35 Burst results for "Pita"

New Car Agency, the South African Experiment With Peter Viljoen

Talking Automotive

02:08 min | 4 d ago

New Car Agency, the South African Experiment With Peter Viljoen

"He's talking to beautiful young. The managing director said some in south africa. He has done extensive research into the whole agency. Model and peter. Thanks very much for joining us and agreeing to shay some of the things you have found out in terms of what's happened in south africa. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much john. Thank you very much markets and met. Somebody came to ask you a question before we jump into the agency saw just to put some perspective. Ray what you do in south africa. You run a successful automotive talk show. Can you tell us about the show. Yep so the cost sharing. It's one of its a win by that. We lost in action. You win cosstalk harbach downs again. Where we wanted to do was my body. Crops on scouts is on the shine actually for the producer the archives and what they wanted to renew isues be attached customs. I joined the shine after being an oxygen and so we provided some industry insights to That slides or missing funds usually watching the chart and somebody transitions consumer price. And there's immediately on to the point that we've mentioned to keys onslaught we had We will have one of the modules insurance needs king postures and we recently got a new sponsor sponsors are climbing pixel part someone all very happy z. Aggressive bras but not the whole new at seventy. It's much easier for us to shoot so many batches then and office another boss to us. So we're having a lotta pita

South Africa Cosstalk Harbach Peter RAY John
As NCAA president flails, whispers of an exodus get louder

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:15 min | 2 weeks ago

As NCAA president flails, whispers of an exodus get louder

"Seems like mark. Emery is always in the news. We talked to pete thamel about him. A couple of days ago and since then pitas written Even more talking about whether the winds of change are not already in the thanks for the time. Let's let's talk about your latest on. When i was i was dumbfounded when i read your column because i swear. I rent a comment the other day. Some poo bear in the ncwa hierarchy. That said he was doing a good job and they were happy with him. Well hey it was interesting. Paul like he. There's a little bit like i know. I caught in the stock market. When when when the stocks keep going up they call it the goldilocks effect in in college. Athletics when someone who is perhaps not performing their job at a high level but still gets to keep their job is a similar thing. We're just all the all the factors surrounding them are in place so they can keep on going even if the results aren't there and we we saw you know most recently with larry scott out in the pac twelve where it was fairly unanimous Feeling amongst athletic director certainly in a lot of people out there that maybe it was time for larry to move on and he had a couple of key presidents especially the gentleman at arizona state and they make a crow who were were on his. We're on his side and he kept the job probably three or four years longer than maybe even more than that than than most people in that area would Would have thought he was going to in so the Mark emirate is that he is pretty much lost his constituency on the ground meaning he has lost the commissioners for shore at multiple commissioners going to estimate that least eighty five percent of them would like to see a change in the president's spot athletic directors. A little harder to judge. 'cause you're you're going from university of maine to miami and alabama you know eastern washington. There's three hundred and something in division one and there's d tuned. three as well But it's probably a fair estimate to say eighty five percent there want change as well. I mean let's put it this way for all the stuff that's come out about mark emmer. His anybody stepped up to defend him. I don. I don't think there's i have not heard or seen a you know a single person other than his bosses.

Pete Thamel Emery Larry Scott Athletics Mark Paul Larry Arizona University Of Maine Alabama Miami Mark Emmer Washington
I Thought True Love Was About Fighting For Your Man

Love Issues

04:07 min | Last month

I Thought True Love Was About Fighting For Your Man

"Yep eat emmy tell you a story. I never told you going waiting three months of being in a relationship with you. Your mother called me on the side and said to me yongbo pitas my son and i love him very much. But if i were your mother. I wouldn't allow you to date my son. I smell sheepishly. Thank she was joking with me. She continued pizza's. Not a woman. Like you should follow your young to fall and look i'm bishops. Would you follow someone like pete. Just we didn't this week. The foot woman has entered this house with. He doesn't respect women because he has many of them after talkin for about fifteen minutes. She's that at me waiting to hear me say something. All i said was thank you but i do like to make him. Stop your mother. Only smart as sid. Don't be a stupid child. Just walk away. I thought your mom didn't like me that much noah's why she was trying to push me away. You should until those three women to walk away. I was she telling me it's only meant one thing. I was the one among the full. She didn't like so from that day on. I decided to fight until i win. I was a child. Nineteen going on swing t. I didn't know so much about love. So i thought fighting to win was the only way to prove my love for you from that day on. I became very obsessive with you. If three other women wayne your life already meant only one thing. You're so good that most women would like to have you for themselves. If you could remember very well. I never wanted to be a part from you. I was always in your space trying to push all the women away. Didn't wake no matter how hard i tried. You slipped away to be with other women so one day while you were sleeping. I picked your phone and through autumn messages. I found nothing smart guy. You covered your tracks before. I could find out next thing i did was to form an alliance with your genius. I bought had gifts and give him money and accidents money to hold coming in goes out one weekly saw. She called to tell you the lead in your room. I checked the time and it was ten fifteen pm. You had messaged me and said good night. Even me kisses and said she dreams. So how could you be with someone else. Got out of bed on mine. Jean-charles impact a taxi. please. I didn't know what i was coming to do but i came nonetheless shoots watch your sister said though was ago. I don't know what came over me. But immediately i entered you. It was the goal i felt. I should talk. I pounds on. Hey head and started pulling all the while shouting boyfriends. I might have my own strength and underestimates dot optical. Somehow she pulled off my grip and held my neck. I was when i realized i was in trouble. I tell you come to my aid and fight on my health. I thought you would hold the go and try to pull hallway. So i can get a chance to hit her where it hurts you. Pick your shirts and quietly walked away from the room. Thanks to your mom and attendance. Who came to my rescue. I wouldn't be alive to write you desolate. By the time they were able to separate us. I've had swollen up politics and bloodshot eyes. I was bleeding from my nostrils. But you we're nowhere to be found.

