22 Burst results for "Pitchbook"

"pitchbook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Ranking domain and see as number one spot belongs to TikTok That's according to Cloudflare Just last year the social video platform was ranked number 7 and has skyrocketed to the top spot Google remains number two followed by Facebook Microsoft Apple and Netflix Meanwhile social video platform and thriller has agreed to a merger with sea change reverse merger In a move that will take this small arrival to TikTok public the transaction will value triller at about $5 billion though It's a fourfold increase from its recent valuation of 1.25 billion according to pitchbook Is expected to close in the first quarter CEOs were here with us I hate to silver Great to have some time with you Just tell us I mean I feel like I spent the whole of 2021 talking about special purpose acquisition companies spacs Why did you go for a reverse merger What was different here I think our combination with sea change is strategic It's not just backing into a shell company It's just an investment vehicle There's real synergies between the business that they're in Which is around streaming and providing OTT capabilities to operators and our platform which has really been focused on empowering creators to be the best they can be giving them AI powered superpowers to drive better distribution better monetization of their content Talk to us about the plan when you of course have such evaluation when you're looking to expand I'm interested in how your business model evolves Because you've been making some interesting acquisitions of course you recently acquired verzuz which is that the music platform Swiss beats Timberland behind that one But you've also been getting into AI amplify AI You've been going into streaming yourself the sports streaming with fight How does this all work together as a vision of yeah it's a great question So our business model and keep in mind we're barely at three year old company Came together initially with a short form video app And we've grown significantly from there And it's a realization that we had about a year and a half ago that the creator economy is really broken Platforms like Facebook and TikTok rely on creators to create content and to create a vibrant environment for consumers But those platforms which make all their money through advertising don't really share much of it with the creators So we saw an opportunity and we heard this from creators that they need better tools They need tools that can not only help them create and distribute content but to measure the audiences that interact with them How do they create monetization experiences for them to potentially sell some of that content on a premium basis How do they participate in this now emerging NFT economy How do they create their own subscription services So a lot of the things that trailer has done particularly in the last year or so has been creating these flag pole events like with triller Fight Club with versus around music chiller fast But all of those are designed to really inspire creators and to be able to bring them onto our platform and help them create their own audiences So just in terms of scale and scope of our business we did 11 big events this year But on the 5 TV platform we did 1100 events for other people So the platform focus is really coming into play today Interesting So you can give the size and scale of the events Give us the size and scale of users right now I know an awful lot of people have downloaded 250 million at least to have downloaded the app But how many people are on a daily basis or actually using it viewing it Yeah so keep in mind that our platform is a mixture of our own apps things like the trailer app and the fight TD app But it's so much more in the interactions that we create on other platforms on behalf of creators So a creator might create a piece of content using our platform and send it out to Instagram to TikTok to Twitter to Facebook But our job is to instrument that click out experience because all you get is this bite sized bit of content on that platform But what we enable is driving those users.

TikTok pitchbook verzuz Facebook Netflix Timberland Microsoft Apple triller Fight Club Google Twitter
"pitchbook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:03 min | 6 months ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Talent management startups trying to make it easier for people to make a career move without having to leave their current employer According to one study only one in four employees say their company makes it easy for them to find job opportunities Well year after year we see the same thing when it comes to venture capital investing The money largely goes to three places in the United States The Bay Area New York and Boston But a new report out from revolution who partnered with pitchbook finds that tech investing in those three spots is on the decline with about $13 billion going outside those locations this year alone For more on what it means I'm joined by revolution chair and CEO Steve case He's also of course the cofounder of AOL So Steve in terms of the numbers where are you seeing those dollars go instead Well there's a lot of cities It's not just a few There's a few that get attention like Austin Seattle more recently Miami but it's really dozens of cities that are rising And we started a separate as you know a decade ago when I was sharing The White House startup America effort then we launched our rise of the rest bus tours about 7 years ago about rice restaurant funds about four years ago so far we've invested in a 180 companies and 80 cities So this really is quite widespread But the report we did in partnership with pitchbook the data that's particularly important there are three points I would make The first is for the first time in ten years the venture capital going to the Bay Area is less than 30% which I think is significant The second is there's been a 600% increase in the last decade of these rise the rest cities in terms of how much venture capital and from 4 billion to 24 billion So outside of San Francisco and New York and Boston that's the phenomenon 600% And finally and perhaps most importantly in the last decade 1400 regional venture firms have started all across the country And since it's important to see companies to get them going it's also important to see funds to get them going And once you've got that happening you start seeing these cities rise So I think what we're seeing now is an acceleration partly because of the pandemic that will continue into the next decade Now you estimate that about 75% of all venture capital dollars still end up in the Bay Area New York or Boston What do you think that number should actually be What should the percentage be What would be fair or right given the distribution of talent and opportunity Well given the distribution of talent and opportunity over time it should even out It should level out And in the short run over the coming years see the rise of the rest cities double that would be a great step We've seen some momentum in just in the last few years hopefully that will continue which would mean those other states would go to from 25% to 50% to the three big ones with at least go from 75 to 50% That would be the nearer term thing But over time we know that the data is pretty compelling that opportunity is equally distributed creativity is equally distributed But the capital is really not there to follow those ideas And that's what really needs to change I think this report suggested starting to change Hopefully it will accelerate in the years to come Do you have any advice for cities and policymakers about how they can better attract those dollars Yeah first is to focus on the new companies startups not on big companies for too long economic development has been how do you get a big company to move their headquarters or open a factory a real focus should be on terms of more sustainable economic development on these small companies some of which will end up being big companies And second is the drive more collaboration in your city That's we've seen in all the cities we visited critically important Get the university working with a big company working with a small companies working with the nonprofits in that particular area So there's a collective effort a collaborative effort to create a strong startup community And a Thursday tell your story make sure people know about what's happening there What's unique about your city your history of your city the particular industry expertise you have that you can build on that's becoming more and more common as well So I think we're seeing a lot of people that are champions of the startups that aren't just the traditional startup kind of cheerleaders if you will but a broader group in these communities And as you have successes have you had these iconic companies that develop what some called tent pole companies then a lot of great things happening There's a spin off effect from it Even Seattle And Microsoft is going to start getting started there I started Albuquerque They then moved to Seattle Seattle was struggling But Microsoft was successful because Microsoft was successful Jeff Bezos moved to Seattle to start Amazon there He figured he could pick off some engineers They obviously were very successful Now Seattle is really booming That's the store going to be more and more the story all across the country in the next ten to 20 years The other big story across the country is the continuing scrutiny from Washington of big tech We just saw Adam massary the head of Instagram testifying on the hill When you look at this do you think it's tech companies that need to step up and can they really regulate themselves or is it Congress and lawmakers that need to create some framework that these companies can follow Why Right about this 5 years ago and wrote the book the third way I said that this next wave is policy is going to become more important than having more of a conversation more of a bridge really between innovators and Silicon Valley and policy makers in Washington D.C. and Brussels and other places are critically important I think we've seen that develop over the next 5 years that will continue in the years to come So part of this is educating people Congressional hearings both the Senate and the House today both on Instagram as you mentioned but also on crypto Part of that process is educating them but I think you have to really respect the policy process and really engage otherwise you won't like some of the decisions that are made So engaging is important Taking a first step both as a company and as an industry to try to put self regulation in place is important but sometimes people wait too long to do that And that's when the government steps in and some of that's happening now All right Steve case chair and CEO of revolution always appreciate you stopping by Thanks for joining us Great to be with you Coming up Pfizer and BioNTech saying a third dose of their vaccine gives effective protection against the omicron.

Bay Area pitchbook CEO Steve Seattle Boston New York United States AOL White House Austin Miami Steve Microsoft San Francisco
"pitchbook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:22 min | 6 months ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"2021 it's becoming a record year for female founders So far women have raised roughly $40 billion across 2500 deals Nearly doubling the 2019 record of $24 billion And that's not it According to a recent data from pitchbook women their companies are also outperforming the market with their value rising 144% from 2020 Now I discussed in this week's unequal recovery series All of these was the focuses and how it can still continue to improve Lux capital partner Dina Shaka was here in the studio in the flesh and talking about the drive to keep on shifting and keep up this momentum I'm delighted to say for the first time in many years we've actually have some progress to report on both in terms of the number of women at the table that are writing checks into companies as well as the number of women who are founding companies and receiving venture dollars Even more we're actually seeing more exits and quicker time to exits from female founded companies And so there's some exciting news to report but there is a lot of work that remains to be done here And in some ways the numbers show sort of near doubling in terms of amount raised for female entrepreneurs But what was the tipping point do you think In some weird ways there's been the silver lining of what became of course a health crisis an economic crisis and a social crisis and this moment of reckoning that more needed to be done Well I think the pandemic across the board as you have reported about and spoken with guests about has generally been a blow for underrepresented people in general Unfortunately that has been the case for women It has especially been the case for mothers It has been the case even more so for women of color and mothers of color and intersectional individuals and communities And that really also was the case in the venture world For a period of time especially in 2020 we saw a dip in dollars that was going toward women founded companies both in terms of the actual number of dollars as well as the percentage of dollars And that was despite the fact that we are in one of the most prolific and productive periods of technological innovation and venture deal activity And I think there are many reasons that that is the case A lot of which have to do with sort of systemic issues related to both to women as well as especially to communities of color Now that is starting to change and it is not a coincidence that it is changing both on the check writing side and on the venture funded founder side because there is data that shows that women investors tend to attract female founders and vice versa There is a natural symbiosis that happens there And there is also data that shows that women founded companies perform better And that's what I really like to speak to at the end of the day because it is about the bottom line It's about performance I mean we've seen this in terms of money management many feeling that women who control money in many ways outperform because they have a different view on risk We have had these moments of great glory this year I just think of how spanx has been sending amounts of their business and of course founded by a female We've had rent the runway going public and to see a mother and her child ringing that bell together was like just such a moving moment What businesses are being founded that you're really excited about What problems are currently being fixed that you think are really notable Oh there are so many And I'm so glad you brought up the public exits and the sort of symbolism and the inspiration of those moments when I saw rent the runway and bumble and Anjali from Vimeo and really across the board It seems like almost on a weekly basis in some cases multiple times a week It is a very different view than we're used to seeing over there ring the bell And my first reaction was to go home and show my daughter That's super exciting And that's of course on the exit side On the early stage side we are seeing so much talent that's innovating in particular around areas like women's health which has been relegated by many wrongfully so to a niche category even though it's not only half the population but we're 80% of the dollars in healthcare are being spent And so that's why you've got money in Maven clinic for example This is a company that's been raising phenomenal amounts of money being able to show real growth Where do we push this forward therefore as we still see what is desperately unequal recovery as it stands where it still seems women holding back as we still have a stop start relationship with children getting safely back at school As you do still see you know the haves that have nots become more evidently clear particularly with those who have assets in those that don't How will you continue to push the balance What sort of companies are you seeking out at the moment Yeah so there is still a lot of work to be done And as I think about it for me my job as a venture capitalist I have the word capitalist in my in my title is to make money for my LPs many of whom are some of the most philanthropic institutions out there But I only do that by investing in the best founders and the best companies And that is where the data is incredibly compelling And if somebody were to arbitrage around early stage companies well they should be looking at women They should be looking at founders of color And the data shows that they outperform across the board including as I mentioned faster time to exit diverse boards have better better performance as well in terms of board members which really should start as a practice much earlier.

