35 Burst results for "Place"

Americans Likely to Boycott Companies They Disagree With

The Trish Regan Show

00:52 sec | 5 hrs ago

Americans Likely to Boycott Companies They Disagree With

"I'll tell you this, Americans are so over it. There was a poll that just came out conducted with Trafalgar and the convention of states action in which they found that the overwhelming majority of Americans from all political backgrounds say that they're likely to boycott companies, they disagree with, which is an indicator that regardless of what side a company chooses to take, it's kind of a losing battle for companies. I mean, why get into this? In the first place, Disney, right? At least Netflix is figuring that out. I told you yesterday about how Netflix, which by the way, is a stock to watch because it's gotten beaten down so much. But Netflix is common to the realization that, hey, we got to serve our customers. And if our employees don't like it, too bad. And so it's important to offer a diversity of product. It's important to stay out of politics.

Netflix Trafalgar Disney
Politico Urges Biden Admin to Blame Fox News for Buffalo Shooting

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 8 hrs ago

Politico Urges Biden Admin to Blame Fox News for Buffalo Shooting

"Here's cut 12 A Politico reporter to Karin Jin pair on Air Force One today urges her to blame Fox News And the GOP from mass shootings cut 12 goats Yesterday you were asked a couple of times about whether or not certain commentators and media whether or not certain members of the Republican Party as well should share some blame and amplifying replacement theory It seems like the administration at this point is not calling out by name some of those people that have in fact amplified that theory Can you walk through the thinking of the president and The White House of why Barack Obama Obama has amplified it I'll mention a few Joe Biden in the past is amplified at the Democrat party has promoted in an amplified it People on MSNBC and CNN have promoted it and amplified it Scholars so called experts so called in our faculty with tenure They've written treatises on it Does that help your pal Go ahead It's not effective to call them out or do you feel that it's not effective Will you call them out by name So here we have a so called reporter Hat tip right scoop Whose insisting that the murder that took place in Buffalo Be projected upon Fox News and hosts This is sick When the guy hated Fox News hated Fox News and conservatives Go ahead The people who spread this filth know who they are And they should be ashamed of themselves But I'm not going to give them or give them or their noxious ideas They're pushing the attention that they desperately want But you are a mouthpiece for one of them

Karin Jin Republican Party Fox News Barack Obama Obama Politico Air Force Democrat Party Joe Biden Msnbc White House CNN Buffalo
Joe Biden Won't Explain Why the Border Is Wide Open

Mark Levin

01:47 min | 8 hrs ago

Joe Biden Won't Explain Why the Border Is Wide Open

"You see there's a gap between the leadership of the Democrat party And most Americans who are Democrats just as there is for the Republicans particularly in the Democrat party side Joe Biden takes no responsibility for anything Including a wide open border And you know what ladies and gentlemen neither Joe Biden nor his party nor anybody else has explained in any rational or substantive way why that border is wide open They won't tell us Why is the border wide open Why is it open to all comers Including people who commit felonies Why is it open When they know what's going on in that border is anarchy Crime ridden anarchy When they know they're violating our immigration laws which are very specific about who comes and who doesn't come and how people come Why is the border wide open So drugs can flow into this country Fentanyl and other drugs killing at a record pace Mostly young Americans Sex trafficking on the southern border and elsewhere like we've never seen in this country before Drug cartels getting placed holds in our major cities as a result again of the borders being wide open Joe Biden and his party have effectively effectively defunded the border patrol and ice through the back door with their policies

Democrat Party Joe Biden
Tucker Carlson: The Truth About Payton Gendron's Letter

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:49 min | 14 hrs ago

Tucker Carlson: The Truth About Payton Gendron's Letter

"I want you to hear Tucker, because it must be a weird place to sort of be in the crosshairs like this. Of the viciousness of the left and the attacks, can you imagine what it must be, what it must feel like to be blamed for a mass shooting like this, here's what Tucker said. Gendron left in a 180 page letter that he said would explain his motives. You've probably heard this document described as a racist manifesto. But that's not quite right. It's definitely racist, bitterly so. Gendron reduces people to their skin color. That's the essence of racism and it's immoral. But what he wrote does not add up to a manifesto. It is not a blueprint for a new extremist political movement, much less the potential inspiration for a racist revolution. Anyone who claims that it is, is lying, or hasn't read it. Instead, gendron's letter is a rambling pastiche of slogans and Internet memes, some of which flatly contradict one another. The document is not recognizably left wing or right wing. It's not really political at all. The document is crazy. It's the product of a diseased and organized mind. At one point, gender suggests that Fox News is part of some global conspiracy against him. He writes like the mental patient he is, disjointed, irrational, paranoid. Now that's true, not that it makes the atrocities he committed easier to bear. If your daughter was murdered on Saturday in Buffalo, you wouldn't care why the killer did it or who he voted for. But the truth about Peyton gendron does tell you a lot about the ruthlessness and dishonesty of our political leadership. Within minutes of Saturday's shooting before all of the bodies of those ten murdered Americans had even been identified by their loved ones. Professional Democrats had begun a coordinated campaign to blame those murders on their political

Gendron Tucker Peyton Gendron Fox News Buffalo
93: Find What Tickles the Soul - burst 03

How to Live A Fantastic Life

07:59 min | 23 hrs ago

93: Find What Tickles the Soul - burst 03

"I think a lot of I think a lot of the, you know, at a certain point, I think we reach a place where, you know, listen, I don't need any more character. Life can take it easy on me now. And so I think I had a lot of the grit again just rural Tennessee and especially rural Tennessee where I was, I mean, I wasn't in the absolute deep, deep, deep, deep, deep Woods, but in the 70s and Tennessee where I was out by Hendersonville and gallatin, not like it is today. There was not a whole lot around. So I had quite a bit of what we would call character building and grid just growing up in a single parent home. By the time I got to Los Angeles, the LA part was just trying to build a career in an exceedingly difficult profession where I didn't have I didn't have any nepotism. I didn't have anything, I didn't show up here with anything on my side for lack of a better phrase. Yeah. Well, national was a totally different city back then in the 70s than it is now. I mean now it's the home and hard of a lot of productions, both movies and radio and television. That was not happening way back then in the same way. Now it's Nash Vegas. First of all, it's the number one bachelorette weekend destination in the south. It's number one, even more so than Atlanta. And number two, I mean, yeah, my mother was a country singer, but there's a very famous train station Alan in Nashville called union station that actually country songs have been written about it. It's beautiful. They refurbished it. When I was in high school, it was boarded up in dilapidated. So yeah, you didn't go past, you didn't go past 20th or 21st street towards first street to downtown. When I was a kid or you were looking for trouble and that would be just past Vanderbilt. So it's a very different city now, yes. Yeah. As I say right now, I mean to Nashville and there are many areas that you would stay out of. I mean, it's a totally grown up city and it's safe. It's prosperous. It's really become uptown. Whereas it used to be a hole to begin with. You are correct. There were distinctly places you did not go. That is correct. And now it is. It's just, it's just blown up in the last 15, 20 years. Unbelievable. Yeah. For sure. So do you remember any stories along the way that you can tell the audience? About that journey? Several of them depends on which ones we can allow on air. No, I think we, when we tend to use the word journey, doctor leica, we, a lot of times, as a country that we're very result oriented and I respectfully understand that certainly as an athlete, your result oriented, taking tests where result oriented, and so when we look at journeys, sometimes we wind up just looking at the end of like, oh my gosh, that person is so and so they've gotten to it doesn't matter what industry it is. And so when I tend to look at some of those years, I tend to look back at some of the moments when I should have looked at myself and gone, what the hell are you doing? And one of the key ones for me would have been what I chose to go to Atlanta for two years. I won an event in New York. And I could have gone to New York, but similarly, New York back then, Manhattan back then is not the Manhattan you see today. I mean, people who have not seen Times Square from a perspective of the early 80s to where it is today, Times Square was a place after one or 2 o'clock in the morning, you would just get killed. And so I had been there and for this event and as a guy who grew up in the rural south and who also was a golfer, I didn't really see myself hanging out in Manhattan trying to haul my sticks on the subway somewhere to go play golf. So I chose Atlanta, but I also went to Atlanta with a very old car, $200 in my pocket, and the only person that knew I was coming was the gal who was to be my agent. So I had to I slept in my car for three days in this abandoned Sears parking lot. That is in really upscale Buckhead at the time. It was just this big abandoned building. And it was kind of downhill and there was behind the building thing and I thought, oh, that seems safe. And I literally slept in my car for three days, and then my agent had a client that was in the catering business. And she had a couple of kids that they had moved out. She was an empty nester. And she was kind of a whack a doodle. She might have been kind of a functioning alcoholic. She was funny. And she didn't live that far down peachtree. And I rented a room from her for $50 a week. For about 6 or 7 months and then one of her neighbors was a lawyer and he knew somebody who worked at this really fancy restaurant downtown and he helped get me a job. And once I had a job for 6 or 7 months, I had enough money to finally move out and get my own place. So that's the beginning of a journey right there. That is the beginning of a journey and how did you get motivated? A lot of things were stacked against you. You know, a lot of things, you know how many actors try and never meet their dreams. How did you stay motivated during that process? You know, that becomes the intriguing part about that question for me, which ironically, I've asked a number of people on my own myself. Is we get into the we go the direction in my opinion of nature versus nurture. And I'm someone who believes, I don't think that it's 50 50 personally as a guy who was almost a psychology double major. I do believe we're a little more nurture than we are in nature personally. I think our environment of how we grow up has a little bit longer lasting effect on us and maybe the nature part of us remains a little more a little more hidden, but not always. I think that the way I grew up with just a sister and a mother who was not home very much and was sort of a latchkey kid who learned a lot on his own and had to grow up pretty fast. I think there was just a nurtured part of me that quitting wasn't really in my vocabulary. I don't know if you want to put words to something like that such as stubborn or cocky or defiant or I don't know. It doesn't much really matter. Even just going to the event that I went to in New York that I won, we didn't have any money for me to go to that. I literally had to go around and raise the money to be able to even go on that trip and when I wanted and that's a trophy that sits right

Tennessee Hendersonville Gallatin Los Angeles LA Vegas Atlanta Nashville Alan Manhattan Times Square New York Vanderbilt Sears Golf
If Guilty, NY Should Explore Death Penalty Against Buffalo Suspect

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 1 d ago

If Guilty, NY Should Explore Death Penalty Against Buffalo Suspect

"Well obviously what took place in Buffalo was a horrendous Mass murder crime and a race based slaughter There's no question about it And this man is 18 years old So he's an adult I don't know if New York has the death penalty or not But if it does I mean I know innocent top proven guilty but if it does and he's proven guilty they ought to try and use it All the people who suffer Just going shopping the families devastated It's why constantly say we're red blooded Americans We're red blooded Americans in these racists who are on TV And they're still at it all weekend long It's just sickening But the corporate media do It is just horrendous The nation is becoming increasingly diverse do mostly to immigration But whatever the reason and so more than need to keep the nation together more than need to have faith more the need for the media to conduct self responsibly But it won't

Buffalo New York
The Right Scoop Analyzes Buffalo Shooting Suspect's Manifesto

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 1 d ago

The Right Scoop Analyzes Buffalo Shooting Suspect's Manifesto

"Now over at right scoop our buddy Brian has laid out a pretty good case breaking down what this manifesto says via Tom Elliott And he says the race is shooter in Buffalo left Ted dead In a grocery store this weekend wrote a manifesto before the shooting In the manifesto he reveals that he chose his own state of New York in part because of the restrictive gun laws via Tom Elliott Why did you choose redacted for the place of the attack This is out of the manifesto Has the highest black population percentage He put the zip code and isn't that far away plus New York has heavy gun laws So it's easy for me if I knew that any legally armed civilian was limited to ten round magazines There are a number of firearms I replaced the name of the city to redacted because I prefer that the apparent local police don't know until the attack has started if the attack can somebody switch it over please This shows you what a head case this guy is Obviously the shooter is a racist and he readily admits it Are you a fascist Yes fascism is one of the only political ideologies that will unite whites against the replacers Since that is what I see calling me a fascist would be accurate Are we a white supremacist Yes I would call myself a white supremacist after all Which race is responsible for the world we live in today I believe the white race is superior in the brain to all other races Are you a racist Yes I'm a racist because I believe in differences at capability between races Are you tolerant sure the vast virtues of a dying nation are tolerance and apathy and I want none of it Are you an anti semite Yes in bold double exclamation mark I wish all Jews to hell

Tom Elliott Buddy Brian New York TED Buffalo
Jim Hanson and Sebastian Chat About '2000 Mules'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:47 min | 1 d ago

Jim Hanson and Sebastian Chat About '2000 Mules'

"So I mentioned it got to talk about it. That is the now the most successful documentary of the modern age in just over a week, it's netted 10 million gross. It has had a million downloads. It is 2000 meals. I'm in it guys full disclosure. I've got a stake in it, but it is so important. Got to ask you, this told us we were conspiracy theorists. That's nothing happened. We've got in just the areas where Greg Phillips Catherine, engelbrecht and the 2000 mules team looked. We have at least 400,000 illegal ballots that were being trafficked by NGOs by individuals who went to 27 drop boxes in 36 hours at 2 a.m. 3 a.m. what is your reaction to this? Is this a game changer? Will it affect those who are un political or in the middle potentially? What it needs to change is any state that still has a law that allows mail out ballots to everybody, ballot harvesting or any of these ways that our ballots don't go from one person's hand to the election officials directly should be outlawed. Now, I can understand mail in balloting at some level if you've got controls like states that do it well, is okay. But the states that just mail them out and these NGOs scarf them up, I got to tell you, in 2019, November, my wife and I took information to the Republican National Committee about ballot harvesting in California. Concrete concrete showed that they were doing it. They were registering people at Starbucks with addresses at dog parks, at places like this. We gave them the dataset that showed this. And they were like, that's great. We're going to go buy some 32nd attack ads.