Pete Noah Wayne Jean Charles
"pita" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

Watch What Crappens

05:25 min | Last month

"pita" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

"Is this basically wasn't a broken place was living in the streets and do you know what save me. I'm just gonna guess. Food food saved me food. Save me top chef de so he gets and sees like going really fast. Just everything and it's like okay. You know people think bitch hardcore because life sex you know. my grandma. everybody was on drugs. Eighteen i got married. That was twenty three thousand four. He was abusive and an alcoholic. Dead take for park benches on my right. Okay okay talk to you later. Talk to you later. Wow that was download like neo in the matrix. It's a lot so that's always the one with a candy dish at their desk. You know like you have to ask. And she someone with the coffee at her desk like you have to go over there. So so john. Luke did not wipe down the deck and then daisy and setting up the breakfast table and daisies like them are crappy. Put out. The more people will go. Wow that's why. I put an end to each other places so eighties. My favorite song goes like this So relaxing just the theme of his show. Here we're on. I don't qatar almost as much as i love. Alcohol crave it second on the alcohol. They're eating breakfast. Are having well glance like did you guys sleep. Well hope you slept well. everything's good. i don't go to the kitchen. That legal talk your damn head off all right just fair warning. What was the plan captain. He's like well. We're gonna head back. Eleven twelve who else. I mean you've failed today. Am my right now. Have breakfast service which is like a mediterranean breakfast would like baba spreads everything. There's pita bread ronnie. Were you triggered when. I think it was greg but it may have been rusty called the pita bread shells triggered by the pita bread. That was floppy like a corn tortilla. I'm not really sure what kind of pita bread that was a pita bread dismount. Flop around but i'll take agree show. I'm sure whatever. Ucla please beat agrees. Yeah so then. We got like a super petty fight. That really worked for me. Like this is the kind of fight i like. So basically they go through. They go through their pitas really quickly. They want more. So daisy goes down tomorrow pay toz and twenty there which you think at that point it just it just make more. Today's he goes up there. He didn't put out twenty of those mug. Yes.

Luke tomorrow Today Eighteen today john twenty twenty three thousand four Ucla Eleven twelve ronnie qatar neo in the eighties mediterranean matrix each
"pita" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

Watch What Crappens

05:52 min | Last month

"pita" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

"Sleep in his bed and then people are sitting down in the vegan burgers are coming out and allie has now been. She's been sent down to the rooms to clean up and Basically daisies. Can you do this in an hour. And she'll we'll shouldn't be a problem and then she just started working very very very slowly see tells her way is to say in the last summer i did. He took tim allah. It's supposed to take one. Can you do them one. Gal yes and then it's like the you know the snail on the him just going really really slow and then we see her cleaning. They love showing alley cleaning slowly. Because they're like look. We've got french fries. Alley cleaning slowly. Cats up allie. Very slowly emptying water from trash cans and just like piles of sheets and garbage and daisy checks. And she's like how you do and thank you don and a half an hour. She's like yeah. I think i'll be done soon. It's like a raw because hopefully hopefully she has. She has half a brain because she had to be a genius. Do that's all you really need is half a brain and just like our de like. Oh this shoo-in do laundry adia subsidiaries outside was saved me and they're working and getting the little boat dinghy or whatever you call it in and he's like ehler on our land like oh yeah we're okay we're by like e you know the we get along because he's more of a sailor than a yadi us sailors or more loose and so you find with kenya move. He'll ride. you need help with that I'm strong okay. A stronger than you think. Yeah that's knock at. This is not going to be disaster at all. And then it's a john luke trying to get comfortable in his bed and now it's now it's nine thirty five. It's been an hour thirty five minutes since turned down. Started and alleys those leaning now. She's just brought her stuff all into the hallway so she's just like sitting on the hallway and has bottles towels on down there. She's created actually more of a mess and one of the ladies and her man come down to take a little nap and she's like what are we supposed to do that all full of stuff so i'm gone down anyway. But he doesn't. He goes down and so allies on the ground with lego pieces of a vacuum. Like i don't even know what's going on with that vacuum safely. She decided to he a good team. Decided it'd be fun to put together ikea furniture right here. Minutes is great Great allie thank you. You did such a great okay..

ikea john luke thirty five minutes tim allah last summer allie nine thirty five an hour half an hour one one of the ladies hour kenya
How Virgie Tovar Is Leading a Fat Revolution