pitchbook Lux capital Dina Shaka Maven clinic Vimeo
"pitchbook" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:53 min | 8 months ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Acquired

"Click the link in the show notes and see how pitchbook can help you. Thank you to our friends over at pitchbook. Indeed pitchbook so david. They've now got the structure in place to become a national trust and expand here. How do they do that. What happens this is so great from dislike this story the smile on my face. Sit right now whether it's juicy great great is up for debate. So you know structure joint-stock company they come by and hold stock and other companies that can issue shares holding them. What are they gonna do here. Remember we said the railroads at the most strategic important supplier and choke point for the industry. Standard goes to the three biggest railroads. The pennsylvania railroad the storied huge enormous pennsylvania railroad. I think that's on monopoly board. It is it is literally on a monopoly. Like that is how pennsylvania the new york central and the erie railroads and they say So we got this new thing this new thing. Lets us do things with other companies. Do you want to cooperate as a part of our new thing to cooperate. How about we all do something together. The railroads like oh yeah. We like doing stuff. This sounds pretty good so they get together. They set a shell. Corporation called the south improvement. company This is so to see which is intentionally nebulous named. Yes and in fact leader in life. When rockefeller would be getting grilled in federal depositions. He would if he was ever a director or involved in the southern improvement company. Which of course is not a thing idea. Standard roy was never involved in the southern company. My goodness so great obviously it. He was not perjuring himself by saying that. Because the questioner. Got the name wrong though. I think he did. Perjure himself in other sic related. I think he did. So here's the deal. Standard oil is going to set up and control most of the south improvement company.

pitchbook pennsylvania david erie new york rockefeller Perjure roy
"pitchbook" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:35 min | 10 months ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"The technology industry has provided really lucrative returns to investors for awhile now and the kobe pandemic actually accelerated that as so many industries A accelerated their digitisation think of in commerce for instance over the past eighteen months or so that may tech products even more attractive to investors. There's also longer-standing issues like near zero interest rates and a lack of other good investment options in the public markets that have for some time now pushed investors more and more into tech startups. Okay so let's talk about that. Push big money. Market managers aren't new to investing in startups. What made them enter this riskier space in the first place. Yeah around a decade ago when interest rates were really low and appeared to be staying that way for a while and the number of public companies. Stocks really dropped dramatically. These big pension funds sovereign wealth funds hedge funds mutual funds among others. Were looking for new ways to find good returns on their investments and the other factor is tech startups. Were staying private longer. And that's a trend that continued for some years so they were staying in the private markets for ten twelve. Fifteen years which didn't use to happen. So they were getting all their growth and providing a lot of their value in the private markets and these big funds that hadn't previously played in startups started getting into the game and now they're playing a much bigger role in startup financing so far this year these big firms have participated in forty two percent of startup financing and those deals have accounted for more than three quarters of invested capital according to pitchbook. Do they have a different approach. When it comes to start up investment. Yes they really do. Of course they're not all from the same cloth. but to generalize. They tend to have a lot more money. They have really big pools of capital so they can write digger checks. They need to write bigger checks to spend their money. They often don't want the job of being a board member or being a mentor to a startup or getting involved in company decisions. About what sort of cfo they're going to hire. That's a job that traditional venture capitalists have often had have often prided themselves and having those skills. But what we're finding is that startup..

pitchbook
"pitchbook" Discussed on Switched On

Switched On

01:35 min | 10 months ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Switched On

"Everyone i'm just going to get right to it. There's a lot of money going into the energy transition right now. Give you a couple of examples. There appear to be sort of renaissance in climate tech venture capital this year with according to pitchbook nearly fifteen billion investment in h. one twenty twenty one nearly matching the previous full year record and it just being published a report on tv related specs raising ten point two billion in the past two months in public markets. But today we're gonna talk about even bigger stuff. Asset managers raising huge funds to invest in the energy transition so things like wind and solar projects other renewable geothermal. Ev charging networks batteries anything and everything zero carbon as well as investments in companies doing these projects and applying the kit. Okay so just to name. A few of these funds recording on on july twenty ninth yesterday on the twenty eighth brookefield announced a seven billion dollar fund. That's on its way to twelve point. Five billion target teepee. Pg david four on the twenty seventh and has to five point. Four billion dollar fund on its way to seven billion target in back in april. Eight point four billion from copenhagen and infrastructure partners and four point eight billion from blackrock. Okay so in his latest piece. For bloomberg opinion matt bullard chief content officer and friend of switched on talked about this frenzy and fundraising. We've got not on the show to tell us about it and give a few frameworks for how to think about it along with this week. Column bloomberg users can catch not every wednesday at eleven am eastern. We're host asked being f a weekly show where he gets into it with bean analyst on their recent work and users can ask questions live the next. Spf is on august fourth..

pitchbook brookefield matt bullard blackrock copenhagen Column bloomberg david bloomberg bean
"pitchbook" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:14 min | 10 months ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Acquired

"Steffi's done well. This is going to be great. I don't wanna say lie. Because it's not alive. But the sort of posturing from one of the key elements of the beginning of entries and horowitz Which is their motto that all the general partners here need to have been ceos like half of the first like five or six general partners. At never been see is right. And there's a lot of credibility behind that they were strong operational leaders executives. But yeah absolutely like jeff. Jordan led the pay pal acquisition around. Pay pal within ebay. Like i would take him on my board but yeah that's funny. Well this good point before we get into like the ninety six ninety seven ninety eight continuation of the browser wars. What happens to netscape. And i'll leave it there for the moment. This is a great time to announce our second sponsor of this season of acquired. We are very excited to welcome pitchbook to the show now as many if not all probably all of you know. Pitchbook is the leading financial data provider for vce private equity and all mergers and acquisitions. Their platform includes a database with information on more than three point. One million companies and over one point five million deals on a deviate from the script here and just say like it is so comprehensive like there is no better more broad coverage data source of private company data and the a lot of public company. Data out there. So i'll tell you they definitely don't sacrifice quality for quantity because ninety six percent of their clients rate pitch books coverage of private companies as better than any other data provider. And we also do want to tell you we use pitchbook. All the time for the podcast. It is a huge part of how we research and how we do our homework for episodes were able to share these precise details like pre and post on rounds share price shareholder equity who owns what throughout the story because of pitchbook and this has been true for years. If only jim clark had back in the days maybe he wouldn't have gotten deluded so much as negotiations so true i mean. I'm thinking back to our uber episode. Where we were telling the share price along all the different years it was getting funded. That was all from data. We pulled from pitchbook so listeners. We do.

Steffi Pitchbook netscape Jordan jeff ebay jim clark
"pitchbook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Countless cities have spent years trying to sprout their own. Silicon Valley's talk of a so called tech exit is from California is hitting fever pitch as companies and workers. Relocate to places like Austin and Miami. In fact, Pitchbook is reporting that venture capital is already starting to trickle out of the Bay Area, joining us to discuss Pitchbook director of institutional Research There's our Tarhouni, Nas R, Thank you so much. For joining us. So you believe that deal count the share that the Bay Area claims of D count deal count is actually going to decrease. What do you seeing? Yes, I think if you take a step back and look at the broader industry as a whole, particularly in 2020, you saw $290 billion come back institutional investors via venture backed exits. And you saw $156 billion deployed in the ecosystem, which gives you positive net cash flow back into the industry about $134 billion, and we expect a lot of that capital to come back into the market. But we saw in previous years we started to see funds being raised in different ecosystems outside of Silicon Valley. That to Michigan or and in Florida and in the Midwest in general, and I think what we saw so far in 20 twenties of pull through of also transaction flow starting to happen in the cities that had a bigger clip. I think what it takes for those ecosystems to be successful if they need a lot of larger, nominal outcomes from a dollar's perspective in the exit market, And while we haven't seen that significantly get we're starting to see a lot more early stage investments make their way there and what we're seeing right now over 19 kind of created this pull through effective of creating a lot more viable. Targets. They're from early stage and seed investment activity perspective, and we think that's going to continue to push forward over the next number of years, which then is gonna you know, equal bigger outcomes in those areas. And so we think we're in the early stages of the shift happening within Cove in 19, as really propelled it forward on there are some, you know, I think total dollar value still gonna be a lot higher in Silicon Valley, but we think we'll see the flow of companies being founded and funded and outside region. Just gonna really pick up here the next couple of years. Anytime. Obviously, the external environment is changing dramatically. There's you know these these specs, potentially hundreds of them looking to acquire a tech companies on there's some concern that that could increase valuations and impact the venture Capital landscape. What influence? Do you expect that to have on Deal flow and where the dollars go. Yeah, So I think that if you think about specs, you're adding another added element of innovation into the venture backed ecosystem in the late stage, but allows for a lot of different alternative liquidity options to the traditional AIPO emanate exit or private equity buyout Exit Avenue. And I think when you look at a lot of companies in the venture backed ecosystem, we talk a lot about the late stage companies like the Airbnb Zor like the ubers of the slacks that can make it through a public listing, But there's a number of companies that are incredibly successful that are growing at a good clip. Aren't attractive enough, or maybe are large enough to be able to take the risk from pricing perspective or be able to really afford the process of going through with an idea. And so I think we've seen private equity pick up quite a bit to jump in to some of those transactions. And I think specs another added innovation to allow some of these companies to really move forward in a public setting and raise more capital and increase their brand through that. That being said. I think we've seen nontraditional investors play and that includes asset managers are really big portion drive really big portion of Lee transaction to venture backed transactions over the past number of years and that continued 2020. I think what we do by going through this back market it allows a lot of these investors also be involved, which we think will continue, and so I don't think it's going to drive evaluations per se for some of your good, solid companies. I think there's some outside companies like what we've seen the mobility space where we might see that. But in general, I think it just provides another valve to allow these companies to find liquidity.