Greg Phillips Catherine Engelbrecht UN Republican National Committee California Starbucks
Jim Hanson and Sebastian Discuss the 2022 Primaries

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:00 min | 1 d ago

Jim Hanson and Sebastian Discuss the 2022 Primaries

"He is Jim Hansen, the author of winning the second Civil War allegedly without firing a shot. Jim, welcome to the studio. What a wonderful place, dude. I like it. Not enough guns though, right? You know, is there some rule about that? I think we'll find out. Well, we'll do some research that I know we caught smoke cigars. That's the biggest problem, but we'll find out about the Second Amendment. Welcome in studio, we have so much to discuss Russia, Ukraine, Finland, Sweden, the border. But let's talk about tomorrow. It's been a rather dirty primary season in the granite state, the Keystone state. Talk to us about so, granite's New Hampshire, the Keystone state of Pennsylvania. We've invited us Doctor Oz on the show while constantly told by his PR team that is very busy. We'll get back to you. We'll get back to you. He seems to be ducking and avoiding media of late. Kathy Barnett, who I've known for years when she first came on Fox when I was hosting the national security moms there on Fox and Friends. Came on Thursday when all the hubbub about her D two one fours and her military service erupted. I asked her some tough questions. She quitted herself quite well. So give us your take as somebody who understands Trump, maga, the swamp, the rhinos. What's your take on Pennsylvania? Anybody but the Democrats? I think all this infighting was not helpful. I think Oz doesn't want to come on your show because you're going to ask him why he's pals with Erdoğan. Why he voted in the last Turkish election why he hasn't renounced his citizenship and why he's not even vaguely a conservative in any meaningful way. I understand Trump like celebrities. Okay, I get it. And he figured name recognition matters. That's a reasonable thing to do. But the problem is now we've got not just a rhino. We've got, I don't even know what he is. He's a no. You know, he's a nothing. And if he wins, he may be able to do it, but I would prefer someone who's actually on

Jim Hansen Kathy Barnett Pennsylvania FOX Finland Ukraine JIM Sweden New Hampshire Russia Erdoğan OZ
Rick Klein's Analysis of the House Midterm Elections

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:55 sec | 1 d ago

Rick Klein's Analysis of the House Midterm Elections

"So that's the breakdown of the Senate. They went on then to break down the house and the likelihood that Republicans are going to take control of the House. You focus a lot on the Senate control of the house almost certain to go to the GOP. They only need to pick up four seats. Yeah, and that map right there, you're looking at the narrowest House majority by Democrats in the modern history of the House of Representatives. We know how first midterms go for presidents. None of that has really changed. But what has changed is redistricting. And this is fascinating. Our friends over at 5 38, they looked at every state that's finished redistricting so far. They're not all done. So far they found a net total of 7 fewer competitive seats than just two years ago. Down to just about 33. That means in the whole House of Representatives, you're just looking at this kind of narrow window of truly competitive races. Places where the Democrats and the Republicans are relatively evenly split. So, you know, they know what's coming.

Senate House Of Representatives House GOP
Rick Klein's Analysis of the Senate Midterm Elections

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:25 min | 1 d ago

Rick Klein's Analysis of the Senate Midterm Elections

"And they know that the midterm election is coming. Here was ABC's Rick Klein talking to George Stephanopoulos yesterday on ABC's this week. Yeah, George, you know that they were in a tough spot when it comes to holding the House and Senate. But when you look at the Senate, it's a 50 50 Senate. It means Republicans only need to take one seat. But what's interesting is that not all the seats are up. Of course, only 35 Senate seats on the ballot and in that group that's 21 that are now held by Republicans 14 by Democrats. That means that Republicans have to play a lot more defense than they do the opportunities for offense. And when you zoom in a bit on the states that are likely to determine control of the Senate, these are the 9 states that are probably going to tell us who's going to be the majority and who's going to be in the minority. And 5 of them are controlled by Republicans only four by Democrats. That means if you're the Republicans, you've got to not only hold your seats, but then go on offense somewhere. That means picking up maybe an Arizona or a Georgia. Both states, of course, that went to the Democrats in 2020. Or you have to move into deeper blue territory and Nevada or a New Hampshire. That all assumes that the Democrats don't find any places of their own to pick up. And there's a couple of states that were carried by President Biden or were very close last time. They were targeting, including Pennsylvania, the primary on Tuesday, a spirited democratic fight, and an opportunity that Democrats see to win even in a very tough election cycle.

Senate Rick Klein ABC George Stephanopoulos George Republicans House President Biden Arizona Georgia New Hampshire Nevada Pennsylvania
Buffalo shooter's prior threat, hospital stay face scrutiny

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 d ago

Buffalo shooter's prior threat, hospital stay face scrutiny

"The the the the eighteen eighteen eighteen eighteen year year year year old old old old white white white white gunman gunman gunman gunman accused accused accused accused of of of of committing committing committing committing a a a a racist racist racist racist massacre massacre massacre massacre at at at at a a a a buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo New New New New York York York York supermarket supermarket supermarket supermarket Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday made made made made threats threats threats threats in in in in high high high high school school school school buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo police police police police commissioner commissioner commissioner commissioner Joseph Joseph Joseph Joseph Grimaldi Grimaldi Grimaldi Grimaldi S. S. S. S. as as as as state state state state police police police police went went went went to to to to Peyton Peyton Peyton Peyton get get get get run run run run school school school school last last last last spring spring spring spring he he he he had had had had a a a a mental mental mental mental health health health health evaluation evaluation evaluation evaluation was was was was released released released released and and and and off off off off their their their their radar radar radar radar and and and and the the the the threat threat threat threat was was was was not not not not race race race race will will will will lead lead lead lead it it it it was was was was a a a a generalized generalized generalized generalized threat threat threat threat not not not not a a a a specific specific specific specific threat threat threat threat directed directed directed directed at at at at a a a a specific specific specific specific place place place place or or or or person person person person still still still still summer summer summer summer asking asking asking asking was was was was it it it it a a a a missed missed missed missed opportunity opportunity opportunity opportunity to to to to prevent prevent prevent prevent what what what what would would would would come come come come later later later later meanwhile meanwhile meanwhile meanwhile the the the the community community community community is is is is grieving grieving grieving grieving for for for for that that that that ten ten ten ten black black black black people people people people he's he's he's he's accused accused accused accused of of of of killing killing killing killing pastor pastor pastor pastor Russell Russell Russell Russell bell bell bell bell the the the the the the the the people people people people of of of of our our our our community community community community people people people people we we we we love love love love and and and and we're we're we're we're connected connected connected connected to to to to it it it it it it it it just just just just breaks breaks breaks breaks our our our our heart heart heart heart police police police police say say say say get get get get drawn drawn drawn drawn targeted targeted targeted targeted the the the the store store store store in in in in the the the the predominantly predominantly predominantly predominantly black black black black neighborhood neighborhood neighborhood neighborhood traveling traveling traveling traveling two two two two hundred hundred hundred hundred miles miles miles miles from from from from his his his his home home home home in in in in Conklin Conklin Conklin Conklin New New New New York York York York I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

Buffalo New New New New York York York Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo Buffal Joseph Joseph Joseph Joseph Gr State Police Police Police Pol Peyton Peyton Peyton Peyton Pastor Pastor Pastor Russell R Heart Heart Heart Heart Police Store Store Store Store Conklin New New York York York York New New Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker
Ask Officer Tatum: What's the Truth About BLM?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:38 min | 1 d ago

Ask Officer Tatum: What's the Truth About BLM?

"Next question, it is no secret Chicago is one of if not the worst places in America when it comes to crime, but more specifically black and black crime. Do you have any thoughts as to why it is why it is if BLM wants to make sure that the world knows Black Lives Matter, what are they doing to work on that issue? Well, let me just make this very clear. BLM has no, I don't think they have any obligation. They don't have any desire to do anything for black people. It is literally a fundraising organization that threatens people and coerced them into giving money and influence so that they can push a political agenda. They're not doing nothing for black people. I have never seen because we see children getting shot in the head in Chicago all the time and drive by shootings. We see young men, black men getting murdered in the streets in cold blood, mass shootings every weekend, and they don't have a single picture of not one of those people on their website. I literally David dorn was a police officer for a retired police officer and got murdered, trying to defend a property. And some thug murdered him. He was on camera, and it looked worse than George Floyd, if you asked me, he didn't show up on a sicaria Turner, my followers raised over $300,000 for Sequoia Turner's family. And Sakura turned a young black girl in Atlanta, got shot in a crossfire between two black idiot black men who were shooting out in the parking lot. They didn't feature her not one time. There are so many young men and so many children that have been murdered senselessly and Black Lives Matter have not given them money. They have not mentioned them. They don't have no t-shirts, they don't have no fundraisers, but they make money on the backs of dead black men and that's their whole

BLM Chicago David Dorn George Floyd Sicaria Turner Sequoia Turner America Sakura Atlanta
Kevin McCullough on the Failure of Democrats' Abortion Legislation

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:59 min | 2 d ago

Kevin McCullough on the Failure of Democrats' Abortion Legislation

"Tell us both triggered Thomas. When I saw. The Senate try to push forward this insane abortion law and fail, I thought this is pure politics. They're doing this because they know they're going to get destroyed in November. So they're trying to come across like we're the only hope we're doing everything we can to save you from the evil Republicans, something like that. Well, what's interesting about the failure of that vote was that it not only didn't meet the cloture standard, which I think they were required to have 60. And this is why Elizabeth Warren was all out of sorts when she was in the hallway with the hill afterwards saying, oh, it's time to do away with the filibuster. It didn't even get a majority of votes. So it failed 49 51, you had a couple of Democrats that sided with Republicans that swayed the difference there. And at the end of the day, we are still not a country that is eager to. We don't worship moloch here. We don't eat our children. This is not and it feels somewhat surreal saying that, Eric, but when you look at the insanity that the left has gone after our kids with, they hate children from the pre born stage to the infant formula shortage that is cropping up all over the place now where the USDA actually controls about 60% of the production of formula and it had this been the Trump administration and he had taken the same blueprint that he did with vaccines and said, let's go get a private public partnership and get formula made and get it out to the shelves so that babies are okay. They could have done that in there's a couple of factories in Michigan right now that are sitting still that have been lifeless since mid last year.

Elizabeth Warren Senate Thomas Trump Administration Eric Usda Michigan
What Did Robert Hanssen Get Out of Being An Evil Russian Spy?

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:12 min | 2 d ago

What Did Robert Hanssen Get Out of Being An Evil Russian Spy?

"We are talking to Lee's wheel. You probably know her. Remember her from Fox News and many other prominent places talking about many things kind of like this, but nothing can top this. She has a brand new book out called a spy in plain sight. The inside story of the FBI and Robert Hansen, America's most damaging Russian spy. It really is nightmarish. And I always say, Lee's that, you know, apart from my faith in God, I don't know how to process this. I think you would just be frightened at how evil the world is, how dark it is. I have to ask you the most basic question. What do you suppose that Robert Hansen got out of this? In other words, it's kind of a funny thing. I always feel that these traders sell themselves extraordinarily cheaply, you know, that China has billions of dollars to spend. And if there's anybody out there willing to kind of give them a leg up here or there, what was Russia giving this man? And again, we want to be clear. This wasn't Russia. This was the Soviet Union, as wicked as it gets. The evil empire, what were they giving him to make him feel that it was worth his doing this because he could have made a decent job doing the right thing. What were they giving him? Right, exactly. Cash. I mean, they were giving him bundles of $30,000, $10,000, $50,000. At one point he asked for diamonds, they gave him diamonds. And he had a cash flow problem, right? Because you can't put more than $10,000 in cash into a bank without alerting all sorts of things. So he would just honestly put it in a drawer. He put it under the bed. And in fact, Eric, one time when he had the cash in the drawer, Bonnie, his wife, saw the money in the drawer. It was like a sock drawer or something, you know, basic drawer like that. She pulled out the money, sees all this cash. She confronts him. This was early on in his spine, confronts him. She thinks it's money for a mistress because he's got he's done that before. Say that again, money from what? We're a mistress from mister. Oh, because he had cheated on his wife. Right. So she thinks that she confronts him. He says, oh, no, no, Bonnie. I'm not cheating on you. This is just money that I got from the Russians for spying. That was better or something. But he did say that to him. Yes, no, he admitted it to her. And then they, but here Eric, here's a twist. It go to their priests. That's what body his wife wants to do. They go to the priest, the priest basically says, oh, that was bad. Don't do that again. It's fine, that is. And you can be absolved from it if you just give them money that you've already made to the church. Which Hanson does, and he doesn't spy for a little bit, and then he starts up again. But the idea that a priest would say that, that basically, hey, you know, don't do that again, that's bad, but you know, it's all okay if you give the money to the church. And that, of course, you know, Bonnie was okay with

Robert Hansen LEE Russia Fox News FBI Bonnie Soviet Union America Eric China Hanson
Lis Wiehl Shares the Intriguing Tale of 'A Spy in Plain Sight'