Latina to Latina

05:10 min | Last month

How Virgie Tovar Is Leading a Fat Revolution

"Virgin. Thank you for waking early. Do this leisure burji tell me about being four years old and the first thing you would do when you come home. I was a little fat kid. I was a chubby kid in chubby family and my favorite thing to do every day. When i got home from running errands with my grandma was jiggle. I would push open the front door and i would run to the bathroom and i would take all my clothes and then i would run how to the kitchen or my grandmother pretty much lives and i would like spread out my arms and legs and i would jiggle and she would just laugh and laugh and i just it really sort of is as vivid memory because i had forgotten about that beautiful jiggling feeling in adult head. But like i had this recollection a few years ago that like oh my goodness. I used to love that sensation of fat moving. Like i love. Ital- my arm fat like moved on my tummy. Fat moves in my size fat moved and it felt like magic. I remember thinking it felt lake the water in the bathtub or like the water at the pool. It was like so pleasurable to feel that sensation of my body moving and it's such a high contrast to how were taught to think of that sensation adult head. You know i do. I mean and i have a four year old daughter and she loves to do multiple outfit changes a day. She is super into her body and it breaks me knowing that at some point that could change. When did it change for you. It changed for me around the same time that it changes for most children in the united states. Which is the age of five so most children learn about something called fat phobia when they're about five years. Old and fat phobia is essentially a form of bigotry. It's an idea that says a an entire group of people who comprise about seventy percent of the. Us population are inferior. Because they're higher weight and that of your body extends to like and fury were romantically inferior where intellectually inferior where incapable of completing tasks. There's a lot of evidence that shows that people have really negative attitudes about higher weight people. And i started learning about that and becoming a target of that phobia at the five. We're kids learning that. At five it seems to coincide pretty strongly with introduction to formal education. Five is also the age children typically go to kindergarten. They're in an environment where there's children of all ages i think for some people. They're learning it at home and their parents. I've talked to a lot of people who whose parents put them on a diet at a very young age often at the recommendation of their pediatrician. And i think obviously we live in a culture where the message that being big as a bad thing is omnipresent rate like ended subtle in some ways right like you think about who's always the hero who's always the villain who is the person who falls in love and who's the friend who's always pining. Who's the person you're supposed to relate to in a movie. And who's the person you're supposed to sort of make fun of or or not relate your feel embarrassed for in media. There's this phrase that. I often use a my work. Not and i'm not the only one but it's diet culture or weight loss culture and that we really use the word culture. Because it's inescapable it's like everywhere right. You see it on the street. You see it on your screen you see it in your intimate life. It's kind of unavoidable. Last night. i was reading the book. I was eating pita chips. And i looked at the bag. And it's a bad guy by all the time and it said reduced guilt. But i don't have any guilt about this like this. Why are you trying now. Now he'll guilty like it's reduced from what i guess it would have been but lake. I did not realize the extent to which the word diet had gone out of vogue and had been replaced by some more subtle but equally nefarious constructs. Absolutely i think diet culture like any toxic system is really good at adapting the point of diet culture again any toxic system. Our culture is to maintain itself by any means. Necessary especially as body. Positivity has become really trendy. You're gonna see more and more. That word diet is going to be going away. In fact diets are going to be saying. We're not a dime. I literally got an ad the other day that was for an ad diet app and it was like. This isn't a diet this something else. It's not as i mean literally. That's like unlike girl your diet of a diet that's you. I don't know what you're talking about.

Fat Phobia Virgin United States
L'Oreal Bans Animal Hair in Its Brushes

Pop Fashion

01:26 min | 2 months ago

L'Oreal Bans Animal Hair in Its Brushes

"L'oreal has decided to ban the use of animal hair in its makeup brushes which i just occurred to me that may be animal hairs and makeup brushes. That lawn had your percents. Yes how much. I think about those things in my bathroom so among some other brands laurie. Al had been targeted by pita and by the public. Because it's male grooming brand. It's called baxter of california made its shaving brushes from badger hair. Badgers very cute. That is what i know about them. The real q. And of list. If you're from wisconsin you know they look like that's a sports reference so a pita investigation in china exposed poor treatment of batteries that would eventually be killed for their for and in response to all this There was also an eighty thousand signature petition to get them to make changes. So laura will not only stop using badger or goat hair which were cited in the petition but animal hair any kind other companies that have also banned batter. Hairbrushes includes sephora proctor and gamble and nour's some instance that up in their little brains for next time you're looking for some new brushes great development. This is good news that they are headed in destruction leave. The badgers are low. Just lay them allowed.

