35 Burst results for "Pita"

Pirates rally in 9th inning for wild 6-5 win over Dodgers

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Pirates rally in 9th inning for wild 6-5 win over Dodgers

"The pirates scored two runs in the 9th inning to beat the Dodgers 6 to 5 Michael Perez hit a game time single off closer Craig kimbrell and Pittsburgh would then score the go ahead run on a fielding error by first baseman Freddie Freeman The pirates are three and one in their four meetings against the Dodgers this season and manager Derek Shelton couldn't be more pleased Yeah I mean we've played well against him and when we haven't beat ourselves which is the most important thing And you really have to execute because they're so good As part of the Pittsburgh win tuka pita marcano smashed his first career home run Mark Myers Los Angeles

Michael Perez Craig Kimbrell Dodgers Pirates Freddie Freeman Derek Shelton Pittsburgh Pita Marcano Mark Myers Los Angeles
"pita" Discussed on Wild Business Growth Podcast

Wild Business Growth Podcast

05:11 min | 9 months ago

"pita" Discussed on Wild Business Growth Podcast

"And then somebody else.

"pita" Discussed on Wild Business Growth Podcast

Wild Business Growth Podcast

02:19 min | 9 months ago

"pita" Discussed on Wild Business Growth Podcast

"Righty we are here with stacy. Madison the amazing stupendous. I don't think i've used that word but had stupendous founder of stacy's pita chips and be bold bars. One of the coolest most inspiring people. You will come across stacey so glad to have you on. How're you doing today. I love that intro. Thank you max. I'm ready to gal. Perfect cool just love your products and we've had an outpour of support in in questions that listeners vans have for you as well so we'll get to that as we as we wrap up this interview super excited to dive into your story with stacy's and be bold and some of the other things you're up to you before we get to the official stacy's pita chips start. I love to start with the little food. Cart called stacy's delights and pita chips wasn't even your main focus at the start. Can you take us through the first time that you actually served pita chips from stacy's delights. Sure it was really a inventory management reason if you would like to think of it from the mba side. Which i obviously don't have but a lot of a lot of like when i speak at classes. They love this because when we were serving sandwiches you can run out of anything on the cart. Pretty much you know. Whatever onions lettuce made a whatever. But if you've run out of bread european every served on pita bread so you always had to purchase enough to plan for a big lunch rusher something so with all the extra bread we had all this fresh bread and so when lunch was over we would cut it up and baked into different flavor. Pita chips and then the next day we hand them out for free to people standing in line and it was really just an incentive for people while. They waited for for us to make sandwiches. That's how that's all and and you know in the beginning. We didn't even album. We were just giving them away. Then we started to back them up and then you know somebody was saying. Oh we were. I'm having a party and you know. Can i get a bigger bag. So i can take home..

stacy stacey Madison
Mets' Pete Alonso Becomes Second Fastest Player in MLB History to 100 HRs

Boomer & Gio

00:52 sec | 11 months ago

Mets' Pete Alonso Becomes Second Fastest Player in MLB History to 100 HRs

"Beat the marlins nine to four pita lonzo having himself a night. One alonso drills one of air deep to left me. This one's going along way. Homerun pete alonzo old clevelander down there on the left field side at low depot. Mark lots out wait long after hitting number one hundred earlier the hits number one one wayne randazzo. Wcbs eighty two home runs for peter lonzo indeed over one hundred now for his career. Mets beat the marlins nine four that cap. The scoring here was alonzo second-fastest to one hundred in his career. I mean I mean again in that list. It's it's truly. It's really special ryan howard. Only the one ahead of

Pita Lonzo Pete Alonzo Marlins Wayne Randazzo Wcbs Peter Lonzo Mark Mets Alonzo Ryan Howard
Jen Psaki and John Kirby Can't Keep Their Afghanistan Story Straight

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Jen Psaki and John Kirby Can't Keep Their Afghanistan Story Straight

"If you want to know just how confused things Listen to the difference between the what the left hand is saying and what the right hand is saying. This is the president's press secretary. Jen psaki. who's getting very very irritated. At steve. doocy site steve. Doocy son pita doocy because he's actually acting like a journalist asking questions and here. She says very clearly that we're even gonna leave before. The taliban imposed deadline cut seven. Jen psaki. does that mean that. The evacuations will stop before the actual thirty first and then there is time to get the troops and machinery weaponry out of there. That would be correct. Yes that there would need to be time to wind down the present. So did you hear that. A random act of journalism somebody else hate. You got to leave before the thirty first because you've got to get the military equipment out you can't evacuate everybody on the last day because then what about all the weapons. All the soldiers all the marines. And she says yeah. We're gonna leave earlier. Well we're going to get out of this so i it's it's already to roll. That was the white house now. The same question was asked of john cabbie today and what did he reply eight there will be. There will be a transition more towards getting military assets out as we get closer to the end but again we're going to continue to work the evacuation mission right up until the last day. So which is it. Biden administration is that we will stop evacuating people so we can get the military equipment. Out or will we be evacuating americans and really everybody else who can get to the airport. The thousands and thousands and thousands of afghan nationals. Who may or may not have worked for us may or may not be

Jen Psaki Doocy Pita Doocy Steve John Cabbie Taliban Marines Biden Administration White House
"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

"About what's going to happen with my children who's gonna give them a hug who's gonna take. Obviously you know i mean. I've got family that. Would that would step in and take care of them but but it's the little things it's the day to day things that you mentally go through That makes it really hard. How's your has your health now now. I'm good scrape. I had double mastectomies deal. I don't identify myself as a cancer survivor. I just look at it as this was a shit ass time in my life and now it's over and all of that a you know getting past the medical issues selling the company. All of that adds up to taking control. And that's my sense of bold so you kind of cut it now. You got your mind in a new space amazing. stay soon. You think about the trajectory of your life in your career and the incredible success you had do you. Do you think that it's because of the skills that you brought in the hard work that you brought or do you think that luck played a bigger role in that. You know a lot of people say oh. She got lucky. That really pisses me off because you know yeah maybe the stars aligned and maybe the timing was right for a lot of things but each and every one of the challenges and the hurdles that you overcome others might not have gotten there and we did. I could've very easily followed the path that my father laid out for me. Now i probably could have just stayed in that comfort zone but yes by moving to this place in moving to that place in taking on additional challenges you i think you develop the skill somewhat of a survival skill. That's what got us to where we were in two thousand seven when we sold. Yeah maybe there was some luck in there but there was a lot of skill. That's involved in crossing that finish line that stacey madison co-founder of stacy's chips by the way stacy is still in the food business. A few years ago along with her brother. Dave she launched a new energy stack called be bold bars but she hasn't forgotten her first obsession and she still gets excited when she sees somebody buying a bag of her pita chips. There was a time. I was in the grocery store and this woman picked up two or three bags and she put them in her car and i just couldn't resist. I'm like you know what i'm going to tell her i did. I went up. And.

cancer stacey madison stacy Dave
"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

"Time purchase. Yeah all right so you guys are Kind of operating under the radar but growing steadily. Do you remember the first year you you actually turn a profit like a significant profit was it. Was it in one thousand nine hundred nine or in two thousand people say it takes three years i would say it takes five right so took some time. Yeah but i guess you guys hit a million dollars in revenue like around two thousand one which sounds super impressive. Did that mean that you guys were all making lots of money now. We really paid ourselves very little and if anything. We really weren't making anything because everything went back into you know if we needed another oven. Well you know you don't buy this. You don't do this because you need another oven. Yeah all right so you guys By two thousand one. You're starting to become more stable in the production process But just about. I think but five years after the two of you get married you mark divorce. You decide to get a divorce that year. Yeah but then you stay on us as fifty fifty business partners that this is normally how the story unfolds normally this is very messy traumatic and difficult and the it. It doesn't sound like that's what happened. Yeah like i'm not gonna say we didn't argue. I mean certainly. We argued over a lot of things. And there's a lot of tension and the employees had to put up with us like each other and they'd they'd go. Oh boy there they go and they turn around and they leave the room and then and then eventually everybody would come back to their desk. And and and that's okay but we had a common goal. And i would have to say. I think he'd probably agree that during the time that we were married for the most part it was a successful marriage but we also had a successful divorce it was clean and it was clear and we shared the company like it was our child and everything that we did was in the best interest of the company so we went to court together and we went before the judge said. We want to get a divorce. And we're splitting this fifty fifty and we really had no assets. Yeah everything we had was the company and we agreed we built this together and we were splitting the company and we were both going to stay on and the judge was like. Wow this was the easiest one it is. I think it's surprising. At least for me. And i think probably for a lot of people listening just because it it seems to me that takes eight remarkably like clear-headed people to come to this agreement to say. Hey you know like. We're not going to be romantic partners anymore. But we're really good business partners. We've got this good thing going and let's keep it going now. Now when i hear that i'm thinking of course you would say that that makes total sense. Most people don't say that so the greatest gift that mark gave me during this period was his honesty because at one point he said. I don't know when or if i want to have children. Yeah and i was in my mid thirties already so you. He said that to me and it was really an meaning. It was that night that i left. I went to the factory. I had brought my dog to the factory all the time. So i really. I went to the factory. And i slept in the bed that night. But you know now that i look back on it. I mean really. Could you imagine if we would have stayed together. And and we might have hadn't done up having a kid that he wasn't really into having kids and that could have been that road that so many people go down and ends up being a mess. Yeah but i did decide to start a family. And he was very supportive of that. I think this is like two years later. Two thousand three. You gave birth to your twins. Yup i was thirty nine years old. I gave birth to twins boston. Ivf and that's how. I had the kids. And i and i have always spoken openly about that that i was financially and emotionally ready to start a family and i just need a little help so at this point when your girls were born in two thousand and three was stacy's pita chips was the trajectory like. Was it clear that it was going to be a much bigger brand or did it still feel like it. Was you know more successful regional brand so at this point the company was growing like crazy. It was successful enough that we could each be taking a decent salary. We couldn't pull that much out of the business but you know it was enough so that we could each you know by a car and you know we could each buyer on place or whatever so. It was successful enough to do that. But we really. We decided how much we're gonna pay. And then everything else just stayed in the business and we're companies coming to you guys at this point and saying. Hey we want stacy's pita chips in our in our stores. Yeah so. I think it was when we got into the club accounts like costco and sam's club. And all all those so we started manufacturing for them and then we got into trader joe's and we just and it was the perfect demographic for us and trader. Joe's was an amazing company to do business with they paid on time or early well and because of that we were able to not take on equity well and at that point you know everything just went back into the business but we were just about to give give up a piece of the company and we never ended up actually doing that because we got trader joe's and they were ordering truckload and when we were selling when we say truckloads and it is really amazing when trucks are lined up for selling a two dollar item. We're not selling computers. So when we're when we get to the point that were doing you know thirty. Forty fifty million dollars in sales are two dollar sales or one dollar sales. That are just truckloads of chips going out the door and at this point we were. We had moved to the sealy mattress factory where we bought the building and it was two or three hundred thousand square feet. Something like that was basically four acres inside and we converted the sealy mattress factory into a giant pita chip factory. I think it's like two thousand five. She doesn't six. You're selling like more than fifty million dollars worth of pita chips a year. Which is i think sixty five. Thank you pepsi announces that they were acquiring. Stacy's how did that happen. Did they approach you like a year before they say. Hey we're really interested in buying your company is. Is that what happened or were you looking to sell it so a couple of months before we saw them at a trade show an and they were like oh this is a good product and in order for them to even look at you. You have to be at least fifty million in sales and blah blah blah and. We were nowhere near there at the time and and that was the only contact we ever had with them. Then you know a year later at the trade show again there. Was this one month window where we got phone. Calls from three of.

