35 Burst results for "Plague"

Snoop Dogg rage-quits game, leaves Twitch on

Checkpoint Radio

01:08 min | 17 hrs ago

Snoop Dogg rage-quits game, leaves Twitch on

"It. Losing those frustrating Nobody likes it. But when you're hip hop Ogi, you probably have a much lower tolerance for getting your ass kicked than most regular gamers. Du That's why this week are failed. It goes out to Snoop Dog who ended up rage, quitting a Madden livestream after playing for only 15 minutes. I get it. I totally understand what you're playing like the computer again, somebody against other people. Alright, Fair enough. Fair enough. That's new dogs. Still the man in the while he's been known to talk a little trash about his mad and skills since he's a pretty good player. This time the trash was talk to him. Listen as he pulls the plug and bails obvious dream life. Oh, man. What the because you doing cause What is going on him. Snoop never quit out of the stream entirely and let the stream apply for another 7.5 hours while he went about smoking weed and playing classics from James Brown to Bruno Mars, his home stereo literally didn't not just rage quit out of the game. He just left the stream of plague. Weighing his like his room that he was in everything Come back to a DMC take. He was so

Snoop Dog Snoop Bruno Mars James Brown Plague
With 'Raya,' Disney has their biggest animated action hero to date — and yes, she's still a princess

Fresh Air

06:10 min | 1 d ago

With 'Raya,' Disney has their biggest animated action hero to date — and yes, she's still a princess

"Chang says the new Disney film Riot, and the last Dragon is not just for kids. He calls it a gorgeously animated fantasy adventure with a hopeful message. For this moment, the movie began streaming on Disney plus today. Ryan and the last Dragon is the lovely moving surprise. Its big selling point is that it's the first Disney animated film to feature Southeast Asian characters. Like so many movies that break ground in terms of representation, it tells a story that's actually woven from reassuringly familiar parts. Didn't mind that in the slightest. The movie directed by the Disney veteran Don Hall and the animation newcomer Carlos Lopez. Estrada brings us into a fantasy world that's been beautifully visualized and populated with engaging characters. And it builds to an emotional climax that I'm still thinking about days later. Story is a little complicated as these stories tend to be It takes place in command Ra and enchanted realm inspired by various Southeast Asian cultures and divided into five kingdoms, named after a dragon's body parts heart Thing, spine, Talyn and tail. Before they became extinct centuries ago. Dragons once roamed the land and served as friendly guardians to humanity. Their magic lives on in a Jule called the Dragon Gym, which is kept in a cave in the heart, but the other four kingdoms covet. It's mighty powers. One day all five factions come together and try to reach a peace agreement. But tensions erupt. Ah fight breaks out, and the gem shatters into five pieces that are scattered across come, Andhra. This opens the doorway to an ancient enemy called Bedroom, a terrible plague that turns people to stone. Actually, a hero must rise and save the day. Her name is Ryan. And she's a young warrior princess from heart voiced by the excellent Kelly Marie Tran from Star Wars. The last Jedi. I Ryan manages to escape the drone, though her father, her body whose leader of heart isn't so lucky. Now Ryan must recover the pieces of the Dragon Jim, reverse the damage and banished that room for good. This is the first time we've seen a brave young character embark on a quest for magical bottles. And Ryan and the last Dragon is rooted in traditional fantasy lore with the Lord of the Rings and game of Thrones being just the most obvious influences. Movies, Intense scenes of sword play and hand to hand combat. Give it a tougher, more grown up field and most Disney animated fantasies. My own young daughter had to cover her eyes a few times. Some other recent Disney princesses, including marijuana, and Elsa Ryan has a bold, adventurous streak and isn't all that interested in romance? Unlike them, she doesn't even have time to sing a song. That said the movie still has plenty of lightness and humor. Screenwriters. Quick win and Adele Limb have provided the usual Disney array of cute critters and lively supporting characters. None of them is more colorful than see Soo Ah friendly water Dragon who is magically resurrected during riots journey. She's the last of her kind, and she has a crucial role to play in the story. She's voiced delightfully by Aquafina doing one of her signature chatterbox comedy routines and selling everyone of ceases and naturalistic wisecracks. In one scene, she touches a piece of the dragon Jim and magically Lights up. Which riots sees as a hopeful sign. You were glowing. Oh, thank you. I use Alan Rivers climb. Maintain my know this'd my little sister office magic. I got that glow in your little sister's much jack. Yet. Every dragon has a unique magic. Okay, What's yours? I am a really strong swimmer. Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. You touch this gym piece, and it gave you powers. You know what this means? Right? I no longer need a night light. What? No, you're still connected to the jumps. Magic, not means you can still use it to save the world. If we can get all the other Jen pieces, you can reassemble it and, well, the drooling away. And bring my bar back and bring all of commander back Ryan and sees his journey takes them toe. All five kingdoms of command ra all of which are so vivid and transporting, I found myself wishing they really existed. More than I could have at least seen them on a proper movie screen. There's the town of talent, which is built at the edge of a river and the desert wasteland of tail where Ryan and See Soo must enter a cave of obstacles straight out of an Indiana Jones adventure. As the two of them search for more dragon Jim pieces. They, of course, pick up a few friends along the way. There's a street smart boy who cooks a mean shrimp Con ji and a toddler pickpocket, whom I found more creepy than cute. The movie's most intriguing character is no Mari arrival. Princess from Fang, who's voiced by Gemma Chan. As a side note. Chan and Aquafina both appeared in crazy rich Asians, which, like this movie was co written by Adele Limb. Mari and Roya used to be friends until the fight over the dragon Jim rip them apart. Now they're bitter enemies, and their emotional dynamic is fierce and complicated in ways that relationships are rarely allowed to be in Children's animated films, especially between women. Contrast, See, Sue is all feel good vibes. She's a dragon, after all, with little understanding of how treacherous humans can be. She doesn't get by riot and the Mari distrust each other so why they can't just set their differences aside and defeat the drone together. It's Caesar's sincerity and purity of heart. That makes the stories finale so unexpectedly stirring, especially now. Our fates are closely bound together. It reminds us as it builds a case for forgiveness, reconciliation and mutual sacrifice. The emotional power of riot and the last dragon sneaks up on you. Its lessons aren't knew exactly, but it makes you feel like you're learning them for the first time. Justin

Disney Ryan Don Hall Carlos Lopez Adele Limb Kelly Marie Tran Aquafina Elsa Ryan Estrada Chang Alan Rivers Andhra See Soo Jim Pieces Con Ji Gemma Chan Mari Roya Indiana Jones Fang
Disney's New Movie 'Raya And The Last Dragon' Out Now

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

Disney's New Movie 'Raya And The Last Dragon' Out Now

"New movie hits theaters and Disney. Plus today for 29 99. You can stream Mariah and the Last Dragon Southeast Asian Warrior riots seeks the last dragon to save the world from a monstrous plague. In order to restore peace. We must find the last dragon. Her funny sidekick is a water dragon voice by Aquafina, who recalls Robin Williams Genie in Aladdin. I'm not like the best dragon Have you ever done like a group project? But there's like that one. Headed in pitch in as much We're doomed. The digital animation rivals any video game featuring cool reflections in sword blades. Best of all are the timely themes as the plague turns victims to stone in an allegory for covert 19, where we can only be saved if we learn to trust our perceived enemies.

Aquafina Mariah Disney Robin Williams Plague
Nintendo Plans Switch Model With Bigger Samsung OLED Display

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:29 min | 3 d ago

Nintendo Plans Switch Model With Bigger Samsung OLED Display

"Nintendo co plans to unveil a model of its switch gaming console equipped with a bigger samsung. Oh led display this year hoping the larger touchscreen can prop up demand in in time for the holidays people familiar with the plan. Said samsung display co. We'll start mass production of a seven inch seven. Twenty p resolution led panels as early as june within initial monthly target of just under a million units. Said the people who asked not to be identified discussing internal matters. The displays are slated for shipment to assemblers around july. The people said representatives for nintendo and samsung display declined to comment nintendo seeks to sustain a switch lineup that continues to sell well against the xbox and playstation thanks to pandemic era breakout hits like animal crossing and a chip crush. That's plagued supply of rival devices but the gadget is now in its fifth year while microsoft corp and sony corp both have new more powerful machines in the market. The gaming community has speculated online about the introduction of an old lead. Organic light emitting diode screen but nintendo has stayed mum in president Shuntaro for awhile. Through our set in february his company has no plans to announce a new switch quote unquote anytime soon. Which is we pointed out in february could have meant as much as oh no time soon and they do next week and they're like well no. That wasn't soon. That was a week. Are you talking about. Saddam works samsung's involvement is the strongest indication. That nintendo is serious. About updating the council on a large scale

Nintendo Samsung Display Co Samsung Microsoft Corp Sony Corp Saddam
Nintendo Plans Switch Model With Bigger Samsung OLED Display

Kinda Funny Games Daily

03:48 min | 3 d ago

Nintendo Plans Switch Model With Bigger Samsung OLED Display

"Nintendo co plans to unveil a model of its switch gaming console equipped with a bigger samsung. Oh led display this year hoping the larger touchscreen can prop up demand in in time for the holidays people familiar with the plan. Said samsung display co. We'll start mass production of a seven inch seven. Twenty p resolution led panels as early as june within initial monthly target of just under a million units. Said the people who asked not to be identified discussing internal matters. The displays are slated for shipment to assemblers around july. The people said representatives for nintendo and samsung display declined to comment nintendo seeks to sustain a switch lineup that continues to sell well against the xbox and playstation thanks to pandemic era breakout hits like animal crossing and a chip crush. That's plagued supply of rival devices but the gadget is now in its fifth year while microsoft corp and sony corp both have new more powerful machines in the market. The gaming community has speculated online about the introduction of an old lead. Organic light emitting diode screen but nintendo has stayed mum in president Shuntaro for awhile. Through our set in february his company has no plans to announce a new switch quote unquote anytime soon. Which is we pointed out in february could have meant as much as oh no time soon and they do next week and they're like well no. That wasn't soon. That was a week. Are you talking about. Saddam works samsung's involvement is the strongest indication. That nintendo is serious. About updating the council on a large scale quote the led panel will consume less battery offer higher contrast and possibly faster response time when compared to switch his current liquid crystal display said co founder of display consultant the ds the latest model will also come with four k ultra high definition graphics. When paired with tv's they said that could intensify a longstanding complaint of developers who have struggled with the difference in resolution between hand-held and tv modes and now face a bigger gap between the two that can intensify long cynically. The nudist plays resolution. Mir's the current switch and switch life but is an upgrade from the switches. Six point two inch and lights five point five inch size if the consuls housing remains unchanged the new switches likely sport a thinner basil parris lilly. How do you unpack this. would you be excited for. Would you buy. Do you believe it. So i have three switches in my house already. My kids you're buying this no matter. What no yeah. I'm getting it absolutely. This is the one that i've been waiting for. I think the biggest thing that i took out of this. It's not only as an led screen but the fact that you're because of the power consumption is going to be less. You're going to get more battery life. That's obviously been a big thing that we've wanted with the switch in portable mode on thing which they don't talk about in this that i'm hopeful to see what whenever we we get the unveil. This is better joy cons potentially You know probably thinner. Basil's noted mentioned mentioned it in there as well. The fourcade thing is interesting. It's clearly the logical step to go when it's going to be in tv mode so speak. Yeah i guess. I really don't care when it comes nintendo with four k And i know there's obviously been some speculation with developer support on this. How are if it is going to be going from. Seven twenty pm scaling. All the way up to four k is that gonna put just make an extra workload for developers. Like i said to me if it stated tonight ep but it had better battery life better a bigger screen. That's enough i. I would be happy with that to me. The switch ninety percent of the time. I'm playing it in portable mode anyway. So i'm not overly concerned with there being four k in dock mode and playing that way so i mean i think a lot of this is true but it'll be interesting to see what what the truth looks like.