Laurie Badgers Baxter AL Wisconsin Sephora Proctor California China Laura Nour Gamble
L'Oreal Group Bans Animal-Hair Brushes After PETA Push

Fat Mascara

01:11 min | 2 months ago

L'Oreal Group Bans Animal-Hair Brushes After PETA Push

"I have to say it's been a long time since i've been this excited about a headline like this. So l'oreal is in the l'oreal group worldwide. I'm not just talking l'oreal paris. His band animal hairbrushes across its entire portfolio following pressure. From petah cepeda documented the cruelty in the badger brush industry. They didn't excellent expose on what happens in china to these. Badgers you can google. It be warned as well as what happens what it means to get a goat hairbrush. If you're wondering. Basically they cut the skin off. The animals may stitch up the wounds. Right there on the floor. There's no like antiseptic or anything. Obviously and they don't provide pain relief so that's just a peak into this horrific industry and if you wanna know more you can certainly go onto pita or really any other kind of animal welfare source which will tell you a similar story so while this is a sad insight into the industry. I'm so happy. That loria has changed. Course and i'm really happy to see that. All of the lobbying has had a really positive impact on the

Cepeda Badgers Paris China Google Loria
"pita" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

08:09 min | 2 months ago

"pita" Discussed on TechFan

"It's got an hour's worth game-tying on and sit down. But i got the problem. Is i've got so many games on the switch. Now they're and they're all you know much more They much mold. The song konsultan games. I lots play well. There's a lot of that stuff on on arcade but let's be honest when it comes to. I want to sit down and play a video. Game as great as iowa on. Either the mac iphone or ipad. It's not going to compare to the switch. I mean that it's just well which is kind of weird because the switch is basically smartphone hardware. Yeah i i think this is better than what sony or microsoft is going on right now i had. Well it's it's not that don't have any interest in the ps five of the xbox whatever. They're sold out every single time Yep and i checked bus by every couple days. And if i see a ps five. I might buy one. But i don't. I don't. I don't know if i really care because if i'm going to spend an hour playing games in doesn't usually happen but if i am i'm either playing on arcade i And then the switch second. And then maybe apple arcade stuff and but this outlander game has kind of got my interest. So i've been playing. I'm i'm enjoying it. I think i'm going to do the world. I'm in right now. And then one more after that to see if i can get any better and if not just going to delete it because it's kind of frustrating yeah expensive and everyone size doesn't seem to be any reason i mean. It seems like it's almost too difficult. Like yeah you like. The only thing you're supposed to do is build houses and farms and that's it and if you do anything else to kind of advance your city you run out of food to quicken and ron dies. Now i'm like okay. This is the thing with the switch from these. The so many reports of the games on that the i've never played the old stack them waiting to go on. I'm just working my way through them. And i'm really enjoying you know. I like playing these classics on have applied before you say when yeah. Let's just kind of keeping me busy in a minute so I guess a couple of weeks ago now are go ahead of the apple privacy update coming out yep and this is this has been a big a big debate because basically what happens is the apple is trying to really kind of push down on only kind of a creepy background tracking that goes on with social media and on various different apps and of course the Companies like facebook and other companies that rely on this stuff of basically seeing as kind of a technical armegeddon for them because they gonna lose this this data that they they either resell holy. The usa drive their appetizing business. That brings money in and The single you know the problem is you have people the choice. Most people are going to opt out. That's terrible can do this too. Which is completely missing. The point that the reason they're hurting small businesses espy's so yeah the the the problem is if a law's number of people want walked out of this fundamental issue isn't it is that you'll doing stuff that when you ask people about they say they don't want you to do and people don't ask them just remind just reminded of When back at the beginning of the pandemic when trump said he didn't wanna test people because it drives the number. It's a similar sort of attitude. It's like you just stick in your head in the sand. Nigger la la la hope. He goes away. I mean this is what your customers they don't want you to do. And the thing is you've heard me say this before i think online tracking is is useless. Anyway i think the advertise the online advertising industry has has gotten to a thing where they high for these stats. And the the myth is actually. It gives you better tell you. This is the avatar we all. We all know it. Doesn't we all know that you get all you get is more ads for things volleyball. That's exactly right because we're just bought. I just got something recently. And i bought it. And now every to buy this thing competitor's like why are you showing me this. I already if you're tracking is so good you should know i already purchased the scaring around and wasting my time to offer me something i already have. Maybe if you're really intelligent you say you know when people by this they also by this amazon is good with that by the way and so start arguing with ads that go along with the thing i bought. You know yeah. He bought a pair of shoes. Here or these cool new here shoe cleaning devices you might. That would make more sense but what they're just dumb. Yeah what happens is is if you go forbid you accidentally even you have a moment of weakness and you click on facebook. Strain for bird right for start. That means everyone family's gonna start seeing it to your And and secondly that song they don't seem to understand that sometimes when you click on something you look at it and go. Well that was terrible and you click away and you don't wanna see again and they can't don't seem for all this information they have on the they don't seem capable of picking that up either. No so so yeah. I think the problem is is that the online advertising instruments law money changing hands around this difesa the data. We all feel absolutely worthless. We don't want the tracking happening and they go. What's going to happen to our business model but you know what. Advertising is always managed to advertise Before this stuff came along. So i'm sure they'll figure out without the the sky falling in well. They've always done their advertising in using false metrics anyways. How do you know how many people watching the super bowl. Fifty eight million people really. You know exactly how many. Because i don't remember a little box sitting on top of my tv broadcasting back to cbs studios in the seventies eighties nineties. Two thousands saying exactly what. I'm watching out nowadays. Yes they can track exactly what you're watching. How long you watched it. They could track all that stuff either on yet or on line right. Yeah so now. They actually have that information in the advertising worse. Yeah you know back in the day they would just i i i call you. Know throwing something at the wall and seeing what sticks. Well i i think the problem is is back in the day. They used to use real social science. They used yet. They use surveying they had lost far more sophisticated techniques for understanding groups of people the difficulty they have now is they get this very very specific data but it doesn't really tell them it does it is it's people's activity doesn't tell them what they've done what they like what they don't like the diff the difference is that if you get a group you know you've you get somebody who's who you survey and you sit down you ask a whole lot of questions you can filter out a lot of the The kind of the brain semantic stuff the way we always do because people no social scientists know what that stuff is the word the questions. You can all different sorts of questions to tease out the information you want but you can also get qualitative opinions about you know. How do you feel about this. How do you feel about what happens when this happens. Which you don't get from this rule data and the problem with this is it's dumb raw data and i'll give prime example. Guess what. I see ninety percent of an ads on facebook. Think about what i do for a living. Yeah com right. Yeah because i'm always online at work signed into my chrome browser just like i am at home..