stacy sam's club mark joe boston costco Joe pepsi Stacy
"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

"This point have a vision for how big this could be. Were you and mark saying. Because i have to assume you are still doing a lot of legwork. You were still maybe even baking the chips and Or maybe hiring people to help you but did you think this is going to be huge. Is going to be a national brand. Was that your ambition at this point or not. Quite now our goal was to be a regional brand more like cape cod potato chips. And we were we were going to keep things manageable and in the northeast but what happened was with the growth of the natural foods industry. There were these pockets like colorado and atlanta and california and there were these little pockets. Where the natural food business was really booming and the whole creation of whole foods and then buying up all of these smaller stores. We were in all those smaller stores. So we were in the bread and circus and wild harvest and then they all became whole foods. Yeah which grew tremendously. So our initial plan to be a small regional brand we had to rethink that. And i think that you know one of the things that mark and i were really good at was you know not being so locked in to a straight path that we were able to see when other opportunities came along so for example. The pita chips over the food cart or You know rather than sell into small gourmet food stores. We're going to go into the natural food you know we're like well we could sell to these ten stores or this one chain has one hundred but the business was still you and mark right. It was you were the only permanent employees at this point so it was for the first two years and then my brother who at this point had his phd also And we said to him you want to sell some chips and you know. An ha ha ha ha. We were all joking around about it. And then he came back like a couple of weeks later and said you know what if i don't try this now he's married they don't have kids and what if i don't try this now. When am i going to try it again. He's like schorr has his wife. She was an accountant. She had a steady income so he said you can just pay minimum wage. And then we'll give it a try and after the first of the year you can just kinda start paying me back as we start generating a little bit of money. And that's really really important. Is that in the beginning. We surrounded ourselves with believers. I mean hugh. You've got two psychologists and social worker running a pita chip business right like how implausible is. That like what like nobody would say. I want to start my business. I need to psychologists and the social worker. But somehow like your. You guys brought these skill sets to this to this thing. I was street smart and those guys were both street. Smart and book smart so we all work together on trying to figure out how we're gonna do this. And i'll tell you at one point. We had paid fifteen hundred dollars and we flew a consultant up from frito. He was a retired frito guy and he walked into our how we were running things and he was just like these are very good and they taste good but this cannot be done This is a home baked type product. And it's fine but you won't be able to scale this business wait. Why did he say that was. Were you literally like hand. Cutting the pita pita bread's marks right bicep was like three times the size of his left because he was literally using a knife to cut bread. Well so when this guy walked in and he saw moore hand cutting bread. And we're hand bagging everything and each batch took a certain amount of time and then we have to like you know scrape off the trays and clean everything and he was just like yeah. You'll never be able to bring this product to market on any kind of scale so for us. That was a really hard blow. I bet but we also still found it hard to believe like if we can take forty racks forty trays of pita chips. And we can make that. Why can't we just line up a whole bunch of these ovens and be able to make so many racks at a time and then that led to was us realizing we needed a conveyor oven you needed a conveyor belt of an where you could just throw the pita on there and it would just go through the conveyor belt and then come out the end just into a just a big barrel and the chips are made. Yeah in the endgame. We ended up. Having to purchase a custom built oven. It was the size of fifty. Two foot like an eighteen wheeler truck. Wow but you are still or mark was still hand slicing the pita into the right shapes. You can't scale that like one or two or ten people can't do that. So how did you solve that problem. You're right on target here so you we. We broke it down into each stage of making a pita chip and that piece of it. What we did was we. We would go and we would tour other factories so we went down to cape cod potato chips and we went on that tour that everybody in cape cod goes on that tour or you just went as tourists. We went as tourists and we looked through that window and we saw they were cutting potatoes with this machine and we asked him well. How does that machine cut the potatoes. And they gave us the name of the machine and then we went out and we contacted that company and said this is what we're trying to do and we had this guy who worked for us. Who could tinker with anything. And so what we ended up buying was a machine that used to cut carrots for campbell's soup so you know how they cut those tiny little squares. Sure well what he did is he took those blades and space them further apart and when he first based these blades and and all of us are kind of gathered around the opposite end of the machine holding a bucket where the these are tempted. Chips are gonna come out. And so he feeds the brand into the machine. He starts tossing a piece of bread a piece of bread. Peace bread and we're standing out at the other and and we're like holy shit lo and behold pita chips. It's a chip and that was the very last day that mark ever cut a piece of bread. You and mark eventually got married right your business partners and then you got married. 'cause you were together right yes. We had been together for a long time and eventually we just got married in ninety seven and always good. Yep all right. Nineteen ninety nine. You get your production method down. Get the machines. You need revenues growing I have to imagine that there are big chip companies looking at you guys. Even though you're this tiny little new england-based pita chip company and thinking Pita chips. that's the new craze. Let's make pita chips and crush these guys not really because so at this point in time in the company as we just started to grow it was also during the time of the no carb phase. Those no carb low carb diets. Oh yeah and we rely here. We are once again. We're making toast and we thought. Oh my god that's gonna put us out of business like all these time all these things along the way you think. Oh my god that's gonna put us out of business. Oh my god that's gonna put us out of business. But ultimately people loved the chips it was something. People ate all the time and it was becoming a staple in their cabinet. It wasn't just a one.

frito schorr mark atlanta colorado hugh california moore cape cod campbell new england cabinet
"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey welcome back to how a built this from npr. So it's the late nineteen nineties. Stacey and mark have created kind of a side hustle out of a side hustle selling pita chips from the little sandwich cards. They started in boston and at a certain point. The chips are doing so well that they decided to make more of them. They're using an oven. That can only make eight racks of them at a time but then they find a way to scale up. We met a very nice woman when we were doing the food cart. Who sold pretzels. It was boston pretzel bakery. And she said oh. I have a forty rack oven. Why don't you come try to make them over there. So we went over to boston pretzel. And we mixed up are the pita chips and we were able to make a rack of forty of them at a time. Instead of you know instead of eight trays we could make forty trays and she had backup racks so l. Forty were in the oven. We load up another forty trays and forty came out and forty went in. And we're like okay. Well this is this kind of makes more sense. What i'm trying to look at. What point running. This card did you. And mark say you know what actually the business we really should focus on is the pita chips and not the pita sandwiches so i think the coming about of that whole thing was the struggle of getting an inside location and you know come winter. It's really rough being out there in the cold and we started working with a realtor and the real turkana laughed at us. And said if you want a tiny little indoor location near where you are want to keep our following of people You and your food cart can stand online behind oban pan. Dunkin donuts at the time starbucks was coming into the world you know everybody wants little spaces and we realize we had to make a choice and we decided to go for the pita chips because in the winter i was working on on the pita chips and the bag and the design and the licensing and all that i needed to do in order to get that off the ground so with the pita chips we could get bigger faster. Yeah and i took a bag. We we ever had put them in almost like a coffee bag like with little window. Oh yeah plus a little plastic bag inside of the paper bag so a lot of labor went into it but you know what i took the bag and i. I walked into bread and circus in downtown boston. And i said hi. I'm stacey these are my chips. And i'd love to give them a try. We just walked into a bread and circus which eventually was was bought by whole foods. And you ask for the manager. Okay and what did the managers say. Wow he's good. Yeah i'd love to get him and now we have one store. There was like six or eight of these bread and circus stores and he showed them to corporate And there was nothing in them. They were all natural and it was the time of the beginning of the natural food revolution. And that just what we were innately doing. And obviously you guys presumably. You chose the name. Stacy's pita chips just because that's what it was called stacy's delight when you were food cart right. We chose it because we thought that a female name on snack food brand would sell more than a male name You know the woman in the kitchen kind of thing is to say that that's really. That was the thought behind. It was that it sounded better than than marks. Let's just pause from an and talk about money because even though you were getting some stores you know willing to pick up the chips and To sell them. I i can't imagine your business could could operate entirely on like the sale of pita chips. Have money to run this thing. Yeah i mean. We had a lot of debt between the two of us. We ran up our credit cards. We applied for. So i i was. I started working with the neighborhood development center and they helped me write a business plan. There was i really networked with everybody. I ca- possibly draw information from So there was a neighborhood center. there was I think jewish vocational services was in downtown. Boston and there was this one girl that used to eat at the cart. And she said to me How do you know if you have enough bread. And she asked what these weird questions and and one day. I said why. Are you asking me these weird questions. She said well. I teach a business plan boot camp. And i use your cart is an example all the time wow and i said really i'm like can i take that class. She's like you wanna take you come on over. And i went and i took an eight week business. Plan boot camp. So between all of these agencies that i kind of worked with because remember i didn't have a business degree. I didn't know what a business plan was. So after that eight weeks. I realized that i didn't just need twenty five thousand dollars for the packaging machine but i also needed twenty thousand dollars to buy bags. Yeah to run on the machine. And then i needed twenty thousand dollars for this thing. That people kept calling working capital so that was all new to me so i thought i only needed twenty five thousand dollars sixty. I needed sixty. Yeah how did you get sixty thousand dollars. So the neighborhood development center in jamaica plain helped me spruce up my business plan a little bit and put me in touch with a bank that they used that worked with the sba so we had to put down twenty percent of the sixteen thousand. And that's where our family kicked in you needed to put up twelve thousand bucks in collateral basically. Yeah and that was a sixty thousand dollar loan from a small business administration backed bank in boston. She got sixty thousand dollars. Which gave you. how much runway. How how long could you could you function of sixty thousand dollars because you're talking about needing to buy a machine to seal the bags to buy the bags and then you're not left with a whole lot. Sixty thousand dollars was not going to go very far because yes we bought the machine. We bought the bags but the one thing that we did have we had customers both the consumer and the retailers that loved our chips and kept reordering. And when i got that sixty thousand dollar loan within six months i went back and ask them for five hundred. Wow and they and they said here's sure here's five hundred thousand bucks. No no. they said no well. They didn't say no they said no not without equity and we were like equity equity what we've got nothing. Yeah this company software thing thing at this point so they said notify hundred and over a couple of months we were able to scale it back and they did say yes to three hundred and fifty. Wow so you got a three hundred and fifty thousand dollar loan from the bank. Yeah but how did you get the word out about the pita chips. I get it that you're you're pounding the pavement and you were asking for managers at at a local you know markets and asking to talk with them but how did people find out about. The chips was entirely word of mouth. And this pre internet pre social media pre. You didn't have ad dollars. We would go everywhere. We could to sample so we would go into the store and we would set up a table and we would just give away chips for free just like we did on the card. People would try them and they would buy them and that. Just that's how we built our customer base. We had three words sample sample sample. Did.