Silicon Valley Pitchbook director of institut Bay Area Deal flow California Austin Pitchbook Airbnb Midwest Lee Miami Michigan Florida
"pitchbook" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"We're the biggest entrepreneur platform on the planet. Welcome to business rock stars. I am joined now by the co founders of Party Act we've got Will Kennedy and Rady, Can I thank you so much for chatting with me today. Thank you for having me on. I love your story because you started this right out of college is went into it, Bootstrapped it. It's so great. So let's get into those details. But first, if you could tell everyone what is party act so party joins the whole nightlife community in one place. So for user where that friend that knows exactly where to go. The best events that string specials all that for venues where direct channel to promote directly to those customers and then for promoters were the best tool to build your network. Awesome. So how did you guys come with the idea? So we started where actually College buddies at University of Connecticut. That's where we met. Basically one day we wanted to go out the thing about in Connecticut Yukon. It's always cold. It's not like right so When you want to go out. You need to know. You know, that is going to be good place, because if not, you're going to spend the time getting ready and going through the rain and snow to get to the bar. So with us has basically what happened. We, um we wanted to go out one day and you know, we went all the way out to the bar and was completely dead and we had to walk all the way back in the rain and it was cold and we're He said. Hey, there's gotta be a better way toe. Do this to know what's going on around you without having to go all the way to the bar. So what is that better way that you've created for your users take me through kind of all the things that they get to explore and no, before they commit to where they're going out for the night. Sure, So by bringing everyone together on one platform, right, we connect everyone in a unique way. So you log onto the AB, You know, only see all the places around you. We see the events any exclusive drink specials. They got going on where your friends are going. You can invite friends so forth. So we basically give users one environment to plan their night together, and not only that you can see exactly how the scene's gonna be before you go. So instead of driving around, going from bar to bar going home disappointed you're going to know where you're going into and have a great time. No matter what. So great idea. But obviously idea is just the 1st 1st part of being entrepreneurs is all in the execution. And you guys decided to execute this right out of college and you had to bootstrap it. So take me back to that time. What was that? Like when you had the idea, and you went, We're going to make this happen. What were some of those next steps you took? Um, So I think you know, with us the thing being, you know, you know, we knew we wanted to create an app, but none of us were technical co founders. So right off the bat. We knew that was gonna be a challenge. But that wasn't something that we thought. We couldn't overcome And I think that's what a lot of entrepreneurs you know they might stop there. They might say, you know, you know I can't do it, cause I don't know the code. But I think now and not today's society, you can learn everything. You can go on Google. You figure out how to make a pitch that you can figure out where to find other people. I know how to code and you could really get get things done. So, basically what we did is you know, we just moved out. Um, from my house is in Connecticut with him. Tell a and just sort of started started working on it and kind of, you know, every day progressing progressing until we started kind of figure out what we're doing going a long way, make mistakes but eventually got it to a place where we know what we're doing, And we can move forward. Yeah, and obviously so many benefits to being in Los Angeles or the Bay Area because you have a built in tech community and network. But do you think in hindsight that was a crucial step? You know if there's something Watching or listening that does not live in Los Angeles or the Bay Area. Do you think? Hey, if you wanna make a tech company work, I'd really recommend you move to these cities. Yeah, definitely so We started. We got the ball rolling in Connecticut. We soon found while they're a lot of resource is there we weren't exactly in the Empire Environment to grow it right. So we came out here. We slept on air mattresses, ate a lot of ramen noodles right and finally built the dream to the point. We got to support to make it a reality. One thing that's unique about us is when we started this. We were barely the drinking age. Right? So this was a dream. And on top of that, we weren't coming out of different companies. We were exactly Well versed in business yourself. So we had to learn everything as we went right every facet of the business because when you're not raconteur, you have to handle everything. And when you do get to the point where you hire people that helps you so much because then you know exactly how to do it. And what to expect of people you hire. S O. That was probably the biggest learning curve for us. And without being in l. A, um we would have been surrounded by the people to learn from to meet as questions off like, pick up a call in the mentors. We have The investors we have. They're also supportive and also so important to our growth. Not only personally buys a company, right, so tell me about the various hats that you had to wear in the beginning. Yes. So when we really started You know, we we needed We knew we couldn't code. Yeah, but released needed something to give to somebody that could coach we didn't know how to design everything. So we learned how to design the US. Perhaps we learned how to What sort of back ends we're needed. We learned so the marketing aspect pretty much everything creating a pitchbook talk talking to investors, A lot of different like aspects and a lot of different avenues that you need toe master, or you need to have a good grasp on to start. Um, and like we'll set it being, you know, being the first co founders of a company need to where all the different hats you got to be comfortable in all these different atmospheres. You've got to step out of your comfort zone and do something you might not know how to do because nobody else in the company can do it. And, of course, once you get that investment money, that's a game changer because then you can hire a team and they can do all the things that you aren't an expert, and so was that one of the first steps was putting your pitched back together and going out and trying to get funding. Yeah, nice, definitely most important step And one thing about that is not only Does the investment help people preparing for the investment hopes? You? It really helps you identify who you are. Who, where your company is where you're going, right? So when you planned that whole process, it lays a road map for you..

Los Angeles Connecticut Bay Area University of Connecticut Connecticut Yukon US Will Kennedy Google Rady
"pitchbook" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"News on the level on the go. When will the help becoming? It's a sunny Thursday afternoon 58 degrees in downtown Indy lows tonight in the high thirties on Sean Herrick. Here's What's trending at 4 31 in order to help the people of Indianapolis and Marion County deal with the coronavirus, Indianapolis Mayor Jo Hogg said says he needs help from the feds need the federal government to act quickly and Decisively to provide assistance to families. All of those who are bearing the brunt of this extraordinary surge in the number of covert cases Marion County schools will be allowed to reopen in person. January 4th a stopgap funding bill that would extend government funding through next week, was approved by the House, the Senate supposed to approve it today that would avoid a government shutdown. As for what's holding up a coronavirus relief bill, the blame game continues. One of the disagreements is over whether or not more money should go to sit She's in state's Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot says Mitch McConnell is the one trying to drop federal help Four cities and states. God stop the nonsense. Get something done. We are hurting here in the Heartland and all cost our country and we need the federal government to step up and do their job. Chicago is facing a $1.2 billion budget deficit next year. Ship only is naming a burrito. After a well known performer sponsors Kristen Goodwin explains Chipotle a sharing a clip to tic tac of a wrapped burrito with the name Miley on it. Captioning if Miley Cyrus comments will make a Miley Burrito In our app, the singer taking the bait and suggesting the name posting on Lee. If you name it, the guac is extra..

Miley Cyrus Marion County Chicago Indianapolis Jo Hogg Sean Herrick Kristen Goodwin Chipotle Senate Mitch McConnell Lori Lightfoot Lee
"pitchbook" Discussed on Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