Nintendo Samsung Display Co Samsung Microsoft Corp Sony Corp Parris Lilly Saddam Basil
Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

Photography Radio

06:02 min | 3 d ago

Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today we are going old school and we are going deep into a really really wonderful type of photography. That's not practice very much anymore and really frankly when you see it. It's going to knock your socks off. We're talking with shane belkevich. Shane happens to live just a couple hours. West of me out here on the great plains of north america up north dakota chain that afternoon. How's everything out in the middle part of the state. good scott. thanks for having me on. We've got a little snow last night. Which was a very welcomed. Got a little snow over here. It's cold it's january is imagine about winner on the american that should be asked should be. You're absolutely right shane. You are just absolutely mesmerizing with the work. You're doing you do wet plate colin on photography. You do when one of the earliest styles of photography and admit you know. When i first heard about it i thought why in the world would anyone want to go through that amount of work for an image that i can do in my mirrorless. Dsl are very quickly. And then i realized how wrong. I was can't do that image and i certainly can't come up with a product that you've come up with so first question for people that that are familiar with the process. What is wet plate photography. What is the whole call it on process. Yeah so a wet plate clothing. Photography's invented by frederick scott archer in. He started working on about eighteen. Forty eight we believe in eighteen fifty one. He came out with a journal article in a scientific journal and presented it to the world. So what we're doing. I'm sure many of your listeners. Know about daguerreotype process which was invented by the declare. The frenchman About ten years. Before what plaguing frederick scott archer wanted to improve on that and This is what he came up with and the final product. And what your comment about why. You can't capture wet played in a modern a digital camera. Is that this is completely analog and the final images the images that i make. I an amber typist. That means i make my photographs on glass specifically for me black glass and these images are made out a pure silver on glass. And what's about silver silver does not degrade so these images that i have Have made over the last eight years of made a three eight hundred of them all by ten most most eight by ten black last amber types of they'll be here thousand years from now broken which which is not something you can save for princeton pigments in paintings and other things like that so the these are very archival images and i. it's just a very very romantic process. i was never photographer before. A two thousand twelve took my first exposure on october. Fourth never owned a camera. And i just find myself chasing this this historic process. It is really really interesting and we need to tell people that there is a movie out. There is called belkevich b. a. l. k. o. w. i t. s. c. h. on video. It's on amazon. Prime it is a documentary about you and your work and folks. You need to go there. You need to watch this film if you are in the any kind of photography. You need to do this but shane one of the things. That really intrigued me. Watching the film is that most of us that are in the photography files were making digital files. Or you know. We're coming up even if we're still dealing with old thirty five millimeter film or that kind of stuff Medium format film. You know we come up with a negative but then you know actual print is a temporary thing. You much more like a sculptor are making an object's this glass plate and it's not revisable you can't go back and tweak the highlights you can't go back and ask grain if you want. What is the appeal of making that object versus a kind of idea. We have to understand most web play. Cloudy and artists There was one here in bismarck. North dakota orlando scott gough. When he he was known for capturing the first ever photograph of sitting. Bull here bismarck. In the in this process that i practice and i i happen to capture ernie lapointe the great grandson. The city hundred thirty five years later in the same town in the same process but goth would have made a negative like you had said he would make a glass of so instead of putting his images onto black glass which you cannot contact with. He would have used clear glass. Clear glass as you insinuated. You can make multiple copies and you can enter. The final product in that scenario is a print. Because you want to be able to sell you know apprentice shayna print scott where wants to print you can make as many prints of these want is your business and it. Did you know good to have a one off plate because you and you know when you're talking about eighteen fifty one is no way of duplicate and they didn't have scanners and we couldn't do anything like that so you know. I think there's something very special about the the fact that these images are one offs and they can never be duplicated in they can never be replicated. When i make one of these images. I've for instance. I've dropped an image once and tried to go five minutes later. Ten minutes later tried to make this image with the same sitter the same camera. The same lenses saint chemistry. And i can never get back to that so if you look at this romantically. I'm not actually taking snapshots people actually making ten second movies. I'm still life movies. Because my exposures in my natural studio that i built here in bismarck. It's called nostalgic glassware plate studio the first one in in the country bill of the ground up and over a hundred years. I'm making ten second exposure. So there's heartbeats and there's blood flowing through the person there's a couple. Maybe a blinker to and what. I really love about this is. Maybe there's a thought so. I'm capturing thought on that piece of glass pure silver. That'll be here on.

Frederick Scott Archer Shane Belkevich Scott Olsen Shane North Dakota Colin North America Scott Gough Ernie Lapointe Scott Shayna Print Scott Bismarck Amazon Orlando
COVID In Pennsylvania: Health Network Allowed Employees’ Family Members To Skip Vaccine Line

KYW 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | Last week

COVID In Pennsylvania: Health Network Allowed Employees’ Family Members To Skip Vaccine Line

"One of Pennsylvania's largest health networks, taking heat for allowing employees family members to skip Covert 19 vaccine line Guy Fingers decision to give special access to employees. Relatives earned a rebuke from the Pennsylvania Department of Health. It says the healthcare giant shouldn't have held vaccine clinics for eligible family members of employees about 3600 relatives of Guy singer employees were vaccinated under the program. Ah guy Singer says those family members met the state's eligibility requirements and the move Is raising questions of fairness at a time of strong public demand and scarce supply. The vaccine clinics allowed family members to avoid frustrating, tedious and often fruitless hunts for appointments that have plagued the state's early

Pennsylvania Department Of Hea Guy Singer Pennsylvania
US. manual upload test - burst 1

test

04:02 min | Last week

US. manual upload test - burst 1

"Hello everybody and welcome to the Abundant podcast It season 13 episode 14 It's the final episode of the year and of season thirteen it wasn't that unlucky or general? Hi, we don't say a big thank you to everyone who supported us this year with our patreon subscriptions and with one off PayPal contributions now as usual his last show of the year. We are going to be going on Hiatus for a couple of months at the beginning of next year to give us and all of you are break. So Martin, would you like to explain what's going to happen with our page? And while we're off are yes, so the first thing that's going to happen is there will be a payment taken on January 1st or whatever, you know, the first week of January is and that would be the money that we use to pay for the December production costs, but then we will pause patreon taking money for a boon to podcast and off. All we return or if indeed we returned because you know, we haven't had our career yet and decided if we're going to do this again, but we will be pausing the patrian whilst we're off. Yeah, great. So yes, if you're subscribed and you want to continue to support us then continue to be subscribed. We won't take your money without giving you podcasts. And in the meantime Alan what have you been up to recently? Well just in time for the last episode. I have removed the audio noise that was plaguing my system and also doubled my speed on my desktop PC. Wow. Is this the same fix for both? It was it was one fix that did both things. It turns out I use ethernet over power adapters tp-link devices off because my office is like the complete opposite end of the house from the internet connection and to get it here. I didn't run ethernet. I just use ethernet over power and I've been using it for years and there's Bob Background like crackle for a while and I couldn't pinpoint what it was and I thought it was cables crossing over or something like that. And also the internet in this room is 50% of what it should be like a nice day for like hundred hundred and ten Meg or something. I get 4850 something like that. And when the kids are out one day, I unplugged loads of things and Shuffle things around and it turned out it was off the ethernet over power device, which has a through socket was plugged into a four-way thing and I moved it. So it's plugged directly in the wall magically met audio problem goes away a my internet is now twice as fast. That's all I did. The only thing that changed was me moving the ethernet over power socket to be plugged directly in the wall. Suddenly everything faster and better well great. Well, I'm glad you got that done in time for one recording. Sorry joke not in or even up to I have been playing Hotshot racing with my dog. Ends on that their Internet. It's a good game. This is a driving game. I imagine it is. I think I may have mentioned it earlier in the year, but it's having a bit of a Revival at the motion. It's a low poly retro arcade style racer available on Steam and you can play it under proton. And now now I'm not working for you know, the Christmas break. I was looking to have some fun. So I've started hosting some Linux game nights and this is the game. We're playing at the moment doing an excellent Romper around the tracks and can people watch you playing even if they don't want to play they can I've started a second YouTube channel just for playing games on Linux and it's all streamed there and everyone loves playing along with me has a voice in the room and it's a real group effort. And in fact, some of the others are streaming as well. So you can even own overlay multiple angles of the game being played at home. I'm brilliant and

Patreon Paypal Martin Alan MEG BOB Youtube
Water Problems Plague Millions Of Texans Following Storm Crisis

Behind the Badge

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

Water Problems Plague Millions Of Texans Following Storm Crisis

"Back to most residents in Texas than the Mercury is finally rising above freezing across the state. That winter storm this week left millions with no heat or water. There is a lot of effort from the community that does have power does have food does have water to help those who don't about half the state 15 million residents are under a boil water notice as of right now, and if you go to grocery stores, there's been a rush on bottled water. So shelves are bare. Almost everywhere you go. Same goes for food. Meat aisles completely wiped out as well as nonperishable food items. Thanks is Grady Trimble. President Biden has declared a major disaster in Texas.

Texas Grady Trimble President Biden
Tens of thousands of buildings have burst pipes in Houston area

Bloomberg Law

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Tens of thousands of buildings have burst pipes in Houston area

"Kind. Water issues are plaguing Texas as a result of power outages from freezing temperatures. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality told CNN. Nearly 15 million people have been affected by water system disruptions, The systems and nearly 160 Lone Star. State counties have also been impacted. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner noted the city's fire department received thousands of reports of broken pipes. On Thursday, Austin's water director said their water supply deteriorated. Over 300 million gallons because of

Texas Commission On Environmen Mayor Sylvester Turner CNN Texas Houston Austin
Serena stopped: Osaka beats Williams in Australian Open SF

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Serena stopped: Osaka beats Williams in Australian Open SF

"Serena Williams quest for an increasingly elusive record equalling twenty fourth major has been thwarted yet again an error plagued Williams falling six three six four the third stayed nine AM you'll soccer who advance to her second Australian Open final Williams my twenty four unforced errors during the match but apart from a nervous start it really was a sucker's heavy hitting that dominated the battle a reward is a showdown with American Jennifer Brady who advanced to her first grand slam final winning a nail biting three set battle with Caroline a look at that securing the victory on her fifth match point nine Graham like us

Serena Williams Williams Jennifer Brady Soccer Caroline Graham
How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

TED Talks Daily

04:07 min | 2 weeks ago

How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

"Oh firm use of fire that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention a kingdom for a stage princes to act and monarch to behold the swelling scene. Though to be totally honest right. Now i'd settle for a real school day a night out and a hug from a friend. The words that i spoke at the beginning firm use a fire etc are shakespeare's. He wrote them as the opening to his play. Henry the fifth and there are also quite likely. The first words ever spoken on the stage of the globe theatre in london when it opened in fifteen ninety nine the global go on to become the home for most of shakespeare's work and from what i hear that shakespeare guy was pretty popular but despite his popularity just four years later in sixteen zero three. The globe would close for an extended period of time in order to prevent the spreading and resurgence of the bubonic plague and facts from sixteen zero three to sixteen thirteen. All of the theaters in london were closed on and off again for an astonishing seventy eight months here in chicago in two thousand sixteen new theaters opening as well. The steppenwolf had just opened at seventeen hundred theater. Space the goodman down in the loop had just opened its new center for education and engagement and the chicago shakespeare theatre had just started construction on its newest theatre space. The yard today. Those theatres as well as the homes are over two hundred and fifty other theater companies across chicago are closed due to covid nineteen from broadway to l. a. Theaters are dark and when or if the lights are ever going to come on again. That means that tens of thousands of theater artists are out of work from actors and directors to stage managers. Set builders costume designers. It's not like it's an easy time to go wait tables. It's a hard time for the theater. And it's a hard time for the world but while theaters may be feeder as an art form has the potential to shine on how we can process and use this time apart to build a brighter more equitable healthier future together. Theater is the oldest art form we humans have. We know that the greeks were writing plays as early as the fifth century. Bc but theater goes back before that it goes back before we learned to write to call and response around fires. And who knows maybe before we learned to build fire itself feeder has outlasted empires weathered wars and survived plagues in the early sixteen hundred. Theatres closed over sixty percent of the time in london. And that's still looked at is one of the most fertile an innovative periods of time in western theater history. The plays that were written then are still performed today. Over four hundred years later unfortunately in the early sixteen hundreds a different plague was making its way across the ocean and it hit the shores of what would be called american sixteen nineteen when the first slave ships landed in jamestown virginia. Racism is an ongoing plague in america but many of us in the theater like to think we're not infected or that we are at worst as symptomatic but the truth is our symptoms have been glaring onstage and off. We have the opportunity to use this intermission. Caused by one clegg to work to cure another. We can champion a theater. That marches protests burns bills. We can reimagine the way our theaters institutions work to make them more reflective. And just we can make this one of the most innovative and transformative periods of time in western theater. History one that we're still learning about celebrating four hundred years from now. What we embody in the theater can be embodied in the world. Why because theater is an essential service. And what i mean by that. Is that theater is in service to that which is essential about ourselves. Love anger rage despair. Hope theatre not only shows us the breadth and depth of human emotions. It allows us to experience catharsis to feel our feelings and rather than ignore compartmentalize them move through them to discover. What's on the other side

Seventeen Hundred Theater Shakespeare Center For Education And Engag Chicago Shakespeare Theatre London Chicago Plague Goodman Henry The Globe Jamestown Virginia America
Reproductive Justice & Women in the COVID Economy

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

04:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Reproductive Justice & Women in the COVID Economy

"Monica. Thank you for being with us today. Thank you so much for having me really is honored to be on the show with you today and to being conversation about reproductive justice. So i tell us what brought you to doing reproductive. Justice work and tell us a little bit abou- calling in reproductive justice in some people call her reproductive freedom. What brings me to reproductive justice. You know To answer that question. I have to take myself back to my hometown of wingate north carolina which is in rural north carolina. Honor one of those small one. Stop light kind of towns off a two lane highway and growing up in the rural south is. It's beautiful in so many ways that also opened my eyes to a lot at a very young age growing up in my community. I went to a school where there was only abstinence only education so we were desperately trying to find ways to have conversations about our bodies and to to talk about the feelings in the urges that we were getting as we were growing into adolescence and there was no space to do that until we had to find those things on our own and to create community with each other in huddle up in spaces to try to get this information in that to me. Just didn't seem right but we were doing the best that we could in. You know the church black church was episode for me my community. It's where i learned how to organize. I learned the had a voice. I mean there's just so much to Organizing route that. I get to the black church right because it was just an important piece in my journey however it was also a space where you know. We couldn't talk about bodies. It was just not the conversation that people were trying to have but almost every young girl that was in my church in so many that were in my community outreach. That went to school with. They were having children before graduating high school. And i'm like it's obvious that we're doing it. It's obvious that you know he's a conversation that we need to have and we just weren't having them and you know i i left wingate. I went to an h. b. c. You and came out while i was in school and it was like another part of my journey of understanding my body consent intimacy all different things that come along with growing into a young adult and i still felt. There wasn't a lot of space to have these conversations and I was desperately seeking those spaces and just trying to put the pieces together for myself. And so i think it's the experiences on. Unfortunately i also dealt with sexual assault in my adolescence as well as these experiences just all came together. And i didn't know what the term was yet but i knew that these issues were important to me in. I wanted to find answers and solutions to help me into also help those folks in our community that cared about. And so when. I put that beside you know reproductive justice movement that was started by black women in nineteen ninety four. The world starts collide. Right so yeah wasserman. Twelve black women actually came together. Some of which are very active in the work today. Like loretta ross. And dr tony bond able may will thomas here in georgia. These black women came together to create a framework that was more expansive in when thinking about our reproductive lives in this country and they brought together social justice in reproductive health and rights to talk about the intersection of her lives of black women and to have an organizing frame that allowed us to really talk about the myriad of issues. Right that we deal with lear making our decisions about our reproductive lives and so this framework was developed in nineteen ninety four battles women in now it is led by women of color all across country. Today right where we are all fighting for the human rights to have the children that we want in the ways that we want to prevent pregnancies without shame and with dignity to be able to parent our children in healthy and safe environments rights. We we we can already see the intersections of our work in terms of you know making sure i were not being plagued by you know. Environmental issues are making our water. Unclean or police brutality and we think about the rising rates of maternal mortality in this country and ultimately nova's work is really about our human rights bodley autonomy to make our own decisions about our bodies therefore our lives and so that's what reproductive justice is. It's the work it's not political home. It's where i feel whole and complete and those experiences again of growing up. Is that country. Girl and unique county is what really brought me to this work. And i didn't know that there was a movement waiting for me but it was.