boston neighborhood development cente Stacey npr Dunkin donuts starbucks stacey mark Stacy stacy Boston sba jamaica
"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

"Just to clarify that. It was basically a chicken. Caesar rolled in a piece of bread. Got there were very few options. But we made You know ours were you know had goat cheese we had turkey and vardi and we had more upscale choices. So we prepared. We sliced meat. We put everything in a giant cooler and then we went to downtown boston. We were literally roll. The car up the street and put it on the corner of johnson summer street and we get an ice delivery to the corner and throw the ice in the bottom and then we'd put out all of the ingredients and then we rolled up in the pita bread and then we had this big white piece of paper and we'd roll the sandwich in the white piece of paper and we twist the bottom so people were walking around. It was almost like they had this big white club and so it was really good. Because they'd walk away other people would ooh that looks good at that and what what was the name of the did you have an for the pushcart. Stacy's delights stacy's delights apostrophe lic fd l. i t. e. s. so it wasn't a delight delight that is so nineties. I love that. Yeah how do was it a hit did you guys get customer like lots of customers right away. Yes it was a hit but we were not the only food cart down there. You have to remember that up fifty yards away as the pretzel cart. And then there's the burrito guy and then there's you know so it was at a time when in the food cart world. I mean now. Food cart is more hip and trendy. And it's a food truck or inviting. It's more of a food truck but at the time a food cart had the connotation of Dirty and disgusting. Yeah but the way that the cart was designed in that was presented in that it looked. We had fresh tomatoes a mountain of them out front and it was. It broke the traditional mold of what is a food cart. Yeah yeah in every day. We ordered fresh bread. Where would you get the bread from the just a local bakery and it always over order the bread. Because you can run out of alfalfa sprouts. You can run out of tomatoes and it's not going to be a big deal but in this business if you run out of bread you're closed. Yeah so i think this is going so you. You've all this extra bread and you're thinking what do we do with this extra bread and we didn't want to use it the second day because it's not his pliable to roll the pita sandwiches shirt so when we got back to the kitchen we would cut them up and bake them into different flavor chips and the idea was a you would you would do. What with the pd chips you would give them away. You would sell them like what initially. What were you going to do with them. So initially it was just a way to retain our customer base and to keep people happy as they were waiting in line Because it was a long wait you had every pita sandwich order. Yes and people would. We hired a college student. She was a cashier but in between she'd go up and down with a basket of pita chips and just given for free to people standing in line while they waited and people loved it because it was kind of like a happy hour and we gave them away for free but people started saying that they did want to buy them so initially we would just put some in a little baggie with a gold ribbon and keep a basket of him out on the food cart as well and you could buy it for like fifty cents or a dollar something. Yeah bach but the sandwich and just just out of curiosity like did you guys. Experiment with the baking. 'cause i've because pita bread can burn pretty quickly and it could get right like i have to assume that you had to experiment with the right temperature and the right flavors and stuff like that. That came later initially. We just baked the cinnamon sugar in the parmesan garlic. Everybody thinks simply naked was our first flavor. It wasn't it was the Parmesan and the cinnamon sugar. We were baking them in a four rack oven. I mean literally for maybe eight trae. Sorry it's eight rack of and so we could spread out the pita chips on a tray and we could bake eight of them at a time. And you know you really. We were making toast. Yeah you were making thin slices of toast really good toast. And it wasn't until later as the company started growing that there was a huge jump between. I'm gonna make host in my oven and i'm going to manufacture keeping in mind marks deferring his loans and deferring his loans and that adds up. He's not at this point he's like full on in the food business and you are too. He's not using his phd in clinical psychology. It right you know. I got i was a clinical social worker. He's got his phd in psychology. And we're on a street corner selling sandwiches and so at that point you know we are all in. We are going to do something and we.

vardi Caesar Stacy stacy boston johnson
"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

"From npr. How i built this a show about. Innovators entrepreneurs idealists and the stories behind the movements they built. I'm gyros on the show today. How stacey madison turn day-old pita bread into a new snack. Stacy's pita chips and then went on to sell her brand one of the world's biggest food companies for a quarter of a billion dollars so there are some startup stories. Were most of us are probably thinking. I couldn't do that like squarespace. If you heard that episode you'll remember that anthony tusla was and is a gifted computer programmer. He had a highly specialized skill. Same story with steve madden. He literally designed and then fashioned shoes from leather and sold them but then there are the stories where most of us can actually imagine doing that. Thing ourselves like brian. Scooter moore who bought an old truck and offered to holloway people's trash. That's how he started one eight hundred got junk or lisa price who tinkered with homemade lotions and our kitchen. She went on to sell her brand. Carol's daughter till laurie out. Well today story is the second variety. The kind of story that almost anyone can relate to because it is such a simple and elegant idea. You take pita bread in cut into wedges you bake it throw some parmesan or seasoning on it and voila. You've got stacy's pita chips now. Even though the snack food industry today is a sixty. Six billion dollar juggernaut. Stacey madison did not have a grand master plan to disrupt snack foods in the late. Nineteen ninety s at that time. She and her boyfriend were literally selling pita wraps sandwiches from a sandwich cart in downtown boston. The pita chips were an afterthought a way to use up those extra pitas at the end of the day. Peter chips were never supposed to make stacey wretch but eventually frito lay would come knocking with a fistful of dollars but long before that long before stacey even sold her first sandwich she was on an entirely different path. She grew up in the suburbs near boston after college. Stacey went to california to get a master's degree in social work. She thought about becoming a psychologist like her dad but he wasn't so enthusiastic about that he felt. I should always become a social worker rather than go on to get my mba psychologists. He was like oh. That's no profession for a woman. That's one thing that he said was smiling. Look pretty and you will find a husband you know. I don't wanna make him sound like a jerk. He was like a caring loving man that put his family first but he was also a product of the fifties. Sure so once you get your master's degree I read the you. You actually moved to washington dc to To to what to do social work. Yes i worked in a group home for homeless pregnant drug addicted women and i have to tell you i mean i loved. The job was very rewarding. But at the time i think i made twenty two thousand dollars a year and it was really paycheck to paycheck and very hard to survive on that kind of income so i decided to go and get licensed and be able to private practice. Which eventually i did go on to do. But i've found it very isolating. No now i've got to go. And i unlocked the door and and i do you know marriage counseling and then my evening is over. I've seen five or six patients. And i closed the door behind me and i go home and i put a lot of effort into getting those degrees and licenses and realize that ultimately it probably just was not for me to your your I guess roughly thirty years old at this time and by the way you were engaged to break right now that ended. I think it was just mutual. I think ultimately it was. Just not the right thing. I think we just both agreed we had had the place picked out. We were going to get married. And it was kind of a bizarre story. But i went and i had a massage. This i know sounds like i'm going off on a tangent here but it will come back. I went and i had a massage. And the woman told me to take off all my jewelry imbaba blah blah blah and. I took it off. I put it in the dish guy massage. And i got up and i went to get dressed and i was like oh my god. All my jewelry is gone including my ring might engagement ring and i was just you know it was from his family. It was like i was just so upset and the girl was gone. She had gone gone like never to return. I think she took off to florida or somewhere. She never came back to work. She just kinda took all my stuff. But with rick and i was kind of like ring wasn't replaced immediately even and i don't care about the ring even if it's just a cigar brand or something like that that it kinda took so long replacing the ring that it forced both of us to look at. Should we really be doing this. Maybe this was a sign or something and ultimately. Yeah we just decided. Maybe we shouldn't get married. So you guys split up a meantime there was this guy mark andrews who you had met through your brother a few years before he was a friend. Did you guys start dating or would you just kind of touch. So he was still a friend. And i talked to him. All the time about my disengagement and all of that he was super supportive and eventually our friendship led to dating and he was getting his phd so he was doing an internship in hawaii and said well. Why don't you come out to hawaii. And what did you do in hawaii. So hawaiian was.

stacey madison anthony tusla Scooter moore lisa price till laurie Stacey madison Peter chips stacey wretch steve madden npr boston Stacy holloway frito stacy Carol stacey brian
Conservatives Need to Draw the Line to Curtail Ubiquitous Porn

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Conservatives Need to Draw the Line to Curtail Ubiquitous Porn