"Is it here we go. Let's welcome my friend. Ron shapiro here. You're familiar with this. This is n. sean. I don't know what that is. But ron is a very cultured guy. Ron spears one of my sponsors in in my event here and he's a good guy he's got a great program. But thank you ron. But but with your students your caseload. What is their typical motivation. Is it to get a job. Is they can come study in your country. Is it both as they wanna marry a person who speaks english. Maybe i don't know. But what would you say their motivations usually they're in schools are not really married now. You may sometimes stay stay single day single but usually usually the primary reason is that they want to be able to Courses that stuff. I'm able to rewrite essays for example On the students that we teach agenda Students who are studying a conservatory for example Don's aussie studies What you see there is that they really Sort of meet. The runway shows to express themselves and dated lying onto to communicate with heat. This and the fellow students mcdonnell. So that's really important on was also really important to them. Is this really specific. Capillary woman's jogging Store we may try and be specialized on figure out what exactly these students lean soot conservatory students rating for musically mush and then try on Rates the unnecessary material. So when you say conservatory. I think you taking like a person who maybe from russia or something has a violin player. Music conservatory right question. Is there any. Do you find who depending on the la- the native language someone speaks like a different way. If someone's native line would just say french. Is it easier for them to learn english. The somebody whose native language is a completely different. Like greek. or you know something. It's a completely japan japanese or chinese. It's a very different didactic word. I'm trying to think of the whole like sounds and stuff you know or different french english and french overlap. Obviously so is that easier that easier to teach your students learn corrugated question. We were very high level here. I think it depends So if someone's coming from french. Obviously the jumped. This isn't big sur if If they speak french Learning you compare that to someone who speaks. Japanese unveiling than the presence of bronze is gonna have easier. Obviously in lots of cases. I mean it also depends who is how good some. Yeah picking up on which generally say yet but If you have someone who's ready learn the language is english going to then the bus from a house definite advantage so something that we also look at something not with us from sample is how many other languages you already speak. So how familiar are you with the idea of the concept of picking up another language. Now you walk us through what a class would be. How long is it. Do you have a set lesson plan. is it individual. Groups is at once a week out. What what's your protocol. Here will the types of lessons. I just say i say i'm going to say this in russian root for which i'm trying to say i need to learn english right. I'm here. I need english right and you say well. This is how we're gonna teach it right. What what would be my options. What options could i have as a student. So usually it's group lessons The two hours wants wink Just a regular format and then now of zero nine and you'll get some homework in between And that's that's basically what we won't do but sometimes she gets All just people in general like businesspeople who needs pick long which really quick And then we say three times a week rooney the have the heavy intensive cools So it really depends also on the how house you wanna go. How much do you wanna learn. What timeframe basically how much. I'm out for her work Can somebody in your experience be competent with the language in two months. Six weeks a month elliott. What's the minimum amount of time. You think it takes. I know that's a difficult question to give an exact answer to but is there a like. What's the fastest ever saw. Somebody go from nothing to elise conversant. That's a good one. I'm not sure maybe a month zero. Okay probably some people's like me still struggling to pick up dutch If you just you know average You will take I think Well they say a number right sense from but in a year you can. you can be basically up witches. That's the case. I think Can you share some success stories. You've had like maybe you know you don't have to name names or anything but you know maybe some stories of student came to me with this and this is why i case study. We would call it here. Well actually i think the interesting success story is not one of my students but one of a group students that my business type vote on their family and i think is really interesting because It's mum and dad's army On they had like Pitchbook with is the family The parents are Academics on the reading interested in philosophy but also technology It on the sun as well on my business fought now created all these lessons round all the things that they really interesting and i think in six months time they went from zero to compete to an upbeat crude level. You can have like interesting conversation on. Nuanced can give your opinion on difficult topics discussing philosophy. Writing.

Ron shapiro Ron spears ron n. sean jogging Store japan mcdonnell Pitchbook Don russia rooney
"pitchbook" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on KOMO

"Stay informed. The Northwest's on ly 24 hour news station. Coma news, 1000 FM 97 7 Good evening. Thanks for joining us. I'm Rick fan sites with least champion our editor is Bill O'Neill. Fourth presidential debate is not happening. President Trump is calling for one to be added before early early voting begins. He tweeted today that he and Joe Biden owe it to the American people. But the commission on presidential debates decided another one is not needed. Some black lives matter. Protestors in Utah could face up to life in prison if they're convicted of splashing red paint and smashing windows during a protest. Critics say it doesn't fit the alleged crime. The felony criminal mischief charges are more serious because they carry a gang enhancement. The New York attorney general is filing a lawsuit against the National Rifle Association seeking to dissolve the powerful gun lobby for a multitude of alleged violations of state law governing charities. ABC is Aaron Carter Ski is following this and spoke with comas Jeff Pooja, there seemed to come out of the blue. Where did the evidence come from? Well, they've been investigating for about a year and 1/2 and in the course of that time, the attorney general said they've uncovered evidence of about $64 million that has been misappropriated. Effectively by Wayne LaPierre, the long time chief executive of the NRA, and three other current or former executives, the we'll see, you know, as this case moves forward, you know exactly what they Uncovered, But it's a 170 page complaint has detailed accusations about what money was spent. Where for pricey travel for expensive suits, and this is all money. That should be for the benefit of a nonprofit. Has there been any reaction from the NRA itself? Yeah, they call this a Premeditated attack on on unorganised ation fighting for Second Amendment Rights Theater knee general says, but far from that mission The NRA has basically become the personal piggybank for these for men, and and she said that corruption has gone on for so long and is so deeply embedded in the NRA's culture. That the NRA itself can no longer continue to exist. And so she is seeking of the dissolution of the NRA on DH to bar the four men, including Wayne LaPierre from serving on the board of a non profit in the future. Now, any time you talk about Second Amendment issues, it becomes very political on what about the GOP? The NRA has long supported conservative candidates or any of them coming to the group's defense. Not yet that we've heard, although President Trump was asked briefly about it, and he said the Just heard about it, so he wasn't really in a position to say much, but he called it unfortunate that you can imagine that this is going to be cast as political theater Knee general of New York is a progressive Democrat. She insists. This has nothing to do with her personal views and everything to do with this long standing years along, she said, corruption and misappropriation of funds but dissolving the NRA. That seems like a bit of an extreme move. And certainly that's what a lot of advocates are going to focus on. Probably on DH, but But, she said, and again, you know her her view that there's just no other choice that a change in leadership wouldn't do it. Because of the cultural the pervasive cultural corruption that that's been implanted in the way and the way she described the organization. That it's just become ah slush fund for for its executives and has gone long away from its founding in 18 71 here in New York. A Zey, a organization focused on marksmanship for union soldiers. Alright, ABC is Aaron Carter Ski joining us. And that's commas. Jeff Pooja. It's 5 50 your Homo propel insurance Money Update to Seattle Business magazine hears Editor Rob Smith, Seattle based financial data provider Pitchbook has been named Arena partner in suite level sponsor of the new climate pledge Arena. The suite level of the arena will be named the Pitchbook Sweets. Pitchbook will also become the exclusive financial data provider of the NHL. Seattle cracking to support expansion and business development initiatives. Terms were not disclosed. Chili's is the most popular casual dining restaurant in Washington state as sit down restaurants open again, a report by analytics firm Top data finds the Chili's Olive Garden, Applebee's and other chain restaurants are dominating America's returned to well known sit down restaurants. Down, rose 185 points for 1/5 straight session of gains to close the 3 27,086 NASDAQ gained 109 and the S and P 500 rose 21. This is Rob Smith with Seattle Business magazine for KOMO News. Catch money news on coma with 20 and 50 passed every hour. Look at traffic is next. This summer. The movie experience.

National Rifle Association President Trump New York Wayne LaPierre Jeff Pooja Coma ABC attorney editor Bill O'Neill Rick Seattle KOMO News Seattle Business Pitchbook Sweets Utah
"pitchbook" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on KOMO

"Return to nursing homes and other long term care facilities during covert 19 the state issuing a four phase guideline on visitation that encourages outdoor meetings and correlates with governors for Phase County reopening plan. The New York attorney general is filing a lawsuit against the National Rifle Association seeking to dissolve the powerful gun lobby for a multitude of alleged violations of state law governing charities. ABC Zehra Her ski is following this and spoke with Cuomo's Jeff Pooja. There seemed to come out of the blue. Where did the evidence come from? Well, they've been investigating for about a year and 1/2 and in the course of that time, the attorney general said they've uncovered evidence of about $64 million that has been misappropriated. Effectively by Wayne LaPierre, the long time chief executive of the NRA, and three other current or former executives, the we'll see, you know, as this case moves forward, you know exactly what they Uncovered, But it's a 170 page complaint has detailed accusations about what money was spent. Where for pricey travel for expensive suits, and this is all money that should be For the benefit of a nonprofit. Has there been any reaction from the NRA itself? Yeah, they call this a premeditated attack on on unorganised ation fighting for Second Amendment rights. The attorney general says. But far from that mission, the has basically become the personal piggybank for these four men, and and she said that corruption Has gone on for so long and is so deeply embedded in the culture that the NRA itself can no longer continue to exist. And so she is seeking. The dissolution of the NRA and a bar the four men, including Wayne LaPierre, from serving on the board of a non profit in the future. Now, any time you talk about Second Amendment issues, it becomes very political. And what about the GOP? The array has long supported conservative candidates or any of them coming to the group's defense. Not yet that we've heard, although President Trump was asked briefly about it, and he said he just heard about it. So he wasn't really in a position to say much, but he called it unfortunate. Um, you can imagine that this is going to be cast as political theater Knee general of New York is a progressive Democrat. She insists. This has nothing to do with her personal views and everything to do with this long standing years along, she said, Uh, corruption and misappropriation of funds but dissolving the NRA. That seems like a bit of an extreme move. And certainly that's what a lot of advocates are going to focus on. Probably on DH, but But, she said, and again, you know her her view that there's just no other choice that a change in leadership wouldn't do it. Because of the cultural the pervasive cultural corruption that that's been implanted in the way and the way she described the organization. That it's just become ah slush fund for for its executives and has gone long away from its founding in 18 71 here in New York. A Zey, a organization focused on marksmanship for union soldiers. Alright, ABC is Aaron Carter ski joining us and that's Como's Jeff Pooja. Time for an update on money NEWS. Your coma propel insurance Money Update Here's Rob Smith at Seattle Business magazine. Seattle based financial data provider Pitchbook has been named Arena partner in suite level sponsor of the new climate pledge Arena. The suite level of the arena will be named the pitch books Sweets. Pitchbook will also become the exclusive financial data provider of the NHL. Seattle cracking to support expansion and business development initiatives. Terms were not disclosed. Chili's is the most popular casual dining restaurant in Washington state as sit down restaurants open again, a report by analytics firm Top data finds the Chili's Olive Garden, Applebee's and other chain restaurants are dominating America's returned to well known sit down restaurants. Down, rose 185 points for 1/5 straight session of gains to close the 3 27,086 NASDAQ gained 109 and the S and P 500 rose 21. This is Rob Smith with Seattle Business magazine for Comeau. New Money News on Co mo A 2050 past the hour coming up a new covert scam to watch out for I'm Herb weisbaum with what the fraudsters have come up with now to steal your personal information. The United States is among the most dangerous developed nations in which to give birth. It's not fine, but together we can do something about it. Help March of Dimes give every mom and baby the best.