North Carolina Wingate Monica Loretta Ross Dr Tony Bond Wasserman Lear Georgia Thomas Bodley
This day in history - NAACP founded

This Day in History Class

06:34 min | 3 weeks ago

This day in history - NAACP founded

"The day was february twelfth. Nineteen o nine in new york city. A group of black and white people met to talk about the status of black people in the united states. There were sixty people at the meeting including suffrage is philanthropist journalist clergymen educators and people from other traditions in attendance and some of them have been part of the abolitionist movement. Many of the people there had also been part of the niagara movement which was a civil rights group founded in nineteen o five sociologist activists w. e. d. boys and editor an activist william morris. Trotter the date of this meeting was notable because it was the hundredth anniversary of former us. President abraham lincoln's birth which many found meaningful because. Lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation. But anti black violence was still endemic in the united states. And the people who met in new york on this day. We're committed to fighting racism and discrimination in the us. starting what was sometimes called a new abolition movement. At the time. Jim crow laws enforced racial segregation in the south. Though discrimination on the basis of race was constant throughout the united states thousands of black people were being lynched by white mobs at public events that were made into spectacles and deadly race. Riots were taking place across the country. In the period after the reconstruction era interpersonal and institutionalized racism were plaguing american society but activists reformers in revolutionaries were using and fighting to combat rampant racism and violence in the country in august nineteen. Oh eight there was a violent race riots. In springfield illinois where mobs of white people destroyed the homes and businesses of black people in the community and killed in lynched others author and activist. Ns stransky and her husband. William english walling. A socialist journalist went to springfield to investigate the right and in september. A magazine called the independent published an article by walling titled the race war in the north in the article. He wrote that. People must revive the spirit of abolitionist. Entreat black people social and political equals or else the race war would continue to spread across the country and walling went on to write the following the day. These methods become general in the north. Every hope of political democracy will be dead other weaker. Racist in classes will be persecuted in the north. As in the south public education will undergo an eclipse and american civilization. We'll await either a rapid degeneration or another profounder and more revolutionary civil war which sell obliterate not only the remains of slavery but all other obstacles to a free democratic evolution that have grown up in. Its wake who realizes the seriousness of the situation. And what large and powerful body of citizens is ready to come to their aid. Marie white ovington a social worker and writer heated wallin's call and sent him a letter in support so in january nineteen o nine. She met with walling in social worker. Henry moskovitz at wallin's new york apartment to discuss proposing an organization that would fight for the civil and political rights of black people. So oswald garrison villar grandson of abolitionist. William lloyd garrison wrote the call which was a summons for civil rights activists to form an organization that would advocate for ending racial injustice in america and fight for african americans rights the call was endorsed by sixty people including w. e. b. voice journalist and activist ida b wells philosopher and reformer john. Dewey an activist jane addams and on february toldt nineteen o nine a group including mary turks. Tarot charles edward russell in florence kelly among others breath met for a national conference but they didn't hold their first large meeting until may when they organized as the national negro committee. There was some conflict at that first session as leaders tried to get the more conservative but washington to join in on the meetings also tensions rose between white and black members and the press beer the radical nature of the conference but by nineteen ten members of the committee had formed the national association for the advancement of colored people or in double. Acp the n. Double acp mission was quote to promote equality of rights and to eradicate cast a race prejudice among the citizens of the united states to advance the interests of color citizens to secure for them impartial suffrage and to increase their opportunities for securing justice in the courts education for the children employment according to their ability and complete equality before law the organization established is national office in new york city in named a board of directors and president moorefield story at this time w e b d boys was the only black executive in the organization but that same year two boys started the crisis a journal offered discussion on race relations politics and black life and present it black intellectual and artistic work in double. Acp members went on to challenge segregation laws. Stage boycotts start anti lynching campaign in lobby and advocate for new legislation the end ps methods aren't loved by people who use more direct action tactics but the organization did make gains in the movement for black civil rights and is still going today.

United States Stransky William English Springfield President Abraham Lincoln Wallin William Morris Trotter Marie White Ovington Jim Crow Henry Moskovitz New York City Oswald Garrison Villar Walling New York Ida B Wells Lincoln Mary Turks Charles Edward Russell Florence Kelly
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
A highlight from S6 E3 - What is VA Solid Start?

Courage to Fight Again

30:48 min | Last month

A highlight from S6 E3 - What is VA Solid Start?