"And i i really believe that the porn example is a pretty good. I think there's broad agreement here that we need to curtail. The spread of ubiquitous hot high-speed pornography in our culture. There were two laws passed for this in the nineteen ninety s with a republican house and a democrat senate democrat president the communications decency act which we actually argue a lot about now because of its section to thirty provision for big tech and the child online protection act. The cd was gutted by the supreme court and the copa. The child online protection act was held up in the courts as well but there was overwhelming support for this. I talked to a lot of young conservatives. As do you young conservatives in particular really want to curtail this stuff. And i i think. Beginning with obscenity as a way to kind of sh- finally have some limits. Some standards here is a great way to begin. There's no first amendment protection for it. And it's a recognition that liberty requires the suppression of of certain appetites and liberal education requires the cultivation of certain virtues and a conservative society needs prudence. We need to be able to say yeah. Words means something we can kind of know things in and we can kind of guide how we're going to govern ourselves and we really can't tell the difference between drag wing story our in church on sunday or a porn star and political speech than we can't tell the difference between between anything and we can't govern ourselves but just fascinated that really sharp people whether david french ben dominic That they would fall for this. I mean it seems to be kind of pure libertarianism. that in in seconds falls apart. I mean we just said it right. You know if you wanna bring. Let's bring in the racist. We wanted to be a big ten. I don't have to agree with them. But bring them in. No listen speaking of buckley when he founded national review in the fifties He specifically said that we're not going to let the john birch irs in. He understood that there are. We wanted to be as big a tent as can be but we have to draw the line. If pita can't do that everything falls

Republican House Senate Supreme Court David French Ben Dominic Buckley John Birch
"pita" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"pita" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

"My god. There's not enough time for you. So i know we had to i. We really had to learn everything. We had to learn everything and we started ninety seven. There was no youtube right. There was no youtube. We were the school of hard knocks all across the board We learned so much with the The mistakes that we made with supermarkets and chargebacks that we got a big pile of. We sold all this stuff. I've we're not making any money. And then you know you sold ten thousand dollars worth of product and you get a check for two thousand bucks and you're like what did i do wrong in somewhere along the line. I signed up for some stupid program. That obviously i can't afford and that's a hard. You never see that money again and We had hired somebody that was did know what they were doing and spent the first six months of of his project was just kind of going back through a stack of paperwork that was six inches high and dealing with all of the mistakes that we made in the grocery channel. So you know it's so that's mistakes in the grocery channel if you think of our packaging when we first started packaging by hand we had a cute little coffee bag low window but only the chips were sharp and the window was the wrong material and the chips pierce through the bag and would fall out the front window and then we thought we knew what we were doing when we finally got into a packaged bag. But we didn't realize you know go. When we started to ship over the mountains. We had an entire trustful of chips. Just go can continue to explode literally all the bags were popping. And you know when you go up on an airplane. They do something to those bags. Deflate him a little bit so that you've ever gone on the airplane. You get one of those bags that are just like a big alone. They can pop. We didn't know that. Not just the mistakes are just endless. Endless that is entrepreneurship. Folks all right so one last question for you which is how has your definition of success change from the beginning of your entrepreneurial journey until today.

youtube two thousand bucks six inches ten thousand dollars ninety seven today first six months first one one last question
"pita" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"pita" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

"That i make you know. I have this food that i like to to make for people or have an idea and i obviously has tastes good like if if it doesn't taste good like don't do it but beyond that you know you're i mean the pita chips are very addictive. I can't have them around me. I love him so but beyond the taste alone and for people bars. You know you building a new product which is completely different. What are beyond the taste. What are the attributes of the product that you think are important to make successful. Okay well if you think you were addicted to the pita chips wait till you get you some bars okay. We're gonna turn you into a junkie so you know. I mean the key to building a successful food brand. You have to like it. A lot of people think It's all based on a good product. But if you have a good product don't have the right people there's gonna be a problem and then it's the same thing a lot of times. You can have a great team. And you're putting out a crappy product you may get some great distribution but a year from now you know you see a lot of come and go products that have got really huge in then all of a sudden. They're just not there anymore so you know you have the trick. Is you have to make a product at a price that people can buy it so you can go into a restaurant and have the best meal that you've ever had and they've used you know they've they've made their own catch up. You know what it's like. Oh my god. This is the best chicken nugget or something. But but you when it comes down to it can you take that nugget or that catch up and get it out there for three bucks and have it go through. Have be able to make millions of it. Have it still tastes good. Have it be able to go all the way through the supply chain and get to the shelf in the right place where people can can afford to buy it right so it's not just a team in the packaging and the pricing all those other things but you know being able to mass produce it. I'll never forget we had a frito lay a retired executive. Come into the company and tell us that this is an amazing project product. And if you wanna be a you know it's a mom and pop and and you'll forever be a mom-and-pop you'll never be able to mass produce this and that's you know we just couldn't our minds couldn't comprehend that how can we never produce it. We're producing it now. We just have to do it like you know hundred thousand times.

three bucks millions hundred thousand times frito
What is Erectile Dysfunction?

Sex With Emily

02:19 min | 1 year ago

What is Erectile Dysfunction?

"Erectile dysfunction is defined as the inability to obtain and very importantly maintain an erection adequate to complete sexual intercourse. So many guys think that all. I get it up for a minute one hundred percent. I don't have a problem but even though it goes down before. I can reach climax satisfy my partner. I don't have a problem. That's a problem. That's a problem for everyone. Yes vault a minute. And in fact. That's a form. Form of erectile dysfunction as called venus league where guys can get a good erection but they just can't maintain that erection and this is a very devastating form of erectile dysfunction because it affects young men. And how does it affect young men. What is it is it something. that's genetic. is it saying. Well it's just might be something that they acquired from say some trauma some injury or some something like that but a lot of guys. It's a genetic problem and it's the inability of them to hold out blood in their penis and the analogy. That i always get my patience. Is that imagine you had a faucet and you had a bucket and someone said hey you got to carry a bucket of water from the faucet over to that point. Be fossa works. Great water flows in great but so enroll a hole in the so. By the time you get over to point b. half the waters leaked out already. So you're not gonna have much water in that bucket. So that's the kind of e. Ed that younger men get and a lot of older men. Get as well okay. So that's one kind of since you were just talking about. I always say that gets this umbrella. Penis challenges like it's just you you can. You can't get hard or they you get hard you can't say hard and it's a problem and says there's pain involved form of pain and it's painful it's painful relationship it's painful so let's talk about. How much of these pitas challenges are mental and not necessarily physical small percentage. We're talking about ten percent of erectile. Dysfunction is due to psychological services. And there's things like you know stress anxiety You know those. Those will contribute to erectile dysfunction Expectations being inappropriate. You know those will contribute erectile dysfunction. But it's really a small percentage about ten percent is due to what we call. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction the vast majority so cruelly. Ganic problem that there's something wrong with the guy and we can usually infects it

Venus League Erectile Dysfunction ED Ganic
New Car Agency, the South African Experiment With Peter Viljoen

Talking Automotive

02:08 min | 1 year ago

New Car Agency, the South African Experiment With Peter Viljoen

"He's talking to beautiful young. The managing director said some in south africa. He has done extensive research into the whole agency. Model and peter. Thanks very much for joining us and agreeing to shay some of the things you have found out in terms of what's happened in south africa. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much john. Thank you very much markets and met. Somebody came to ask you a question before we jump into the agency saw just to put some perspective. Ray what you do in south africa. You run a successful automotive talk show. Can you tell us about the show. Yep so the cost sharing. It's one of its a win by that. We lost in action. You win cosstalk harbach downs again. Where we wanted to do was my body. Crops on scouts is on the shine actually for the producer the archives and what they wanted to renew isues be attached customs. I joined the shine after being an oxygen and so we provided some industry insights to That slides or missing funds usually watching the chart and somebody transitions consumer price. And there's immediately on to the point that we've mentioned to keys onslaught we had We will have one of the modules insurance needs king postures and we recently got a new sponsor sponsors are climbing pixel part someone all very happy z. Aggressive bras but not the whole new at seventy. It's much easier for us to shoot so many batches then and office another boss to us. So we're having a lotta pita

South Africa Cosstalk Harbach Peter RAY John
As NCAA president flails, whispers of an exodus get louder

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:15 min | 1 year ago

As NCAA president flails, whispers of an exodus get louder

"Seems like mark. Emery is always in the news. We talked to pete thamel about him. A couple of days ago and since then pitas written Even more talking about whether the winds of change are not already in the thanks for the time. Let's let's talk about your latest on. When i was i was dumbfounded when i read your column because i swear. I rent a comment the other day. Some poo bear in the ncwa hierarchy. That said he was doing a good job and they were happy with him. Well hey it was interesting. Paul like he. There's a little bit like i know. I caught in the stock market. When when when the stocks keep going up they call it the goldilocks effect in in college. Athletics when someone who is perhaps not performing their job at a high level but still gets to keep their job is a similar thing. We're just all the all the factors surrounding them are in place so they can keep on going even if the results aren't there and we we saw you know most recently with larry scott out in the pac twelve where it was fairly unanimous Feeling amongst athletic director certainly in a lot of people out there that maybe it was time for larry to move on and he had a couple of key presidents especially the gentleman at arizona state and they make a crow who were were on his. We're on his side and he kept the job probably three or four years longer than maybe even more than that than than most people in that area would Would have thought he was going to in so the Mark emirate is that he is pretty much lost his constituency on the ground meaning he has lost the commissioners for shore at multiple commissioners going to estimate that least eighty five percent of them would like to see a change in the president's spot athletic directors. A little harder to judge. 'cause you're you're going from university of maine to miami and alabama you know eastern washington. There's three hundred and something in division one and there's d tuned. three as well But it's probably a fair estimate to say eighty five percent there want change as well. I mean let's put it this way for all the stuff that's come out about mark emmer. His anybody stepped up to defend him. I don. I don't think there's i have not heard or seen a you know a single person other than his bosses.

