen is. Obviously I mean most times would be quite large piece so we're talking about quite large surfaces if it would be just like one whatever rectangular lers traits surface it can be quite intrusive quite distracting or something. So that's something which we tried to soften working with curves and working with transparency. But it's more like to create certain distance within the space so it's not completely breaking it. It's not like putting wall somewhere in between clean but rather it's almost like a mental thing you know it's like something which it's about the perspective of the viewer of user of people around Hello Shylock ally from resign studio I walk with my wife life yet. We design furniture and products and installation and spaces for these showing here at days to rugs from my collection. Shen we designed for gun. It's a Spanish company. The production is in India. And when we started to walk with gun they didn't really give us a brief. They say you. Oh you just hit you make your vision happen. It's often amazing. It's free and you just need to come in idea. The only thing they say is that they do you have a group of women in India did specialize in embroidery and they love to have some embroidery in the collection. Because it means taking Kim Day workflow and it's important for them to keep these women busy because they'd been taken in mind and be independent we had destroyed and you're like okay no way. He's just yes. We are definitely gonNA use embroidery and the body was studying born. We did the research we look at embroidery from Different Cultures Khuhro of North America different places aces and as a kid. I remember going to my grandma. She was from Bulgaria and looking handles embroidery and beautiful. You see those roses and flour and tax and runners the core development. And then when you turn to the other side you see all the mess of their handmade embroidery and we. So let's just take this mess in the back of the stitching them. They make a collection of these. We analyzed different different mess basically because the mass of the roses looks different from the mass of a text of runner. And we just mopped which one can be turned into a recollection. And that's basically what we did just trying to take defend. Take on something that people are doing for for so long. That was

India Shen Coyne Netherlands Saddam Amato Partner Asia North America Morris KIM Bulgaria One Hand
"plato" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"plato" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Right. So first of all in Socrates defense. Let me say this. I think this was again dangling the city like Kalisz before him, and however had Socrates not intervened with Clough con. There's no question that he would have joined the regime of the thirty tyrants and participated in in that Toronto oligarchy and engage in many unjust aids. As a result. Why is there? No question. Well, Plato leaves a letter call the seventh letter and in the seventh letter he explains his own experience. Now, Plato was the youngest brother adamant is was the oldest glaucoma was the middle brother Glock. We know had already established himself as a brave warrior in a very bright young man by the time a four zero four Plato would have been about twenty four years old block on maybe closer to thirty. Plato writes in the seventh letter I was invited by my relatives. They took over in Athens at the end of the war, and they promise to restore the city to virtue injustice, and and he indicates that basically he was on board and he began to participate and he said, but I quickly realized that the previous regime was a thing of gold compared to these guys, and he talks about how they they persecuted. Socrates? They actually made a law. Right. They didn't like soccer because he asked questions, and and naturally Socrates was anti-tehran ical. And so they made a law. Socrates can't talk to anyone that the age of thirty and you can't teach the artist speech and so forth. Glauber on would certainly have been invited to to join this regime at a mantis would have been invited to join the regime..