microsoft ps five amazon mac ipad trump facebook ninety percent sony super bowl xbox Two thousands cbs studios Fifty eight million people iowa one chrome seventies eighties nineties a pair of shoes an hour
"pita" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

06:38 min | 2 months ago

"pita" Discussed on TechFan

"I should say and you know. There's these people that are buying up. You know all these old zooms modifying Nasty cards numb and You know collecting on and getting the old ones of working again that you can get zoom. Just dirt cheap. I had a offense so have one upstairs in my in my in my one of my roles i have a an st zun. The came with a memory with flash memory. And i had a i i sold it not so long ago i had a odyssey and you know walk as the thing i'm looking at it completely in isolation this was a pretty nice pronouns. Well they were ahead of the curve and a lot of respect number audio quality. Zoom was As good if not better than the later i pods the first first couple of generation ipods had way better audio quality at but then they sought cutting costs. Mass-market exactly zoom. Does it stayed the. Didn't they had really good. Dic's in that yup and then they also had the social aspects of the zoo marketplace And then you could also basically subscribe and they would. I think it was ten or twenty songs every month for free. But you can if you paid a certain amount. Basically a subscription pandora before pandora Or itunes music or apple music or amazon music. And that you know you just pay them a fee and you listen to all kinds of stuff. They were way ahead of the game on that but microsoft just they i number one. It was one of the ugliest products that you oversee. I mean it was. It was and the first generation was brown. I mean the. I was kinda brown with a the it it was brown underneath and then it kind founded a green tints to the transparent plastic was over the top. It was all michelle. We're going for a seventy s. Hi fi vibe. And it didn't come across to me like that. But i bro mets. That was my first impression if the thing is while you got to remember when it came out i mean Ipod was at its height. Well yeah exactly and not was really part of the problem mistake. They brought in that products in the market too late and they so they were always going to be an also-ran because of the sony people already invested in in the apple ecosystem and the strong thing about the ipod was the hardware itself is the fact that you had the i chain store and everybody was in the store. And so if you weren't compatible with the archie in store because the microsoft product wasn't they were always to be different. The volunteers that the The zun had this. I'm very monday me. Looking at it many is later discontinued whilst that it was much easier to manage music in zing market in the software than it was with changed because it didn't put everything into a database. It just kept it away. Put it so you could manually drag your stuff in and it was because of that. It was really good if he wants to. Put your music on that rather than get it from the store. The problem was the at the. I chain store. Kinda kicks up everybody going on. I don't want to manage my music anymore. I just want to stream off the cloud at. That's that's that was the ultimate evolution where i tunes went to. I mean i. I would argue that without without the install. We wouldn't have spotify in diesel and all the others we have tonight. No i don't think so. So basically microsoft again like the game. They came up with a with a product that was really great to import your own music time when everyone was moving away from having their own physical music anymore. And you know. They just didn't have the they didn't have the market share. They threw plenty marketing dollars to it. But the thing is is i think. A lot of people didn't sit down and windows. Pc's and i wanted you know. We're very thorough. Very stay of the very few people who kind of role windows wants to do everything for windows. I think there's plenty of people who have windows computers but then have a even when monks hundred smartphones. Then have google fan. Or or an. I i i fi. And so the idea of everything being one locked in ecosystem now Across all of your devices is just not just not there anymore. I think Yeah much just came late to the game and like all off. They often did things quite innovative but The just didn't they just didn't able to not punish a mainstream. No they relate to the mark on a market that was going to go by really really quickly. Yeah exactly and they don't know and you know the thing is though. I like reading stories like it. Was the verge. I like reading stories about these things. These fringe technology guys that have latched onto something you know. There's a whole thing about the newton to those people that are still buying newton's and upgrading them and doing stuff like that. I kinda like that. I don't i mean sure you say i'm somewhat like that with my old a video game councils and the kids and stuff. But i don't do a whole lot with that anymore. I kinda hit a peak and there's really not anywhere else to go with all the stuff. So i'm just kinda i play the game. I feel like it but you know speech. Try and go ahead. the problem. the problem with that retro stuff is that the longer it goes on the holiday you have to work to try and keep it or working properly. Zun is at the point now where I think in the next couple of versions of windows ten. The software will stop working. Yes and they've already had to set up. This guy who runs Runs basically a a fake zoom website. That allows you to kind of register. The thing and an update the firmware to license vision and everything and veggie. He'll give up on that point that the things will become useless. And it's like that with retro hardware. It's you know the. I'm quite into buying very old laptops in an old computers from the eighteen in the nineties when the problems facing those now is all the capacity sought to leak never designed to run that long and so you need now need to have kind of electronics insulting skills to be able to keep those guys working which i have a i. Yeah i would imagine i. You know. I've never discussed use soldering. Do you had is one of my one of my shameful. Weaknesses is the fact that i have never led to sell the property and anytime i've tried to do it. I made a spectacular mets. What you do is you go onto. Wish dot com or a place like that or maybe even ebay you buy just a blank bored and you buy a whole bunch of just cheap transistors..