Pete Thamel Emery Larry Scott Athletics Mark Paul Larry Arizona University Of Maine Alabama Miami Mark Emmer Washington
I Thought True Love Was About Fighting For Your Man

Love Issues

04:07 min | 1 year ago

I Thought True Love Was About Fighting For Your Man

"Yep eat emmy tell you a story. I never told you going waiting three months of being in a relationship with you. Your mother called me on the side and said to me yongbo pitas my son and i love him very much. But if i were your mother. I wouldn't allow you to date my son. I smell sheepishly. Thank she was joking with me. She continued pizza's. Not a woman. Like you should follow your young to fall and look i'm bishops. Would you follow someone like pete. Just we didn't this week. The foot woman has entered this house with. He doesn't respect women because he has many of them after talkin for about fifteen minutes. She's that at me waiting to hear me say something. All i said was thank you but i do like to make him. Stop your mother. Only smart as sid. Don't be a stupid child. Just walk away. I thought your mom didn't like me that much noah's why she was trying to push me away. You should until those three women to walk away. I was she telling me it's only meant one thing. I was the one among the full. She didn't like so from that day on. I decided to fight until i win. I was a child. Nineteen going on swing t. I didn't know so much about love. So i thought fighting to win was the only way to prove my love for you from that day on. I became very obsessive with you. If three other women wayne your life already meant only one thing. You're so good that most women would like to have you for themselves. If you could remember very well. I never wanted to be a part from you. I was always in your space trying to push all the women away. Didn't wake no matter how hard i tried. You slipped away to be with other women so one day while you were sleeping. I picked your phone and through autumn messages. I found nothing smart guy. You covered your tracks before. I could find out next thing i did was to form an alliance with your genius. I bought had gifts and give him money and accidents money to hold coming in goes out one weekly saw. She called to tell you the lead in your room. I checked the time and it was ten fifteen pm. You had messaged me and said good night. Even me kisses and said she dreams. So how could you be with someone else. Got out of bed on mine. Jean-charles impact a taxi. please. I didn't know what i was coming to do but i came nonetheless shoots watch your sister said though was ago. I don't know what came over me. But immediately i entered you. It was the goal i felt. I should talk. I pounds on. Hey head and started pulling all the while shouting boyfriends. I might have my own strength and underestimates dot optical. Somehow she pulled off my grip and held my neck. I was when i realized i was in trouble. I tell you come to my aid and fight on my health. I thought you would hold the go and try to pull hallway. So i can get a chance to hit her where it hurts you. Pick your shirts and quietly walked away from the room. Thanks to your mom and attendance. Who came to my rescue. I wouldn't be alive to write you desolate. By the time they were able to separate us. I've had swollen up politics and bloodshot eyes. I was bleeding from my nostrils. But you we're nowhere to be found.

Pete Noah Wayne Jean Charles
How Virgie Tovar Is Leading a Fat Revolution

Latina to Latina

05:10 min | 1 year ago

How Virgie Tovar Is Leading a Fat Revolution

"Virgin. Thank you for waking early. Do this leisure burji tell me about being four years old and the first thing you would do when you come home. I was a little fat kid. I was a chubby kid in chubby family and my favorite thing to do every day. When i got home from running errands with my grandma was jiggle. I would push open the front door and i would run to the bathroom and i would take all my clothes and then i would run how to the kitchen or my grandmother pretty much lives and i would like spread out my arms and legs and i would jiggle and she would just laugh and laugh and i just it really sort of is as vivid memory because i had forgotten about that beautiful jiggling feeling in adult head. But like i had this recollection a few years ago that like oh my goodness. I used to love that sensation of fat moving. Like i love. Ital- my arm fat like moved on my tummy. Fat moves in my size fat moved and it felt like magic. I remember thinking it felt lake the water in the bathtub or like the water at the pool. It was like so pleasurable to feel that sensation of my body moving and it's such a high contrast to how were taught to think of that sensation adult head. You know i do. I mean and i have a four year old daughter and she loves to do multiple outfit changes a day. She is super into her body and it breaks me knowing that at some point that could change. When did it change for you. It changed for me around the same time that it changes for most children in the united states. Which is the age of five so most children learn about something called fat phobia when they're about five years. Old and fat phobia is essentially a form of bigotry. It's an idea that says a an entire group of people who comprise about seventy percent of the. Us population are inferior. Because they're higher weight and that of your body extends to like and fury were romantically inferior where intellectually inferior where incapable of completing tasks. There's a lot of evidence that shows that people have really negative attitudes about higher weight people. And i started learning about that and becoming a target of that phobia at the five. We're kids learning that. At five it seems to coincide pretty strongly with introduction to formal education. Five is also the age children typically go to kindergarten. They're in an environment where there's children of all ages i think for some people. They're learning it at home and their parents. I've talked to a lot of people who whose parents put them on a diet at a very young age often at the recommendation of their pediatrician. And i think obviously we live in a culture where the message that being big as a bad thing is omnipresent rate like ended subtle in some ways right like you think about who's always the hero who's always the villain who is the person who falls in love and who's the friend who's always pining. Who's the person you're supposed to relate to in a movie. And who's the person you're supposed to sort of make fun of or or not relate your feel embarrassed for in media. There's this phrase that. I often use a my work. Not and i'm not the only one but it's diet culture or weight loss culture and that we really use the word culture. Because it's inescapable it's like everywhere right. You see it on the street. You see it on your screen you see it in your intimate life. It's kind of unavoidable. Last night. i was reading the book. I was eating pita chips. And i looked at the bag. And it's a bad guy by all the time and it said reduced guilt. But i don't have any guilt about this like this. Why are you trying now. Now he'll guilty like it's reduced from what i guess it would have been but lake. I did not realize the extent to which the word diet had gone out of vogue and had been replaced by some more subtle but equally nefarious constructs. Absolutely i think diet culture like any toxic system is really good at adapting the point of diet culture again any toxic system. Our culture is to maintain itself by any means. Necessary especially as body. Positivity has become really trendy. You're gonna see more and more. That word diet is going to be going away. In fact diets are going to be saying. We're not a dime. I literally got an ad the other day that was for an ad diet app and it was like. This isn't a diet this something else. It's not as i mean literally. That's like unlike girl your diet of a diet that's you. I don't know what you're talking about.

Fat Phobia Virgin United States
L'Oreal Bans Animal Hair in Its Brushes

Pop Fashion

01:26 min | 1 year ago

L'Oreal Bans Animal Hair in Its Brushes

"L'oreal has decided to ban the use of animal hair in its makeup brushes which i just occurred to me that may be animal hairs and makeup brushes. That lawn had your percents. Yes how much. I think about those things in my bathroom so among some other brands laurie. Al had been targeted by pita and by the public. Because it's male grooming brand. It's called baxter of california made its shaving brushes from badger hair. Badgers very cute. That is what i know about them. The real q. And of list. If you're from wisconsin you know they look like that's a sports reference so a pita investigation in china exposed poor treatment of batteries that would eventually be killed for their for and in response to all this There was also an eighty thousand signature petition to get them to make changes. So laura will not only stop using badger or goat hair which were cited in the petition but animal hair any kind other companies that have also banned batter. Hairbrushes includes sephora proctor and gamble and nour's some instance that up in their little brains for next time you're looking for some new brushes great development. This is good news that they are headed in destruction leave. The badgers are low. Just lay them allowed.

Laurie Badgers Baxter AL Wisconsin Sephora Proctor California China Laura Nour Gamble
"pita" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"pita" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"I think issue, though, with the whole forest monkey labor. I mean, what is it? Not? It's just monkey lady. How do you get a monkey to consent? I mean, is there voluntary monkey labor? Exactly? I don't know. I can't imagine this is e. It is voluntary. Monkey labor is just gonna be coincidence. It's no. They happened to do that thing that I wanted them to do. So I struggle a lot and I'm like with with Pita and I am very skeptical of Peter because people who are like really big believers and supporters in Pita also say that you shouldn't ride horses well, and Peter kills. More animals than anybody. They do. I mean, no one talks about it, but you beat beat up. You know, Peter kills animals like Kabul. A Harris, you know, locks people up. I mean, that Z kind of their thing is killing animals. Just as much as Kamila Harris enjoys locking up small block our young black men for marijuana. It's just totally true. Say they love it. So right off the bat favorite thing right off the bat. I'm pretty skeptical, like their belief when it comes to things like Farm animals. I mean, their belief is they all should roam free and which, like, roam free and not have any contact with people. So s so I'm super skeptical of that. I'm sure it's very possible that these monkeys were maybe mistreated. But also I mean, what if the monkey's really enjoy picking coconuts? Yeah. I mean the way they described in the story. I mean, they're change. They have chains around their necks is they're forced to pick the coconuts. But you're right. I mean, it goes both ways. When how would you get a voluntary the monkey to do something? And how would you know it was voluntary? And secondly, how do you know they're not into? This could be their favorite thing. Yeah, Yeah, it was like, I gotta pay. Sit around. Get pick and go get us all day long. I gotta wear this. You know this collar, all right? Cool e Just take issue with the force Monkey Laborites. Maybe love like it's not instances. Monkey labor. Yeah, his other foot. Just any marquee labor is forced. You did not get the contract with that monkey. No, there was no interview process. There was no Yeah, there. No wages being exchanged. Believe us. We've heard that I heard his tribe. Yeah, Chad, if you're listening This is a bad idea trying to get the contract with the monkey. Speaking of Ah, Speaking of Peter, the least by forced Monkey labor a day this rate with content were about the dole out sneaking a paedo..

Peter Kamila Harris Pita Kabul dole marijuana Chad
L'Oreal Group Bans Animal-Hair Brushes After PETA Push

Fat Mascara

01:11 min | 1 year ago

L'Oreal Group Bans Animal-Hair Brushes After PETA Push

"I have to say it's been a long time since i've been this excited about a headline like this. So l'oreal is in the l'oreal group worldwide. I'm not just talking l'oreal paris. His band animal hairbrushes across its entire portfolio following pressure. From petah cepeda documented the cruelty in the badger brush industry. They didn't excellent expose on what happens in china to these. Badgers you can google. It be warned as well as what happens what it means to get a goat hairbrush. If you're wondering. Basically they cut the skin off. The animals may stitch up the wounds. Right there on the floor. There's no like antiseptic or anything. Obviously and they don't provide pain relief so that's just a peak into this horrific industry and if you wanna know more you can certainly go onto pita or really any other kind of animal welfare source which will tell you a similar story so while this is a sad insight into the industry. I'm so happy. That loria has changed. Course and i'm really happy to see that. All of the lobbying has had a really positive impact on the

Cepeda Badgers Paris China Google Loria
How To Listen to Podcasts on Amazon Alexa