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:05 min | 2 d ago

Lis Wiehl Shares the Intriguing Tale of 'A Spy in Plain Sight'

"We have a really exciting guest talking about a very exciting book and subject, exciting, depressing, amazing. I don't know where to begin. You probably already know my guest. Lee's wheel, maybe you saw her over the years on Fox News or on CNN or any place just a prominent legal mind federal prosecutor on and on and on. It goes, and she has now written a book. I got to tell you, it's nothing less than shocking. It's titled a spy in plain sight. The inside story of the FBI and Robert Hanssen, America's most damaging Russian spy, remember the Cold War folks. Remember when we were at war with the Soviet Union, they were a superpower in those days. And there was somebody on the inside. It just, it's one of the most amazing stories ever. A number of books have been written about it. This is being called the best of them all, a spy in plain sight Lee's wheel. Welcome to the program. Eric, it's great to be with you. Thanks so much for that kind introduction. Well, I tell you, when I read originally about Robert Hansen, it was one of these things, it's out of a movie. It's a nightmare that somebody would be this deeply embedded in our FBI working for our enemies. Today it would be, you know, working for China. But give us the background for people who don't remember the details, the timing, the years, the decades, so that we have some sense of who this monster Robert Hansen was. Yeah, and you've got it right. He really is a monster. I mean, finally, he's locked up now forever. So he's in a 24 hour or 23 hour solitary confinement and Florence Colorado in a supermarket, a super max. But started, you know, kind of an unremarkable upbringing. He was a middle class in Chicago, his father was a cop, kind of trying to tough on him. I mean, really tough on him. We'd call it child abuse now. But he grew up, became an accountant and then joined the FBI, which was really the Pinnacle for him. You know, it was just the thing that he wanted to be. He admired James Bond. He wanted to be everything, James Bond. So the enters in the early 80s into the bureau. And Eric within a year of entering the FBI, he approaches the Russians. They don't have to flip him. He approaches them. He doesn't tell them who he is, but he says he has this great Intel information for them. And indeed, it is the first thing that he's gives them is the identity of our major the primo Russian asset that we had at the time on the ground. And of course, we rely on those people to give us information from you said it, China, North Korea, Russia. He was at the very top level of the counter espionage unit in the

Robert Hansen FBI Robert Hanssen LEE Fox News CNN Soviet Union Eric James Bond America China Colorado Chicago Intel North Korea Russia
Kurt Busch takes Jordan Brand to victory lane at Kansas

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 d ago

Kurt Busch takes Jordan Brand to victory lane at Kansas

"The the the the last last last last time time time time the the the the number number number number forty forty forty forty five five five five car car car car went went went went to to to to victory victory victory victory lane lane lane lane NASCAR NASCAR NASCAR NASCAR was was was was nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen sixty sixty sixty sixty four four four four but but but but Kurt Kurt Kurt Kurt Busch Busch Busch Busch was was was was a a a a man man man man on on on on a a a a mission mission mission mission Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday at at at at Kansas Kansas Kansas Kansas speedway speedway speedway speedway powering powering powering powering his his his his way way way way to to to to the the the the front front front front for for for for his his his his first first first first win win win win of of of of the the the the two two two two thousand thousand thousand thousand twenty twenty twenty twenty two two two two season season season season bush bush bush bush said said said said after after after after leading leading leading leading one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred sixteen sixteen sixteen sixteen laps laps laps laps he he he he didn't didn't didn't didn't want want want want to to to to have have have have to to to to explain explain explain explain not not not not winning winning winning winning to to to to basketball basketball basketball basketball legend legend legend legend Michael Michael Michael Michael Jordan Jordan Jordan Jordan who who who who co co co co owns owns owns owns the the the the twenty twenty twenty twenty three three three three eleven eleven eleven eleven race race race race team team team team with with with with fourth fourth fourth fourth place place place place finisher finisher finisher finisher Denny Denny Denny Denny Hamlin Hamlin Hamlin Hamlin it it it it was was was was that that that that moment moment moment moment where where where where I I I I could could could could not not not not let let let let the the the the team team team team down down down down and and and and I I I I didn't didn't didn't didn't want want want want to to to to have have have have to to to to make make make make a a a a phone phone phone phone call call call call to to to to M. M. M. M. J. J. J. J. afterwards afterwards afterwards afterwards and and and and why why why why we we we we did did did did not not not not win win win win so so so so he he he he pulled pulled pulled pulled a a a a few few few few old old old old tricks tricks tricks tricks out out out out of of of of his his his his bag bag bag bag to to to to get get get get around around around around Kyle Kyle Kyle Kyle Larson Larson Larson Larson for for for for the the the the lead lead lead lead Larson Larson Larson Larson ended ended ended ended up up up up second second second second but but but but was was was was closely closely closely closely pursued pursued pursued pursued by by by by younger younger younger younger bush bush bush bush brother brother brother brother Kyle Kyle Kyle Kyle Busch Busch Busch Busch in in in in the the the the final final final final laps laps laps laps I'm I'm I'm I'm Jerry Jerry Jerry Jerry Jordan Jordan Jordan Jordan

Kansas Kurt Kurt Kurt Kurt Busch Busc Basketball Bush Bush Bush Jordan Jordan Jordan Michael Michael Michael Michae Denny Denny Denny Denny Hamlin M. M. M. M. J. J. J. J. Bush Kyle Kyle Kyle Kyle Larson Larson Larson Bush Bush Larson Larson Larson Larson Larson Kyle Kyle Kyle Kyle Busch Busc Jerry Jerry Jerry Jerry Jordan
3 shot and killed in Milwaukee following night of violence

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

3 shot and killed in Milwaukee following night of violence

"Milwaukee Milwaukee Milwaukee Milwaukee police police police police are are are are investigating investigating investigating investigating three three three three more more more more shootings shootings shootings shootings these these these these ones ones ones ones deadly deadly deadly deadly I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas with with with with the the the the latest latest latest latest the the the the shootings shootings shootings shootings took took took took place place place place late late late late Saturday Saturday Saturday Saturday and and and and early early early early Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday and and and and they they they they followed followed followed followed a a a a night night night night of of of of violence violence violence violence Friday Friday Friday Friday in in in in which which which which twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one people people people people were were were were shot shot shot shot and and and and wounded wounded wounded wounded in in in in three three three three other other other other attacks attacks attacks attacks near near near near the the the the Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer Pfizer form form form form in in in in downtown downtown downtown downtown Milwaukee Milwaukee Milwaukee Milwaukee it's it's it's it's the the the the box box box box took took took took on on on on the the the the Boston Boston Boston Boston Celtics Celtics Celtics Celtics in in in in their their their their NBA NBA NBA NBA playoff playoff playoff playoff series series series series the the the the latest latest latest latest shooting shooting shooting shooting left left left left three three three three dead dead dead dead seventeen seventeen seventeen seventeen year year year year old old old old male male male male the the the the twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one year year year year old old old old man man man man and and and and a a a a twenty twenty twenty twenty eight eight eight eight year year year year old old old old man man man man Friday Friday Friday Friday night's night's night's night's incidents incidents incidents incidents prompted prompted prompted prompted authorities authorities authorities authorities to to to to impose impose impose impose an an an an eleven eleven eleven eleven PM PM PM PM curfew curfew curfew curfew requiring requiring requiring requiring everyone everyone everyone everyone age age age age twenty twenty twenty twenty or or or or younger younger younger younger to to to to be be be be off off off off the the the the streets streets streets streets and and and and it it it it walks walks walks walks in in in in effect effect effect effect when when when when the the the the shootings shootings shootings shootings happened happened happened happened police police police police have have have have reported reported reported reported no no no no arrests arrests arrests arrests so so so so far far far far I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

Milwaukee Pfizer Pfizer Police Police Police Police Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas NBA Celtics Boston Boston Boston Boston Ce
"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

08:46 min | 10 months ago

"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"For lessons on adaptation for us. All nikola ripley is the executive director and nick. Kortan is the curator of the plant collections of the betty ford alpine gardens in vail the gardens team of scientists have authored the north american botanic garden strategy for alpine plant conservation which includes multiple objectives for increasing awareness and understanding about alpine environments to further conservation efforts for these zones and the lives who have co evolved their nikola. Nick join me today to share more about their high elevation enthusiasm and efforts. Welcome to you both. Thanks very much looking forward to talking to you. This morning jennifer. I would love to get started by having both of you describe both your title and your role there at the garden. So nikola ripley. I'm the executive director at the gardens. I've been with the gardens for a long time about twenty years. I rose up through. The ranks came in as the director of horticulture Which i did for about ten years and then became Executive director ten years ago and my role at the gardens is to make sure that we have a good strategic direction. A work with the board of directors very closely. We have a fifteen men aboard. That is the visionary group for the cottons that helps us with fundraising and i work closely with them. To make sure that we keep in the right direction We have an updated strategy going forward on. I oversee the staff at the gardens and work closely. We have a wonderful team of people who enjoy working here and you know we. We work closely as a team gets me up in the morning is conservation work and to me. It's absolutely critical. Best botanical gardens play a role in connecting people with plants getting people to appreciate another stand plants and therefore to be interested in a rolling conserving. Them we focused particularly on the alpine environment. So as beautiful as the gardens are and i you know. I i know that most of the people who comes through the gardens enjoy them because they are beautiful place to be for me It goes much deeper than that. And the the role that we play in leading people to appreciate stand that want to conserve plants is what gets me up in the morning and into the office and nick. Let's move to you. Remind us of your title and your role there at the garden. And i want to ask you that. Same question of a distilled kind of mission statement or can northstar for what you do and why you do it has done for. My role is curator plant collections. And i have been with the gardens for. This is my eleventh year now like nikolai. Roseau rose to the ranks starting as an intern and then becoming a gardener horticulturist to the curator now my overall title is not just what i do. Every day as curator is creating the plans collections and growing. We wear many hats. nikola does to around the gardens. But what gets me up. In the morning to is to come in and and to see the plants blooming and learn something new every single day and to curate and maintain the best possible collection an alpine in rock garden plants in the united states. And if that may be the world so my vision is always striving to be one of the best alpine botanic gardens in the world. The overall idea that i have for my role is that we keep growing in our ever expanding species in the gardens and we aesthetically make it amazing for the public to enjoy every year. So i'd love to go back a little bit before we go forward and dig into the gardens themselves in their history and their future goals and get a little bit of history on both of you and a sense of where you were born in raised and the people and places in plants that grew you into people for whom these would be values and sources of great delight as well. And why don't we just go ahead and start with you nick. And then we'll move back to nikola. Tell us a little bit about your earliest influences. Oh well it begins sexually. Basically when i was born. I grew up a biodynamic farm in upstate. New york where i Was first exposed to vegetables and plants in waldorf education which really exposes kind of the curiosity of nature from early childhood. And from there. I really just kind of love being outside and after that wanted to do something with that when i graduated so then from there i went to school. Matt longwood gardens pennsylvania. And i went to school for their public horticulture professional gardener training program. So i went after high school in two thousand eight graduated in two thousand ten. It's a two year long Intensive program where we get hands on in classroom porticos training In possibly one of the best tanna gardens in the united states and then graduated in two thousand ten in march and came out here in may of two thousand ten where it was still snowing which was a huge surprise to me coming from the east coast and i had absolutely zero knowledge of alpine plants or rock art plants for that matter or west coast plans so it was a whole new world for me when i first moved here and i fell in love instantly. I always have been a big person. The mountains of big skier so this happened to be kind of paradise me a botanic garden in world class ski pound so i was instantly hooked great There's nothing like a may snowstorm in in colorado or june. Want so nikola. Let's move to you and same question. You know who were the the people and places in plants that grew you into a person for whom conservation would get you up in the morning and Maybe start with where you were born and raised and take us through your training that brought you to by ford. So i grew up in the north west of england in garden country relay but actually never was of net. Didn't spend a lot of time visiting botanic gardens growing up. My dad was a mountain climber. And so all of our holidays were spent out in the yorkshire dales and in the pennines of northern england. And i grew really to love mountaineering to love the plants that grew in the mountains. We spent a lot of time in scotland and the lake district climbing. And so got a loss of the british alpine's and that's how i got really interested in the environment and plants in particular. I went to the university of your contented. Degree in biology and my thesis was on plants of limestone pavements in northern england that led me to work with nature conservancy in the uk looking for sites of special scientific interest in the north yorkshire moors national park..

nikola ripley Kortan betty ford alpine gardens north american botanic garden Best botanical gardens nick nikola Roseau rose vail jennifer Nick Matt longwood nikolai united states waldorf upstate pennsylvania east coast New york west coast
"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