ten windows ten Ipod ipod ebay apple twenty songs microsoft spotify itunes music tonight ipods i chain store first impression pandora apple music sony first first generation google
How To Listen to Podcasts on Amazon Alexa

Voice in Canada

01:15 min | 3 months ago

How To Listen to Podcasts on Amazon Alexa

"Question is basically this. How do you listen to podcasts. On lexi and there's a couple of options for this and again i want to give a shadow to pete. Pitas always helping out so generous with his time. He helped out by Putting a link to an article about how you can use spotify. And i'll get into that in a little bit more detail. Eleanor also says you can use any pod which is a lexi skill. Which of course is another way that you can do it so let me just touch on that a little bit for each of those. Any pod is a skill and you can open any pod and then use any pod to ask for particular podcast. This is the way that i was recommending to do it. But now podcasts are hasn't for a while. They've been natively built into spotify and to apple podcasts. And so if you're looking for a podcast that is on one of those platforms on spotify or an apple. Podcast you can literally just ask for it so for example if you want to listen to the voice canada podcast. You can simply say lexi. Play the voice in canada. Podcast on spotify. And then you can do that and we'll start playing so that is probably the easiest way to do it. Although like i said you can also use that. Any pod skill. So there you go. I hope that is helpful for

Lexi Pitas Pete Eleanor Apple Canada
Christmas in Holland

Travel with Rick Steves

04:07 min | 4 months ago

Christmas in Holland

"Let's start with what the holidays were like growing up in the netherlands. That's where lisbeth enhanced was born and raised. Thank you said. I should go on radio. Yeah i think so. I'd love to hear what. Christmas is like in your memory. Let's pretend your five year old girl in small town in the netherlands and christmas eve what do you what did you just do. What's happening tonight. And what happens tomorrow. Oh well you see for us. Christmas was really a family. Feast because probably you know in the netherlands. Originally we never had gifts at christmas. It was the real religious holiday and a family holiday. In my case. I remember my mother started. Prepare the house to decorate it and she had little planks and we put mawson eat with a wire and then we put all kind of green leaves like hawley and other little objects to decorate the house and we fixed it on the wall and we put it on the table and then of course we made the wreath for the front door and then you were hoping it would be snowing on the right day. Because i remember the connie fear the big tree in our garden when there was snow on each and my father would put lights that was magic and then just before christmas. My mother came up with the real christmas tree. And you know when. I was really very young. We had real candles but the clip ons real candidates under the tree inside the house yes and there was a white sheet on the floor to protect the four and then there was a basket with water in case the tree would be set on fire so it was only allowed to light the candles when daddy nami were there and we hardly moved of course because there could be a fire but it was magic to see all these flames burning and then we got it a beautiful dog and it was too dangerous so we had to put electric lights but it was still very nice now for a little child. Who is there a santa claus figure that brings the gifts that seat because christmas without presents because our santa claus is called sinter glass and he has his birthday on the sixth of december. So that is the real exciting. Feast for gifts. And i really. I would be willing to set up an association to save that son abrasion. Because i think it's the most beautiful feast in the world. Why well first of all as a child. You believe in santa claus. He is bishop coming from spain on the big ship with his assistance. Who are black pitas. They are funny dressed and are doing funny things at croats. They are little bit naughty. And you're scared of him because he is the one who could eventually put you in the sack if you hadn't been a nice job but year cintas class is keeping book and he's writing in the book if you were good or bad sell. It is very well organized into netherlands because about three weeks before the six of december which is his birthday. He officially arrived on the big ship in amsterdam and this is transmitted on television. So you are looking at it because you know once. He's in the country. Your parents will allow you to put your old shoe at the chimney. Of course many people had central heating of a problem. But you find a solution you put your shoe in front of the door or whatever anyway. Some problems for a child to believe in san nikolas because one hour later after yet seen him arriving on television in amsterdam. He's arriving in your village as well and so you say to mother. How is that possible. So then she usually explains you while there is the real warm and he has assistance because there are so many children like you. The real one cannot cope with all that

The Netherlands Lisbeth Sinter Glass Hawley Santa Claus Spain Amsterdam San Nikolas Netherlands
Will giving Happy the elephant human rights actually make her happy?

Sue Jeffers

03:57 min | 4 months ago

Will giving Happy the elephant human rights actually make her happy?