"Welcome to we serve now. What were we seek to answer. The questions. veterans and their families are already asking that stays question is about a relatively new. Va program called va solid. Start and on today's show. We'll be answering all your questions about this program. What is it. who's it four. What's the goal of the program who's eligible and perhaps most importantly the actions that you need to take to not only take advantage of this program but also to take advantage of ball. The va benefits that you've earned through your military service. And i thought who better to answer this question than the person who came up with the program. So some of you may have heard of dr paul lawrence who is the head of the veterans benefits administration. Well his second. Command is a lady by the name of margarita devlin and she is an absolute well of knowledge. Not just from the. Va solid start program. But about so much more as well hello. My name is aaron perkins. I'm a. Us army combat veteran husband to a beautiful wife. Father to two amazing kiddos on the author of resolve a step by step guide. That takes you the veteran through the journey of rediscovering purpose. Meaning and passion in your life after you've left the military and if you hadn't guessed on the host of this podcast and when we come back my special guest will be here so sit back. Relax and enjoy my conversation with margarita. Devlin who am i. Why am i still here. How can i uncover who. I was meant to be during my own transition from the. Us army the wounds of war especially those not visible continued to plague my through the pain of job loss of ptsd diagnosis at crippling anxiety by finally discovered the reason. I'm here on the earth. And i knew i couldn't keep it to myself so i wrote a book. Simply titled result. Resolved is a book that has one apologetically faith-based a step by step guide designed for maximum effectiveness in the context of a small group of other veterans resolve provides veterans everywhere with the tool to help you step into your new life a life full hope purpose and vision for the future to pick up your copy of resolve head over to courage to fight again dot com. That's courage to fight again dot com. Well i am here with margarita. Devlin and i just want to take a minute to thank you margarita for being here on the show. This is going to be so so great. I'm super excited about it. But i want to take a minute just to kind of introduce you. And i don't want to steal your thunder because i'm going to give you a chance to introduce yourself as well but margarita devlin. She is the principal secretary for benefits in the department of veterans affairs. She's held that position since may of two thousand eighteen. Now that title in itself obviously a mouthful right. But i will let you. Margarita explained what your role is and all of that and kind of dive into a little bit more for listeners. Basically she second in command at veterans benefits administration so veterans benefits administration. Va that's your va. Va home loan disability compensation of oak rehab life insurance transition assistance and speaking of transition assistance marguerita has a lot of different advancements in military to civilian transition and also suicide prevention to include. What we're talking about today and that is the. Va solid start program so margarita. It is so good to have you. I just want you to want you to take a few minutes and introduce yourself but is so great to have you here. Welcome to we served now. What inky so much. It's really my pleasure to be here. Thank you for inviting me to be on this podcast And i guess what. I areas like to tell people as i've been in the va for twenty five years It's my passion to serve veterans in in various different roles throughout my career. i'm also mom of inactivity serving marine And also the mom of a college student Dad was a navy veteran brother served in the army so Military family close very close to my heart this mission so really happy to be here and talk about the solid start program haas of also weived definitely excited to have you and again on this show. We do our best to answer the questions that veterans and their family members are already asking and one of those questions is what is the. Va solid start programming. And that's question. Maybe we can just lead off with that. What is the. Va solid start program. Absolutely i'm happy to just dive right into that. so solid. The solid start program is really part of the military to civilian transition journey. That really looks at the fact. That transition does not end when you get the d. to fourteen at the end of your military service in fact those of you who have served you know this right. That's really when everything starts to actually happen and no amount of preparation With the military can really prepare you for what what your situation is gonna be like after we heard this from veterans so this program really seeks to connect with veterans in that first year after separation starting at about three months and then we follow up beginning six months in a year and it really is an opportunity for us to start out with. How is it going for you. How's your transition going. How're you doing what's going on in your life. What are you worrying about. And really letting the veteran drive the conversation about what he or she needs the moment how it's going and then our agents are very well trained to pick up on those cues from that conversation and provide that veteran with specific resources in guidance on how to continue their transition in the most successful manner. Possible that is that is huge. I remember. I remember when i got out at the end of two thousand fourteen. It was a kind of a drinking from the fire hose. Except i didn't even know what i was supposed to be drinking. You know it's like hey here's a bunch of benefits you might be eligible for good luck and so it's funny so we started this podcast in the summer of two thousand eighteen and it wasn't until i started this podcast and started doing some research that i learned about more benefits. I could've taken advantage of when i first got out. You know four years prior and so the fact that this this solid start program is tackling that specific issue. I think is great. So what what. Problems specifically is the program trying to solve will it is really a suicide prevention initiative and it came from the fact that we heard from veterans. That sort of felt like all the services and support sorta stopped When they separated from the military and because it was like drinking from a fire hose. They really didn't know where to go to do And who to connect to and it was really difficult for. Va to connect with veterans who were not engaging with our with our systems already so we entered into this agreement with department of defense and homeland. Security is coastguard is under homeland security to get data feet of all the military members when they were separating so that we can start those phone calls so that we can call everybody and by the way we do call everybody that we have information for that includes regardless of character discharge We will call these veterans and we will make sure that they get connected to services and resources that are that are specific to their needs so again suicide prevention. We recognize that. There is a a real. There's a reality about transition stress Which is very different than what you might think about with clinical rate with post traumatic stress disorder. Which is a clinical diagnoses Comes with its own required treatment in the mental health arena. But this is just It's stress around. All the life changes that happened with transition. And what you said you know sometimes they. You're hearing so much about so many benefits while you're in the process of separating that when you get out you might not realize that you didn't take advantage of all of them right right. That is so true. That is so true. So so the the tap program transition assistance program or the army's version i think is a cap or something. It is this part of that is essential that the tap program still exist. How does it factor into all that. They're they're connected. They're two separate things but connectors so the transition. Assistance program does still exist Dod really owns and operates. Don on any of the military services of course puts their own branding on their part of the program via has an entire day where we come in and we teach about. Va benefits was really great. We were able to get it to a full day. Always didn't always look like that but even in that full day where we teach it's really It's a classroom experience right so you're Before covid you were in a room with twenty twenty five other service members and as much as we try to make it engaging and make sure that the servicemember can tie all the benefits to their own personal situation using interactive workbook. All of those things. It still was a classroom experience. A not individual not one on one We do still have benefit visor. Available for one on one support with and they. They advertise that during the class. Now when we went into the code environment we go to virtual So we we are still pretty much in the virtual environment. We've we've started working on getting a little bit more in person presence with tap classes but of course as you can imagine Safety is the number one concern And so we think about this way. Transition assistance program is about teaching. You what you might need to know and getting you prepared in the right mindset for transition. Solid start is like okay. Now we're gonna talk to you after this happened after you got out of the military to see. How are you doing ended. All that stuff makes sense. What questions do you still have. And it's one on one so rather than having to listen to what everybody has to listen to if you already have a job and that's not your concern or you're already in college and using your education benefits that's not your concern but maybe you need to get into a medical appointment. You don't know how to navigate. That will work with you on justice. If that's what you need is maybe you have issues with your children. You need some some other resources. We have access to information about state department of veterans affairs benefits that can sometimes filling gaps were. Va can't Provide a service to really is personalized the comments we hear from veterans. I know you've been seeking feedback from veterans. As well is that they're surprised that va's calling and they're so thankful for it because they were maybe not sure who to call her how to ask about a particular benefit so it's been really interesting seeing the positive reaction from our veteran community. Absolutely and you know. I think that you know this is my opinion. You based on my own experience and the experience of know friends and other veterans who gone through the transition systems program. There are getting ready to get that to you to fourteen right. So all of those briefings. I shouldn't say all but a lot of those briefings are at least in the transitioning servicemembers. Mind it's it's a check the block it's like all right. Let me just get through this thing. So i can go home. Take off this uniform for the final time and get on with my life so the fact that you're contacting them throughout that first year i think they're going to be a whole lot more receptive to hearing. What the benefits are. Because it's not like you're not keeping them from you know from going home you know. You're not you're not saying. Hey you have to be here. This is your place of duty right now. So you mentioned covid nineteen and a lot of things have gone. virtual has there been any other impacts to the program. I know the program still pretty new but have there been any other impacts of the program as a result of the pandemic like are you behind or ahead or anything like that. A solid start actually was in a great position to react effectively to the covid nineteen situation. All of our agents were telework ready and all of our equipment works from telework standpoint. So they haven't skipped a beat they are not behind. They are on target When we first created the program we weren't sure what kind of response we were gonna get so when we created the program We we have to have a performance measure right so we said well. How many people do we really going to answer. The phone won't va calls. You know think about yourself right if your cell phone rings and you don't recognize the number what's the chance you're gonna answer it. Probably not your let it. Go to voicemail right. And if that person's important deli new message so we kinda thought we might get that sort of a reaction so we kinda started. Set the bar low. We said fifteen percent our goal was fifteen one. Five fifteen percent of veterans we reached out to we would be able to actually engage with. They would answer the phone and engage with our with our representatives. It's been just phenomenal. The actual result actually have your with me the december twenty twenty report since we began the program. We have reached over. Eighty seven thousand veterans and the fiscal year. Twenty twenty today fifty seven point. Five percent have responded and engaged. Yeah i know it's it's been just an incredible Response and we also prioritize veterans. Who we know from the information from dod if a veteran had mental health appointment In that last year of service before they left the military prioritize them and we also know that for that population. We need to make sure we get them connected into. Va healthcare and with that sub population. The percents even higher seventy three point. Six percent have responded to our agents and our end have engaged with them on the phone. Wow that is really really great. How surprised were you at the at the numbers when he finally saw them. In the beginning. I was very surprised. And then you know we had a town hall with are Representatives the ones who are actually making the call and it was really interesting. Many of them are veterans themselves. Some of them are you were military spouses. And some of them even used to work in the tap program and and they're so passionate about their work and they're always submitting new ideas about how to improve the program here in the anecdotes That they shared with me about what some of these veterans were telling them and how grateful they were for this phone call. One thing we do is we did put it on the caller. Id so in most with most cellular services You you'll it'll save veterans affairs on your phone so you kind of notes the. Va calling so kind of helps to increase the the response rate but yeah. It's it's been an amazing response for veteran for so happy that this program is reaching them in making impact. Yeah definitely that's great. That's great so. Va solid start. It's for those who are basically brand new to the civilian world right so for those of us like myself and a lot of our listeners who are not newly separated what resources are available for us for helping us understand available that that we can take advantage of so a couple things you're right. Solid start is for those that are recently separated so for veterans of any era. Were here for you as well. And you know i always. I'm always very sensitive to that that you know if you Or vietnam era veteran. We care about you. We want you to call us if you if you never got connected to your benefits. Please call us and we will walk you through. There's a main toll free number which is one eight hundred eight two seven one thousand and that is our main call centre. Those agents are trained across the entire portfolio benefits as well and they will help you identify. What eligibilities you might have In the benefit side and they can even connect you to healthcare If you if you haven't signed up for your healthcare so they can. They can kind of connect you regardless of when you got out of the military And if you are a veteran that just got out in the last year and you haven't gotten your solid start call. I say the information we get from dod his last information we had about the servicemember. Sometimes people change their phone number They changed their email address. We do try and reach out by email First before we make that first phone call so call us. And if you're in that last in the first year after separation just asked to be transferred to the solid start program very cool very cool and you just taught me something with this eight hundred numbers at eight hundred eighty two seven one thousand right cracked. Okay so i could you know after we finish this conversation i could off here. I could call that number and find out the benefits that i'm eligible for. Maybe i'm not taking advantage of. Yes and really. What what they're gonna do is they're going to ask you some questions. What type of benefit are you thinking about. you know. and because we haven't education call center so if you said hey. I'm really wondering if i'm if i'm eligible for the gi bill. They'll transferred to gi bill experts. Right if you say well. i'm really kind of thinking. What kind of employment types of benefits or what about disability benefits So you know they'll help you with those benefits. It's a little bit different than solid. Start in that There are more got react to what you're needing in the moment whereas are solid start agents are trained to sort of prompt And get information out of the veteran to help navigate the whole suite of benefits they might be entitled to and i also wanna say your state department of veterans affairs. They have offices in in different states. We have regional offices. One day hopefully will be able to meet in person again. But in addition there's the veterans service organizations in. They're out there to help. There's a lot of resources but yes feel free to call us. Anybody listening to podcasts. Give us a call one. Eight hundred eighty two seven one thousand and we'll try and get you connected to your benefits above love it and so speaking of benefits and this is it's kind of a curiosity question. I guess what is the most overlooked benefit that veterans typically. Don't take advantage. There's a couple and we actually make it a point to focus on these in the beginning They're time sensitive so one thing for example is life insurance benefits. There is a time limit on when you can convert your service group. Life insurance to veteran group life insurance. And if you don't do in that timeline you kind of miss the opportunity It's about a year and a half out from from when you leave the military so We tell them always about life insurance and that's always kind of a tricky thing right. Nobody ever wants to think about end of life. Especially you know you. A young twenty five year old veteran and twenty six year old. And they're thinking while life insurance okay. You know if they're single and they don't have a a spouse children they might not be thinking about it so we want to make sure they understand the value of having that life insurance policy and so that they make an informed decision potentially to take advantage of it another one is dental care the eligibility for dental care which is time limited in a lot of veterans miss out on that because they don't fully understand it so there's a couple of the ones that we know are are critical sensitive And honestly we've heard some some of our veterans who say they didn't file for disability benefits. Because they didn't feel like they should take that benefit away from another veteran so we do spend some time explaining that they don't take benefit from another veteran. It's a it's a mandatory benefit. Were any veteran. Who's eligible for the benefit and it also opens up the door for healthcare. And you know if you're young and strong now but but you know that you had injuries orthopedic injuries for example. But you're okay and you can kind of deal with the pain right now. Well one day you're going to need healthcare it might worsen You know this is. This is not a handout. It is an investment in that veteran. Making sure that they can stay strong and half the care that they need to to For the rest of their life if needed sure sure so that is some really really great information. But it's not every day that i get to to the principal. Deputy undersecretary for benefits at the veterans benefits administration or being translated. Second command right. So i have a couple of questions that they're they're along the lines of transition but not solid start specific right sure all right so one thing that i'm incredibly passionate about is helping veterans rediscovery since of purpose and meaning after the military and so finding that sense of purpose in that sense of meaning after military service is. It's really the single most challenging part of a chat challenging part of the transition and so one question. I wanted to ask you is how does the. Va help with this aspect of post military life. It's interesting that you bring that up because our research also validates that is one of the biggest challenges. In fact we did. We just started last year. A post-separation study of veterans. Who went through the top programme while they were in uniform to kind of see the retrospective look right. Because it's one thing we can really high marks in the classroom right there. The ninety six percent are highly satisfied with our tap class. But what we wanna do is wait to your veteran in the naski. Look back on and say okay now. How well prepared did you feel you were and we also bounce that against data to see are they employed you know are they using our benefits and we ask them for information about how they're doing so in that study we found the open comments that we got from veterans were very much around that loss of sense of camaraderie. That loss of sort of feeling that you're part of a community unit cohesion that you had the military you don't have that in communities today And just that that loss of sense of purpose and mission so we're just now starting to lean in to explore how the can help with that. We can't solve the problem ourselves right because we're not going to be that sense of community for them but we can connect them and we've been engaging with a lot of organizations nonprofits and via so organizations that provide that connectivity that sense of community in that sense of mission And we're starting those conversations to say. How do we infuse that into the solid. Start program so that we can start connecting veterans in a different way to give them that sense of community. they're looking for. It's really going to involve have to involve a partnership model via. Can't do this alone. Sure sure on love the fact that that the va is realizing this and is like you said leaning into that so now this is a this next question for you is potentially a touchy question. But i don't need to tell you that. A lot of veterans are like. I don't like the va about experience for those veterans who have had that experience or they're just like man. I've heard so many bad things. I don't even wanna try it you know. It's probably not worth the hassle. What what would you say to them if they were if they were asking like. Okay what should i do. Should i do anything. What would you say to them right now. A couple of things first of all. I wanna say avenues. Cells and good news typically unfortunately does not get the same kind of traction. There are so many good news stories out there. And if you look for them you'll see them. I would say comback triumphs again. It's not the same. va that. It was a few years ago. We have come such a long way in the healthcare system with the hospitals in the end the outpatient clinics in our regional offices are outreach is is so much different and we understand better how to improve the experience for our veterans. So i would say it's been a couple of years maybe had a bad experience comeback to us get another chance and if your experience is not absolutely stellar fabulous edit. It doesn't make you turn around your opinion of va. Reach out to us. And i would say in the healthcare system. We have Advocates in every medical center. Go talk to the patient advocate. Tell them about your experience. Let us change something. If there's something specific that's not quite right. Sitting in our via regional office asked to speak to the leadership team. We have lead dan so hard on getting feedback from veterans and making changes across the entire enterprise. It's it's just not the same. Please try again in comeback. That's what i would say. Sure sure so of just just anecdotally right so my family. And i we live in alabama and so my closest a regional center is in birmingham. And so you know i. I've been there a lot over the past few years. And when i compare the service and the facilities and everything like that to a to a more local hospital more local medical facility. It is night and day difference. I mean bring. Va clinic is just top of the line. So it it is really an and again. I know everyone is different but it even from. When i used to go to the va we lived in texas to go into the va. Here it is. There's so many positive changes that have been made in at so honestly i'm really really happy with with the facilities and the care receive and everything like that so glad to hear that. Yeah absolutely absolutely so what's a big takeaway here right. So what does something. All veterans and newly separated veterans or. Otherwise what should they really remember from our conversation. Today i would say remember that. Va is here for you We probably have a benefit or a service that you might not have been aware of And we wanna be there. We want to be partners in your military civilian transition. We want to be partners in your life and help you with any issues that you might have. We're not the answer for everything But we also have connections with community resources and just reach out to us if if you need anything don't try and go it alone and again if if you had a bad experience in the past comeback to us i promise you it should be a much better experience now and like i said if there's anything you encounter that that you have an issue with let us know we're here to be part of it. I mean my personal story. My brother who is an army veteran wouldn't go to the. Va for the longest time. I finally got him to go and he's been so thrilled he was. He calls me up and he's like says they're offering me services that i didn't even ask for. They're they're doing this. They're doing that. And i said yes. That's what we call wraparound services when you come into a va. We are not just looking at the problem that you presented with. We're gonna ask you how else we can help you. And he's been so impressed with that. He wishes he would start in the. Va system a long time ago. It really is We've really made some great advances. So please come see as awesome awesome so here on the show. We like to give our listeners. Some practical next step. So when this podcast finishes playing what should they. Do you know the context of our conversation today. What should they do because today's question is. Hey what's the. Va solid start program. And obviously you've answered that more than we could ever imagine and in so having you on the show has been just absolutely outstanding but what should their next steps be right after listening to this podcast. I would say if you're curious about the benefits and services we offer You might try to going to our website. Www dot va dot gov easy to remember And when you go to. Va dot gov. You'll see sort of things grouped into logical sort of life domain issue. So you'll be able to kind of navigating see. Wow you know what is what does the. Va half for me. And then you can actually apply for many of our programs online. Some of them Were still working on getting online. But you get the application online so that would be one thing and then if you just don't wanna talk to somebody some full more comfortable calling on the phone and talking to somebody call that number i gave earlier one eight hundred eight two seven. One thousand You know we're here for you. Take that step. Check us out If you're already enrolled in one of our programs you know good on you but there might be something else that he don't know about so check us out. Sure well margarita. Devlin this has been so so rate again. You have answered the question. What is the a solid star program. Frankly answered a whole lot more questions as well. So thank you so so so much for coming on serve now. What really enjoyed having him my pleasure and thank you for what you're doing to. It's really important work. I hope you've enjoyed my conversation with margarita devlin. So what are your questions recorded voice memo on your phone and send it to podcast at courage to fight again dot com or joined the post nine eleven veterans and families facebook group. And post your question there. We all have a lot of questions but the most important question we can ask ourselves is this have. I accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith in jesus. Christ we'll i'll see you right back here. Two weeks from day and the nixed veteran question. We'll be asking is this. How do i use my post nine. Eleven gi bill. Well until next time. Thanks for listening. We serve now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Veterans Benefits Administrati Margarita Devlin Department Of Veterans Affairs Devlin Dr Paul Lawrence Aaron Perkins Us Army Margarita Marguerita Department Of Defense And Home Traumatic Stress Disorder Army Ptsd Navy
 burst 2 expand 08:31