Socrates Plato Kalisz Glauber Toronto Athens soccer Clough twenty four years
"plato" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"plato" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"They did it in college, and some sort of genetic philosophy course, they had to take where they just did it for pleasure. But there's some people who don't know. A lot about Plato talk about there's a lot of Greek. Philosophers this time the Axial age what made Plato unique as a philosopher compared to Xenophon or nearest doddle. And all these other guys. Yes. So Xenophon who you just mentioned was one of two very important students. Of the philosopher Socrates Plato being the other and Plato student was Aerostat will. But it all started with Socrates who was very charismatic personality. And I'll be talking more about him later in this podcast Plato is unique for a number of reasons. First of all he wrote dialogues when are usually called platonic dialogues thirty five of them, and we have all thirty five dialogues that were attributed to Plato in the ancient world, plus a number that were attributed to him. But are probably not by Plato in these dialogues are unin tire sort of fictional world of the sort that only really the greatest writers like Homer or Shakespeare might produce. And I mentioned Shakespeare because in terms of literary genre. The dialogues are closest to Greek drama. You know, you had these Athenian drama tests. Ascalon Sophocles Euripides who wrote tragedies and comedies and weird little dramas called Seder place. So the platonic dialogues are dramas in. In which we don't see the sorts of things we get in Greek drama where people are killed, and you know, there's fighting and war and so forth. But what we see as people arguing having philosophical discussions and doing all the sorts of things that people do in discussion telling jokes making little speeches, maybe getting angry telling stories, and in these dramas Socrates, Plato Steeler is the protagonist. He appears almost every single platonic dialogues. And this is really unique in philosophy that what we have is a kind of story making not philosophy, but the philosopher the center of attention. So we get to see Socrates as a whole human being. And we get to see him interacting in the historical circumstances of his age with other themes, and one feature of Socrates that I want to mention I'll talk about this more later too. But he is a kind of new hero. He's sort of. New protagonist, you know, that the Greek dramas and Homer, they might have somebody like achilles or Periclean these. And these these men were great because they were courageous and they were victorious in battle and so forth. Socrates is a philosophical warrior of sorts, and and what makes him heroic is his integrity. I think that he shows us Socrates because Socrates was a rare human being who lived up to his best understanding of things he didn't just talk the talk which would be philosophy. He walked the walk. So he spoke about Justice and courage and virtue and making your soul as good as possible, and he lived that life, and that's what played a wants to present to us. So very different from say, a philosophical treatise like Aristotle or Kant who basically engages them the analysis of phenomena, but doesn't give us a drama yet. That's what I've I love reading Plato. I'm drawn to Aristoteles virtue. Ethics but. Eading Aristotle is a slog because you know, those are basically his lecture notes. Yeah. Just like if then this and lot of an interest like, but like Plato, it's like, wow, I could just you. You can just read this for pleasure..

Socrates Plato Socrates Xenophon Homer Eading Aristotle Shakespeare Ascalon Sophocles Euripides Kant Aerostat
"plato" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"plato" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Like that. Right. So. He he proposed this as an explanation. Four four four the ice ages. And. You know, such a such a shift also, and this, you know, this is I think what got the phlegm apps and others thinking about, you know, poll shifts as a as a mechanism for, you know. Worldwide or, you know, extensive cataclysms because you know, it's not the sort of thing that would necessarily affect the entire planet to kind of pens on where you are if you're sort of at the, you know, perhaps where the the axle of the wheel is, you know, using that analogy and the crust is shifting a lot where you are just of rotating, perhaps the damage isn't as great as if it's moving thousands of miles in one direction or the other. And so this perhaps could have been an explanation for for the, you know, for disasters and could have been a trigger point for volcanic eruptions and all kinds of stuff that has been associated with, you know, these cataclysms throughout throughout time that, you know, even you know, you know, Plato mentions in in in his dialogues. And so let me just get a drink of water here. Sure. Absolutely. Because I mean, Plato was the one who started at all in terms of our. Interest in Atlanta's. That's right. And and and really the only he's he's really the only source of that myth everything else. Pretty much has been an interpretation or or or some variation of that. And this whole idea that..

Plato Atlanta
"plato" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"plato" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Care freedom there's been a tremendous amount going on behind the curtain when it comes to the take take down of the globalist new world order deep state however you wanna define it that syndicate and the bought off lame stream fake media is begrudgingly starting to let a little bit of that information out i start with a quote from plato no less quote we can easily forgive a child who was afraid of the dark the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid i should say men and women are afraid of the light and quote oh what's the light i'm speaking about it's a topic that makes people shudder it makes people that haven't really looked into this say this is conspiracy theory this is fear porn i i'm not even going to acknowledge this information i'm not even going to deem it worthy of doing some research it's important for you to research it it's important for you to know about it because it's what the globalist the new world order the criminal international banking syndicate the deep state the shadow government.

plato