06:33 min | 11 months ago

"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"We'd love to have you out there. And then he asked if he could bring his grandson which i just was so touched and so i really realized how important the story is. And how having a place where we could in a safe space explore this history together and you know kind of uncover it a little bit and and not just like the sort of the data that we find in the field which is really important but then also the stories that those bring it up and the memories and kind of those serbs spiral out from that engagement With a place and so many of the the volunteers survivor volunteers That i've worked with were were are the ones who are. Were really little in camp and being part of the field school means that they can personally experienced something that for many of them their parents would not talk about but but is there is there story and so they can come and they can stand in their barrack and experience that and then look and then we often. We looked to see well did. Was there a tree in front of your barrack. You know what what. How did your family landscape this place or did they or What's going what was happening in your area or where your school was that sort of seeing the ways that their families didn't give up that they made things better and that they got about the business of living is very comforting to people and it it fleshes out a story that in in i mean i think i was struck by this when i attended your conference in heard some of these volunteer and surviving now adults but who were very young children. It fleshes out a story that in their mind could be much worse and makes it just more real and it's still terrible but it gives life to it in a way that's better than complete a knowing all right so let's move to gardens. You start your first field season in two thousand eight. Tell us you know. Give us a sense of your organizing questions and walk through some of the methodologies that you are using because i think there is some fabulous irony in the fact that this particular location its challenges to being a good place to garden are in fact what have helped preserve the integrity of what is still there because there haven't been large developments and it's very hard to because it's so dry and windy. It's hard to keep things alive but it also preserves really good specimens in place. I think yes so. I just knowing that so knowing that the environment would be a really good place for the preservation of botanical materials on as well as a just the that sandy soil that everybody cursed when they were there actually then gets blown in and sort of layers over in most of these places and against it protects these living surfaces and these garden surfaces for us to be able to come back seventy years later and so knowing that from the very beginning i worked with Colleagues who were specialists so a friend of mine who had done garden on specifically garden archaeology before and he kind of we worked together. And i've just been so lucky. His name is steven archer and he He's like an archaeology plant nerd by you know and so he really helped me think about how to best do this. And he's kindly come into the field with us that first season in an ever since and then he gets all of my botanical samples. I send them to him for research. So we knew we wanted to gather some soil and be able to recover botanical remains from it. I knew i wanted to look for pollen because pollen actually lasts long even longer than botanical specimens So like you know seeds and and leave bits and would Are gonna last a certain amount of time again especially in the high plains but pollens going to last a lot longer And is also going to be just a kind of different line for the kinds of plants that are going to just decay all the way away except for their pollen. There's also another microscopic plant remain called a finalist which is literally plant glass if you look at the the greek route to it so it's So lots of plants have these set of silica bodies that give the plant structure and they and like pollen. Their shape is specific to the family of planet. They come from. Wow so i knew. I needed to gather up those and then when i was first doing field recon i took a A colleague of mine from our from our ecology department But dr buck sanford and he as we were going down there and trying to kind of figure out what i should do this especially trying to figure out. How are they taking their expertise and applying it in the high plains. Then you know these these folks who were you know farmers and gardeners and landscapers and you know even poultry farmers who are they're raising plants animals For they get there. How do they taking that knowledge and then trying to make it so that they can grow anything out there and he was the one who said to me. You know. bonnie this soil is an artifact. I want you like to treat it with that. Respect that you would. If you were to find like a beautiful ceramic pot like figure out how to get to it and analyze it and so he helped me come up with a set of protocol for for doing soil chemistry analysis and then And then he With to greener pastures in and i was But i was able with his.

steven archer dr buck sanford bonnie
"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"Of hope along with practical advice for your healing journey. Your host terry walbrook trauma warrior writer speaker blogger therapy dog handler and founder of the same as fumbles of hope project as a survivor and thrive over. Terry's mission is to shine the light of hope into the world by interviewing inciteful guests from across the globe. Please stay tuned at the end of today's interview as we honor our sponsors the healing place podcast is fiscally sponsored project of fractured atlas. Now here's your host and trauma warrior. Terry well brought welcome everybody to the healing place..

Terry terry walbrook today place
"place" Discussed on The Knowing Place

The Knowing Place

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"place" Discussed on The Knowing Place

"Hey y'all. Chuck here from Annoying Place podcast and got some things I want to share with you this morning about the power of the mind and Hopefully get some feedback from some of you. Be sure to shoot me a email at the letter T knowing place at gmail.com with your thoughts ideas critiques that I'm about to share about the my name is power. So stick with me short commercial break. We'll be right back with a minisode stay tuned off. There are a few things that are worth having that are free. And anchor is one of those things. If you haven't heard of it, here's the deal. It's the easiest way to make a podcast. But Ancor isn't just regular free. It's the kind of free that comes with great podcasting tools that allow you to record and edit your podcast right from your phone or computer. Anchor even distribute your podcast for you on all the major life forms, like apple podcast Spotify em anymore. You can even make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need in one place dead. So if you would download the free anchor app or go to Anchor. FM to get started. Happy podcasting. Good morning everyone on this November 3rd 2020 election day Tuesday. Hope all is well. Want to share a thought with you this morning and maybe get some feedback from some of you thinkers out there. I've been there is a preoccupied lately with psychology and the power of the mind and on the heels on my last minisode making your thoughts golden. I'm paying attention steal to my thoughts and how they affect control effluence my life. But if this power of the mind that has me most intrigued follow me on this scenario. You visit Grandma's house. Now she's long since passed away. But it seems like you can smell her cake baking or the scent of her hair or maybe even her voice hear her voice how many experiences like these have been attributed to ghosts or hauntings? But we're actually just the power of your memory. What if the mind being the supercomputer that page is can just vividly recall specific details from memory, especially in certain locations or circumstances, which may trigger these powerful member. Maybe seeing Grandma quote unquote or smelling certain scents or hearing certain sounds in certain places at certain times is no different than typing in google.com and having the website pull up on your computer. Now how much more powerful is the Mind than a man-made computer? Is this idea far-fetched when you think about it that way the truth of the matter is we have no clue just how powerful our minds are. So take care of your mind by controlling what you watch what you think what you listen to? Now in all fairness we talk about encounters with ghosts and spirits. How would you explain those experiences that people have with ghosts or spirits that they don't know personally that they don't have memories of that would be a good argument against this idea. I just presented but I guess I'm speaking more. So in cases of what the Bible calls familiar spirits, you know, brother or sister that passed away a good friend that passed away and you see them or you hear them when you experience them. I really think that this supercomputer mind of hours. Gives us these experiences and projects these images and gives us those smells and those touches in those fields long after our loved ones have gone. So don't discount how powerful you are how powerful your mind is. Peace and love is always. Hit me up. Give me some feedback. Thanks.

Chuck Ancor Grandma Spotify apple
"place" Discussed on The Knowing Place

The Knowing Place

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"place" Discussed on The Knowing Place

"And today's I start micro-mini sold one. Is Entitled Tough Guy Talk. Tough guy talk lesson. Number One. When he says I don't cry. Translation. I don't like to let people. See me cry or. I don't like how weak I feel when I cry so out on that people see me cry. Trust me. He cries. There are few things that are worth having that are free. And anchor is one of those things. If you haven't heard of it here's the deal. Is the easiest way to make a podcast. But anchor isn't just regular free. is to kind of free that comes with great podcasting tools that allow you to record an editor podcast right from your phone or computer. Anchor. Distributor pockets for you on all the major platforms like apple podcasts, spotify 'em anymore. You can even make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need in one place. So if you would. Download the free anchor APP. Or GO TO ANCHOR DOT FM to get started. Happy podcasting. I really hope you've been enjoying knowing place podcast. I've really been enjoying recording and sharing my thoughts. And getting feedback from you are. if you want to reach out, Tummy, hit me up at the letter t knowing place at gmail.com. Emma social media. Knowing place on twitter the knowing place on facebook. Knowing place on instagram. And if you'd like to support..

Tummy twitter facebook Emma editor apple
"place" Discussed on The Knowing Place

The Knowing Place

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"place" Discussed on The Knowing Place

"We'll wrap up. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> I really hope you've been enjoying <Speech_Male> the knowing Place <Speech_Music_Male> podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> I've really been <Speech_Music_Male> enjoying recording <Speech_Male> and sharing my <Speech_Music_Male> thoughts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and getting feedback <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from you all. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you want to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reach out to me, hit me <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> up at the letter T <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> knowing place <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at gmail.com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> And my social <Speech_Music_Male> media <Speech_Music_Male> knowing place <Speech_Music_Male> on Twitter <Speech_Music_Male> The Knowing place <Speech_Music_Male> on Facebook. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> knowing place <Speech_Male> on Instagram <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and if you'd like to support <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> means <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you can support at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Cash <Speech_Music_Male> Out <Speech_Music_Male> dollar signs <Speech_Music_Male> annoying place. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Also <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> PayPal. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> For <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Chuck <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> 500. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Or a mighty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> spring store <Speech_Music_Male> at teespring.com <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> forward slash <Speech_Music_Male> stores <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> down to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> pick up a t-shirt <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or mug something. <Speech_Music_Male> You feel like an <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> So <Speech_Music_Male> again, just reach out <Speech_Music_Male> to me. Give <Speech_Music_Male> me some feedback critique <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> show some support if you feel <Speech_Music_Male> motivated to <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> again, thanks so much for <Speech_Music_Male> your support <Speech_Music_Male> as always <Speech_Music_Male> walk in love. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> that's the Route 4 episode <Speech_Male> 7. Yeah. <Speech_Male> Hope <Speech_Male> you enjoyed it. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Hope you get something out <Speech_Male> of it. <Speech_Male> Shoot me <Speech_Male> a message or <Speech_Male> an email or <Speech_Male> give me some ideas <Speech_Male> on topics. You may <Speech_Male> like me to discuss <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> or if you like to come on the show <Speech_Male> and chat with me. Let me know <Speech_Male> off and <Speech_Male> something. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> until Dan <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Stay healthy. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Stay motivated. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Keep <Speech_Music_Male> your eyes open. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Make sure your house is in <Speech_Music_Male> order <Speech_Male> if you need <Speech_Music_Male> me. <Speech_Music_Male> Hit me up. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> again, <Speech_Male> peace <Speech_Male> and love until next time

"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Describe how you came to be President and CEO of the Urban Farming Institute and how long You have been there before we get into its history and mission. . Well, , I was actually the first employed. . There was a grant that the board had put together <hes> to to get the first director in that, , and that was me and. . I don't know it certainly was not actually because of my <hes> gardening abilities. . So that came accurate <hes> to friends of mine that were on the board they were looking for someone that for all intensive purposes was a jack-of-all-trades I think could do fundraising marketing <hes> presentations, , little bit of everything, , and that was me, , and so that is what this particular job did need <hes>. . So that's actually how I came on board. . In the beginning and what year was that March, , Fourth of two thousand fourteen, , right so give us the history of urban farming institute. . Where is it? ? Why is it urban farming institute? ? Really an admission then the mission today is really the same is to develop and promote urban farming to engage individuals neighbors in growing food and building a healthier community, , but also within that mission is to teach. . Adults to become urban farmers. . So that's really a key component of our mission as well, , and we do that by running a full fought farm operation in in the in the urban farming institute. . So where is that exactly and what do the physical facilities and and site? ? Consists of and look like. . The Urban Farming Institute is growing on approximately six farm sites in there really micro farm sites in Boston we're talking about ten twelve, , thirteen, , thousand square feet so so we do very intensive farming and there's a certain skill set that that must be learned to do this type of farming. . You've got to do all crop rotation each year <hes> irrigation systems are a little bit different. . It's a different entity when you're doing this <hes> inside a city we also two years ago in April two, , thousand, eighteen , with wonderful partners historic Boston Inc we were able to <hes> restore. . A beautiful farm site, , it was a farm. . Two hundred years ago it was three hundred, , thirty, , acre farm, , in Boston. . So back in the day. . So the original house dates back to seventeen, , eighty, six, , , the barn. . Dates back to eighteen, , thirty seven. . So we were able to. . Completely restore this wonderful facility. . It has become our headquarters and has basically we call it the hub of urban farming. . In Boston and Boston itself the city has been wonderful to us many of the thought leaders of our organization and this goes back to two thousand eleven two, , thousand ten worked with the city of Boston to develop a program to basically legalize urban farming in Boston for us. . It's called article eighty nine, , and now people can legally far. . We were the test case. . The city of Boston allow us to work on Similan to see you know this urban farming thing real can it really be done and since then we've had a wonderful relationship are farm. . The garrison trotter farm was actually the first legal farm under article eighty nine. . So our board, , our staff is extremely diverse. . The majority people of Color on as well as our board and we're all working on a mission to build a healthier community to create <hes> economic opportunity becoming becoming far entrepreneurs. . To provide training so that folks leave us are able to work in other food related businesses and then just creating a culture throughout our city a culture of eating a healthy manner. . And also in our area as we, , we often lack a key supermarkets. . So this is another way through our farm stands that we can really feed folks really good nutritious food no chemicals no pesticides all done freshly. . So. . As these neighborhoods became residential as the city grew and developed out, , it was a zoning issue that would have made. . A business of farming Rog illegal. . Okay. . I'm with you tell us any history you can of how the original board formed around this idea that they saw as a gap in these these neighborhoods well, , it all actually, , there wasn't distinct starting point here the story we often tell one of our board members who Had a wonderful business called city fresh foods. . <hes> was always concerned about a folks eating a healthy meal and having healthy vegetables and good food, , and how can we get <hes> get that two people? ? So they do a lot of work with. . Kind of meals on wheels, , food elders of Institutional <hes> meals, , etc, , and the bottom line was as he was walking to work one day in Roxbury. . He was actually going through many vacant lots on his way to work and the idea went through his head. . Why do I have to order MIC Salad Greens from California Why can't why can't I just use these vacant lots in actually grow food for the business. . You know and and clean up the lots and it's a better thing for the environment and that's kind of that's a piece of the impetus <hes> that started all of this and so he and many other thought leaders <hes> certainly got together and you know work with our state legislature etc and that's how article eighty nine came about and again as I said. . The city was able to <hes>. . Allow us at that time to work on a couple of vacant lots just to see if this experiment would work and yes.

Urban Farming Institute Boston Farming Institute president and CEO Patty Arnold Arboretum Boston Inc Jennifer Joel Harvard Horticulture Gardner Patti director Jamaica
"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"Welcome to the healing place part coast. Space with inspirational stories.