Ubuntu Podcast

08:31 min | 2 months ago

burst 2 expand 08:31

"Everybody and welcome to the Ubuntu podcast is season 13 episode 14 It's the final episode of the year and of season thirteen it wasn't that unlucky after all. Hey, we'd like to say a big thank you to everyone who supported us this year with our patreon subscriptions and with one off PayPal contributions now as usual as this is the last show of the year. We are going to be going on Hiatus off for a couple of months at the beginning of next year to give us and all of you are break. So Martin, would you like to explain what's going to happen with our patreon while we're off? Yes, so the first thing that's going off. And is there will be a payment taken on January 1st or whatever, you know, the first week of January is and that will be the money that we use to pay for the team member production costs, but then we will pause patreon taking money for a boon to podcast until we return or if indeed we return that and because you know, we haven't had our career yet and decided if we're going to do this again, but we will be pausing the patrian whilst we're off the air great. So yes, if you're subscribed and you'll continue to support us then continue to be subscribed. We won't take your money without giving you podcasts. And in the meantime, Alan what have you been up to recently? Well just in time for the exhaust episode. I have removed the audio noise that was plaguing my system and also doubled my speed on my desktop PC. Wow. Is this the same fix for Bose? It was it was one fix that did both things. It turns out I use ethernet over power adapters tp-link devices because my office is like the complete opposite end of the house from the internet connection and to get it here. I didn't run ethernet. I just use ethernet over power and I've been using it for years and there's been this background like crackle for a while and I couldn't pinpoint what it was and I thought it was cables crossing over or something like that. And also the internet in this room is 50% of what it should be. I get paid for like hundred hundred and ten Meg or something that I get home forty eight fifty something like that. And when the kids are out one day, I unplugged loads of things and Shuffle things around and it turned out it was the ethernet over power device which has a through socket was plugged into a four-way thing and I moved it. So it's plugged directly in the wall. Magically the audio problem goes away and my internet is now twice as fast off. That's all I did was. The only thing that changed was me moving the ethernet over power socket to be plugged directly in the wall. Suddenly. Everything's faster and better. Wow, great. Well, I'm glad you got that down time for one recording. Sorry Joe Martin what we even up to I have been playing Hotshot racing with my friends on that their Internet. It's a good game. This is a driving game. I imagine it is. I think I may have mentioned it earlier in the year, but it's having a bit of a Revival at the moment. It's a low poly retro arcade style game racer available on Steam and you can play it under proton. And now now I'm not working for you know, the Christmas break. I was looking to have some fun so long I've started hosting some Linux game nights and this is the game. We're playing at the moment doing an excellent romp around the tracks and can people watch you playing even if they don't want to play they can wage. I've started a second YouTube channel just for playing games on Linux and it's all streamed there and everyone who's playing along with me has a voice in the room and it's a group effort. And in fact, some of the others are streaming as well. So you can even own overlay multiple angles of the game being played at the same time brilliant. And with that let's get on with the show you as it's the last show of the year. We thought we would have a big fight respective on all of the good news that happened in 2020. So let's begin back in episode one or the 24th of March Martin. What good news did you find? I was delighted by Alain running. The urban too long will paper World Cup and Hardy heroine being voted as the all-time favorite a bun to desktop wallpaper who would possibly have seen that result coming off but what transpired is I did a bit of archaeology and we dug up the original artwork for that and we were able to reproduce a 4K version which was included in the focal fossa. LTS release later in the year nice brilliant and speaking of that LTS release. We had more good news in a purple. Yes, indeed April was of course the release of the the focal fossa LTS release and you know, I think for Alan as much as for me, you know, this is a landmark for us off. The LTS is a very important but you know personally this was my first time around being, you know engineering director for a bunch of desktops. So it were it was, you know, Grill milestone for me personally and professionally and this is now the distro that's going to be out there for the next five years, you know running on all manner of you know, laptops and workstations Allen. Yeah following on from that was a nice Community led a bunch of testing week that we talked about back in episode three, I think this year and the thing I loved about that was it was community-oriented. They didn't even have to ask permission. They didn't have to you know, get canonical approval to do this. It was just a bunch of community people who decided let's get together and get some testing of 2004 before it's released and they organized wage for all of the flavors and it really helps a lot more people were had more eyeballs on on 2004 than previous releases. So it was it was very welcome that people were doing it and he May Roam Shuttleworth did an interview with ZDNet where he spoke about canonical's finances possible initial public offering and going into some details about canonical's profitability, which is interesting because ZDNet did some looking into canonical's reports which they file which show is actually been a profitable company since 2018, which is really cool to see the way they talk about how it's not as profitable as redhat because you'd have to pay as much women too as you do Fred her but it's really cool to see it's actually, you know, financially self-sustaining now and there's a possible path to it going public but there's reasons for caution about especially given the the current situation in the world. It'll be interesting to see how that pans out in the coming years. Martin so later in may we announced the codename for our what was the urban to 2010 release and that code name was groovy gorilla and I'm very pleased that because I managed to convince Mark shuttleworth that that's the codename we should go with and and he he decided to go with it. So yeah, what's the what's the bucket list moment? There should also led to having gorilla based wallpapers and gorilla based t-shirts and stuff. But yet Grill is an iconic animal rather than some weird squirrel the animal that nobody have it scrolling teacher. Yes. Yes and jumping ahead to do now and yeah Lenovo made their entire workstation range of a.m. For brunch and obviously as a ThinkPad nerd this made me quite happy. And so this was a good news item for the middle of the year and I haven't actually bought one yet. I'm I'm still I thought These machines and thinking carefully about what my next laptop purchase will be. But the fact that you can buy Lenovo is now with Ubuntu pre-installed and available directly from their website page makes me very happy. So that was good to see that. Yeah, and it also marked that this year. We had more of an to certified certified devices than any previous year. So, you know

Patreon Martin Alan Joe Martin Paypal MEG Zdnet Alain Hardy Youtube Shuttleworth Allen Mark Shuttleworth Fred Lenovo
S13E40  Ravens - burst 2

Ubuntu Podcast

05:27 min | 2 months ago

S13E40 Ravens - burst 2

"Everybody and welcome to the Ubuntu podcast is season 13 episode 14 It's the final episode of the year and of season thirteen it wasn't that unlucky after all. Hey, we'd like to say a big thank you to everyone who supported us this year with our patreon subscriptions and with one off PayPal contributions now as usual as this is the last show of the year. We are going to be going on Hiatus off for a couple of months at the beginning of next year to give us and all of you are break. So Martin, would you like to explain what's going to happen with our patreon while we're off? Yes, so the first thing that's going off. And is there will be a payment taken on January 1st or whatever, you know, the first week of January is and that will be the money that we use to pay for the team member production costs, but then we will pause patreon taking money for a boon to podcast until we return or if indeed we return that and because you know, we haven't had our career yet and decided if we're going to do this again, but we will be pausing the patrian whilst we're off the air great. So yes, if you're subscribed and you'll continue to support us then continue to be subscribed. We won't take your money without giving you podcasts. And in the meantime, Alan what have you been up to recently? Well just in time for the exhaust episode. I have removed the audio noise that was plaguing my system and also doubled my speed on my desktop PC. Wow. Is this the same fix for Bose? It was it was one fix that did both things. It turns out I use ethernet over power adapters tp-link devices because my office is like the complete opposite end of the house from the internet connection and to get it here. I didn't run ethernet. I just use ethernet over power and I've been using it for years and there's been this background like crackle for a while and I couldn't pinpoint what it was and I thought it was cables crossing over or something like that. And also the internet in this room is 50% of what it should be. I get paid for like hundred hundred and ten Meg or something that I get home forty eight fifty something like that. And when the kids are out one day, I unplugged loads of things and Shuffle things around and it turned out it was the ethernet over power device which has a through socket was plugged into a four-way thing and I moved it. So it's plugged directly in the wall. Magically the audio problem goes away and my internet is now twice as fast off. That's all I did was. The only thing that changed was me moving the ethernet over power socket to be plugged directly in the wall. Suddenly. Everything's faster and better. Wow, great. Well, I'm glad you got that down time for one recording. Sorry Joe Martin what we even up to I have been playing Hotshot racing with my friends on that their Internet. It's a good game. This is a driving game. I imagine it is. I think I may have mentioned it earlier in the year, but it's having a bit of a Revival at the moment. It's a low poly retro arcade style game racer available on Steam and you can play it under proton. And now now I'm not working for you know, the Christmas break. I was looking to have some fun so long I've started hosting some Linux game nights and this is the game. We're playing at the moment doing an excellent romp around the tracks and can people watch you playing even if they don't want to play they can wage. I've started a second YouTube channel just for playing games on Linux and it's all streamed there and everyone who's playing along with me has a voice in the room and it's a group effort. And in fact, some of the others are streaming as well. So you can even own overlay multiple angles of the game being played at the same time brilliant. And with that let's get on with the show you as it's the last show of the year. We thought we would have a big fight respective on all of the good news that happened in 2020. So let's begin back in episode one or the 24th of March Martin. What good news did you find? I was delighted by Alain running. The urban too long will paper World Cup and Hardy heroine being voted as the all-time favorite a bun to desktop wallpaper who would possibly have seen that result coming off but what transpired is I did a bit of archaeology and we dug up the original artwork for that and we were able to reproduce a 4K version which was included in the focal fossa. LTS release later in the year nice brilliant and speaking of that LTS release. We had more good news in a purple. Yes, indeed April was of course the release of the the focal fossa LTS release and you know, I think for Alan as much as for me, you know, this is a landmark for us off. The LTS is a very important but you know personally this was my first time around being, you know engineering

Patreon Martin Paypal Alan Joe Martin MEG Youtube Alain Hardy
"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

The Anthropocene Reviewed

05:11 min | 5 months ago

"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

"Stanway, the towns popular former minister who'd been ejected for puritanism on a plan to contain the spread of the plague by self isolating the entire village. A nineteenth century chronicler of eames history wrote that mom pederson was certain that he could prevail on his suffering and our lead diminishing flock to confine themselves within the precincts of the village if they could be supplied with visuals and. Articles and thereby prevent the pestilence from spreading. Now before enacting this plan to isolate village some people leave him and others including hasn't and his wife Catherine Center children away to escape the plague but undermine peasants leadership. The village did eventually decide to coordinate itself off from the rest of the world. They also agreed to hold church services outdoors to retain some measure of social distancing and they decided that each family when possible would bury their own dead. A stone boundary marker, which can still be seen marked the line that villagers would not cross eam residents would leave coins and holes bored into that marker to pay for food and other supplies, which would then be left around the marker by people from nearby communities. EAMES self quarantine held to a remarkable extent.

mom pederson eames EAMES Stanway Catherine Center
"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

The Anthropocene Reviewed

07:39 min | 5 months ago

"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

"Recently I found myself reading the last women testament a distant relative of mine who died in the seventeenth century part of the document begins in view of the fact that nothing is more certain than death or less certain than it's our and just loved that line like I thought my ancestor might be some kind of literary genius who wrote an absolute Banger of a will but then I found out that it was actually quite common for wills to include that phrase at the time, and that my ancestor was just a normal Taylor doing normal Taylor things who signed a very average will and then went on to die during get this an infectious disease pandemic. Anyway in view of the fact that nothing is more certain than death or less certain than it's our, there's never been a better time to consider life insurance and the advocacy in reviewed is supported by policy genius right now, you could save fifteen hundred dollars or more a year by using policy genius to Compare Life Insurance Policies Policy Geniuses an insurance marketplace built and backed by a team of experts. So if you need life insurance policy genius dot com to get started policy genius nothing is more certain than death or less certain than it's our. is not their tagline, but it should be I'm available by the way policy genius for all your tagline writing needs I'm right here just reedmen seventeenth century wills. All right back to the show. The Eighteenth Century Historian Berthold Georg neither once wrote times of plague are always those in which the be steel and diabolical side of human nature gains. The upper hand infectious disease outbreaks have long been blamed on marginalized peoples and outsiders Amanda Thomas Notes in her book cholera that in nineteenth century England blamed for the spread of the disease was commonly. Too. Irish immigrants and in the US cholera was blamed both on recent immigrants and on black people more recently, the president of the United States has been among those referring to Covid nineteen in racist terms calling it both the China virus and the Kung Fu even though Cova came to the United States primarily by Europe. During the black death, the pestilence in Europe was widely blamed on Jewish people. Wild conspiracy theories emerged that Jewish people were poisoning wells or rivers, and after confessions were drawn out through atrociously cruel torture many thousands of Jewish people were murdered. Entire communities were burned to death and the emotionless matter of fact, accounts of these murders are willing Heinrich Troikas wrote I, Jews were killed or burnt in sold in in November than Zaw again, they were seized and some put on the wheel than in stood guard they were all burnt the same thing happened during November in Lawns Berg And it goes on like that for paragraphs. Now many Christians in Europe did recognize that it was utterly impossible for a vast Jewish conspiracy to spread the plague via well poisoning. But fact still don't slow down conspiracy theories and the long history of Anti. Semitism in Europe predisposed people to believing in even the most absurd stories of poisoning pope clement the six pointed out. Not Be true that the Jews are the cause or occasion of the plague because through many parts of the world the same plague afflicts the Jews themselves and many other races who have never lived alongside them. Still the torture and murder continued antisemitic ideas about secret international conspiracies proliferated. And that is part of the human story that we have not just blamed marginalized people we have killed them. This compounds the injustice of pandemics which almost always disproportionately sick and kill the poor and the vulnerable in England one chronicler wrote virtually none of the Lord's and great men died in this pestilence disease only treats humans equally when our social orders treat humans equally. But to say that times of plague only bring out the be steel and diabolical sides of human nature is I think untrue. Amid the tears of the black. Death in Baotou tells us a story of people coming together in the city of Damascus. He says that people fasted for three consecutive days. Then quote assembled in the Great Mosque until it was filled to overflowing and spent the night there in prayers after the dawn prayers the next morning they all went out together on foot holding Korans in their hands and the emirs barefoot the procession was joined by the entire. Population of the town men and women small and large. The Jews came with their book of the Law and the Christians Their Gospel all of them with their women and children the whole concourse weeping and seeking the favor of God through his books and his prophets made their way to the mosque footprints and there they remained in supplication an invocation until near midday then they returned to the city and held the Friday service and God lightened their affliction. And so in Edmund Pettus story, even the powerful went barefoot in a statement of equality and all the people came together in prayer and supplication. Of course whether or not this mass gathering really slowed the spread of the plague in Damascus is not clear. But we see in this account that crisis does not always bring out the horrible sides of human nature. It can also push us towards sharing our pain and hope and our prayers and treating each other as equally human. And when we respond that way, perhaps the affliction is lightened. And then there's the story of EAM. Waves of plague continued to roll over Afro Eurasia for centuries. London saw outbreaks in fifteen, sixty, three, fifteen, ninety, two, and sixteen o three among others and then in June of sixteen, Sixty five, the diarist peeps wrote to migrate trouble here that play is come into the city. It would come to be called the great plague of London, an estimated one, hundred thousand Londoners. A quarter of the city's population would die. Again there were stories of the dead in the streets and the sick abandoned. Again, the plague pits were dug to deal with the overflow of corpses and again the poor were disproportionately affected. The village of aim is over one hundred miles north of London in the East Midlands region late that summer of sixty, sixty, five, some cloth arrived in the village from Lundin maybe the cloth contained fleas or perhaps a rat had made the journey inside the cloth regardless the tailor's assistant to unpacked that material a man named George Vickers soon fell ill and died on September seventh by the end of the month five more residents of eam had died. In response, the local minister the Reverend William Penn worked with Thomas.

Europe Damascus London murder United States Amanda Thomas Taylor Great Mosque Eighteenth Century Historian eam Edmund Pettus Berthold Georg George Vickers China England Afro Eurasia Heinrich Troikas
"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

The Anthropocene Reviewed

02:37 min | 5 months ago

"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

"It. But. Still, my mind keeps circling vulture like around the extensively precedent it tragedy of not being able to hold the hand of your beloved. And say goodbye..