National Rifle Association New York attorney Wayne LaPierre Seattle Business magazine Seattle Jeff Pooja President Trump Rob Smith Phase County Pitchbook ABC GOP United States Herb weisbaum Cuomo
Who's Right About The Economy? Wall Street Or Silicon Valley?

Techmeme Ride Home

09:07 min | 2 years ago

Who's Right About The Economy? Wall Street Or Silicon Valley?

"Who's right about the economy right now. Silicon Valley or Wall Street. Let me start by saying that. We're going to hopefully have really speculative high level discussion about the global economy here. And I'm pretty. I know for a fact. I'm not qualified to have that kind of a discussion. And maybe you aren't at the level that I M- aspiring to here either. So I think we're GONNA caveat that guys at the top but Alex look the reason we're is because on twitter. I saw a piece the gist of which was You know everyone that I talked to in tech and Silicon Valley and investing and venture venture side of investing. They're all sort of battening down for a nuclear winter and then meanwhile the stock market while not back to where it was you know is sort of roaring back and so. I've been asking people all the time like who's right here Wall Street or Silicon Valley and so let's start with your piece and let's start with the tech side. Which is I guess. You've been hearing the same things that I've been hearing from venture folk and stuff like that. Yeah it seems like we're on the same page going back to your very generous intro. I want to say that. Not only are you and I not qualified. Has I don't think there's a person alive who is because no one's really seen this. Before the the scale of unemployment the rapid rise of unemployment the complete destruction to travel. I mean this is. I hate the term unprecedented. Because it's so kind of lazy to catch all for like. Oh Gosh but I mean this is unprecedented. We do not know what's GonNa Happen and so I I think speculation is the right game here. We'll do our best to be as as coach unreasonable began. But like we're going to be you know a off of our offer shoulder here we're GONNA be. Maybe like I said to you over. Tm We're going to be in our dorm room getting a little high kind of the we're going to be on that level a little bit but that's the goal so You go first. Give me just. You don't have to name names but give me a broad sense of what you're hearing because you cover SAS a lot and enterprise a lot but also investing in those areas too. Yeah yeah so I part of my job as a as a reporter in the technology in kind financial world is that I talked to a lot of venture capitalists a lot of folks he put the money into the startups that you hear and read about in the media and usually speaking for the last forever years. They've been upbeat. They've been positive their complaints have been you know. My portfolio companies can't hire fast enough. Or You know. Everyone's watching the same channel with ads and now the tone is different than the tone is is much more negative and downbeat and people are generally pretty okay about this like look. This happens every ten years. No big deal. But certainly companies in our portfolio are struggling. And what I'm hearing from them is ruined for a tough patch. People are going to be going through layoffs. The economy is going to go through recession. This is gonNA take some time. It's not gonNA be a v-shaped recovery. As talking point loves point out it's going to be a U. shape recovery at best and and and then I turn around and I look at the stock market and any small news item that could be construed as positive sends the dial by five hundred thousand points. And I'm just sitting here going. What in the hell's going on because you know to me both these people both these groups of people can't be right at the same time and the piece was an attempt to begin to kind of poke it then toured part. Yeah and I WANNA come back a little bit too. We'll say the stock market speculation such as we can do for the second half but The the folks that I know in the venture world are basically. We're we're still at the stage where they're telling their companies like stop hiring hoard cash like batten down the hatches. The people that I know that are the entrepreneurs are like you know basically everyone that I'm talking to in in that world is like What's what's what's the quote from. Last of the Mohicans stay alive whatever occurs. I will find you like so first of all in the SAS space. Like in your we're talking about like like startups in the space or are seeing things. Like fifty and eighty percent drops in new bookings like Gimme some of those anecdotes. Yeah so if you covered this offer base at all or even just really any start about their. That sells a product that recurs that you pay for more than once what? They really care about his churn and they want to keep sure. Absolute minimum turned his. When someone who was paying you no longer is. It's like the worst thing And enterprise software companies tend to have very good churn which they have very little churn and that's why they're so attractive to investors and that's why they've become a huge part of the venture capital world so when we talk about the health of enterprise SAS. We're talking about really the health of a big chunk of the world of venture capital and investors. I've put tons of money into this group of companies and really believe in the business model and the sector focus. Bigger companies are saying that churn is going up and that's impacting. Everyone's ability to grow on the other hand. There are also seeing new bookings new business coming in the door. Go down there seeing. Churn go up. And there's a new book go down which is double effect on growth. He brings growth down very sharply. Because you're losing stock your bucks leaky and is less new stuff coming into the bucket So it's kind of a double whammy and that's why I think a lot of people are doing kind of what you said. They are slamming the door and hiring. They are hoarding cash. And ironically their pullback in spend is going to hurt other companies that are selling stuff to companies like them so there's a there's a a circular firing squad effect to some degree to get really Dorky if listeners want the kind of insider stopped we're seeing stuff like ACV's go down SEV's average annual contract values. You want those to be as high as you can't. It means that when you land a customer they're worth more People are being forced to sell for lower prices and trying to get more discounts. Acb's are also slipping and it's hard to find a positive Positive talking point inside this knicks of stuff. It's a mess in other words. So let's let's do devil's advocate for a second again. You're talking about largely enterprise software. So what if everybody just collectively over the last six weeks or so? Did the thing where they're like all right. Everyone freeze in place and then Well okay maybe it's not so bad which again we'll get to that with the stock market. Maybe that's what's happening. Maybe it's not as bad as we thought and so then things will start to creep back are are we seeing any sort of signs that that might be the case right now or is it. Is it too soon to tell that sorta stuff? I think it's important to note that we're still on the downward slope of I would say the broader Economy End Looking Valley The state of fear is getting worse as opposed to better still and people are talking about Q. Two being pretty terrible so that may happen that kind of sit back and go okay. Maybe things are opening back up. Maybe about to get better again. But I think it's a Q. Three discussion and I'm not predicting that on just my gut instinct and kind of my thoughts dots based on what people are telling me about what to expect for Q. Two And just add context to that. I spoke to a number of these these with partner. Natasha crunch and we're looking at the Boston market a market. That we love and those are saying Q. One won't be as bad as you thought because January February pretty good for these startups choosing to be a hot mess so the people that are putting the money into the firms. Expect the next quarter to be terrible. Maybe you're holds up in Q. Three but those green shoots are more like you know late summer as opposed to early spring. Well speaking of your podcast m correct me. If I'm wrong but at least and again this could be again acute versus q versus q three thing at least as far as I know we haven't seen like actual numbers of investments that. Vc's have been making sees up terribly right like it's it might be down. You would think it would be down but it's not like horribly down yet. A very similar point to what we just went over because V C as you know and everyone listening to the show knows is very laggy. You'll hear about it on a market was closed in December totally standard. So the Q- want numbers are just the rounds that were announced in q? One effectively? And here's the thing even inside those metrics you can see some deterioration in March and I'm just beginning to parse through all the reports are coming out from CBS sites in pitchbook. And everyone else. So I don't have the the firmest view yet I will in about a week and a half but marches bad. The numbers weren't as good as they could have been and people are expecting once again cue to be worse. Vc's are not contrarians they are. They are momentum investors and they don't like to say they don't to be called that but they are and they're they're all listening to other and listen to the The prior carnage stock market somewhat. And I think they're pulling back. Dramatically valuations are going down and new deal getting harder and harder to land because feces are focused more of their portfolio. The new bets. So I think it's it's again acute you. Problem MADE ECONOMY COMEBACK IN Q. Three may get better.

Silicon Valley VC Twitter Alex ACB Reporter Batten ACV CBS Boston Natasha Crunch Pitchbook Partner
"pitchbook" Discussed on ChupaCast

ChupaCast

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on ChupaCast

"Takhar who says it's GONNA fall out. I think now Tomsic epidermal better. They don't come out of the mustache us on a similar mission. Socar we believe there's any liens little mute. He Knew Mustard Shafie Split Colin Baker Faisal. Her chagall Wisconsin Nola. Today's nigh bond. Iv UP MA. Eighty five to put boisterous productivity. I in Scottish pitchbook would do the producer. La Speedy mate from Fulton south of Tampa was. He sees orders. Deploys Scott Voice died you ooh Jacka off is breaking down. Iguazu gained really. Liz remained. Eight is awesome Achieve Jessica one aggressive Fulton north as Keita to the Peruta somewhere. It's Kobe. Cooper was for this grasp. Come on key Lucasville Okoronkwo Todd. Father has seen one sequel to two. I purchased show car. We also I don't know I don't know I don't really as far as is known as pity maintained in our Nicosia's meet and so the boys I ever dodge produce SONKE PROBLEM. Our were strays folly. Scholars you spell taping theater La for the camera but all Sukey voter to push your own me Jacques. Oh well off for the the facilitator whom to know to saw Bach and know deep soulful but I suppose five people who think brought neutrally sitting here. I'm hoping they'll pro sieben. Don't they? Don't know it washed possible future. I got a says age. They knew they tipple Varas visa by Jane. Doe is all model cars to off of this movement no buffers I empire city Bata before. Cnc Semi differences appeared to cut an inter. She passing Carlo before he kinda. We'll see stuff washing. Your whole is getting his level battle. Who knows how to ace amendment volatile import to the vote at your produce so spitting premarital Vit- Faisal's Orichalcum Philosophy? Don't file the pig genes. Big Idea do that. Press Sill although CEO causing center allowed was looking for you know. I didn't put the former Tom. I saw Kara. We'll see we'll see proof. Footloose TOBIA LA. La La Janette applesauce as we speak up. Jay Tickets each sub. You must put his approachable. This gene savage do the huge. You'll sweaters how many data jeff saw my hope. And now I live out there and I hope I'm his model who don't want press Chichibu via business visas Kavala sees Oughta Besar. Ooh Why does some groovy? Gm has eight. Fumbles LAS old days false. Don't even have other good. I'm wonderful I've got a quiz is so public so preoccupied after each body photos into salt. Asfaw deploys but if we can start his own company Postal Jackie these Dennis Wise Cup size. Or you don't Opportunity Birth Canal Days Democracy Way. You can lose you know Tony. Curtis' Buster Aspen Pairs g-gonna sad. You will low-fare Mr Barroso. Who Pass Squadron Class WHO AKINCI NOT bad so silly and said you plus a warm disease? All that is lost. Only in the block who custodies Penacoba was a beggar. Phil..