Voice in Canada

01:15 min | 1 year ago

How To Listen to Podcasts on Amazon Alexa

"Question is basically this. How do you listen to podcasts. On lexi and there's a couple of options for this and again i want to give a shadow to pete. Pitas always helping out so generous with his time. He helped out by Putting a link to an article about how you can use spotify. And i'll get into that in a little bit more detail. Eleanor also says you can use any pod which is a lexi skill. Which of course is another way that you can do it so let me just touch on that a little bit for each of those. Any pod is a skill and you can open any pod and then use any pod to ask for particular podcast. This is the way that i was recommending to do it. But now podcasts are hasn't for a while. They've been natively built into spotify and to apple podcasts. And so if you're looking for a podcast that is on one of those platforms on spotify or an apple. Podcast you can literally just ask for it so for example if you want to listen to the voice canada podcast. You can simply say lexi. Play the voice in canada. Podcast on spotify. And then you can do that and we'll start playing so that is probably the easiest way to do it. Although like i said you can also use that. Any pod skill. So there you go. I hope that is helpful for

Lexi Pitas Pete Eleanor Apple Canada
Christmas in Holland

Travel with Rick Steves

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Christmas in Holland

"Let's start with what the holidays were like growing up in the netherlands. That's where lisbeth enhanced was born and raised. Thank you said. I should go on radio. Yeah i think so. I'd love to hear what. Christmas is like in your memory. Let's pretend your five year old girl in small town in the netherlands and christmas eve what do you what did you just do. What's happening tonight. And what happens tomorrow. Oh well you see for us. Christmas was really a family. Feast because probably you know in the netherlands. Originally we never had gifts at christmas. It was the real religious holiday and a family holiday. In my case. I remember my mother started. Prepare the house to decorate it and she had little planks and we put mawson eat with a wire and then we put all kind of green leaves like hawley and other little objects to decorate the house and we fixed it on the wall and we put it on the table and then of course we made the wreath for the front door and then you were hoping it would be snowing on the right day. Because i remember the connie fear the big tree in our garden when there was snow on each and my father would put lights that was magic and then just before christmas. My mother came up with the real christmas tree. And you know when. I was really very young. We had real candles but the clip ons real candidates under the tree inside the house yes and there was a white sheet on the floor to protect the four and then there was a basket with water in case the tree would be set on fire so it was only allowed to light the candles when daddy nami were there and we hardly moved of course because there could be a fire but it was magic to see all these flames burning and then we got it a beautiful dog and it was too dangerous so we had to put electric lights but it was still very nice now for a little child. Who is there a santa claus figure that brings the gifts that seat because christmas without presents because our santa claus is called sinter glass and he has his birthday on the sixth of december. So that is the real exciting. Feast for gifts. And i really. I would be willing to set up an association to save that son abrasion. Because i think it's the most beautiful feast in the world. Why well first of all as a child. You believe in santa claus. He is bishop coming from spain on the big ship with his assistance. Who are black pitas. They are funny dressed and are doing funny things at croats. They are little bit naughty. And you're scared of him because he is the one who could eventually put you in the sack if you hadn't been a nice job but year cintas class is keeping book and he's writing in the book if you were good or bad sell. It is very well organized into netherlands because about three weeks before the six of december which is his birthday. He officially arrived on the big ship in amsterdam and this is transmitted on television. So you are looking at it because you know once. He's in the country. Your parents will allow you to put your old shoe at the chimney. Of course many people had central heating of a problem. But you find a solution you put your shoe in front of the door or whatever anyway. Some problems for a child to believe in san nikolas because one hour later after yet seen him arriving on television in amsterdam. He's arriving in your village as well and so you say to mother. How is that possible. So then she usually explains you while there is the real warm and he has assistance because there are so many children like you. The real one cannot cope with all that

The Netherlands Lisbeth Sinter Glass Hawley Santa Claus Spain Amsterdam San Nikolas Netherlands
Will giving Happy the elephant human rights actually make her happy?

Sue Jeffers

03:57 min | 1 year ago

Will giving Happy the elephant human rights actually make her happy?

"Elephant at the Bronx Zoo named Happy the elephant, All right, who was in court last week? Well, actually not in court because they didn't bring happy into the courtroom, But there was a group called the Nonhuman Rights Project. That brought a lawsuit against the city of New York actually state of New York to have happy declared a person to give happy personhood. 49 year old female Asian elephants been living by herself in conditions that have well they're not wonderful to say the least. And so here, the appeals court determining whether animals or people pita Has been making these claims and filing lawsuits for years. Pita you know that bread that Mideast earner so eat? No, no, the people for the ethical treatment of animals. I always get the two confused and There. It's case after case that's filed last time. I think they did one with a chimpanzee, arguing that the genetics of chimpanzees and humans are so close. They should be. They should be both considered human beings and the court said Now I don't think so. And then there's been some really crazy ones that Richard the durable, for example, was once The plaintiff in a lawsuit to be declared A person and so here, the justices looking at this and they're actually looking. There was an appeals court decision. The loss course low record and kicked it up, and I guess the court wanted to hear it. Because the appeals court could say no S o. The judges were a little skeptical, and one of the joint justices said. Isn't this better suited for the Legislature to act on legislatures can actually deem animals People, uh, pursuant to a legislative act now that if that holds up in court, no one knows, But if anybody's gonna do, it's gonna be the Legislature and then the Justice said, I'm not so sure we're equipped to even handle these kinds of matters. And what the group argued is that happy's living conditions at the Bronx Zoo was effectively solitary confinement and arguing she's been mistreated. Now, think about this for a moment. And there's some practical aspects of this because right now animals you own their property. It's that simple. You buy. You sell animals and your that's it now. What if the animals were people? I mean, think about this legally. This is not one of those. He What if animals were people, Then we start to, you know, flying off on fantasies? No. Legally if animals repeated were people you can't own a dog. You're not allowed to own people. They call it slavery Abraham Lincoln and 14th amendment in all that stuff, Actually 13th amendment and so it has been an ongoing fight. So practically speaking, Of course, there's nowhere to go with that aunt. Legally speaking, there's nowhere to go with that, although do you remember Mitt Romney during the run for the presidency, he said. Corporations are people. And that may have cost him the race. He was nailed for that well, corporations are people for purposes of shielding liability. That's what corporations are about. They are an entity. They're not people. But they have Ah, lot of the same shields. And so they've bean s o the animal rights people of this you using that a lot Hey of corporations to be Dean people than certainly non humans, animals, hamsters, durables so happy the elefant. Can be named people. So anyway, of course, is going to go no place, but it's just kind of fun, man. I love these lawsuits.

Bronx Zoo Named Happy The Elep Nonhuman Rights Project New York Pita Legislature Bronx Zoo Richard Abraham Lincoln Mitt Romney
Diamond Jim Moran

Gangland Wire

06:25 min | 1 year ago

Diamond Jim Moran

"Welcome wire-tappers out there here in this video of gang. Lenoir beautiful fall afternoon not on the golf courses afternoon folks in here getting ready to record a podcast for y'all i have the grandson of james diamond. Jim brough cada. His grandson's name is bobby. Bre qatar now bobby. Did i pronounce that close enough. Yes sir okay good. I like to say my northwest missouri nasal hillbilly kind of trying funny. What about that. I just had a comment. Somebody said always seems weird to have a guy with a southern voice. Say the word capco. Now i don't really consider southern voice to you have got northern voice to people up this guy resume shah firm chicago to him. I have a southern boy. So a hewlett you guys. Listen to bobby talk a little bit and you'll hear that salt sweet syrupy south louisiana voice. Our true southern boys right. Yeah it's a little different than new. All has its own unique accent. I've been confused being from boston. New york no. Yeah you know. I hear that now. Wow i do hear that many dollars around the city you know. Talk to different people. You can tell what part of the city from interested in so now. Let's get to the meat of this. You've written a book here recently. Called food for kings. And it's part to crime as part history in his part a recipe book cookbook. If you will food for king diamond jim. A new orleans legend now diamond. Jim mocatta was your grandfather. And there's a really interesting book folks especially if you like to cook. It's got those really great new orleans recipes in it and this guy your grandfather. Your grandpa was one of the most colorful characters in new orleans from what i've read about him. It was unbelievable. Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got interested in doing this particular book. Okay very first of all. Thank you for having me on your show. appreciate it. earth off a married with two children in military. Over twenty years i retired in two thousand and eight and i've been aircraft mechanic for american airlines and now delta. I picked up this project after my father died and wait basically he motivated me to kind of pick up the torch and carry it. My dad was a dentist for forty years and he always wanted to do a screen. Play or movie per se. He's never do it. I have i did a screenplay originally. But i didn't go anywhere with it so i decided a couple years ago. Put a book together and kind of tell a story about my grandfather while i'm telling. The story basically blended in combination photos and recipes as i journey through his whole life. I start off when he's a childhood and carried on throughout his life until the success of his life until he died. It's a good read. It took me about eight years to go through it and do the research are did get a lot of information from father. My father ahead a manuscript he has deposition that he had put together with a attorney. Back in nineteen seventy seven. So i use all that information and took my tom everything in the book that i've talked about a kind of support it with a document and the article. Either that was given to me handed down to me or maybe that of actually found in the library found a lot of information doing the research about my grandfather in the library his life. It was pretty easy because his life was documented since he was a teenager so every time i tried to fill in the blank. Something in my father didn't pass down to me. I was able to answer all the questions that i wanted to answer about his life. You know interesting. That stuck a little bit about his early life. He fought under the name of jimmy moran which is kind of like no joy hupa in chicago took on an irish name in order to fight. I think more likely it was a lot of prejudice against italians in those days. Especially in new orleans. If you remember we go all the way back to the black hand days and they they killed the chief of police some Supposedly some black hander. Kill the chief of police in of new orleans storm to jail and hung. I dunno must have been six or eight say ends i. I can't remember exactly for sure. How many so. It would have been wise for him to fight on her an irish name. I would imagine tell me about his fight career. Let's get started. Well that was one thing. They kind of treat. My curiosity was widely. Any changes his name in the book. I did find a quote where someone asks them. Same questioned do an interview. He said he did for business reasons. But that was part of it because you gotta realize he didn't get into business opened up first restaurants on nineteen forty nine. He changed his name. I found articles where he had his name change in teens early. Nineteen hundreds. He hung around a couple of friends of his feet. Herman who's an italian pita. Golota was his last name. And the other guy. By the name of powell moran. His name was francis. Paul miranda and all of them were full blooded italian as you know and you listeners. Know that back. Then the titans will kinda frown upon. They weren't considered equal. Maybe to a lot of different even the irish whatever. So i've found out. He had changed his name one. He didn't want his mother was fighting when he was on the fighting card. You know and during the preliminaries in hours fighter. Irish name would draw big crowds for fight. A lot of people don't know new orleans was actually a big boxing city equivalent to chicago and new york but on a smaller scale of course but it was a big boxing town in a drool audit. And that's how he got to meet jack dempsey marciano. You know all those big fights back then because they came to new orleans and then he connected so his first circle of friends will all italians. pete. Herman was abandoned. Champion thinking sixty nine fights from nineteen twelve to nineteen twenty two now as far as my grandfather. He wasn't as big of a boxer as those guys. He did it for my research. Maybe about six years and then he got a little older. He got into referee in and he started refereeing. He did that until about twenty seven years old. Then that's when you up his barber shop in the open up a barber shop with a boxer front of his last name was burke in as when he got an barring after referee