"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

The Anthropocene Reviewed

03:23 min | 5 months ago

"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

"And indeed around the plague world, the stories do become repetitive. We read for instance that the corpses lay in the streets of Florence and overwhelmed the graveyards of France and choke the Nile River in Egypt chroniclers also focused on the suddenness of it. All one day a single none is sick within a week her whole community is dead. and. Much attention was also paid to how the rituals around death changed the bells no longer tolled for the dead because they would toll without ceasing. And Anyway. As one writer put it the sick hated to hear them and to discourage the healthy as well. But for me, the most gutting repetition in plague accounts is the abandonment of the ill who were often left to die alone due to fear of contagion. Many centuries later, CS Lewis would right after his wife died. Nobody ever told me grief felt so like fear. But to in pandemic is to both grieve and fear for fear of infection. One writer noted, no doctor will visit the sick nor will the father visit the son, the mother, the daughter, or the brother to brother. And thus, an unaccountable number of people died without any mark of affection piety or charity. In the Byzantine capital of Constantinople Dimitrios. Kaidonis wrote fathers do not dare to bury their own sons. And so in fear of death and hope of survival many left the ill to die alone. To do otherwise was to risk your own life and the lives of whatever loved ones you had left. The black death was vastly incalculably different from our current pandemic. It was orders of magnitude deadlier and far less understood. But infectious disease continues to separate us in our most vulnerable moments too many of us sick and healthy are alone too many are dying apart from those. They love saying goodbye over video chat or a telephone line. In, the New England Journal of Medicine One physician wrote of a wife watching her husband die over facetime. And I think maybe that is the real reason I cannot stop reading about pandemics at the moment. I am haunted by that separation. When I was sixteen, a friend of mine guide and they died alone which I found very. I couldn't stop thinking about those last minutes those lonely and helpless minutes. I still often have nightmares about this where I can see this person and see the fear in their eyes, but I cannot get to them before they die. And at a time when we are separated from each other and especially where the sick must be separated from the healthy to prevent disease transmission. So many people are dying and grieving while separated. I know that being with someone as they die doesn't necessarily lessen the pain and in some cases can amplify.

writer plague Nile River Constantinople Dimitrios New England Journal of Medicin Florence Egypt France Lewis Kaidonis
"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

The Anthropocene Reviewed

07:39 min | 5 months ago

"plague" Discussed on The Anthropocene Reviewed

"This year has turned out very differently than many athletes thought it would think since the season is canceled, they don't feel as though they their. Salary what am I GONNA do now? Football. Football football. I'm ANA, sale host of the podcast death sex and money. In our new series game changer we're talking to three athletes about the DEMOC has upended their lives and livelihoods listened wherever you get your podcasts. Listener. Supported W NYC. Studios. Hello and welcome to the anthrocene reviewed a podcast where we review different facets of the human centered planet on a five star scale. I'm John Green and today I'll be reviewing historical outbreaks of Mubarak and pneumonic plague because you know I wanNA, keep it light and fun around here. The other day in the midst of a global disease pandemic, I called my pharmacy to refill my Murtaza's prescription. Murtaza's bean is a tetris cyclic anti-depressant medication that is also used to treat obsessive compulsive disorder, and in my case, it is pretty mission critical. So anyway, I called my pharmacy only to learn that my pharmacy had closed. So then I called a different pharmacy and very sympathetic woman answered when I explained the situation she told me that everything would be fine, but they didn't need to call my doctor's office before. The prescription she asked when I needed to pick up the medication and I answered well, I guess in a perfect world I'd pick it up this afternoon. And then there was a pause on the other end of the line before finally a stifling a laugh the woman said, well, Hun, this ain't a perfect world. And then she put me on hold while talking to the pharmacist except she didn't really put me on hold. She just put the phone down and I heard her say to her colleague he said get this. He said in a perfect world he'd pick it up today. Anyway, in the end, I was able to pick up the prescription, the following afternoon and when I did. So the woman behind the counter pointed at me and said, it's the perfect world, Guy? and. So here I am the perfect world guy back to regale you with a tale of the anthropoid seen the best of all possible geologic ages in this. The Best of all possible worlds, it's a story about the human capacity for cruelty. But also for sacrifice and compassion. It's a plague story at the moment I can't tell any other kind. In the past three months I've read about almost nothing except for pandemics, we often hear that we live in unprecedented times. But what worries me is that these times feel quite precedent for humans being an uncharted territory is often news because our chartered territory is so riddled with disease and injustice and violence. and. Maybe I've been reading about all that charted territory because I'm scared of going back to it and looking for ways to avoid it. Between the years of thirteen, forty, seven and thirteen, fifty, one perhaps half of all humans living in Europe died of the related diseases, bubonic and new plague bacterial infections spread by fleas, and also in some cases from one person to another what was then usually called the mortality or the pestilence is now known as the black death and this torrent of plague also devastated Asia North Africa and the Middle East. The Egyptian historian McCreevy wrote that the pestilence did not distinguish between one region and another. Hometown of Cairo was the world's largest city outside of China in thirteen forty with a population of around six, hundred thousand. But at least a third of Cairo's residents died in an eight month period beginning in the summer of thirteen forty eight, the famous world traveller been Tuta reported that at the height of the pestilence in the city of Damascus twenty, four hundred people died every day. Too many it felt like the end of humanity had arrived the Muslim historian even Khaldoon wrote that it felt as if the voice of existence in this world had called out for oblivion. In Christian communities, the devastation was seen as more final and total than even the great flood. The chroniclers of Padova wrote that at least in the days of Noah God did not destroy all living souls and it was possible for the human race to recover. This statistics truly boggles the mind cities from Paris to London to Hamburg saw most of their residents died from the plague and resulting systemic collapses in Dubrovnik. The was so unrelenting that the government ordered every citizen to fill out a will. In Florence City of over one hundred, thousand people. One recent estimate concluded that about eighty percent of the city's population died in a four-month period. In Ireland amongst name John Clinton described life as quote waiting amid death for death to come. Near the end of his blade journal Clinton wrote. So that the writing does not perish with the writer or the work fail with the Workman I leave extra parchment for continuing the work in case, anyone should still be alive in the future. Beneath that paragraph, a brief CODA appears in different handwriting. Here it seems the author died. In Florence Giovanni, Villani wrote of the pestilence many lands and cities were made desolate and the plague lasted until. And then he left a blank space that was never filled in because he died of the plague before the plague ended. To read about the black death is to glimpse how it may end with our species in Wyoming and despair and also. -able hope the kind of hope that makes you. We've sentences unfinished and extra parchment in your book in case, anyone should still be alive in the future. As William Faulkner once put it. It is easy enough to say that man is immortal simply because he will endure that when the last Ding Dong of doom has claimed didn't faded from the last worthless rock hanging tied with in the last red and dying evening that even then there will still be one more sound that of his puny inexhaustible voice still talking. Faulkner. went on to argue that humans will not merely endure, but we'll prevail. But these days that feels a little bit ambitious to me. I for one would be delighted merely to endure. The historian, Rosemarie Horrex, the black death, the very enormity of the disaster drove chroniclers to take refuge in cliches. The same comments appear in chronicle after chronicle..

pneumonic plague Murtaza Cairo football John Clinton DEMOC William Faulkner Football Ding Dong Padova Rosemarie Horrex NYC Florence City Guy McCreevy John Green Mubarak Europe Damascus Khaldoon
"plague" Discussed on Nopeville

Nopeville

01:58 min | 6 months ago

"plague" Discussed on Nopeville

"It can become especially irritated or at times outright aggressive when it feels that it is in the presence of what it calls the pestilence. Often having to be restrained. Should it encounter such if left unchecked SEP's four nine will generally attempt to kill any such individual sap zero nine is capable of causing all biological functions of an organism to cease through direct skin contact. Sap Zero four nine has expressed frustration or remorse after these killings indicating that they have done little to kill the pestilence though will usually seek to perform a crude surgery on the corpse using the implements contained within a black doctors bag carries on its personnel at all times. While the surgeries are not always successful. They often result in the creation of instances of sap zero, four, nine dash to these instances are basically reanimated corpses and are generally inactive unless provoked or directed by sap zero, four nine in which case they will become aggressive interesting. So so ZOMBIES Zombie controls. Zero four nines considers these beings to be quote cured. And that is all I have on the plate doctors. I just got a plague doctor. Are you going to name him Dr Biki? I'm. GonNa I'm Dr Biki. Oppose to picture of him on social media. Say Hi Dr Biki. All right. Let's step back through the portal and head back towards the bus get back to the safety of Note Ville. Okay. Now that we're back at the bus, let's do a quick headcount looks like we're missing Jim Great. Here, is there in the foundation? Oh The disease..

Dr Biki Note Ville plague Jim Great
"plague" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:09 min | 7 months ago

"plague" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Closed. The Chamber of Commerce in Mountain also had organized the Sanitary Brigade to help conduct house to house inspections and searches in the city that effort. Apparently went better as all of this was going on China, ask for other nations to send medical experts to Manchuria, both to help control the outbreak antiques, study the disease. To American doctors, Richard P strong and Oscar teague were in the Philippines and they were among the ones who arrived in. Manchuria. Their focus was more on study than on control since autopsies were so taboo. They focused their work on unclaimed unidentified bodies conducting twenty five autopsies that contributed enormously to the understanding of pneumonic plague researchers also tried to confirm whether the target and. And marmot really had played a part in this epidemic, but their research at that point was hampered by the fact that these animals hibernate in the winter like they could go try to find some that were hibernating. But that still wasn't gonNA really help them determine whether whether like that was not a real world scenario. So what it had been like back in November. Studies conducted later on, though did confirm that these marmots can contract pneumonic plague in the can spread it from one to another. So it seems likely that the first case of plague in this epidemic was contracted from a Marmot, but that's not likely something that will ever be proved for certain. The last new case of pneumonic plague in Harbin was reported on March first. First nineteen eleven with scattered cases elsewhere being reported over the following weeks in April of nineteen eleven. China outlawed ptarmigan hunting as the plague was winding down. The first international play conference was convened in Mukden, from April third to twenty eighth in. This was the first international conference of its kind to be held in. China. Was Conference involved a whole lot of like in. International drama. Russia's delegation was primarily made up of military people which China took as an implied threat to try to take over more territory at first Japan announced that it was going to boycott the conference altogether apparently because it felt like it was being upstaged by China. Japan did ultimately sent five delegates though in the end, the delegates at the conference past forty five resolutions as recommendations for the Chinese government on public health and plague prevention, and another thing to come out of this conference was the establishment of the north. Manchurian, plague prevention service, which we will talk about more in a moment. By the time, the international play conference came to a close the pneumonic plague epidemic in Manchuria was essentially over. Official Records Document forty-three thousand nine hundred seventy two cases of pneumonic plague and one survivor although because migrant laborers and trappers may not have been listed on official tallies, some estimates are as high as sixty thousand deaths since cases were clustered in railroad towns, the death tolls in those communities. Br Tremendous. If you look at the like the percentage of deaths like death as a percentage of the whole population. Like that number seems small, but that's because it's spread out of the whole population, of Manchuria, and not just as railroad towns. It is really not clear whether this outbreak was brought under control through medical intervention or whether it wow. Nd down through other factors, the way bubonic plague outbreaks Manchuria seemed to be cyclical and temporary, but it is clear that efforts to stop traffic along the railroads and established sanitary cordons. Round cities generally keep people from travelling that kept the disease from spreading much beyond Manchuria the creation of the. The. North Manchurian plague prevention service was one of the last formal acts of the Ching. Dynasty before the Chinese Revolution of Nineteen Eleven, which overthrew the Imperial Dynasty and established a Republic of China. The Plague Service started its work on October first nineteen twelve under the new Republican government. Sometimes, the North Manchurian plagued prevention service as described as China's first public health agency, but that's not entirely true. When we have talked about public health reform on this show before we've generally been talking about the US or the UK where typically philanthropists or medical professionals or sometimes just really enthusiastic lay people have done everything from creating new programs themselves to advocating for change at the government level. But Chinese public health followed precedent that had been set in Germany and Japan where the first public health efforts were part of the police. China had established a police based. Public. Health. Service in Nineteen Oh two in the Ministry of Police established in nineteen o five included sanitary department. These officers carried out health and sanitation directives, quarantine enforcement, and infection control procedures. China was still implementing police sanitary departments in cities by the time, the epidemic started, and there wasn't one in Manchuria yet. So it is true that the North Manchurian plague prevention service was the first public health service in northeastern China and many of its efforts were still connected to policing the quarantine. Established were modeled after prisons with patients being described using the same general language as would be used for prisoners. Conversely, it is absolutely true that this plague outbreak and the North Manchurian plague prevention services had a huge role in the development of medicine and public health in China. The Chinese government quickly recognized the role of Western medicine in treating and preventing contagious diseases. During all this, it also started to adopt the general idea that the government had a responsibility to protect Public Health William. Do was a major part of this process. He helped found the National Medical Association, in China. In Nineteen Fifteen, he service secretary that year and then as president from Nineteen Sixteen to Nineteen twenty, he helped establish hospitals including six isolation. Isolation hospitals that operated under the plague prevention service. He also helped found the National Medical Journal of China and became the first Chinese person to publish an article in the Lancet is published work in the field of medicine included co-authoring a massive history of Chinese medicine and publishing that treatise on pneumonic plague that we've been talking about that happened in nineteen, twenty six, and that treatise was the standard reference on pneumonic plague for the next. Next three decades. He also published ninety two papers over the course of his career thirty, one of them on the subject of plague, and he was involved in a series of other epidemics in China, including multiple other plague outbreaks, and to outbreaks of cholera. Woo was nominated for the Nobel Prize in medicine for work on pneumonic plague, and especially the discovery of the role played by the target in its transmission in nineteen thirty, five, this made. Made Him. The first Chinese person to be nominated for a Nobel prize in medicine over his career, he was also awarded honorary doctorates from picking, university Hong Kong University, and Tokyo University outside of his medical work. Wu helped establish libraries and he amassed a collection of two thousand books that he donated to Nanyang University as the Wu Lien Duck collection. He also donated six works of art to the Art Museum of the University of Malaysia. Thirty one. Japan invaded Manchuria, and Wu. And his family fled to Shanghai. Then in nineteen thirty seven when Japan invaded Shanghai and his family moved to Malaysia that same year Wu's wife died of tuberculosis, two of their children had died as well. One at the age of sixteen in the other in infancy. Wu. Eventually remarried to a woman named Li Shu-chen and had five more children. Whose life beyond this point is not as extensively documented and? As his earlier career and his.