Colin Baker Faisal LA Fulton Doe Wisconsin Nola Takhar Tomsic Lucasville Okoronkwo Todd Pass Squadron Class Iguazu Mr Barroso MA custodies Penacoba Scott Voice Nicosia Liz Cooper producer Keita Curtis
"pitchbook" Discussed on Beer, Beats, and Business

Beer, Beats, and Business

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on Beer, Beats, and Business

"Laurel is a digital marketing strategist and speaker sure. WHO works with clients every day to make the Internet better for humans and for robots and Bowie? Hi Laura how're Ya. Hey I'm well how are you. You know. I'm I'm living the dream and one of the reasons I am living. The dream is I am drinking a beverage from our sponsor SKETCHBOOK pitchbook brewing and one of the best compliments. I can pay sketchbook is I drank their their Pale Ales and their IP. As I am drinking the no parking central Pale and as you might know and my listeners definitely do I don't usually go for the hoppy beers I know you do laurel all but I love you and your ideal schedule Fan. Good as you should be. They're fantastic and this is a very tastier so that is what I am drinking. And I I know that they call it no parking because way back when they got started you had to go into their brewery through a door in the alley which of course had a big no parking sign right next to it so anyways here is my question Laurel who is the four humans or robots. It's it's for humans it's gotta be for humans but the robots help us find the right things I think and categorize things and can make sense of all of the information and data. That's out there so I always look at things that I'm creating or things that I'm optimizing being as being for humans first and foremost but you know making sure that they are structured for robots that they are written in a way that robots can access and understand. Understand what they're about and help us You know organize everything the it's A kind of see. The robots like giant Dewey Decimal System or card catalog. They used to dig through at the library without it. We're less than a stack of bucks. I'm just remembering that day in grade school where we went to the. Do we have a little library in a grade school in the librarian. Explain the dewey decimal system and I just remember going. This makes no sense. It's crazy it's brilliant and crazy and it actually worked and now we have algorithms and Google and a bunch of smart people helping us Do that in the online world. Leo and you're one of them in fact. I was kind of amused when I was looking at your bio because I realized digital you'll marketing strategist is definitely one of those job. Titles even ten years ago really like what's that. Oh yeah and it's still a meeting so many different things to different people so so what is it digital marketing strategist. Let's let me ask that question for my own edification as much as anybody else listening. Sure we're Again I think it means a lot of different things to different people. I see it as someone will what I what I guess as my role is I help clients understand understand what they are trying to achieve through their online channels from a business perspective and make sense of that through their website largely sleep but also you know all the ways that people get to that site all the ways that people can find and access and engage with that information. Cool all okay. So it's it is exactly what it says it is it's creating strategy around this one part of a business which didn't really exists twenty years ago right. What to that end? Do you find it off in challenging to work with clients because almost they don't have a background what they should be doing because it is so new or is that make it actually easier because people don't know what they should be doing so you say yeah. I think it's particularly challenging for large established organizations attend because they're already operating often in silos across departments and across parts of the.

Laurel SKETCHBOOK pitchbook Bowie Laura Google Leo twenty years ten years
Tech's Next Hit Remains Unclear For Investors

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:10 min | 3 years ago

Tech's Next Hit Remains Unclear For Investors

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Deloitte, a global leader in digital transformation, helping clients apply technologies like cloud an AI to their unique business challenges. Deloitte got com slash look. Again. This is tech news briefing. Im Tanya boost does reporting from the newsroom in New York. And if you're wondering what the next wave of tech has to offer it turns out, it's complicated journal CEO council aims to find out. That's after these tech headlines. After years of steady growth auto sales in the US Europe and China are slowing denting earnings across the sector and prompting more car manufacturers to find partners to share the costs of developing new models. And of course, investing in new technologies enter Fiat Chrysler, which has just proposed a roughly forty billion dollar merger with French rival Renault, a deal that if completed would completely third largest automaker by production, carmakers are also under pressure amid a shift towards car-sharing rather than car owning. It's also grappling with more stringent emission standards. And the need to invest hundreds of billions of dollars on developing the tech needed for electric cars and autonomous driving. Fiat Chrysler said its proposal came after an initial period of discussions with an adult to identify products and markets to collaborate on electric vehicles self driving cars and in-car. Connectability. So what's next for the global space race half a century after the US landed on the moon? A new space race is gathering pace and China has particularly ambitious plans in wants to build a manned lunar base within the next decade and start mining for energy resources the journal notes. How other governments have big plans to in the US, NASA recently unveiled plans to return to the moon, and it requested a one point six billion dollar budget increase for twenty twenty to pull it off. President Trump also has proposed a space force, which is a military branch dedicated to space. Read more on the global space race from science writer Lee hosts wsJcom. The journal makes the case that Wall Street isn't buying what cele- convex is selling and it isn't just Uber. Who's public performance has looked grim compared with its private fundraising private investments in six of the ten best funded US tech startups to go public since two thousand fifteen have fallen from the peak levels. They hit in funding rounds before the company's stock debuts zone, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of data from research firm pitchbook, despite Wall Street's apparent skepticism. The flood of cash continues, however food delivery company door. Dash just announced new funding at a valuation of around twelve point six billion dollars. That's nine times what it was a year ago. The journal goes on to say few have more at stake in this area than SoftBank its initial investment in. Uber is up about twenty percent. And while unclear how long the company plans to hold its Uber stick. The journal says the company has made clear its investment style is closer to that of a venture capitalist than in public market investor looking at future cash flows coming up. Are you ready for the next wave of the tech revolution? Because it's ready for you. We just need to figure out what it is. Blockchain smart cities, the digital transformation happening now makes the seemingly impossible doable at Deloitte, we help clients harnessed these powerful technologies to improve business and the world Deloitte dot com slash look. Again. The Wall Street Journal CEO council connects the world's most influential business leaders to discuss the issues shaping the future at its recent event in London. The journal aimed to find out what the next wave of tag had to offer turns out, it's complicated helping us get a better sense of what might lie ahead is Sonali director partner at XL. She explains why it's less clear for investors lately. Really interesting thing today is that is probably never been a better time to be an entrepreneur, and in many ways, sort of never been a more difficult time to be an entrepreneur. The low hanging fruit has sort of been taken if you, if you think about the first wave of technology innovation in media with companies like Netflix or shopping ecommerce with, with Amazon, and of course advertising intact, which really you had a lot of data. So it adopted technology very Foucault, Google and Facebook etcetera, doesn't tie. Segments that's going to happen sort of foster than people think, especially in autonomous vehicles, but this not easy to figure out how to build a logistics company in two thousand and nineteen. So I think it's difficult sectors that haven't been taken on yet. Your data and privacy did come up many a time at the conference, and we learned some big tech companies see it as a good thing. We think of data and machine learning which is a kind of a I really as a horizontal technology, and you have to view every industry and every new startup that v that we look at with the lands that if there's enough data available enough compute power available will this company, essentially be extinct because they won't be able to compete, and that's really interesting lens, but layered on top this is sort of one of my pet peeves. You have to think about data privacy. We really need to sort of stay on the right side here, and it's very difficult for these young companies to figure out how to adopt GDP are I think some of the best and largest businesses themselves, probably struggling with GDP are the interesting thing is we're now seeing a whole bunch of. Entrepreneurs really trying to solve this issue, around privacy and differential privacy, and then also prejudice within the US and China trade issue remains largely at play. And it turns out Europe. It may prove to be an example of what lies ahead because of wet China is in the US today, I've never had more cords and more inbound from the Chinese tech giant's because they want to invest in the company of Europe. They want us that'll make a play. So I don't know nothing's going to stop them, but they looking have us is the US for more on the WSJ CEO council had to wsJcom or the WSJ app, that's it for the tech news briefing reporting from the newsroom in New York. I'm Tanya boost does. Thanks for listening.