"Elephant at the Bronx Zoo named Happy the elephant, All right, who was in court last week? Well, actually not in court because they didn't bring happy into the courtroom, But there was a group called the Nonhuman Rights Project. That brought a lawsuit against the city of New York actually state of New York to have happy declared a person to give happy personhood. 49 year old female Asian elephants been living by herself in conditions that have well they're not wonderful to say the least. And so here, the appeals court determining whether animals or people pita Has been making these claims and filing lawsuits for years. Pita you know that bread that Mideast earner so eat? No, no, the people for the ethical treatment of animals. I always get the two confused and There. It's case after case that's filed last time. I think they did one with a chimpanzee, arguing that the genetics of chimpanzees and humans are so close. They should be. They should be both considered human beings and the court said Now I don't think so. And then there's been some really crazy ones that Richard the durable, for example, was once The plaintiff in a lawsuit to be declared A person and so here, the justices looking at this and they're actually looking. There was an appeals court decision. The loss course low record and kicked it up, and I guess the court wanted to hear it. Because the appeals court could say no S o. The judges were a little skeptical, and one of the joint justices said. Isn't this better suited for the Legislature to act on legislatures can actually deem animals People, uh, pursuant to a legislative act now that if that holds up in court, no one knows, But if anybody's gonna do, it's gonna be the Legislature and then the Justice said, I'm not so sure we're equipped to even handle these kinds of matters. And what the group argued is that happy's living conditions at the Bronx Zoo was effectively solitary confinement and arguing she's been mistreated. Now, think about this for a moment. And there's some practical aspects of this because right now animals you own their property. It's that simple. You buy. You sell animals and your that's it now. What if the animals were people? I mean, think about this legally. This is not one of those. He What if animals were people, Then we start to, you know, flying off on fantasies? No. Legally if animals repeated were people you can't own a dog. You're not allowed to own people. They call it slavery Abraham Lincoln and 14th amendment in all that stuff, Actually 13th amendment and so it has been an ongoing fight. So practically speaking, Of course, there's nowhere to go with that aunt. Legally speaking, there's nowhere to go with that, although do you remember Mitt Romney during the run for the presidency, he said. Corporations are people. And that may have cost him the race. He was nailed for that well, corporations are people for purposes of shielding liability. That's what corporations are about. They are an entity. They're not people. But they have Ah, lot of the same shields. And so they've bean s o the animal rights people of this you using that a lot Hey of corporations to be Dean people than certainly non humans, animals, hamsters, durables so happy the elefant. Can be named people. So anyway, of course, is going to go no place, but it's just kind of fun, man. I love these lawsuits.

Bronx Zoo Named Happy The Elep Nonhuman Rights Project New York Pita Legislature Bronx Zoo Richard Abraham Lincoln Mitt Romney
Diamond Jim Moran

Gangland Wire

06:25 min | 5 months ago

Diamond Jim Moran

"Welcome wire-tappers out there here in this video of gang. Lenoir beautiful fall afternoon not on the golf courses afternoon folks in here getting ready to record a podcast for y'all i have the grandson of james diamond. Jim brough cada. His grandson's name is bobby. Bre qatar now bobby. Did i pronounce that close enough. Yes sir okay good. I like to say my northwest missouri nasal hillbilly kind of trying funny. What about that. I just had a comment. Somebody said always seems weird to have a guy with a southern voice. Say the word capco. Now i don't really consider southern voice to you have got northern voice to people up this guy resume shah firm chicago to him. I have a southern boy. So a hewlett you guys. Listen to bobby talk a little bit and you'll hear that salt sweet syrupy south louisiana voice. Our true southern boys right. Yeah it's a little different than new. All has its own unique accent. I've been confused being from boston. New york no. Yeah you know. I hear that now. Wow i do hear that many dollars around the city you know. Talk to different people. You can tell what part of the city from interested in so now. Let's get to the meat of this. You've written a book here recently. Called food for kings. And it's part to crime as part history in his part a recipe book cookbook. If you will food for king diamond jim. A new orleans legend now diamond. Jim mocatta was your grandfather. And there's a really interesting book folks especially if you like to cook. It's got those really great new orleans recipes in it and this guy your grandfather. Your grandpa was one of the most colorful characters in new orleans from what i've read about him. It was unbelievable. Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got interested in doing this particular book. Okay very first of all. Thank you for having me on your show. appreciate it. earth off a married with two children in military. Over twenty years i retired in two thousand and eight and i've been aircraft mechanic for american airlines and now delta. I picked up this project after my father died and wait basically he motivated me to kind of pick up the torch and carry it. My dad was a dentist for forty years and he always wanted to do a screen. Play or movie per se. He's never do it. I have i did a screenplay originally. But i didn't go anywhere with it so i decided a couple years ago. Put a book together and kind of tell a story about my grandfather while i'm telling. The story basically blended in combination photos and recipes as i journey through his whole life. I start off when he's a childhood and carried on throughout his life until the success of his life until he died. It's a good read. It took me about eight years to go through it and do the research are did get a lot of information from father. My father ahead a manuscript he has deposition that he had put together with a attorney. Back in nineteen seventy seven. So i use all that information and took my tom everything in the book that i've talked about a kind of support it with a document and the article. Either that was given to me handed down to me or maybe that of actually found in the library found a lot of information doing the research about my grandfather in the library his life. It was pretty easy because his life was documented since he was a teenager so every time i tried to fill in the blank. Something in my father didn't pass down to me. I was able to answer all the questions that i wanted to answer about his life. You know interesting. That stuck a little bit about his early life. He fought under the name of jimmy moran which is kind of like no joy hupa in chicago took on an irish name in order to fight. I think more likely it was a lot of prejudice against italians in those days. Especially in new orleans. If you remember we go all the way back to the black hand days and they they killed the chief of police some Supposedly some black hander. Kill the chief of police in of new orleans storm to jail and hung. I dunno must have been six or eight say ends i. I can't remember exactly for sure. How many so. It would have been wise for him to fight on her an irish name. I would imagine tell me about his fight career. Let's get started. Well that was one thing. They kind of treat. My curiosity was widely. Any changes his name in the book. I did find a quote where someone asks them. Same questioned do an interview. He said he did for business reasons. But that was part of it because you gotta realize he didn't get into business opened up first restaurants on nineteen forty nine. He changed his name. I found articles where he had his name change in teens early. Nineteen hundreds. He hung around a couple of friends of his feet. Herman who's an italian pita. Golota was his last name. And the other guy. By the name of powell moran. His name was francis. Paul miranda and all of them were full blooded italian as you know and you listeners. Know that back. Then the titans will kinda frown upon. They weren't considered equal. Maybe to a lot of different even the irish whatever. So i've found out. He had changed his name one. He didn't want his mother was fighting when he was on the fighting card. You know and during the preliminaries in hours fighter. Irish name would draw big crowds for fight. A lot of people don't know new orleans was actually a big boxing city equivalent to chicago and new york but on a smaller scale of course but it was a big boxing town in a drool audit. And that's how he got to meet jack dempsey marciano. You know all those big fights back then because they came to new orleans and then he connected so his first circle of friends will all italians. pete. Herman was abandoned. Champion thinking sixty nine fights from nineteen twelve to nineteen twenty two now as far as my grandfather. He wasn't as big of a boxer as those guys. He did it for my research. Maybe about six years and then he got a little older. He got into referee in and he started refereeing. He did that until about twenty seven years old. Then that's when you up his barber shop in the open up a barber shop with a boxer front of his last name was burke in as when he got an barring after referee