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"I says well I find out about this so we talked. You talked about friends. I have all my friends of pretty religious. We grew up that that what they said were you that not sufficient for us with that name as well okay and then. I looked at this picture that I had on the ball and while I was looking at that picture intently tenting it came into my mind. This is what came into benign. Yeah I remember Jesus saying anything. He didn't say with brackets around it. He said anything. You ask the father in my name I will give it to assist. You mean that anything I ask you. You're GonNa give to me and then I thought well. Okay I say God I ask you in the name of Jesus your son that that you please cure me of my addiction to alcohol. It's worked for seven months. That's it I'm proud of your Mama. I love you. Don't be around. It's a day at a time. It is just not Nana say I mean I left to you go in and get a drink and come down and sit down relax and enjoy but I don't do I have cooked with a little alcohol. Aw and as soon as I take my amount to put into the food I get rid of the bottle I give it to my neighbor good. They're always gonNA see but I'm sure they walker. He can answer all right. Well my phone is ready to die but I just wanted to say I am so incredibly proud of you. I love you so much. It walking away from you in July was an I'm going to cry was one of the hardest things I've ever done in my life. Well same to you but I knew you needed it. You needed to be your own savior. I could not come in and save the day anymore. So but don't cry undoing guy no one produce you just what she said. My by His grace is sufficient and juices say anything. You is to father in my name. He will do now. That doesn't mean these big new league continental I mean you know how would I My arm seeing that got smashed. All right I love you and EFI to are I. I'm sorry I talk award but my clothes ready to die by everybody. Nice talking to you.

Jesus
"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

14:11 min | 2 years ago

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"Page so thank you for supporting this dream healing space I am ever grateful for it so we will be back next week with a regularly programmed programmed podcast interview but for now here is my mama hey everybody so tonight my life has been just crazy crazy these past couple of weeks and he. I'm having some audio issues on the podcast that I'm supposed to be editing so I was working on it all day yesterday and then I had to take my mom who was sitting next to me to the hearing aid doctor today and we just got home so I I don't know from going to get tonight's episode edited did and out into the world so I thought let's do a conversation with my mom is Tonight's episode now just bumped the other ones back that they have to edit. I have four four interviews amazing interviews coming up so welcome to the healing place podcast impromptu conversation with my Mama and yeah so everyone this. This is We all call her. Dj Grandma Joanne. But Yeah we're pretty excited because how old are you. Mom A. B. M. Eighty four Ken for eighty five. Yeah and what's the big. What's exciting news? You're celebrating six months of what sobriety six months of sobriety. That's so awesome Yay mom. So yes so I said let's talk about because my my healing journey part of it included growing up in an alcoholic household and you know the healing journey that came with that. So I want you to talk about kind of your journey through it in what you said. I just love what you said of of how you how you sobered found your sobriety. So you're healing at cake. I first of all I want you to know that I have always tended towards religious things in my life I was born again. Nineteen thirty five to very Catholic. Family might not there with Irish. My father German and I went all through Catholic Schools Grade School Hallway. Crossing return yet and Notre Dame Academy. It was on Fifth Street. Now it's a very elegant school now where it's a as I think it's probably does Save Your University of Ohio in Kentucky Notre Dame is enough for and I had wonderfully for nuns who taught me and one of the first things that the sister principal. She took a liking to me and I didn't even even have to pay her and she said she would like for me to start with a little spiritual rating and I said okay. This gave me his book on. Say Theresa Little Flower. Who is really a doctor of the church writedowns down? She's just became a doctor even her parents were kid and I say and they had five girls in a couple of boys boy Stein time and every one of the daughters went to the car will bit whenever we tried different ones before she finally ended up. Hit the The carmelites in that Lee. So if Peres up Paris France and and I've always read. Her life is called the story of the soul and she calls herself the little flower and her philosophy. A fly is what I have taken for my own because I've always felt I could never do those things I've done to say not an a big personal Qadhafi for P. Life. That even tried to get an equipment. I confident they wouldn't take me. Let us she said I was more of an extrovert hurt. It needed to be out into the world. You told me that they send you party to Botch Party. Party those days and drink beer. I drink it in not that often but Graham all bidders. It's my dad's mother lift with us while all of our grandparents impaired slipped with us and my grandma bidders she say you go across the street get beer so I'd take my toge- ed's Puckett right over to the saloon get a big bucket of feeder and we put it on the kitchen table and everybody at their glass of beer but they wouldn't let me have it but I found out about that after high school that I was always a pretty good kid. I didn't get cost my mother much. It's trouble but she thought I did right but So how'd you have to get onto your feeling what I gotTa get through this park for. Okay this is this is all of have I got to this all right. We were taking the back roads right well so anyway I I. Didn't I have a little beer. You know that I wasn't much of a drinker. Dan as I got older with friends. My girlfriend tonight. And they were all Roy. Good girls go to Notre Dame together and we'd go out for lunch or dinner after dinner alive alive and we would partner. Did he have cocktail. So we were trying all these I started with Martinez Divi Knife Dam and then I tried Manhattan's and I liked but I didn't I rum did like GIN and a Tequila Wizar- kit but I think I try the ball and and then I decided I after I got married my husband Jim Terry's dead Utah. came up on a tissue. You picture of Terry said now. Don't pay me but anyway but he did not drink well. One time I got him drunk. It was so funny he would stick because I gave him that said I gave him something to drink. And my frantic rented been over and they put a vodka in ice cubes and when he came. Anyway it's really hot and he said he couldn't. Ah You said I said you want soft drink. He says you're so we put this five guys cubes and his drink. Well it did take longer to make him sick. We had to go out getting medicine and everything of course my friends for cracking up. They thought it was funny but it was. We didn't know any better well. Then after we moved my friends upstairs downstairs drank so every afternoon we would have a cocktail party on the patio. WHO YOU and everybody? Maybe we just got along fine. We tell stories assist and we were married. The of course hit kids. And so I'm like drake so I started tricky. Start Drinking at home and I really enjoyed it and the big thing for AUB was ideally. Drink it I'd feel really good and then I take another drink at. I'd start to get a little drowsy. Then after my third drake I thought over time I got what the batch slept like a baby. Well this got to be a habit. It was something I've I I really enjoy and I still would like to have a drink but I knew it's voices to be right. Yeah so I decided that I lost my daughter's not without any fine. I missed A and I said they were so bad after all the back so that they would love me and they were very good natured. Very take very good cure being. I felt very a proud about that and I also felt very happy that they left be enough to take take care may say his fate so I I need to do this. We'll get back to my religious. I I prayed in line. I always see I still to this day. I have a stack books right here to show them Jerry. My stotka books that I pray every day and does show by myself that I lead guidance. In what J.. This was after July after I came back from the hospital. I said I wonder lose by kids and I want to don't want to hurt by friends would hurt myself. 'cause I have. I don't have the big chicken. I don't WanNa be hurt anyway so anyway turned to God. I said what to do left drink and I can't give it up because I enjoy it too much adults. We sleep and I used every rationale that I could think of to why it was okay for me to drink. Well then I started like fallen down and that's where the kids got really big that I was in the hospital all that stuff terry. News about How much it takes this? You can't have that new kid if there's two up this level so teary she understood old stuff and of course I didn't and it's all I know it's I liked it and it made me feel good. So why should I give it up. Well that when things start happening each can't do this and you can't do that. You realize he got a prop so I decide and I was gonNA quit so I quit and I just quit and I did. I Wou I want to tell me to go to a meeting meeting and I went to what is it. Made me sad because she listened to these people and it really breaks your heart De her some of these stories and the people and you can't help for really feel sorry for and we could do for software for came on. I tell tear Acadian. They said mom you could only help yourself. He got out themselves. That's why they're going to these meetings. They want to help themselves so I said Oh well I did not like it did not gonna go back again and I haven't. I've never gone back again. And then I got this big book off the shift Terry Sherwood picture that the big book down there because this book hold the said You keep helping okay. I'm GONNA hold this. When Terry's friends we were at a party at Terry's house they have great parties and cookouts? It was fun to be with but this is a book from Alcoholics External Terry's friend gave me to read. Now you tell me in the stores and here here it is look at the size of this look at that and that large breath certainly but anyway I I've read some of it and it kept making macy's more shared more than and I. It just wasn't for me okay. So it's a water. No I can stop drinking or not. I pretty much had that my mind that I wanted to drink. Nothing else cared because of drake did more for me. I didn't have any by mayor. Pick it on their agendas. Was this happy so anyway after this big big episode of being in the hospital. My Kids said that Stepmom were finished college hear from them for a long time and it it was I was saying about it. I said well I've got a live but by problem I made it and I gotta whether could help myself this away because I had nobody dealt material was there to help me but she her line was. If you've been drinking today if your bed drink did you ever drink today and I was ready to punch. I did love very very good. But it'd be and Katie. She wouldn't talk to me and they said they did. What decor so anyway? I had determined to guide so I started praying to Saint Therese. I said Say Teresa you knew me we know better than anyone and I really would find to stop Durkee if I could. I don't know how now this story I better taste the truth. I sat my low green chair over here and I looked I have pictures of Christ anew showed pictures Kiro okay. Picture of Jesus did over on the other side is a picture bearing holding the baby. Jesus which and and I lifted him and the words came to me of scripture. I was thinking about Saint. Paul Saint Paul would whoa. He hit a cross of really big cross. He never Romans said what is cross was. I don't know what it was but it's in scripture. Few look it up. He complained to God. Please take the stored out of recorded that the Lord please take this thorn atom by side and she says tacky. Paul my grace is sufficient for you. I said I wonder what that means. Did Not Grace is sufficient for.

Jim Terry Theresa Little Flower Paul Saint Paul Dj Grandma Joanne Mom A. B. M. Notre Dame Academy Botch Party Terry Sherwood Catholic Schools Grade School Martinez Divi Knife Dam Stein Peres Puckett Manhattan Your University of Ohio macy Lee Graham cure
"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