pneumonic plague China Manchuria plague Chinese government Japan Sanitary Brigade National Medical Journal of Ch Wu Chamber of Commerce Nobel Prize Mukden National Medical Association Philippines Richard P Russia Wu Lien Duck
"plague" Discussed on The Bugle

The Bugle

05:50 min | 10 months ago

"plague" Discussed on The Bugle

"Top story has week It's getting biblical. The plagues are coming upon us. It was Always inevitable guess that L. Biblical plays at proved so effective back in the day would would make a comeback and Well NATO As a as a fellow Jew obviously We know what how effective biblical plagues can be In terms of You know sort of political Progress You are a biblical plague correspondent. Just bring us up to date with the latest play that mean afflicting affecting America. That's right Andy. So the first thing. We should acknowledges that The last time I was on the Bugle was around the Jewish holiday of Passover which celebrates the story of the exodus which is wins the plagues. Calm and I. I wrote a bit a bit of business about some play jokes that Chris cut from the show and I wanna to take a moment to to acknowledge that the onward March of time has proven me right in Chris. Rock and as required us to bring back the plate jokes that got cut for time last time. So you know the these these in religion you have these stories that last last across thousands of years because of the enduring symbolism and metaphors And they and they continue to teach us and they reach across centuries to teach and inspire us for example these Blue Biblical plagues from the book of Exodus in which the Jewish people need to stay in the house to avoid a plague and those kind of metaphors are really powerful. Today in the book of play in the Book of Exodus there are ten play set by God to punish the Egyptians for enslaving the Jews. In this case we started at the angel of death which makes the other the previous nine plagues seem kind of not that bad. Like rivers of blood. Seems kind of okay. Frogs I take that cattle disease was one of the biblical plagues. We should all give up beef anyway. Because of climate change but so covert is the angel of death plague and then God in her inevitable inevitable wisdom said crap. I shot my wad number ten. I should have started out at a smaller plague and then worked my way up. You know what I mean like. I should have started out with the lesser plague. Like not being able to get the Song Bittersweet symphony out of your head and worked my way up gradually to the pandemic like live. You start out at ten. You have nowhere to go so God had to back it up a little bit and so here we are with murder. Hornets is the next biblical plague. That we're facing in. The United States is a species of Hornet that appeared in the Pacific northwest capable of killing a human murder. Hornets are originally come from Chinese sweatshops. Like the corona virus and mega hats and the murder. Hornets are are so named for their slaughter phase in which they find honeybees decapitate them and then feed the bodies to the. They're young and that's how you know that there are cruel and destructive species because of more humane murder. Hornet would eat the entire honeybee and not waste the head. Everyone knows that honeybee cheeks are a delicacy murder. Hornets have a distinctive. Look quite large about size of matchbox. They described as having large yellow orange heads. Prominent black is a black and yellow striped abdomen and their children are named Eric. Donald Junior Ivanka and baron but they only love Ivanka. Joke was beneath all of us so angel of death check murder Hornets check. What else you got Earth. Your big hailstone. There's hail now that's been spotted. That is six to nine inches across the biggest one scene of the Nilsson was in Argentina. But there's also graduate. Hailstones turned up in the DAKOTAS. They can shatter car window anything else. Gypsy moth infestations can which could destroy the entire food. Supply the gypsy. Moths is the more politically correct name of that type of moth that were previously called the Queer Kaik boss but it's been with the dame has been modernized to be more politically correct anyways. So now we're at four four of the ten plagues plagues detail moth moths. I'm crying uncle but I think trump should let the Israelites. Go like I get the message and in this version of the story. Trump is pharaoh Israelites. Or anyone who doesn't watch Fox News and go means not die. Well it's so exciting for for for Bible Bible Phantom Murder Hornets Let's say also known as the Asian giant Hornets And there is no evidence that they were created in a laboratory researching insight warfare by Chinese hand industry. Emperor Yuan D in The first century BC. We don't know that. No smoke without fire. Trump's advice If you've been stung by giant Hornet You could be able to cure yourself by swallowing an agricultural pesticides or hitting yourself hopefully with a badminton racket or other sorting device or leasing swarms of giant Hornets so more people get stung thus accelerating chase for Hornet Vaccine Barrett Burton. Have you have you ever come across a murder? Hornet in your in your travels. Yeah I call them police. Each we have different languages even though both speak English. I'm not sure how you refer to them. And I have come across this particular breed and I thought it was. It actually gave me sympathy briefly for like maybe immigrants are.

murder Hornets plague trump L. Biblical America Andy Bugle Chris Fox News badminton United States Donald Junior Ivanka Emperor Yuan D Eric Barrett Burton Nilsson Pacific
"plague" Discussed on Blind History

Blind History

04:41 min | 11 months ago

"plague" Discussed on Blind History

"In terms of the scientific literature around this, they said it came from a triple reassortment of bird swine and human flu viruses for the combined with Eurasian pig flu virus. That doesn't sound gross to you I don't know what it's. Maybe it's worth referring to what worked besides quarantining in those days going through all the periods of history of people who survived often with ones who just had stronger immune systems that goes without saying a lot of people who kept themselves cleaner did a little bit better than the ones who were filthy, and there's a wealth component to that as well, but people generally had no idea. Idea until very recently of what the origin of these diseases were, and they had all kinds of theories in fact during the bubonic plague, people thought that Jupiter and Saturn had lined up in the heavens, and there was some kind of what they call them. A conjunction of the planets at that stage, and they blame that for the outbreak of the bubonic plague, which is crazy, but When you don't have any onces you jump to the next best conclusion, young man, maybe at work is maybe was stronger than the disease. Yeah I think some good ideas of come out of these plagues well when Europe was so depopulated, did kind of put a stop to a lot of stupid walls, and the big policies were forced to rebuild at home, rather than seek adventure abroad and tried to conquer territories, which they could no longer for. FOR TO KEEP IT obviously depleted the Treasury's of countries that we're collecting tax and the labor force was severely curtailed for technology to the foreign. It's actually driven technology while you look at this one that we're dealing with the moment I mean the way we're doing. This episode of blind history is only because when a to be in contact your in Capetown. I'm doug normally. We would do an episode in studio together. That's not possible in technology. To do no chance. And you know the things in the end the once again. This is not my area of strength but the. Airplanes in the sky, just think. What a difference make from pollution levels in other spinoffs of this incredible to see. Ya I. Don't know that there's any one of these that has a happy ending. Except that now. Of course, we've developed some scientific methods to arrest the spread of these diseases and to kill the bacteria responsible, and if it's a virus to sometimes cut down the efficacy with vaccines, but obviously what Fleming did in discovering penicillin was tremendously instrumental in helping us fight, bacterial infections, and to pasteurize things, and to be able to to clear disease out of food, which was also a major source of disease for a lot of people up to then. Humans on credible either coming. He Cups in the gets..

plague Capetown Europe penicillin Fleming doug
"plague" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

12:06 min | 11 months ago

"plague" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"According to the scapegoating theory members of a majority experiencing negative shocks settled on a specific target to blame for their problems and other potential mechanism determining the likelihood of persecution focuses on the extent of economic complimentarities so the ability to which they are economically intermingled between the majority and the minority. This thesis argues that patterns of economic complementarity substitute ability to determine the ability of two groups to coexist when the economic activities of the two groups complement. Each other shocks may lead the majority to protect the minority because of its economic value. So that's a bummer. That like what protected communities from. I mean there's two ways to view it either. The Solis is like oh no purely when people think that they have a financial benefits from not murdering each other. They don't murder each other. That's the bomber where it's like. Oh God our only solution is more capitalism. The other way to look at is just that like no when when two different groups when a minority group becomes intermingled with majority and they all become economically tied. They get to know each other. They shop at each other stores and they don't and they're like. Oh No I know these people. They're part of my community. I'm not gonNA murder them and I see that they have. There's we have value that we offer each other and at all it's not just like who the fuck are these people? Yes can you can interpret this in an optimistic view of human nature or a pessimistic view of human nature and it needs well into either. You know I wonder if it would be something like well. You know once. There's robots to do just going to be limited right. That's that's my solution that that motive seems a little bit of far for years now miles every time we've hung out. I've said if there weren't robots I'd be murdering you. I never really thought about why I was saying. But yeah super funny and then now that you said this I'm starting anyway. Yeah we we can explore that later So yeah it's cool stuff anyway. There's a lot of the black plague of armor and and we're going to move on from the black places And the question of whether or not genocide is inevitable or if it's only avoidable with economic complementarity whatever we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA move on from that complicated topic of discussions to talk about something fun. The Spanish flu epidemic of Nineteen Eighteen. Are you a big spam flu fan? Are you all man flu steroid? Yeah Yeah Oh my God Oh my God of foods commie dodgy blue about this whole thing. I love it so much If I'm you know no the only thing I know is that I think Babe Ruth got it twice. That sounds about that. Sounds like Babe Ruth and a lot of people would say you know Babe Ruth. It's Babe Ruth of Flus. I think more modern Lee people would say the Lebron James of Flus. But it's really this is like fucking Shit. I'm just saying if Lebron was a flu he would kill twenty five to fifty million human beings much like shit. I'm probably on Jason just as like a personal thing feel very proud of you for no bring him into the Yongqing. Well look. I just tried to make this defending audience Bron James. I mean he's an how far you've come. I mean Lakers. The Spanish flu carried out a series of dunks all around the world that field tens of millions of people. Just like the Lakers. Now this is. Have you heard much about like how the Spanish flu came about miles? I is in his uniform. Bec- label no well. It became one. Actually it's a tremendous irony okay. So the Spanish flu. We don't know where it came from. Some people say somewhere in Asia and people say somewhere in Eastern Europe. There's actually a really good chance it started in Kansas. And if like some people tracing it back think that it actually did it start in Kansas. Yeah if the Spanish flu originated from Kansas. Then it's probably the second deadliest thing to come out of that state right next to Kirstie Alley. Yeah I was just hockey Kirsty. Yeah what is two hundred twenty.

flu Babe Ruth Lebron James murder Kansas Lakers scapegoating Kirstie Alley Asia Solis Jason hockey Eastern Europe Bec Yongqing Lee
"plague" Discussed on Probably True Podcast