New Orleans Bobby James Diamond Jim Brough Capco King Diamond Jim Jim Mocatta Lenoir Chicago Hewlett Qatar Jimmy Moran Shah Missouri Louisiana American Airlines Golf Boston
Election 2020 Analysis: Bethany Mandel, Ron Kampeas

People of the Pod

08:38 min | 1 year ago

Election 2020 Analysis: Bethany Mandel, Ron Kampeas

"Mandel is an editor writer and podcast at ricochet and online hub. For conservative conversation she's also a rising social media star and conservative columnist. Who has garnered quite a bit of attention. In recent months decrying the government overreach of quarantine restrictions and going from being a never trumper in two thousand sixteen to supporting the president's twenty twenty reelection in a recent column in the forward she talks about why pollsters trying to project the election's outcome got it so wrong once again but don't expect this conversation to be a breakdown of methodology and shifting demographics. Her explanation is much simpler than that and she will explain bethany. Welcome to people of the pot. I think you so much for having me. I'm sorry for the puppy noise. You might hear in the background okay. Now before we begin. I want to remind our listeners. Ajc is a nonpartisan five. Oh one c. Three not for profit entity that neither endorses nor opposes candidates for elective office. So anything i say or ask or challenge really is in pursuit of an explanation. Because i do want our audience to listen so bethany for those who did not read your column. Tell us why. Pollsters predicted a blue wave that we did not see in last week's election so i think that there's going to be a lot of explanations that become clear over the next few months there might be problems with the way that they call people how they call people but i noticed anecdotally and i was saying for months beforehand the most simple explanation for why i thought that it would be extremely close or why the president would garner. Reelection is just because people were lying because they didn't feel comfortable telling the truth and when they would get a call who you voted for from a stranger because you don't actually know who upholstery is. And you can't confirm their identity on the phone When they get a call from pollster hi. I'm just curious for you're voting for. They're not going to tell you on the phone who they're voting for. And in my column i give a story that i thought was really illustrative of my thinking on it coming up prior to the election. Which was i have a. I have a girlfriend who lives in a swing state. i think it's north carolina. And i asked her at the outset of our conversation who e-voting for just sort of in passing and she said. I am still undecided. I don't know what to do and we had a very long conversation. And what we're really talking about was actually. She was doing a conference that got cancelled by a social media. Mob and people were falsely accused of racism. Yada yada and the entire six months of work that she did for the conference just went up in smoke and and it was cancelled and so we were talking about that. And i said this is the kind of stuff that makes people vote for trump. Because he talks about this. Like social media mobs the cancel culture in all these things and i was kind of laughing about how this experience would make her into a trump voter over the course of our conversation. I said yeah. I'm voting for trump this summer on. I never thought i would have done that for years ago. And she was like wait. A second you are and i forgot that. She doesn't follow me on social media. She doesn't know. Sort of where i fall and i said yeah my buddy for trump and she was like oh i am too. I mailed ballots in weeks ago. And she's a friend of mine and we were having an hour long conversation and it was only after i told her that i was voting for president trump that she admitted that she was as well. And so we finished texting. And i looked at my husband and i said the polls were wrong. If this woman who i've known for five years didn't feel comfortable telling me who she was voting for until i told her there's no way we'll no much was made that there were fewer undecided voters in this year's polls but also sounds like what you're saying is that there was even smaller number because those who said they were undecided or at least some of them voted for trump right or they were lying and they said they were voting for biden instead. I i think that that's definitely a possibility as well. Okay now why would they have said president biden. What been the reasoning there. That's the safe answer in this. Cancel culture environment that you know voting for vice. President biden was stackable incorrect dancer. But i think that I think that a lot of people probably unfit apply. I'm curious if you've gotten any feedback from people who read your column and said how dare you call us liars absolutely. Not every single person understood. Even i as someone who works in the media until the eleventh hour did not want to say i was voting for president trump. Because i knew that every time he does something stupid from then on out people with throw that calm back in my face and say this is what you signed on for whatever reality. I'm like. I signed a deal with the devil and i knew i was signing a deal with the devil and i'm not not raw about him. I'm not maga- it's it's an unfortunate situation and it is what it is something that really frustrated me in the wake of biden's election was people sort of saying koumba. Let's all come together and we're were you three years ago. Where were you last year. Why didn't you speak up for the covington. Boys and pete buttigieg was one of the people who was saying it and your staffer. Literally making lists of trump administration employees to blacklist them and to strip them of their livelihood and i think people across the spectrum have different opinions of people who worked in the administration. I know a million of them and they understood the deal that the that the devil that they made to and they were trying to uniformly serve our country and to mediate. Trump's trump. Nece and i think they did a great job and i am appreciative of the work that they did in every single department they worked in and they made it possible for us to come out of the last four years. Fine we're fine as a country and pete bridges people. His former staff are making lists of all of these people and pitas coming out. And saying you know. Let's all come together. I'm like okay. Put your money where your mouth is and publicly denounced what your staff are doing. Where is that being reported. I don't know where it's being reported. It's called the trump accountability project. And if you google it. I'm sure only conservative media are covering it because that's how it is. They had a website called trump accountability project. And it's time for people to put their money where their mouth is a little bit on this and no one is and michelle. Obama tweeted something the other day. That was you know. Half of americans who voted for him are x y. You know the whole litany of and this is not. I don't know how you move forward. When that when the former first lady is impugning the motives of half of the americans that voted for for trump. And you're not. You're not voting for racism. You're not voting for you. Know i think. I think that's a really simplistic way of looking at things. And it's also a really divisive and toxic way and if biden wants to actually move forward in a kun-bae off fashion say something about what michelle obama tweeted now. I want to reiterate what you said at the beginning. Bethany that this is just your theory. it's based on anecdotal evidence. There are many reasons why the polls might not have panned out this year. But let me ask you this. Not all pollsters work for media some work for politicians who are trying to assess what their constituents want. Do you think people understand that. Not being truthful about their preferences might undermine the whole democratic process. Do you believe that so. That's an interesting question. Because in some part it undermines the thesis of my piece because we saw that the internal polling that was done by campaigns was actually far superior to that of the media companies. And i think that people are more apt to trust a cloister that is not in the media because people don't trust the media dot readily and that distrust has been well earned by the media but the internals that we can gather that the biden campaign was getting told them to go to georgia and it seemed like a crazy idea and they were right to do so. So i i think that the internal polls that campaigns had were better than the media hat by. I don't think it undermines the democratic process because is not essential to the democratic process. It just it gives campaigns some idea of where they should be focusing and what their messaging should be but overall the democratic process is completely hinged upon votes. And that's really what counts at the end of the day well bethany. Thank you so much for. Your thoughts really intriguing thoughts. I really appreciate that. And i hope our listeners. Think about it i hope. I hope you've given them food for thought. Thanks

Bethany Biden Mandel President Biden Koumba Pete Buttigieg Trump Administration Nece North Carolina Maga Donald Trump Michelle Michelle Obama Google Barack Obama
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 1 year ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Nobody wears fur any more

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:33 min | 2 years ago

Nobody wears fur any more

"It's time to talk business. Now, with Dana Thomas, who's the paris-based? All of fashion operas the price of fast fashion and the future of closed Dan. Thanks so much for joining us. I must tell you that I have a relative who works in fashion and a little while ago. She very generously I thought started gifting me all these beautiful firs which she said she wasn't going to wear again I now understand why nobody's wearing her. Nobody's wearing for it took pita the people for Africo treatment of animals what thirty years to get this message through the heads of fashion industry players. But it seems like they're finally getting with the getting on board and they're slowing down or or banning. Nordstrom the. The American Department Store Big Department Store one of the few that. Actually is not completely shattered by the pandemic they managed to pull through Is Giving up selling furry will not be selling for I don't think for was a huge part of Nordstrom business. Nordstrom is a very middle market, suburban shopping mall kind of department store. So the for that they would sell would have been like the trim on your Parka or a little trim on a cough as opposed to a mink you wouldn't go to Nordstrom to buy a full length mink coat, but nevertheless there there disavowing vote as has macy's and Chanel a lot of brands have finally given up on it. I don't know what this is doing for the for instance, which is powerful and big industry and the for industry has made. Big Advances in over the years because of the pressure from Petah to make sure that that the whole. Farming, side of it was as humane as possible given you know in the end, you're killing animals for to wear clothing. You know more more humane certainly than the industrial agriculture side for cowhide for our handbags. But you know nevertheless, it seems like you know when they banned fog is in certain states. In the United States, this band for first serves feels like the same we're going to ban for not that anyone's really wearing it right now or that any can. Really afford it right now because they've all lost their shirts during the pandemic, but it's a good idea and maybe we should do it. So they're doing it and I think we're going to see a lot less than the streets but I mean all does and you point out that the house bill shoes I mean we're not talking about banning leather shoes. But you know. Gucci famously put out. mink trimmed Mules Apple seasons ago when I said Rubel Kelly took over the house and they were really popular. I remember seeing a woman on an airplane and I thought wow, that's really decadent. and. It feels really calm. It looks like it's probably really comfortable for an airplane to you WanNa you WanNa, wear something cushy on your feet. Right? I thought that is so decorated it feels like Louis Kettles and we won't be seeing at least being sold at Nordstrom. We won't be seeing those shoes anymore more. Then, and we don't have a lot of time but a very quick look at where we are in this case between tiffany and lvmh. Well, tiffany has decided to countersue. So I mean everyone's suing everybody else and it's it's just back and forth and back and forth tiffany says it did not experienced a managed material adverse effect during the pandemic and that basically lvmh trying to get a better deal, which is what we all believe it is and it says the lvmh's specious arguments are yet another blatant attempt to evade its contractual obligation to pay the agreed upon price for Tiffany and you know they're go to just fight this and see what happens I'm I'm interested to see how this plays out absolutely tiffany needs a sale and Wants it. Somebody's going to figure out the middle ground now? Why does tiffany need to sail? It's it's been in play for some time and it's it's kind of an a stuck place. They redid the store somewhat in New York. But it it a point where it needs to grow change or evolve at. It's kind of stuck an lvmh with its synergies and it's and it's specially it's retail network but also its whole marketing department everything would really give the brand a boost in a way that would take it to a new place tiffany's sort of motoring along but not great. Yeah. That's why it's been. The object of you know it's been. Looked at as a possible takeover lvmh just going to swoop in and buy a bowl the stock, and they still just may do that