15:37 min | 2 years ago

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"Well. Interesting piece of our puzzle. Yeah and as more people start to understand the healing work that needs to be done and go into the prisons and start to help that maybe as they exit they can exit acid- healed or at least the healing journey yet. And they get you know I mean I would love to see just mass amounts of volunteer healing feeling or going into prison. Love that so much. 'CAUSE 'cause if you don't if you're making minimum wage how the heck do you stretch to to pay a therapist. You right right exactly. So any myths or facts that you would like to clarify for listeners Well we we kinda started out with one which was the idea that that healing his heart right. Yeah Yeah Yeah and there can be intensity but there's also this discovery of strength and I think that if we begin to know that then Then we have more confidence to take the next steps in our healing journeys. The other thing I think is That the most important thing is not whether or not you have a good therapist or whether they're skilled that the most important thing is whether they love you the that the most important thing is that you have a sense that your person your therapy person. Whatever kind of there is that you do when I believe that bodywork can be just as transformative as as talk therapy and that both together can be extraordinary but just the sense sense of being delighted in I think is it can be a little tricky to find But I think that if we know that this this is what we're looking for will be more likely to recognize when it comes. Yeah Yeah I've had people say to me I didn't even realize that I needed warmth until I was about ten years in and then I was like oh I need some more and and it may have been that before that time the more would have been unbearable so we need to keep that in mind as well that if it feels right it feels right. Even if there's no delight if it still feels right it feels right because sometimes that delight in warmth if we've never had it before can be really disturbing and disorienting. Yes yeah It's one of one of the things I like to think about. Is this journey. How do we find an how do they feel to us? And what do we need. And what do we become aware that we need. And how was it just right before. Yeah yeah I instantly. I mean I smiled because I'm trying. They could play it in here. My therapist went to I'm so drawn a blank it's The top of this mountain peak Goo Peach Yo much. Up to at UPS. That's it brought me back. I don't have it in here. But I collect hearts Jason so very similar like a heart that she found that the top of it. I mean how touched in. Here's she gave me this beautiful heart gift so yes a for years together. I very much felt that connection with her. And we're GONNA work together. I think because of that so and she remembered you at the top of a mountain yeah. That's pretty cool. This cool thing you said just a few minutes ago was about the grids in one of the things we did and I don't know if it's along the same lines served and I don't know if you know the answer but you probably do brain brain spotty in some paintings marvelous. Yes we we did a little bit of that. We took a break from E. N.. Dr For awhile just because we had. I installed installed but we knew there were still some stop that needed to be data and so we did some brains funding work and boy. Yeah the DAB brings things to the surface about saying anything just a brain spotting noticing what the is do they stop. Stop what happens with the memory. Yes it was what was servicing this relationship between the inside in world. And what we're doing on the outside world. Yeah totally fascinated. I love it all. Yeah and one more thing that came into my head was as you were talking and it made me think about when you were saying about how we learn our strengths. Even though it's scary to go back in there is my favorite Hashtag that I would on almost everything that I put out in the Social Media World Ashtec Trauma Warrior because I look at myself as a trauma warrior that I not only survived but I write and I loved the idea of all of us who have been through Hello Trauma of becoming journal Warriors. Yeah in Mount Warrior from a from a fighting you know stint but just the fact that we're strong strong and that resource that sense of embodied resource empowerment of empowerment. Yeah and knowing knowing our own strength strengthens of overcoming. So there you go my thoughts I love it. Love it now so I have to ask you one of my taber favorite questions. Okay if you could meet anyone in the world dead or alive to help you with your continued during vaginal who would be it would be beatrice. beebe Beatrice beebe is a researcher who lives in New York City. She has a vertical so she does not get to travel so I have to figure out how to get to a conference or something that she's at but she Has Been for forty years doing research on babies at about four months of age. And what she does she takes close video. Hi Definition video of The baby and the MOM playing for four minutes and then she looks looks at those at at at that video screen by screen like a hundredth of a second at a time. Wow and she's been doing this for forty years. There's and what she sees is the microcosm of attachment enough in in this three or four minute video segment. She can Predict with eighty five percent accuracy. What someone's attachment style what a baby's attachment style is going to be the at one year old? Wow yes she she's in the microcosm of timing responsiveness facial expressions and. She's discovered some very remarkable things in one of the things that she's discovered is is that by the age of four months. We have already internalized. w-what is our mothers facial expression vocabulary. How widely does she smile with? Nf and we will not smile wider than she smiles. Does her face easily reflect sadness if her face doesn't reflect sadness we lose sadness all of the nuances of sadness in our facial expressions. If she does nine do anger we do not show the nuances of anger. Now the emotions will still breakthrough with babies. You know they'll wail with grief we for scream with anger. But they won't have a clunker already by four months. They've lost the sense that their emotions make sense if they are not reflected easily by the mother which of course has intense implications for those of us who who had postnatal. It'll depression after our babies were born and we can just acknowledge that with morning that there was an impact and we may need to do healing work and but but the the wonder wonder of this. Yeah Yeah is quite interesting It speaks to us about the Trans Generational transmission of cultural Israel and familial limitations on emotion and also speaks about many aspects of attachment What she what she she noticed And other researchers have noticed is that for example of wittingly attached mothers mothers who are more doers rather rather than beers will smile smaller than their baby. So the baby starts to get the sense of. Oh my life. Energy is too much I need to close it down. Yeah or the. The mothers will pick their avoidance. Attached mothers will pick their babies is up just as much as other mothers. This isn't Beatrice. BB's researched this someone else's but it's to the point The pick their babies up just as much as other mothers but not when they're crying so in a wooden attached mother teaches her baby. Don't cry to me take care that on your own. I'll hold you if you're angry. I'll hold you if you're scared but don't bring your sadness to me. Wow that's profound. Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah wow very cool and facet well. Yeah we can say wow and shall has for anybody who's getting interested in this. She has written maybe six books. She has one photo book where you can see this stuff in detail. That's like two hundred pages of black and white photo strips strips of the mothers and the babies for for you can sort of see the patterns visually. What's interesting to me with her work? Even though I just admire her so Greatly is that I have to go very slowly or I become dissociated and overwhelmed and extremely sad because there are so many implications since for me. My mother had intense trauma before the age of three. And there's intense associative and disorganization patterns for me not that I look at Beatrice Beebe Stephan. I'm like Oh my God. Not only did that happen to me but I did that to my son so then I stopped. I read a paragraph. I stopped by mourn on for months I read another paragraph and then so funny because as you were talking which is why I kept saying well because my head went in six six different directions one one about my own mother and my relationship with her and her severe alcoholism and and then I went to my I children in thinking about five is my brain was just like hiring away with the directions of Miami parenting my own parenting style and then I started thinking you know from a practitioner point of view love an a lover of trauma in in healing of this whole idea of I WANNA say Generational Trauma tends to international news of my mother's trauma history which unjust now becoming aware own really horrific. It was and things that happen but not as bad as was in. Its just now coming to light at eighty three years old for her in digging about how I wonder about that impact on myself and my sister because because of our very poor relationship with our with our mother. Yes yeah what happened to our mothers. Just this Just like like One year ago right now I saw a cousin that I haven't seen for so sixteen or something so like forty years. Since I saw this she had a newspaper clipping of my grandmother's divorce proceedings. That were that that were about my grandfather trying to kill domestic violence. It's my grandfather trying to kill his family and And I was like Dang here it is in black and white. Here's my mother's trauma history. History just extraordinarily captured in a newspaper article for goodness sake. Yeah and that's exactly. What oblate I think that my mom told us in her last hospital visit that I was when I was there was about her father holding a knife to her mother's throat? Not just that and I and I remember stayed in it because I love my grandpa and grandma. I had no idea I just standing at the end Augustine by Jal open she and she was crying and sobbing and finally finally releasing it. It is very powerful healing moment for her but she yeah. Yeah and I you know I mean for those of us who have maybe struggled for a couple of decades trying to you. Know get solid ground with these mothers who were so compromised. It's this. It's a very interesting step to step. Into Cornwall Heck no wonder and you know it's Kinda movement into compassion and And it's a movement movement that I I WANNA encourage any listeners not to do too quickly only do it when you're ready. Yes yeah yeah yeah take time take your time to be angry. Take your time to actually exist in your own pain before you go to. Yeah what a beautiful way to put that. And I talked about this A couple of episodes ago but It it made me think about when I came to a place forgiveness with the bank robber who held the gun onto my head and then three months later came back and murdered my co worker. When I finally came to a place of forgiveness with him I remember the moment of thinking he and I were both born? These innocent little creatures Somewhere along the way he made the choice to go down this road. But then I thought and I didn't know his story no not that. I was making excuses for him but I. I don't know what had happened to him. I is trauma history again. I was able to take a step back from his actions in. Forgive of him Because I I didn't I don't know what happened to him. It was very dave releasing freeing for.

Beatrice Beebe Stephan Beatrice beebe Mount Warrior Warriors Jason taber BB Israel New York City researcher Dang Miami Augustine forty years four months eighty five percent eighty three years four minutes
"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

11:51 min | 2 years ago

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"Everybody to the healing place podcast cast. I am your host Terry. Well Brock excited to have Mac Bennett here with me today so welcome back how you doing this morning awesome wonderful to beautiful day in Cincinnati Johny excellent. I was just in your neck of the woods working with Cincinnati health network. You enjoyed a great trip to your city sal thank you. That's great so your your role and you know the trauma informed where I love that I saw on your website or no. Was your email that you said. Tuning trauma informed everything yes. I'm still trying to search for an arena but this information around the a study just what we've learned about neurobiology Napa genetics where that doesn't help inform our thinking so I i. It's so fun to make a career out of something that I think is such a paradigm shift in a a basically any aspect of our society where we're folks are struggling so wow I tried to find where the world might need me and my energy China provide good tools for folks working in that area. I love it in so you do you. You have a podcast. You're really you've written a book. You have another book coming out this month. you have a blog. I love the name of your blog your inner speaker. I I mean it's it's wonderful. I love that guy. I've just been really blessed to make my passion my my livelihood so I after pinch hitch myself every once in a while because sometimes getting on and off planes seems like an exhausting Trag then I just remind myself from pinch myself if people a flying around the country to talk about my passion so little burn out I feel are exhaustion goes away pretty quickly now and we talk just a minute before before we started recording about that. You find that so that so purposes. I guess you can't help but just be excited about it. SAPS and how fortunate are are we to to do the work that we do. Absolutely I have a regular day job my own another business and that's a totally different world unrelated to this but this this oh my gosh. I could do this do it all the time in the editing in the recording and the writing in the newsletter and all about it doesn't feel like we're yeah exactly exactly and again. There's always another challenge to that's. That's what I love about it. If you think you're an expert on the brain you've got some reading the deal for Burkitt's so it's so humbling at the same time and I just I I just looked at a witch mountain of knowledge. Do I need to climb next to bring resources in tools and in boy to live a life like that. I just support Smith Kershaw seductress about the book that you have coming out. It's a trauma informed in relation to early childhood that education correct or early absolutely so this book emerge. I had just published a I have a little supplement follow talking about trauma change. That really was all the analogies that my I I. I love analogy. I think there's acronym people and there's analogy people. I'm I'm definitely on board with with the analogy said you know some of my first readers for connecting paradigm you WanNa do a nerdy subtitle a trauma or neuro neurobiological approach to motivational interviewing implementation. My editor said nobody will read a book subtitled that and then she read the book is like it's exactly what you wrote so keep keep the title of this that. I packed it with my nowadays so my editors were coming back to say hey. There's there's windows. There's elephants. There's there's talk said you just got to take some of these out so so lot of the things that I really using my trainings really simplify Alana Complex Science just kind kind of felt the cutting room floor side gathered all these together in a book and really the book wasn't the Big Day. I wanted to really create audio book so people could could play these different chapters as part of group therapy or even individual work as well so they didn't have to memorize all this they could easily play it in and there's discussion question so my wife and I were actually sitting in the Denver Airport which I know you have family indifference well so you're familiar with our airport a little bit and we were kind of talking. We were kind of toasted her birthday toasting my my I call my my one point. Five Live a book that came out and we we talk we started talking about. You know what what what I was going to do next. Because if you don't occupy my time I know crazy and and you know every night after school. She's a first grade teacher so she comes home and we talked about her kids. That are struggling and the more I started to learn about trauma and stress said attachment at eight a you know our conversations got deeper deeper and you know we look at this great. 'cause you out your phone and you know that we couldn't really find a there. There's some great books on elementary trauma sensitive elementary tree school a little bit on early education but we couldn't find any kind of from the teacher perspective so we we wrote a book through her voice about Hi. How are early education elementary school a teachers and school staff in really identify students that are working there certainly with trauma. Emma hopefully again that that question not what's wrong with this kid that not label in the bad kid but what was happening to this kid and hopefully we make a good argument for why we need those mental health resources I. I like to say not only in our schools. We need to get them into our classrooms. People like me with the therapist background. We gotta get our butts out of our offices. NB real resources to teachers so we we go through about creating what what's happening to these kids kids again and then how to create trauma sensitive classrooms schools and then we we Kinda in the book on one of my my my I think most important important topics in our time is as self care and creating healthy school environments that in this context so it's in the final stages is it's ninety nine plus percent dining any day. hopefully it'll it'll be up on. Amazon suits awesome. I'm finishing manuscripts excited and congrats feel so good when you can say finishing up how long it take you to the right book for connecting eighteen months in eighteen years. Vote answer and you know coming back to what you just said. I worked at Mental Health Agency in Cincinnati area and I was assigned to different schools and I and all my gosh the teachers would just reject me constantly saying you know what how do I help these kids. What do I do. I mean they they were overwhelmed and frustrated because they knew a lot of them knew this kid is either currently in a trauma environment environment with poverty or drug abuse alcohol abuse in the home or they had experienced. They knew it and they write the children. Were you know against that. We would talk about you know things that they could do but at the time when I was in that situation there just wasn't a lot not available in so your book is just a godsend to teachers. I mean just I really. I really hope it hopefully gives us a you know because allies have teachers when I do school trainees. Come up to me and says hey I'm one teacher I've got I've got thirty third graders. Five of these kids are throwing throwing chairs every day. How can I both regulate their their behaviors. While teaching the rest of my class and it's like you really can't I I mean I wish they could my my joke answered. All these really hard problems is I wish the answer was just more vitamin D supplements everybody can take but we really need to rethink about how we support not a hair support in the classroom mental health support in the classroom My real hope that we put out a good argument for why that investment investment in our children is GonNa pay off many is other. Let's let's invest in school so we don't have to keep building prisons invest in the kids that that something's happening to them in. I like to compare trauma and neuro biological physiological injury like an athletic injury if a running back in in football breaks their leg but they get treatment right away. They're probably going to bounce back pretty good but if they don't get treatment for ten years they can still he'll but they're gonNA suffer a lot more. GonNa walk around with those symptoms of that broken leg and too many of the folks that I come across in my work in Homelessness Nessen addiction in healthcare We're those kids that that we're just labeled the bad kid instead of gave the real the real help that they need it so i. I hope we can add something to that crucial conversation. Yes absolutely brilliant analogy because I mean there you go. I don't I told you I can't accurate but I've got my now. I love it and one of the things again that just popped into my head you know being classroom and for whatever reason I flash back in time to the first grade classroom and talking to a teacher and one of the little girls was coming to see me and she was so surprised by that because she was like she so good and she's so quiet and she's just like that perfect little student and so I would make sure to remind teachers at it's not just that kid that's acting out because a lot of these children can shut down on themselves and and try to be so perfect because they're so afraid of love the consequences that may can't come in so their their children can respond in so many different ways to trauma absolutely I you. I like to say you can start with those. I don't buy the principal's office out. That will get you your. I kid. You probably need to work with but you know we can't. I I just think back to my own experience which is longer and longer ago now. The the kids is seem to fade into the background as you know in high school. I remember these kids that always had whether they will walk down the hollering. Classy will always had their nose in a book like they were so good at hiding and I think a lot of those kids like you mentioned can fly under the radar as well and if we are again if we don't have that trauma lands on but we'll we'll miss them because the kids throwing the chairs. We'll get all of our all arts inches so we got some work. Let's do that but I I hope. We're like people like you and the work. You're doing and all of us out there do enough to work around aces and trauma every day boy. It's so fun to watch this information. Just believe we're in schools guy so excited. Schools now called me up to talk like the I wanNA cool. Police forces like just so cool where this information is is spreading transforming areas of our society. Yes I love it and again thank you for. We're doing it because it's needed in having been there. I know it so yeah wonderful so any any myths or facts that you would like to clarify for listeners either around aces aces trauma great question. Oh where where did it go with that one the one I'll pull a little..