Probably True Podcast

14:59 min | 1 year ago

"plague" Discussed on Probably True Podcast

"From the pain and the shame and the despair of now in the he's about to die and there's nothing anyone can do about it. Imagine go into funeral after funeral after funeral and not knowing if you could hug any of your friends as you cry your heart out in case just by touching them you passed on this awful disease with no cure that seemed very magically targeting. You'll love these. Kids had already left their homes. Either for fear of their parents finding out they were gay or they'd been kicked out because their parents had found out they were gay and they come to the big cities to find a place where they could live and love openly and freely and without judgment they built mu quit families who could love and them and then they had to watch slowly and cruelty everyone they knew and loved died in front of them knowing that it would only be a matter of time before they were next so I was researching this. There were stories people in the late teens or twenties lying in hospital beds alone. There was no one left silica for more anyone who could was too afraid to so many stories of parents who finding out this on was dying from. Hiv would rather just ignore the whole thing. Pretend they don't have a son rather than face. The shame of the fact that their sons dying from this awful disease even after cremation. They wouldn't come and pick up his ashes because of the shame. The was one group of people though who can for those dying men when the strike doctors and nurses would badly even end to the woods or stick their heads around the dose of fear of catching something will because they brought it on themselves and they shouldn't live that kind of lifestyle if they don't want this kind of thing to happen and those people were gay women the lesbians they were there looking after the Menfolk as usual it would be easy and stupid to send to this whole thing around white cysts men but the truth is that people of Color and transgender communities were hit as hard if not worse than the White House and through all of this people of color and transgender people and White Sis gay men. We're all suffering and dying the ones holding the hands and and being shoulder to cry on generally helping. Everyone live and die with dignity with the women in the GP Tq community because as often we need reminding community isn't an should never be people who are just like me so all of us so by Nineteen eighty-three scientists had worked out that it was a virus so within two years of it becoming a thing. Scientists had worked out that it was a virus that spread through blood and sexual contact by nineteen eighty five two years after that there was a blood test to find it. So Y- progress is being made finding out you had at. This point wasn't particularly great because there was no kill or even any way of managing it all the positive test men was. You knew you had it under. It would pretty much definitely kill you. Slowly and painfully in a few years time love young men by the waiting there were quite a few who'd rather take their own lives so party themselves to death rather than wait for it to happen. Even though all this progress was being made the difference between scientific knowledge in general ignorance is a big one so despite it being common knowledge that it could only be passed on through sex and blood. There was still a huge amount of stigma to having HIV. This shame around it was big and heavy and that still around now to a degree which is crazy. You had friends dying of the disease. The best thing you could do was lie in one thousand nine hundred seven though is a guy who died of HIV. His best mate was ago. Who told everyone in your office that he died in a car crash because she didn't want to have to deal with all the judgement and stuff that come from being friends with someone with HIV and the Li- worked everyone was really sympathetic and caring and stuff until they found out that he'd actually died of HIV. Then when she came into work the next week they'd move to a desk to the other end of the office and people refused to talk to her or lend her stay pleasant things like that because they had kids and they had to think about them. Even story I found of a man who was having a heart attack stumbling into a fishing ship and asking to use their faxes before mobile. Phones goes up. So there's no other way he was. He was going to die of a heart attack if he didn't call someone. The fish and chip shop called the ambulance. He sat there and waited and money. I think he survived. Actually I can't remember but they found out at some point that he had HIV and then suddenly customers stopped going to this fish and chip shop. It almost had to close down because no one wanted to eat there anymore because they'd been a HIV positive in it and you might be sitting there thinking. Oh well how city people were back in the old days. We'd never do anything stupid like that nowadays. But all this corona virus knocking around you see people avoiding Asian people on the Tube. Us racist as just nasty. There's always the excuse. Ooh Well you never know or we count our fishing ships from there anymore about HIV guy was in there he was ill and you never know dear. Well we do know and you're an idiot. People are stupid and faithful easily manipulated. This has not changed throughout history. Speaking of the media had not just been homophobic had been downright cruel to Lgbtq people especially those HIV. In fact as far as they were concerned there was no different. If you were gay you either had it or you're going to a whole thing g. a wise Dunn's for got aids yet the Sun the Shitty little tabloid that it is not even absorbent enough to be totally wrong but there we go brown an article calling for the extermination of all gays to stop the spread of the disease. Not Finding a cure or looking after them or better sex education or anything like that. Just kill him all. Line them up and shoot him. It was proven that HIV couldn't be transmitted through touch or sneeze or sharing a toilet Saito. Whatever by about nineteen eighty-three but that didn't stop people being stupid enough right. It's twenty twenty and we still stupid people around actually in nineteen ninety-seven Princess Diana help to bit without blessed. Cotton socks well console. She was posture body. Silky want blessed Silky Stockins CEO this stigma and shunning anyone with HIV being terrified to touch them or take money from them if they were trying to buy something from you in the will before contact with credit cards Princess. Diana did a thing. She went on a tour of a new hospital and it had an AIDS wing and she shook hands with someone dying of AIDS. No clubs or anything like that in front of all the cameras in the world's media she treated him like a human being and that caused shockwaves. Full year four years since doctors. It said No. Don't where you can't catch it from touching someone and the simple act of shaking. His hand made the front page of pretty much every newspaper in the World Chino. What she was doing she might have been Rondi. Talk getting it from anyone will give it to you. Know nothing wrong with that Bozo. We've all been the viruses we can isolate. We can deal with and we have bud. The shame and the stigma and the judgment that hangs off. It has a little harder to shake Mohawk outcome. It really does not only did all these innocent young men land that they would likely to wither away and die and there was little or nothing that could be done but they had to do it in the face of shame and disgust from society. That either didn't know any better or didn't care you brought it on yourself is not something anyone in that situation needs to hit. And so the epidemic continued. It took until nineteen ninety-five four drugs to be developed. That could help. People manage the condition so they wouldn't actually kill them fifteen years from the first recorded outbreaks to a drug. That could manage the disease. Seems like a long time but I'm told by people who knows kind of thing that is remarkably quick anything like this especially considering how little we knew about viruses and things like that a good thing to know you know if you were diagnosed. It could be managed. You could live a normal life. You distil no cure even now but people with HIV on suffering anymore. You can live with it. You can manage it. You can thrive despite it in the past thirty seven years more than thirty two million people died from HIV and AIDS related illnesses. And that's just the ones we know about. So let's think of another way thirty two million people. That's every single person. Living in London New York San Francisco Berlin Paris Toronto Melbourne and Sydney. All of them together or another way. I just over half of the UK population all of it. It's like Thunnus Disney's magic snap and making half the UK die except it's not random and it wasn't quick pain this. He didn't dissolve into dust. It was slow in excruciating. You Watch your body shutdown from the inside. It was messy and absolutely heartbreaking and it would be everyone you know not just your boyfriend or your close friends or some gay people but everyone like the Barista smiles you the guy you see on your way to work most mornings the older guy from the office who always dresses nicely people on the street that you don't know but you'd see every day the bus driver the lawyer the chef and everyone that they ever loved or can about or just shacked because they will horny slowly rotting while they're still alive and you have to watch and there's nothing you can do if I were to sit here and read out the names of everyone who died all the ones we know anyway. Just one after the other without stopping. So I this Scott Flash Stephen Jones tits McGee Labor just going it would take me two and a half years no stopping no sleep. No Rest. No eating drinking anything like that. Just one name after the other like that. Tammy thirty months. They all had dreams and plans and whole lives ahead of them. They were kids. They were a lot younger than me. Most of them and they'd moved to the big cities to find more polite them to build their families and their social groups who would love them and support them in ways their own flesh and blood couldn't didn't want to some of them would have been great artists or writers or politicians inventors or anything like that and you know yeah some of them were complete. Dick heads because of course they were. It wasn't in the twenties. I don't WanNa Romanticize. Or generalize or anything because that's stupid. It's not that these kids were special different or somehow more than everyone else quite the opposite. Actually they were just like everyone else. They were everyone else. All of them had the potential to go on and do great things or to do nothing. Sit At home and rot their brains with Love Island. They never got.

HIV Diana AIDS White House White Sis Love Island UK Stephen Jones CEO Dick Dunn Rondi Chino London New York San Francisco Li Thunnus Disney Sydney
"plague" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"plague" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"It was also cut into food supply. And if the diseases cross into humans could kill everyone. Cowpox or mad cow pox came from all of the purpose. Big bad diseases all cross to humans from livestock, which is our diseases killed people in the Americas. Isn't he Ed evolved to defend against that? They're yeah. Can we go warfare? We're so good at it. The Halen locus would destroy all the crops. Yeah. Hale is doing out of your carriage. Oh, yeah. Hail is still a huge concern. Around cutting time, prolonged darkness is also would be evidence of volcanic activity that could threaten crops if it's dark enough dark long enough. It will definitely affect the crops. Right. And I think venomous creatures in the dead babies is pretty obvious as though that's bad. But any of these plagues by themselves could cause the collapse of civilization. Oh, yeah. I mean by definition, that's what plagues are literally overkill it is overkill overkill. It's a plague is something bad that happens. It can destroy society. The biblical plagues is Egypt would not exist after going through that many plagues, I know you throughout the volcano. But that's a theory. That's out there, isn't that a lot of these are the Retailing's of volcanic activity in the area. And then it's just put it in a different order. Right. Well, like you've got the in the eighteen hundreds. There was the year without a summer. Which was one of the inspirations for creating the New York subway system when there was a blizzard on the fourth of July shut down the city allow people starved because it was snowing all summer long there weren't crops that year. Yeah. That was in the eighteen hundreds. You've got the the bubonic plague that wiped out a third of Europe's population the diseases brought to the new world killing ninety percent of the population of the indigenous peoples the potato famine most famous for Ireland, but it hit all of Europe where Ireland just had the most potato heavy diet. Yeah. And if you read any pioneer story, you're gonna get stories of locus blacking out the sky, stripping the fields bear, right? And the people having to move on or they'll die. That's also. Because that's part of the a locus a natural life cycle that just is like this catos, there's Mormon crickets crickets. Oh my gosh. Man. When those things come out in the summer, and you're you're driving down that like desert road mad. They starts discuss you slide. Yeah. Think they're ugly. So these plagues. You know, these are all of the scariest things that an ancient person would think about right. So perfect for storyteller right into this are the most worst terrible things. Yeah. Which will segue. Nicely into our first news story. The holiest site in Islam is being plagued by swarms of locus now currently yes, thirty thousand black grasshoppers to be precise. Wow. And I predict that Christians will call this God's judgement on Islam. Iran will call it. God's judgment on Saudi Arabia and Sunni Muslims. We'll call it insect migration. Yeah. It's insect migration. Right. Yeah..

Europe Cowpox Ireland Saudi Arabia Americas Ed Egypt Halen Iran New York Hale ninety percent
"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Bacilli while he was hugging his brother microbiologist injected some of the plague bacilli into the guy to kill him oh my god you were both found guilty of murder those microbiologist are not like this and i would have got away with it if it weren't for you pesky microbiology oh my god i can't believe that crazy that's two like i got an idea i'm good idea of an elaborate way to kill my brother i know how did they really figure out that it was not just a naturally infected case of plague lake did he say they broke under questioning did i i don't know i mean if i've seen one csi case i've seen the malia flesh house slash era houses anuri crossover episode between the two yeah yeah you have potential guys there's another story of plague as a bioterrorism agent in world war two this is a fun lines of funland well it's not actually this is a shocking one i would say i would also say it's a really interesting one and i want to talk about why so go apparently the japanese army had been experimenting on chinese prisoners by making plague bombs intending to weaponized plague particularly pneumonic plague and cause epidemics of it apparently around three thousand prisoners died and the japanese army escaped prosecution by the allied forces by turning over their research findings to the u s how vets interesting so i had read a slightly different story i there there are some more yeah yeah what what is the more well there are also some reports from china that the american air force deployed some biological warfare agents in north korea during the korean war in the early 1950s ha so i had read that eight.

murder plague lake world war japanese army pneumonic plague china american air force north korea korean war
"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Plague and not do vanek plague so four pneumonic plague that's actually a fairly unusually low fatality rate which indicates potentially that there was a rapid response it could indicate that it could indicate that for some reason this was just like an unusually not variant strain but who has done an amazing job at responding to this outbreak so let's talk about what happens in the case of an outbreak lee as i think it's thrilling it's what i wanted to do for my job for a long time wanted wanted want to see these the just kidding we can propose are kinda in not kidding um but so what happens when you have a suspected outbreak is a whole mass of people from the who from the cdc from doctors without borders miss on some frontier right they're all sent to the place with the main goal of finding the index case the initial person or persons who could have sort of started this outbreak and in order to do that you have to do what we referred to before as boots on the ground epidemiology you have to go there and interview people who were either friends of the patient family of the patient healthcare workers every everyone who ever came into contact with that patient and then trace of their contacts back and back and back and additionally you have to do surveillance of all of those contacts to see who might develop symptoms in the future and so that means.

Plague pneumonic plague outbreak cdc healthcare workers vanek
"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"The pneumonic plague there is a good thing about it surprisingly yes is that it is most infectious at the end stage of the disease okay and so if you're treating some one or carrying for someone who has demonic plague and they've just come down with symptoms you may still be okay yes as long as you just abandon them right before the day abandon them before they die just kid whereas oh that that's an alternative is an alternative abandon them or wear a mask but yeah you're most infectious during the last few hours especially of your disease however what's scary is that you also remain infectious after you die what so people who are preparing bodies for burial for example can become infected by close contact with the body because their body is still full of bacteria and that bacteria is still alive in all it takes is just a couple bacteria early who yeah so that's a little bit scary that's roughly from the other good news is that all of the plague is treatable with antibiotics as long as you catch it early enough caveat that's the big caveat and we'll talk a lot about that when we talk about what's going on a plate today yeah.

pneumonic plague
"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Is very very limited you'd have to have a ton of contact with that boob o to really get infected that winick play exactly bonnet coca that is in contrast to pneumonic oh yeah which i know is your favorite well favorite favorite is a tricky words used too strong a word hey me it's the most terrifying to me it is the most virulent form of the disease pneumonic plague which means that it has infected your lungs is transmitted via respiratory droplets it is quite high so for bubonic plague the mortality rate is between thirty to sixty percent and 470 cmic untreated yes and for septicemic plague it's on the high end may be eighty or ninety percent but pneumonic plague if untreated is almost 100 percent fatal it's wily sad yeah so pneumonic plague again means that it was transmitted via respiratory droplets so boo bonnet plague if it spreads to your lungs can become pneumonic plague but with scary about pneumonic plague is that it can also be transmitted directly humantohuman via respiratory droplets oh yeah like the flu like the flu like smallpox like so many other diseases that we've seen so with pneumonic plague the incubation period here in some cases can be as short as twenty four hours and again the untreated fatality rate is almost 100 percent and remind our listeners incubation period is incubation period is the time from when you become infected to win you show symptoms okay and so with pneumonic plague it can be as little as 24 hours very soon very short and what's really sad is that you can also die within that amount of time so it takes over your body very rapidly it encompasses very severe respiratory symptoms including shortness of breath and coughing initially the cough will be dry but over time ohno it will become very productive is what we call it productive cough nia meaning your coughing up gunk from your lungs fulham phlegm but mostly blood and bacteria whoa so the one good thing about.

pneumonic plague mortality rate plague flu incubation period cough winick shortness of breath 100 percent twenty four hours ninety percent sixty percent 24 hours
"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"plague" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Man i'm really excited to talk about played today because this is our first real zelenovic disease and vectorborne and our for sector born disease so that's really exciting for me and i am i would guess for you to since we're disease ecologists and so this type of diseases what's really exciting to us and we also both study vectorborne diseases exactly right if you are not aware as though not a disease is essentially a disease that generally circulates in animal populations and often spills over into human populations and a vectorborne disease is a disease such as for example malaria that is transmitted by an insect vector in the case of plague is transmitted by the humble flee i'm gonna say some things that actually might make you have some sympathy for the fleece no lie i didn't think it was possible but as i was reading i kind of felt bad for fleece somebody keep an open mind is an open mind and wait to be convinced so let's go through the life cycle of plague so play is caused by a bacterium called you're scindia pestis which likely evolved to be a bloodborne pathogen quite a long time ago and i'm assuming you'll talk a bit more about the evolutionary history of this disease yeah cool so we won't get into that now but what's really interesting is the life cycle of plague here's how it happens of fleet takes a blood meal from an infected what's call it a rat because those are really common death and the amount of bacteria that has in the rats blood directly correlates with the percentage of fleas that get infected not all fleas are going to get infected but usually at least around thirty percent of fleas that are feeding on a rat will get infected and if you think of a common rat it's got more than a few fleas on it right yeah lots and lots and lots of exactly so a good proportion of those fleas end up getting infected what happens is your scindia pestis travels to the fleas stomach where it starts multiplying and multiplying and malta.

malaria plague malta thirty percent