United States Wall Street Journal Deloitte CEO China Europe Fiat Chrysler New York Tanya Boost Softbank Nasa Renault Netflix President Trump Writer Amazon WSJ Donald Trump Google
"pitchbook" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

09:28 min | 3 years ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Part of the Trump border wall. But they do. Okay. A virtual border wall. That makes sense. So we want an alarm system on our house, but we don't wanna front door that can lock. So we think will be totally having a wide open front door. But as long as they've been alarm system will be okay. Awesome. All some this make your near l'armee off a little bit. But by them saying that I mean now, they hate Trump. They hate Trump. They like their own people talking about you got your your own your own people on that land. They're exposed to these people willy nilly exact drugs drugs. They hang years, you could find all the news stories about natives being paid by the cartels to smuggle see sit back and say what's going on here. Because we're all our land is gonna get destroyed. That's worried about you guys already seen what's happening out in the desert. I know. I know. Up. All right. Okay. Third thing. I think you need to know hundred nine thousand people arrested legally crossing the border record again in the month of April hundred thousand. And of that over almost one hundred thousand the arrests that took place between border checkpoints. We'll all Democrats says, you know, we need to strengthen border checkpoints where all this stuff happens almost one hundred thousand between the border checkpoint ten thousand the border checkpoints between border checkpoints. There is no wall three things. I think you need to know. Now. This is fascinating to me about this this whole situation with Uber. It's the survey. Can you talk about Uber so boring, but it's not boring in the fact that it's going public today. But it's a company are you willing to pay lift shut up? Just stop. It's uber. Uber. Uber is the one that's going public today. Uber said that they have have slowed again. Let me tell you the gr- the company's growth rates slow to two point three percent. The fourth quarter, the annual loss was more than three billion dollars. So we are you willing to buy stock in a company that has lost three billion a year. I mean, I get things you know, you lose money. I get it things like that. But how do you dig out of three billion? Dollar three billion dollar hole. And that's the thing. Right. That's the thing. It says here digging out of a three billion dollar hole. This. Reuters story will not be solved by simply find by. Finding more Uber. Passengers say analysts investors fund managers and former employees Steve blankie Silicon Valley entrepreneur start up advisor. And professor at Stanford said there's no evidence the core ride hailing businesses profitable. It's a question is where's the next billion dollars coming from right there? There is no evidence that the core ride hailing business is profitable. So how are they gonna make your money? Here we go. A person familiar with the business who declined to be named told. Reuters quote, Uber as a wildly successful data collection on who uses it and how they use it. And where they go all this data can become profitable. So there it is be most valuable thing in this world, apparently, not even gold. Data. So you can be targeted by companies that want to sell you stuff, and they know how to sell you stuff. And then, of course, the big fear comes in of the government knowing exactly where you're going what you wanna buy because then, you know, with the government somehow get their hands on everybody is everybody saying it's all about the data. They have used geo location data despond customers journalists. Deceive regulators recruit drivers away from competitors. Uber paid one hundred forty eight million in a US settlement last year over a the cover up of two thousand sixteen data breach. Interesting. Current and former Uber employees analysts say the company's better position now to build a legitimate business from its vast quantity of data. So people think Uber is just playing it's an app, and it's cool. And you get hit I need to be picked up. Don't worry about knowing taxi number or something like that. I just need to be picked up. But you know, what? This might be is is this going to be like the rebirth of taxis again. I mean, it's cool to say, let's get an Uber. It's not cool. Does get a taxi taxes on spying on you? Taxes not collecting your data taxes, not selling your data, which was cheaper. Idea. You gotta remember thing comes down. True, traffic your pain by the minute. Taxi an Uber. It's a flat rate. It's like Uber's wanting to take the loss. Just they collect the data on you. Because that's where they're making the money. See sit back and say, all right. I'm gonna pay forty five bucks. A share? To accommodate three billion dollars. Just not worth it at all. But then. Maybe based on data. We look at. That's how Facebook makes money. Yeah. Ads all you want. It's data and they collect data. And that's what makes it valuable. They hold the keys to everybody every company wants. So they can target people to buy their stuff. So what does that mean you put advertisements in your vehicle? No. But they will somehow be able to target people. If you know, somebody takes an Uber to go get pizza twice a week or go to a restaurant, whatever it might be. They will then take that data and sell to certain industries businesses that can profit off that come to mind pizza place come here for this. Whatever it is that we're how ever you use it that they're gonna target that. And they're going to they're going to somehow reach you, whether it's via your mobile phone. I don't know. But that that's exactly what happens. So it says here Marc Hargraves head of global equities, a a investment managers longer term opportunity for Uber involves extracting value from that data Reverend simply the economics of traditional ridesharing. The guy that runs. Uber says his vision is the Amazon for transportation inferring where people want to go and how they want to move around much like online retailer Amazon dot com customers future purchases. So they wanna basically take that data and sell it to companies that can influence where you want to go. That's what it is. You wanna go here? Instead you wanna buy this. You want to do that. You look at Dan you go. Hey, maybe a forty five bucks a share. It's not bad as long as they can actually do it almost the government cracks down on that. Can they? So it's not about the rides. It's about the data. Right. It says the food delivery service loses money freight, hauling business is heavily subsidized because Uber has all kinds ideas what they wanna do. So it looks like again, it's it's all about data. And it's almost like Facebook buying rivals. As the CEO of travel booking company Expedia together runs. The runs Uber. Now used to be the other ran Expedia. He was a big deal maker. He had fifteen acquisitions in his twelve year period there, including pitchbook Inc. His largest Uber has been three point one billion dollar purchase of Middle Eastern rival Kareem which could help stem. Uber's losses in the Middle Eastern region. But doesn't solve the underlying profitability problem. So trying to buy up all of their like Facebook. It'd be monopoly. Exactly. And that's we sit back and go my forty five bucks. A share is going to crashed onto nothing. If all of a sudden, they can't do what's going to actually make the money? These are the question the gamble. Do. Of course. It's a gamble. Everything in life is again Bill are you are you willing to get crocheting? And well other tanning. Yeah. Love that stuff. You know it. That's easy right there. The crocheting the pinchers. Has their stock price gone up every day? And that's the thing that's been stable to data is everything. It's not like a company that produces a product like soap that everybody's gonna to like this tangible thing you can touch. But it seems to be the future because they're feeding off your ego. No, they're feeding what they think you want that. Which is why when you have Alexa, all these things they listen to what you're saying. And all of a sudden these things up and Facebook to microphone computer in your phone, and all of a sudden you talk to your wife about Disneyland. All of a sudden ads for Disney star popping up, and you're like, I've never even Google gone there. How does this even happen? I got it. But people are they get ego served by by the clicks and the lights and things like that. I'm telling you that instant gratifications addiction in video games. You weren't addicted to to go out and actually play in it, you're dictate to leveling up. That means leveling up. What does that mean? I mean, if you go from level one to level two you want to achieve thing, and this virtual chievements of nothing by getting likes and clicks, go person's ego. Well, these are all very important question. Six fifty three much more to get to don't go anywhere. But the question is it doesn't make sense does not make sense. It is canister..

Uber Facebook Reuters l'armee Alexa Stanford US Disney Middle Eastern Google Amazon Expedia professor Steve Marc Hargraves pitchbook Inc Dan
"pitchbook" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:57 min | 3 years ago

"pitchbook" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"We're going to take a look back at some of the great moments that we had here on the show. And we'll also take a look at what we have in store for twenty nineteen as well. I think I need to get my voice back a little bit. Wore down. Maybe it was yelling about not done. So well, maybe I don't know. But you know, it's interesting that when I went back in those looking through some things and getting some things ready. Two thousand sixteen maybe that less. That was the last time that we had Special Olympics on news as a sponsor. They're going to be sponsoring again this year so want to give them a big shoutout Special Olympics. It was funny because at that time. It was seven thousand one hundred and sixty two athletes, so in the course of just two years, the the athlete. Population has grown. Six hundred and some and that's really good because I know Jim Schmitz who's the CEO and president down there. One of his big goals is to get more people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Involved in Special Olympics, and if you look at that in two years, that's that's pretty good. That's a good number. Yeah. That's a lot isn't busy. That's a lot a lot of folks. There's there's not going to talk about that. That's an idea of God. I don't want to give anybody another idea. But there's something we're gonna talk about with them throughout the course of the years we go along. Right before Christmas. Let's talk a little bit about Christmas here just minute. But right before Christmas, we had a little contest. Christie's Christmas trivia. Since things have been really really busy throughout the course of the last two weeks. I have not had a chance to send out. The prizes to the two folks who did win plus have been waiting for Lou to get back to get a pair of his dirty socks to send the. Get them tonight. I bring those. Yeah. So don't worry. I haven't forgotten you and you'll be getting your prizes. Very soon. Just have not had the chance. And now that everything is all over and done with and all the hoopla, then now's the time to start getting back into things. But I guess do you have a good holiday. Yeah. It was pretty good. It was quiet. We stayed home for New Year's to go out and do any of the hustle bustle. Stop so. Yeah. But then the little one we take care of his glorious Christmas for two year old. She was just overwhelmed with gifts and things from all the different members of the family. So it was a lot of fun with her. Yeah. Nice time New Year's staying home. Yeah. That's good. Seems so funny New Year's Eve I I ended up phone sleep. I set my alarm for like eleven fifty nine. I'm went off. And it was just like all right? Two minutes after midnight. I think I felt right back to sleep. Yeah. I was just that's just that's the way it's been. I have just been sleeping so much lately. I don't know why. But I've been doing the same thing. I don't want to give away our age, but I've talked to quite a few people are age group who stayed in better didn't even bother to worry about New Year's. Yeah. To me. It's amateur night. I don't go out that much anymore on New Year's Eve just because you know, all the hoopla with the youngsters. Yourself from problems. Yeah. Well, let's just no more. It's not as fun as it used to be. I mean, you could go out and get drunk get crazy not have to worry about anything. But now, I mean you got to worry about getting shot. You gotta worry about stupid people in trouble. It's just not it's not fun anymore. So plus everybody I used to hang out with his all moved on and the kids and their kids are getting kids and. Just getting older. Everything. Everything was good. Let's see what else can here. And John media for who is our intern. He's been working with us now for a while. And John's can be talking with us tonight about some things as well to do. You have a good holiday too. Yeah. It was kind of quiet, quiet. Yeah. Nice time with family, and you know. We went up to Pittsburgh area. Well, not really kits book. It's technically nearly outside of pitchbook. But I still consider what Pittsburgh if that makes it did you see the Steelers game today. That's right. They didn't play. They weren't in the playoffs. You caught me off guard. Yeah. So it's, but I, you know, listen, we're we got a lot to talk about tonight. I wanna go over some of the things we did this past year that I thought were kind of highlights and with two thousand nineteen. We've got we're going to go in some different directions. Here this year. There's a lot going on. We're gonna be doing and we'll talk a little bit more about that. As things go on to you. And also we're going to talk with John about something that he encountered back. Couple of months ago, and we're gonna talk a little bit about that with him. And let him talk about some of the things that he deals with. And I think he's I wanna give him a lot of credit for saying, hey, I'm definitely down for talking about this. So. When we come back. We'll talk and get into some of the things that we did last year, which I thought were very cool and where we're headed from here on in two thousand nineteen so go ahead. We take us on that. And we'll be right back..