Cincinnati editor Terry Napa Mac Bennett Brock first grade teacher Alana Complex Science Smith Kershaw Mental Health Agency Denver Emma Burkitt Amazon football
"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

14:10 min | 2 years ago

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"Welcome everybody to the healing place pod odd guest. I am your host terry. Well brock excited to have with me today. Ingrid hollaender so welcome ingrid. I terry thank you. Thank you for having me a happy to be here today. Yeah i was just telling you before we started recording that eye doctor website and i love what i see and i love the the idea of your books so talk to us about what it is you do and oh i didn't do your intro of what did i say therapist teacher. Group leader author and i edit teacher only because yeah. I think what you do is teaching. Oh thanks yeah so yeah. You wanted to talk about. What i do. That was the question didn't before now's checking in <hes> i well when you looked at my website. You probably saw my book and <hes> it's called comu- worries unlike your secret code to lasting stress really and self confident and i wrote it after being in private practice and therapy practice for almost twenty years now and raising my children and coming from a long line of warriors and being one myself <hes> i supervised therapists and they come into my office and they would say just don't give me <hes> clients who have anxiety that makes me crazy. I just don't enjoy working with it but i don't get it and i'd be like oh. Those are my people. What are you talking about. That's my fav- how can you even not wanna work with people who worry <hes> and i think because my concept of people who worry is that they care care. You know these are people who cared deeply and who's neurobiology. Who's nine set has just gotten a little uh taken over by that. You know you know you can't one thing you can't say about people who worry is that they don't give a rat they care so true ooh yeah and and i feel like so often people who worry you know. I don't want to overdramatize it because i know that there are people and and i've worked with these people who are suffering from extreme p._t._s._d. Terrible horrible traumas you know severe biological anxiety disorders and i. I'm not minimizing that at all or saying that this is the same however it it can feel so tougher for a person who chronically worries to not be able to be heard about that. You know when you talk to somebody about. I'm really worried about this. The tendency for friends and loved ones is disabled. He wanted right. You look great. You look great. Let it go. You're so you've made it. You've done chameleon times. You're you're looking at successful. You are look attractive. You are in the company friends. You have an inside. That person feels sounds like you. Don't get it at all right so now. I'm even more worried because i don't make any sense and i put people off with my own. Worry sorry so it's this vicious cycle that gets set up for people and so i really decided i've studied <hes> a many different models of therapy as family therapists because that's what we do and <hes> the two that i've landed on that i love in particular are internal journal family systems therapy by richard schwartz and polly vega theory which is not a form of therapy but has been brought into the therapy room by women named deb dana china and those two together along with just kind of who i am and what i do i've found to be exceptionally helpful for people who have chronic worry worry and so i started writing about it and sort of melting those together and talking to people that are worry and it's been so exciting because i know it's helped me. I know it's helped my clients and it can help other people too yeah. I love it and i totally get it. I have a c._p._t. S._d. diagnosis for my elm trauma history from okay her ethic yeah twenty first twenty two years of light but of my time worrying which made me perfectionist stick yes because you know that control saying if i could try to control everything than it wouldn't be so overwhelming and caused me so much anxiety and worry correctly exactly yeah and in in my language <hes> that that perfectionism that controller part is a part of you right and so when you can have respect for that part of you in recognize. It's just trying to help you out. I i just thinks no one would criticize you right and you'll be in control and nothing will go wrong if you just be perfect exactly zack to adjust right yeah and for those of us who sort of <hes> i don't know if you follow the ground but that's kind of an interesting you know type typology and those of us who are type one which are tend to be perfectionists right sort of fall into that very naturally. I you know i like to do things well i like to be i like to have <music> high expectations for myself and all the sudden. It's eating you up right and without trying. It's not a fault. I think that's my biggest message to people who worry. You're not not not growing in you know. There's no that that perfectionism and that you know people's airline far perfect. That's not what perfectionism it is you know and that constant striving self-criticism vigilance. You know <hes> but it's it's not trying to hurt. You and it isn't a bad thing. If it's sort of within your own relationship inside time you have a good relationship to yeah very good. I'm i'm a to serve the helper. Is that yeah that is that's right to and you might have a one wing then right. I don't know that much about. I don't want to tell me i know i know i love it. I think it's so great yeah. I think it's because it's it's it's unbelievably accurate. When i read the i have the book. Actually i have two of the books and oh my gosh is. I read like deepest what the deepest fear is and i was just like oh my god i well. It has been around thousands of years so that they know what they're talking. I had exactly exactly so you you you explain explain on your website that you have your own history. <hes> <hes> with it and i love the fact i love the idea that those of us who have been through something then take what we've experienced and turn it into a positive to help oh bothers so one studios to you for doing that and helping others long. They're healing journey <hes> just beautiful thanks. I don't think you can really do it unless you have been there and you know i i think that's the gift of struggle that that it just opens us to other people people every struggle i've ever had in life whether it's been worry or you pregnancy issues or marital issues or whatever it is parenting. The struggles are what connect you to other people you know and getting through them and understanding them that that brings people to you and makes you more human and helpful fall you know so i i'm pretty grateful for all of that at least at this stage in my life. I can't say it's always that would be the gift within you know gift within the chaos that you re. We eventually not necessarily in the moment but we eventually find. I am the gift in the lessons learned within yeah for sure and how strong we are. You know really humans are amazing just the the resilience and the ability to grow beyond you know i mean i just think about people stories that have sobered me any so through the years and i you just it's such an honor to witness those and to see the amazing strengths and capabilities that come out of them and when you're when you're with someone that's in the middle of one and they can't see it. You know you just you just have such a heart for wanting them. Yes you recognize ice. Oh but look at you. You know look how amazing you are right i just <hes> and when they do that moment is spectacular like nothing nothing else right for sure or yeah. <hes> involved in you know do utilize aces experience. I know what you're talking about. I don't tend to do a lot of those measures that yeah yeah how's the high stress and the how many right is that what you're talking about that scaling scaling of yeah of how just has such a profound impact on people as far as like the anxiety they expect almost like it becomes like you said a part of them. It is apart and as a part of them yeah and it has you know internal family systems is so so amazing to work with around the anxiety and and trauma and things like that because it literally looks at the inner world as an inner family and so oh you have parts that are protective you know you have parts that come in that want to you know save you from whatever not from the outside world particularly but really from from parts inside right that have been deemed scary or unacceptable or too painful and so it's amazing it is it's i love it so much and it is really i have to say i. I've never felt like oh no. I you know i'm i'm not gonna make it as a therapist but i can see why therapists who don't practice body centered models and especially something like i fast burnout because being able to understand really what's going on inside died to use it for your own parts while you're working with someone else and call and call <hes> you know we feel each other right and not to get caught in that fixit exit trap with kind but to understand they have the capability you can just be curious about it and help them to find their way is so energizing jive thing. It's such a different experience than feeling like the answer personnel to fix it personnel at the time. That really isn't true. You know right. We can't fit you know it's it's not we can't fix other people. Although my personality is to be the fixer so exactly right we're in a lot of us in helping profession. That is exactly league. We are for sure. I got a lot of to about me. You know i i love to take your people and i love to know and i love to tell people and i think that's why i i do love what i'm doing now because i do know a little something about probably bagel here theory. I'm not i'm not the expertise. Importance is the expert deb. Dana is the expert very you know janine fisher the expert but i know enough and i understand the science of it that i can help it. Make sense to people you you know and it's made such sense to me yeah so instead of getting an anxious feeling now and going. Oh no oh i'm in. I'm really in trouble or there's something wrong with me or making some kind of story. The first thing i can do is take a breath and understand exactly where my nervous system this feeling is coming from as much as i can understand it right right and then have a sense of what to do with that on a body form just as if i would feel super super hungry i wouldn't go no then. This has a moral meaning. I'm hungry. Why mine's by just eight then i'd be like i'm kind of a pig. That would be bad right but you would tend to go. I'm hungry. How long has it been since i ate. You know what i mean. Needing okay. I can feel you wouldn't go you wouldn't and make a story about generally and so i think the same thing applies to things like worrying you know. Where do you feel it in your body. What's happening for you now and and first noticing it surely is a body experience blameless. Were supposed to feel respond to have nervous system. You know sensation right that happens all day long or more along. Am i safe my dangerous you know. Did someone make a funny face at me. You know get that that scared me a little does that make me think you know just noticing okay wait. My body picked up a signal. What am i doing with it and then to go from there you can get in deeper and go and what part of me is activated and how can i be with that part of me. Just as i would be with a child or something i love it and two things things popped out at me one. You mentioned your said the words just noticing twice in my therapist. I went through e._m. D._r. they're great therapy for four years and lots and lots ninety eight sessions but man do we work through a lot of trauma <music> but one of the most powerful lesson she taught me was just notice when i would be sitting in a in a session and we will be going back into one family. Traumas a panic attack would be arising and i here's a. b. sobbing and shaking and all of that ensure just calmly remind me one that i it was grounded to just notice in and it was that same sort of thing and then the other thing is i'm so intrigued by this because i'm that person that loves to feel my toolbox with so i'm i'm going to have to dive deep into this because i had matt heard of. Is it internal.

deb dana china Ingrid hollaender terry brock Group leader private practice richard schwartz zack matt janine fisher polly vega twenty two years twenty years four years
"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

11:15 min | 2 years ago

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"M._s. In two thousand fourteen in starting out a new health journey she's transitioned from being an m._s. Warrior battling an autoimmune disease to m._s. driver in living well with the health sidekick. That's so cool yeah. Hey oh yeah i mean wow that's fantastic and i love it and i love it that that one of the things that really stuck out to me when i when i was reading through all of your stuff it was <hes> the word that you used driver and in warrior was the other one and <hes> i call myself trauma warrior as a matter of fact. I'll hashtag trauma warrior a lot on things that i put out because there's something about empowering about it so so yes so talk to us about this. <hes> you know the thriving business that you're doing still when i was diagnosed with m._s. I'll give a little bit of a backstory as was diagnosed in two thousand fourteen and it happened actually quite fast so in the m._s. World sometimes the diagnosis can take years to happen mine happen. Quick the fastest. The right side of my body went numb over the course of a week drove myself to the hospital and started demanding tests in a very proactive way and and <hes> i received one m._r._i. Which showed do mile nation on my spine and then they said you know it's indicative of amass but we can't be sure so so we need another test so you have to stay overnight. Sorry did you just tell me. I have a mess but you're not really sure but you just planted that word in a <hes> brain. My dad has m._s. So i kinda knew what it was. They didn't really understand it at a time <hes> and thankfully social media that existed at the time and was quite robust frame media went onto instagram and started looking at hashtag m._s. hashtag <hes> <hes> multiple sclerosis and unfortunately i stopped post after post i call it. The whoa is me posts which they have a place this and space i believe in the healing lang community because sometimes we just need to be up <unk> did but i just saw post after post the people with the exhaustion part of the disease just sharing selfies on their coach <hes> and just saying like i feel horrible today like kant haven't been able to do anything and i was. I was just terrified but as i was looking through the host i started seeing really vibrant pictures and people using the hashtag egg m._s. warrior like okay. Let me go down this rapid hor start looking. You let me start looking at all. These pictures and i saw people taking care of themselves is in a different way than maybe they had before <hes> they were talking about nutrition and they were talking about stress management and exercise and what i call the building blocks of health. I'm getting better sleep reducing their toxic lomas like what the hell is the toxic loads now. I'm quite familiar with it but i kinda went down that rabbit hole until these people who were empowered judge <hes> and i said that's that's what i want for my life. I i knew that i technically i knew i had n._s. Like the minute they said ad that i had demanded nation i was like okay. This makes sense and i say that i went through the forest eight. Five five stages of grief in the hospital really really fast fast. I didn't want to spend any time in anger. Sadness depression and i just live like let me go to acceptance and the overachiever part of it right hopefully or the and you can you tell by my bio a recovering overachiever cheever so i totally relate. I get the overachiever and i was like okay. I'm gonna i'm gonna live with this. Figure this thing out from the start <hes> adopted the mass for your high end of moniker on accor- put it in my bio <hes> in on my personal bio. You actually won't know that. I live with an autoimmune disease. I have really kind a stepped away about making a part of my identity and it's only a part of my identity now because i'm building a business auto immune disease but <hes> i believe that there's a time in a place for that warrior mentality have to fight for yourself. You have to fight for are your healing for your quality of life and so i- adopted the you know the m._s. warrior. I was like i am going to prove that. I am stronger within a mass. I'm going to fight this disease and the came apart <hes> an appoint in my life where he just said cape isn't going away. I understand that autoimmune autoimmune disease. There's no cause and there's no cure and then i'm gonna live with this for the rest of my lakes instead of fighting it. Why don't i just simply learn to live with it as something. Let's teaching me something every single day and that's when i started really trying to understand this whole thriving mentality and that i could increase the quality of in my life so that no one would ever know. I had a mess. I wouldn't have any disability when have any symptoms <hes> and that's where the thriving kind kind of started it was how they learn to live with this disease so that i'm not fighting it every single day of my life <hes> yeah that's a beautiful beautiful beautiful way to look at. It and i mean i get it again. I told you i i do the hashtag trauma warrior but i love it that people will don't look at me and you know no my story and then when they do hear it. They're like holy shit because it yeah it's it's a part of me but it doesn't identify me and <hes> yeah. I love that yeah and it doesn't rule your our life. I think that's the other thing that's really interesting. Is that <hes> week. There's there's no timeline on healing and and it could be our entire lifetime that we are healing different aspects of mental and physical health and so it's not something that disappears but when we talk about it every single day when we identify with it kinda takes control so when you just simply say like hey so you can be my sidekick i will. I will deal with you when i know i need to do when you tap on the shoulder and be like you haven't been paying attention to be lately than i'll be like okay. Let's hang out right as figure this out but <hes> i can't. I can't be identified can't be just ama- i you have to be so much as identified by bio. 'cause i'm trying to do all things bright right. One of the things that i think is really cool about what you're doing and i just want to give you it. Coulda sport is is just that holistic approach in teaching people that because i know for me personally when i was switching physicians by longtime sometime physician primary care physician retired and so i started to call around they'd given me this list and you know it was through mercy health which is a big organization tation in cincinnati and tons of doctors and i started calling in saying i'm looking for someone that has a more holistic approach. Approach doesn't just want to throw a pill at everything like you know about healthy choices. You know a healthy lifestyle and i really really struggled to find somebody <hes> which was surprising to me in so i finally came across somebody out occasionally. She'll laugh at me and be like wanting to throw a pill at something and i'm like i know i know i just have to say. We'll do it and like my my <hes> cholesterol had gone out and so it was like oh you can take this prescription and then it's like you know that's that can happen so i made changes in my diet and i made changes in rye was hiking but i started to rush swim and they got on my bike. I started to do more in than my cholesterol. Everything was fine so yeah. They're cool and what's really interesting interesting about all these names for <hes> health so i did. I did a post on instagram because someone was like well well. If you're teaching about holistic health like are you just a hippie plants lover and i was like no holistic. Health is the entire picture though i'm not aut for conventional for alternative. I'm pretty using every single modality that's available to us and i have personal beliefs around big pharma. We can get into that it. <hes> i made very specific decisions for my health. I chose not to take a disease modifying drug which is a standard treatment in mass because i wanted to see if i could increase the quality of my life without the site of x-ray <hes> and i wanted to see if i could live a healthy lifestyle and reduce the progression regression of my disease without it because the sight of terrified me so that was a personal decision but i'm not for or against right no whatever they become when chooses yeah but i just think that there's so many things we can do from a lifestyle design perspective to increase the quality of our life whether or not we're taking <hes> <hes> <hes> a pillar conventional medicine because sometimes it's necessary. I absolutely love you know and it worried. My parents aren't worried my <hes> fiance now husband. He was like a what happens. If you're disease gets worse. It was like i'm monitored once a year. If my disease progressive at that time i will reevaluate <unk> at the back of my mind. I was like well. I'd better let over conceived at healing. I was like i'm going to do all the things which was exhausting and we can also talk about that when you like overachieved at healing <hes> but but yet the the holistic health who was like how can i teach people about little changes that they can make and what i call the five building blocks of health. How can i teach people to do do that and then they can see the improvements they can gain more energy they can feel better in their bodies and then they can tackle different aspects and if that that is eventually coming off of a <hes> something that causes side effects amazing then then my purpose is doing really well in the world ultra yeah beautiful. I love it so you you do yoga and i mean it's it's kind of a mind body soul approach why it's all things oh so i started with with like intuitively easy for me to do <hes> and it was also based on what people were recommending the time so i announce the next day after my diagnosis. I didn't keep it to myself <hes> i. I share quite publicly my entire life on social media. I was just like like i literally was lying in the hospital bed rafting the instagram post in my head how they're going to tell everybody. I have a mess literally. That was what my thoughts were not not immediately mmediately like how am i gonna. Yes it was unin. How am i gonna live with m._s. I have to tell everybody. I need support..