Tiffany Nordstrom Dana Thomas Lvmh Big Department Store DAN Africo American Department Cough United States Petah Macy Louis Kettles Gucci Rubel Kelly Chanel New York
"pita" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q & A Podcast w/ Gene Monterastelli - Emotional Freedom Techniques

EFT/Tapping Q & A Podcast w/ Gene Monterastelli - Emotional Freedom Techniques

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"pita" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q & A Podcast w/ Gene Monterastelli - Emotional Freedom Techniques

"About how to tap four chronic illness and my guest to do that is Dr Peter Stapleton. If you don't know pita, she is one of the world's leading researchers when it comes to doing studies on tapping and it's efficient and see. She's currently working on a couple of studies which we talk about inside of this the primary one that we're gonNA talk about. Is, how, we tat for chronic illness, the beautiful thing about this conversation is in my own work with conversations with lots of other practitioners. The stuff that she and her team are able to prove scientifically are working are the things that we have kind of learned instinctually over the years pita has been a guest multiple times in the podcast we've talked about research in history of the research, and if you're ever in a situation where you need to be sharing tapping with others, this is really valuable information. So if you go back to episodes to sixty, six to ninety, three, fifty. I've the links to all three of those episodes in the show notes as well as on the website with episode the You can hear all of the conversations that I've had with pita. Around the research and what we know and what we're learning about tapping also if you have not done so already I would highly recommend you purchase the book the science behind tapping you can find it anywhere books are sold anywhere in the world. She does this amazing comprehensive study of all of the different research has been done through the years all over the world and puts it in one concise place. Again, if you are in a situation where you're sharing tapping with skeptical people having the scientific research back up, our conversations is a really useful thing. So check out the shows and the archive links and the show notes, and here's my conversation with pita on how.

pita Dr Peter Stapleton
"pita" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

09:00 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Talk <hes> pita. Ada is asking georgia to enact sammy's all poor. Sammy sammy died in petah wants us to avoid killing others like sammy poor. Sammy sammy is actually not a person of course 'cause pita. <hes> pita is is not down with with people rights. Pete only cares about animal rights. <hes> people are bad pita well. Sammy cami is a was a miniature donkey in milton and sammy died on the fourth of july. Why pita says that we need to ban fireworks again in georgia that we loosen the laws in two thousand fifteen gene and now we need to rein it in because sammy died currently of fright or something sammy ame sammy <hes> he went to the petting zoo in the sky because sammy possibly likely afraid according to to pita <hes> we need insane and say fireworks that don't sound like bombs bursting in air. What that's the whole purpose of the fourth of july in the sarthe bengal better. I mean john. Adams said this georgia for years now. If you're new to georgia realize we have a lot of new listeners who haven't lived in georgia long time but for the longest time the fourth of july in georgia was the lamest of affairs because you could go to your local grocery store and you could get sparklers and puppets you could get the fireworks that just make little little sparks and make no sounds just a little hiss of the fire but in two thousand ios in fifteen the men and women of the georgia legislature finally decided to be patriotic and allow us to enjoy enjoy bombs bursting in air now you can go get the biggest stuff by law allowed by law. You can shoot it off into the night sky and enjoyer enjoyer fourth of july. I bought so many fireworks in my hallway across from my office at home. I still have fireworks sitting on this table. Giant canisters sisters to take to my in laws and fire off into the sky that go up hundreds of feet explode in giant chrysanthemum birth. It's glorious. I become torius with the local fireworks vendor who happens to also be my kid's teacher who expects me to come in fact. I bought so many fireworks for the fourth of july last year. They let him sell bigger stuff this year and your dern right. I bought the bigger stuff. I love fireworks. When i was a kid in louisiana during the summer it was legal to the shoot off the manley fireworks and when i was a kid we go get those big canisters and shoot him there. I was appalled to come to georgia and find out you can only get the little girlie fireworks that shoot sparklers in the air as long as they don't make a sound come on people. That's not the fourth of july. That's like the fourth of july for unix. We we want real fourth of july. We what bombs bursting in air. We want the potential to put your eye out. Maybe be maimed lose a hand. We want the potential because you know what the revolutionaries in this country. They were willing to pledge their lives their fortunes and their sacred honor to have independence. We should be able to put our lives lives and fortunes on the line for the fourth of july can get a name in this is ridiculous. A miniature donkey possibly died of fright on the fourth of july and now we have to lose our right to shoot fireworks in the air. This is absolutely ridiculous. That's what they want. Thankfully thankfully we we have governor brian kemp and i have a hard time believing he's gonna put us back to the dark ages of pitiful fourth of july i in georgia i mean think of all the businesses that would be put out of his sprung up around the now. It's still not like alabama in south carolina. You got alabama and south carolina. I mean you cross the alabama in line. You got those great aunt on. I twenty and i think down eighty-five as well you cross the state line. You got those massive. Fireworks have never actually been in there what i have learned though is that you've got the huge facades in the store is really really tiny. It's really kind of depressing now in south carolina that's where the the the the real real people. Oh go because you can buy the giant fireworks in the gas station. I kid you not take exit eight in south carolina on your way to hilton head and and that gas station you'll know where i'm talking about you. You get off at exit eight and south carolina when you come up from savannah and you turn to the u turn to the right. There's a gas station right there. You can buy like the industrial sized fireworks stuff that is still even banned in georgia. It's too big georgia in its glorious. I might have bought some one time. It's clarice people. I'm not encouraging your break. The law just telling you wow in here comes pita. Please please breath. Stop making noise because miniature donkeys may die on the fourth of july. This is embarrassing. We we should all be embarrassed for pizza. They have no shame now lauren tyrone you disagree with me. I'll allow it welcome right. I agree with most of what you say but i'm.

Sammy sammy georgia pita Sammy cami south carolina georgia legislature Ada Pete petah alabama brian kemp lauren tyrone dern Adams john louisiana savannah milton
"pita" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Near fort Meade. I'm Barbara Kusak. Bloomberg sports update for the first time in the one hundred forty five year history of the Kentucky Derby the result of the race was overturned. We get the details from correspondent Phil Hulett derby, favourite maximum security lead the pack from gate to tape. But along the way jockey Louis Sayas committed a foul that impeded a horse by the name of war of will the stewards at Churchill Downs to twenty minutes reviewing video voted to disqualify maximum security and give the race to the second place horse country house at sixty five to one odds of winning country house is not only one of the longest shots to win the derby ever. But it's owners take home a purse of almost one point nine million dollars of honor was bumped up to second while Tacitus was third along days journey into mourning for the mat-su seven ten New York Times start in wonky didn't end till half past midnight in when a did the brewers had a four three win. Ryan bronze six into the game a two run single off creeks flex on was the difference came. After Jeff McNeely, given the Mets the lead with an RBI single in the top of the eighteenth. Pita Lonzo at Todd the game of the ninth inning home run and the stadium semi three Yankees. Lost to the twins J Habsudova's service third feet of the season. Gary Sanchez launched his third Homer in the last two games. He's got eleven now Miguel and do our return to the lineup. He went one for three. Oh, very also committed to ours. James Paxton left knee problem has landed him on the I L manager Aaron Boone, he's just got some inflammation in their got a cortisone shot. I think before the game or during the game. Whatever the doctor got here after I saw you guys. So he'll be shut down for five days. And then from that point. We'll see you start throwing hopefully, it's something that's that's fairly short. But we'll see how how we respond. Also what out for today's game? The start time four oh five due to the heavy rain coming into the area. NBA? The rockets beat the warriors won twenty six one Twenty-one at overtime. Golden State leads two games to one red bulls where three two winners over the LA galaxy NYC FC shutout Montreal to doffing with the Bloomberg sports update. Nate. I'm Frank Garrity..

Kentucky Derby Bloomberg Miguel James Paxton Aaron Boone fort Meade Pita Lonzo Barbara Kusak Jeff McNeely Phil Hulett Gary Sanchez Churchill Downs Tacitus Frank Garrity rockets Mets Louis Sayas Yankees New York Times
"pita" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Liberty dot com. Pita is catching a lot of heat for tweet. It sends out that appears to celebrate the death of fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld the animal rights group. Posting the tweet yesterday less than an hour after the eighty five year old German designers, death, pita, founder Ingrid Newkirk, tweeting Karl Lagerfeld has gone and his passing marks the end of an era when for an exotic skins were seen as covetable pita sends condolences to our old nemesis loved ones, and quote people on social media accusing pita of being cold disrespectful and cruel just after the death of the seller photographed kissing a woman in Times Square at the end of World War Two someone vandalized a statue commemorating that iconic photograph as we hear from USA radio's Wendy king does after George died in Rhode Island. So they're looking for whoever spray painted the words to to lag of the nurse kissing. The statue exactly recreate the moment in Times Square. Investigators say the Renault. Witnesses or surveillance video the kiss was the spontaneous act. But at the end of the war. The statue has been sorta ran Mark for a decade for USA radio news. I'm Wendy king. Find us online at USA radio dot com for USA radio news. I'm Chris Barnes. Nobody.

Pita Karl Lagerfeld Wendy king Times Square USA USA radio Ingrid Newkirk Chris Barnes Rhode Island founder Mark George eighty five year
"pita" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Fussy? Okay. No say. You need a pita. I want to. Hey. Does your. Talk to kiss. So. Well. Insane. Back in. Doc. Good. Visit. Get it. Becky..

Becky
"pita" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"One. You need a pita. Feeder egg. But I'm a boss. So. Do you? When you could keep it every day. I'll say..