Olympics John media Pittsburgh Jim Schmitz Lou Christie Steelers pitchbook CEO intern president two years Two minutes two weeks two year
Meet the company training up more diverse startup founders

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:29 min | 3 years ago

Meet the company training up more diverse startup founders

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU. And by the alternatives podcast. How is artificial intelligence impacting people's lives today. Find out with the alternatives podcast new series called human stories of AI, you'll meet people like a widower who talks to an AI chat bot, help him processes grief and a truck driver who fears self driving trucks are eliminating his job. Listen at all turtles podcast dot com. Or find the alternatives podcast wherever you get your podcasts. The meat company trying to train up a more diverse generation of startup founders from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. Only about one percent of venture capital backed startup founders are black according to CBS sites. Data even fewer are black women or Latino. There's not a lot of age, diversity geographic, diversity and underrepresented founders. Don't always have access to the networks or the training programs that can help them get startup funding. Mandela Dickson is a former public schoolteacher startup founder and was a mentor for entrepreneurs at the firm Cape or capital about a year ago. She created founder, Jim, which is an online only training program for would be startup founders. I talked to her the afro tech conference last week in San Francisco. Just like if you want to be a lawyer, you go to law school, if you wanna be a doctor you go to medical school, right? But there is no school for people who wanna be venture capital backed startup founders in often times the schools that are formed are informal right by your networks and a lot of underrepresented founders. Don't have the people in their networks who've raised venture capital who've Ben venture capitalists. So we're. Literally, creating kind of from the ground up this first Ebba curriculum, specifically tailored to meet the needs in how a deep level of empathy for the lived experiences of underrepresented founders. So tell me about the Taylor like what is different about the message that you give to underrepresented founders. What are the first activities we do is actually called differences as strengths, and it really is actively for founders to reflect on what makes them unique how because you didn't grow up where these other people grew up because you went to different schools and were exposed to different things that your purview is different in the world. And that you're able to see problems other people don't even know exist, and that's a competitive advantage because most people out there, are you mostly will out there are not from fluid background. And so the problems that you're going to go out and solve will actually help the majority of people since it's online only talked to me about the network building. Because I know that's a big thing that people talk about when they come out of us of an accelerator in there with a class, and they really have. It's sort of like we were all eagle scouts together. Baen it's huge. How do you create that in a in an online experience straight question? So that's actually one of the biggest things I underestimated Meyer, original hypothesis for founder, Jim was that it was a curriculum was a language barrier that the reason people were not succeeding here from certain groups was because they didn't speak the language. Well, what I grave underestimated was that people were looking for a community these individuals again, they're only in their world. They may be the only black or Brown or let LGBTQ are older founder in their circle in. So how we structure network it's in we're very intentional. We do affinity groups on a weekly basis. We also do peer trainings. So it's not just the expert trainers who have the knowledge we actually elevate the founders within our community to train each other Mandela Dixon is founder and CEO of founder, Jim incubators and exceleron for underrepresented, founders are becoming more. Common. Although experts say it'll be hard to change the industry for good until the venture capitalist themselves. Become more diverse and now for some related links. I did find some hopeful news about the tech industry, relatively speaking. An off Ed in entrepreneur magazine from about a week ago notes, a big upsurge in the number of events focused on women and investment, partly because successful women entrepreneurs are funding the next generation of founders and also because we're just talking about it a lot still only two percent of BC funding went to women at all in two thousand seventeen far less to women of color. But it's a good read binded utter website. Marketplace tech dot org, and before we go a super quick story that you might have missed and all the Amazon hubbub earlier this week. Google is not to be outdone. It said it also plans to double its workforce in New York City over the next ten years, reminding us that the ranks of the underrepresented in the tech industry are also anyone who's not in about four major metropolitan areas. A recent report on venture capital activity from pitchbook and the national venture capital association. Included what it said was a shift in attention towards startups in non coastal regions of the country. The report noted quote this trend hasn't quite surfaced in the data yet, but positive sentiment and interest are emerging. We'll see I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. Hi, I'm Zach and I listened to marketplace in Arlington Virginia. I think what I appreciate the most about marketplace's their ability to take the economic news of the day issues such as tariffs rate hikes and tax reform cut through the political noise, and clearly and concisely explained not only how these issues affect our country and the rest of the world, but how they impact people like me. I hope you'll consider joining me as marketplace investor and donate today at marketplace dot org to help make their work possible. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Amazon web services. Did you ever wonder how we're streaming millions of movies on demand or doing our banking from the beach and how we're watching a live mission from Mars smart business minds dreamed up those ideas and Amazon web services is how they built them with the broadest functionality and the most experienced leading enterprises trust the AWS cloud to build the next big idea. Are you ready to build it? Learn more at AWS is how dot com slash podcast.

Founder Amazon Colgate New York City ALI Colgate University JIM AI Mandela Dickson Founder And Ceo Google CBS San Francisco
Uber enters trailer leasing business

Todd and Don

04:29 min | 3 years ago

Uber enters trailer leasing business

"The driver, and you rent the trailer and the truck and you can have your product delivered. Okay. Okay. What what's what's different about that versus using a trucking company that does the same thing? Well, trucking company may not be available. We do have a shortage of truckers. I mean, nothing different. Maybe just competitive. All right. Now, the largest single funding source for US startups. This is pretty interesting. You know, we talk about the story involving the journalist that was killed. More apparent about that. And people are saying we've got to go to war a Saudi Arabia. We need some sanctions that sort of thing. Well, the largest single, and this is gonna shake the tech community. They don't they won't know what to do with this the largest single funding source for US startups is Saudi Arabia. According to the Wall Street Journal, twenty sixteen at least eleven billion of Saudi money has gone to American startups through soft bank's ninety two billion dollar vision fund Saudis have contributed forty five billion to tech focused funds. This according to pitchbook. The research firm now Saudi money has gone to companies like Uber. We work in augmented reality devices like magically Inc. That's pretty interesting. It is another reason why it's not a good idea for us to get war with Saudi not not not in our best financial interest. They're not our friends, and they're not nice people things. They throw gay men off of buildings and behead p no doubt about it. The scumbag. Treat women way. They treat humanity. Right. Seven twenty five. We got the road to November madness. See a few people on hold that one away in you can't at five one two eight three six zero five ninety Don show. Jay on roofing, the most trusted roofer in Austin, Texas, since nineteen seventy nine and now a lot of beat might be just now discovering that you have some roofing issues to all the rain that we've had lately and is starting to the problems are starting to show themselves. So you can't trust Jay com. That's for sure. I know you have a lot of choices when it comes to ripping an Austin, but you can definitely trust Jay con-. That's one of the reasons why they have an a plus rating from the BBB fact, mini business organizations have just bestowed jacomb with so many accolades over the years, really really great work that they do. And if it's not time for new roof, certainly you need to have them come out and do an inspection anyway to make sure everything is okay. I talk about these inspections a lot because first of all they charge you nothing to do these inspections absolutely free. But that does not mean that they're not gonna do a very thorough inspection. And if you don't have any issues they're upfront about that. They never tried to say anything you don't need. If there's a problem that let. No and many times it'll be a minor repair. And you can avoid much bigger more expensive issues down the road J con five one two four seven nine five one. Oh. Huge savings on new

Saudi Arabia United States Austin Wall Street Journal Jay Com Jay Con BBB JAY Texas DON Ninety Two Billion Dollar
Elon Musk, Jeffries and Ceo discussed on

02:17 min | 4 years ago

Elon Musk, Jeffries and Ceo discussed on

"Say let's start again let's bring back in the us global news twenty four hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries i'm nancy lyons thanks dancing now with our other job stories i'm michael barr as we've been talking about all this morning british prime minister theresa may's cabinet held a two hour meeting about the uk's next move in dealing with syria and a suspected chemical weapons attack bloomberg's alex morales has more from london came ministers agreed on the need to respond to the alleged chemical weapons attack in syria over the weekend suggesting britain may participate in international military action against the regime of bashar al assad prime minister theresa may's cabinet agreed it was vital that the attack did not go unchallenged well not explicitly endorsing military action maze ministers agreed she should continue to work with the us and france to coordinate an international response they also agreed on the need to take action to create humanitarian distress and deter the use of chemical weapons by the syrian regime inland alex morales bloombergradio if you're a night owl you're not going to like this study researchers from england's university of surrey and northwestern university in chicago found that people who stay late are more likely to suffer from breathing and neurological disorders and diabetes the study's lead author kristen knutson is an associate professor of neurology at north western's feinberg school of medicine when important message from this is that night owls need to be aware that being a night owl could have health consequences so unfortunately you guys need to be a lot more vigilant about maintaining a healthy lifestyle researchers found that night owls at a ten percent increased risk of death during the six and a half years of the study the value of elon musk space x keep soaring according to pitchbook data the rocket maker is authorized a five hundred seven million dollar fundraising round at evaluation of about twenty five billion dollars that would make space x the third most valuable venture backed startup in the us after uber and airbnb tesla's ceo elon musk says the electric carmaker will be profitable and cash flow positive in the second half of the year must made his remarks on twitter early economists had tweeted jeffries estimates that tesla would need.

Elon Musk Jeffries CEO Airbnb Feinberg School Of Medicine Associate Professor Of Neurolo England's University Of Surrey Bashar Al Assad London Theresa Prime Minister Twitter United States Tesla Kristen Knutson Chicago France Britain Alex Morales