autoimmune disease accor kant cincinnati cape one m
"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

The Healing Place Podcast

13:03 min | 3 years ago

"place" Discussed on The Healing Place Podcast

"They had someone right me last week. <hes> for my website in anyone can go to my website contact me through there and she sent me an email and she said that <hes> her she is that she was in therapy net her therapist who i do not know in some states than i. I'm not even connected active with had told her that she should read weber. Oh so little toys that yes. It's still there's some really <hes> you know every once in a while i just i get a idea just a glimmer. You know just this little all my goodness out there. Yes it's changing people. Write me and say i. I made an appointment with a therapist because i read your book and i think that i i think that there's hope for me. Eighty he'll and so i mean that's just been oh my goodness such an incredible hard in this journey that day that i sat on the couch and if i could just tell one one person i mean my vision. Was this big. Yes i get it. Yes and you just said you said if i could just you know. Give someone i hope for to heal because i write a monthly newsletter in it's called hope for healing yeah. That's that's my whole point is to offer for. If if any in this podcast you know is i told you beforehand shining light of hope because that's what's so desperately needed for people who have been through through trauma. <hes> you know i know at the beginning of your book you talk about you know the statistics of not put one hundred people in the room <hes> chance czar. You're you know twenty to twenty five of them. <hes> in a women. It's one out of four right yes in one out of seven for her for males in is which i think is actually <hes> not realistic because they don't report exactly is which is just terrifying in horrible. I mean who's doing this like i just stop. I know and end the theme it. It's all healing i mean i had to come to terms with. Why was it what what was in the mind by perpetrators right when they decided that doing this to a three year old child was something they should get up they they they should do that day was it wasn't just i mean i it uncovered in layer after layer after layer. I didn't get to the hall you you can't handle getting to the whole thing and i and i think that <hes> therapist to do e._m._t. Are and they need. They need to be cautious about tanning really have skill in <unk> super guy he go through because of you open up too much too quickly it will drown drown the client and so do the skill on my therapist to contain them afterwards and i heard some stories wasn't contained where you can pots and you send the personnel now and it's you know we always put mine in. We put it in. Its little say fox and go back again. It need me contain. Hey you need to be <hes> so anyway. I hope the midnight signed hi. My books like that. I lost my train of thought again right there. Okay i love coversation came back to it. Yeah we'll come back around. It's all good. I do signed my boot salon. Hope for healy. Oh that makes my heart happy. I know that's why because i saw i connected with you off of <hes> aces yeah right nice. Look you check you out and i was like oh. This is something this is something that goes along with. You know what i'm trying to do you and and so i think am i books my books. I was so careful. I don't i have in telling my story. I understand that some people get will be triggered. I understand i've seen front and i was gonna say i i know i saw trigger warning morning and you said and i love the way you said it because it was just so it was just real was get help like seek seek nick therapy or counseling. I don't remember the exact wording that you used but i wrote. It and i don't remember that's editing. You know they'll change. It was good yes because on our society is generally shied away from offer and so i know that i know that my openness well sometimes people look at me and they said you did this and my generation talk <unk> they generally i mean lots of my friends have come to me and said <hes> and this happened to me too but i'm never never writing grave. I just want to tell you that nobody ir right no no <hes> but the that day it's so the talking about it. This is the only in way that these generational patterns end is for us to be open for us about it into to <hes> the silence is killing us and it it's it's enabling our silence enables the perpetrators correct you're not held accountable and we've seen that in how many church scandals right right they were seen as a set of card in and <hes> and they they got by with the end. I think it's important that in in mice in my story i never name anyone because because that to me i could have but to me that would have distracted from my purpose. I'm not saying that no one should i'm just saying for my choice. This was not too and so <hes> and if i felt like that anyone was still in danger then i would've named wjr right i got i don't name name in mine either but but like you the way way i've set mine up. Is i tell my trauma. I tell trauma story in a chapter at the beginning don't name names but i don't want. I don't want the trauma that'd be the focus. I want the hope to be the focus then i move onto a lesson learned within that you know like empowerment or bravery strength <hes> <hes> may know something that i a gift that i found within that chaos in then i give exercises that i utilized along my healing journey honor from yoga meditation tation and i talk about those kinds of things and i offer those to the readers so but yeah it's not about it's not about. I don't want it by naming them. It almost gives them our yeah power exactly and so by leaving them these nameless entities <hes> <hes> that i just talk about as part of my story then again. I i move onto like that happened. There's nothing i can do to undo do it but here's how healed it and here's what i learned from it and part of mine and that's what my mission statement is is. I take that and i talk about this. How attachment played into this. This is how the trauma got invented which the body the body they keep score by the best s i mean that was a huge huge <unk> neil journey because because i saw aw all of these things in evac two years ago my daughter and in our stories another part of the <hes> and and so when you find your mom by the way there were three of me the race you i mean that's just that's right right so anyway but we did a conference at the attachment trauma conference two years ago and we talked about <hes> trauma sensitive math because we're both math educators and and <hes> and i realize along the way all of the ways that my learning had been affected i i'm a terrific compensator and i i. I actually became a math teacher for basic college level stuff not even basic college level kind of overview view topical approach matt which i did as teacher educator too so i never wanted anybody. Mathematician please sel <hes> but i love math and she does too and she's a elementary <hes> assistant principal appear in washington and so we went together other and did this is great part. We went to washington d._c. Together as spoke and and we talked about <hes> ways that napkin be taught out to help these kids that their brains have been affected by so that's a whole nother piece of what i do is that the education side yeah and <hes> and i may have an opportunity to talk to <hes> therapist in training which say much data. I'm like oh. That's very cool so i have. I have one last final question for. I can't believe like we've gone an hour for which is awesome. I don't wanna stop because there's about fifty other things. I could talk to you about but i have to ask my favorite question. Which is if you could meet anyone in the world dead or alive to help you along your continued journey. Who would it be resubmitting. It was simply because when i saw that unlike i don't know who wants to answer that question because i summit i'm scrolling right now on my ipad because i don't wanna leave one. Kazan couldn't decide on one right all right good. I can't yet <hes> so i already mentioned vessel benadryl and so so for the purpose of learning like i i just want to sit down and and share my story and that would be emory thing to me to have a conversation with and to talk to him about how the body keeps. The score helped me on my injury. That would be a dream. Come true. I talk about that book when i give my presentations because it is very powerful yes now when you sit down in her conversation with him yeah so then okay i am not at the right place by if i wanted to talk about if i wanted to talk to people people that are also spreading hope in it's spreading understanding and and would and would take grave and get it out there to more people people so more people can heal. It's not about selling books. I don't make that much when i sell them right. It's not about that. It's hope right will then it would have to any oprah ellen and rene right mike and mike incidentally that will conversation with that right until them sheer hear how excited i am about all the healing taking place because i just oh my gosh yeah when opiates that right oh there is one more because are you familiar with on doctor bruce perry yeah. That's what i was just gonna say when when oprah did that interview on c._b._s. Sixty minutes with doctor after bruce perry and talked about aces. I i was literally like you know like well. Because you know i had just discovered i had been a part of the the aces connection community and discovered adverse childhood experiences in her talking about it just brought it to the forefront of the mental health seen it did it did i <hes> when i found out in that guy was up here in washington at my brother in law and sister in laws and i was like we we have to watch us everyone sitting down. We're going to watch this you know and so <hes> because it did it brought into mainstream death oprah's interview we did that brought it into mainstream and.

washington bruce perry oprah weber aces healy fox mike principal matt Kazan emory rene two years Sixty minutes three year
"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel, James Chester Roulston, or j c Raulston was a noted horticulturalist and professor at the university of North Carolina. We're back now with plants men, Bob Hyland, who considers his great fortune in having been a student of jaycees Bob credits. His professor as having been a mentor in many ways, horticulture early, and culturally as a gay man, thriving in the horticultural world. JC also was this brilliant person. Excellent plants men. He knew how to build community, and he also kind of opened my eyes and away to my own sexuality. He was a gay person, and he fostered community throughout the horticulture field across. Smart Carolina across the country, you know, gay men and gay women who were in the field to know you were working at in universities or public gardens or at commercial nurseries, and he called it the la-, Vangelis society. He kinda held this thing together and would occasionally, send out, newsletters and built a community of early on of gay people in field, which I found, I don't know. I found quite magical, and what years would that have spanned for you, and in time, Bob? Because I think that was pretty radical at the time and pretty kind of groundbreaking in a lot of ways. I would agree. And so the years I was at North Carolina State university span in nineteen seventy six through nineteen seventy seventy eight of those two years, it might have been a year earlier, but sort of the men to latter part of the seventies. Yeah. So that kind of puts it in context and from there, my first cultural job was at a restored Moravian congregation town in Winston Salem, North Carolina called old Salem. And I want my first dumb was sort of managing horticulture is to help maintain and restore what was you know through historical records, you know, this, the gardens around this restored more even congregation town..

North Carolina Winston Salem university of North Carolina professor North Carolina State universit Bob Bob Hyland Bob credits James Chester Roulston j c Raulston Jennifer jewel horticulturalist two years
"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"place" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel plants men, Bob Hyland describes himself, as a happy wonder having studied and worked in horticulture across the country. He is currently owner of Highland garden design, and contained exuberance, a seasonal garden store in Portland, Oregon, which focuses on contemporary, pots and plantings for the garden. Bob is a plant world activist and advocate, and he joins us today to share stories of the life of a plants person, a state of body and mind that is fully integrated into all that he does and loves Bob joins us today via Skype from his home in Portland to share. More welcome, Bob. Thank you. Jennifer Tavee to be here. So it's finally spring here on our side of the world on the west coast, you a little bit further north than me. I think one of the. Things. That's most compelling about your story to me is how this passion is deeply integrated into all aspects of your life. And I think it's a wonderful story to share with other plants people who may not be familiar with the extensive -ness of this world that your life really illustrates so beautifully. So to get started. I wanted you to describe for listeners, your current kind of work in plants, both professionally, and personally. So my six years in Portland and my partner and I enter lived here in two thousand ten two thousand eleven here year before may, and since I've been in part, when I have been the owner of garden design business called Highland garden design and I have a shop..

Bob Hyland Bob Highland garden Jennifer Tavee Portland Jennifer jewel Skype Oregon partner six years