New Orleans Bobby James Diamond Jim Brough Capco King Diamond Jim Jim Mocatta Lenoir Chicago Hewlett Qatar Jimmy Moran Shah Missouri Louisiana American Airlines Golf Boston
Election 2020 Analysis: Bethany Mandel, Ron Kampeas

People of the Pod

08:38 min | 5 months ago

Election 2020 Analysis: Bethany Mandel, Ron Kampeas

"Mandel is an editor writer and podcast at ricochet and online hub. For conservative conversation she's also a rising social media star and conservative columnist. Who has garnered quite a bit of attention. In recent months decrying the government overreach of quarantine restrictions and going from being a never trumper in two thousand sixteen to supporting the president's twenty twenty reelection in a recent column in the forward she talks about why pollsters trying to project the election's outcome got it so wrong once again but don't expect this conversation to be a breakdown of methodology and shifting demographics. Her explanation is much simpler than that and she will explain bethany. Welcome to people of the pot. I think you so much for having me. I'm sorry for the puppy noise. You might hear in the background okay. Now before we begin. I want to remind our listeners. Ajc is a nonpartisan five. Oh one c. Three not for profit entity that neither endorses nor opposes candidates for elective office. So anything i say or ask or challenge really is in pursuit of an explanation. Because i do want our audience to listen so bethany for those who did not read your column. Tell us why. Pollsters predicted a blue wave that we did not see in last week's election so i think that there's going to be a lot of explanations that become clear over the next few months there might be problems with the way that they call people how they call people but i noticed anecdotally and i was saying for months beforehand the most simple explanation for why i thought that it would be extremely close or why the president would garner. Reelection is just because people were lying because they didn't feel comfortable telling the truth and when they would get a call who you voted for from a stranger because you don't actually know who upholstery is. And you can't confirm their identity on the phone When they get a call from pollster hi. I'm just curious for you're voting for. They're not going to tell you on the phone who they're voting for. And in my column i give a story that i thought was really illustrative of my thinking on it coming up prior to the election. Which was i have a. I have a girlfriend who lives in a swing state. i think it's north carolina. And i asked her at the outset of our conversation who e-voting for just sort of in passing and she said. I am still undecided. I don't know what to do and we had a very long conversation. And what we're really talking about was actually. She was doing a conference that got cancelled by a social media. Mob and people were falsely accused of racism. Yada yada and the entire six months of work that she did for the conference just went up in smoke and and it was cancelled and so we were talking about that. And i said this is the kind of stuff that makes people vote for trump. Because he talks about this. Like social media mobs the cancel culture in all these things and i was kind of laughing about how this experience would make her into a trump voter over the course of our conversation. I said yeah. I'm voting for trump this summer on. I never thought i would have done that for years ago. And she was like wait. A second you are and i forgot that. She doesn't follow me on social media. She doesn't know. Sort of where i fall and i said yeah my buddy for trump and she was like oh i am too. I mailed ballots in weeks ago. And she's a friend of mine and we were having an hour long conversation and it was only after i told her that i was voting for president trump that she admitted that she was as well. And so we finished texting. And i looked at my husband and i said the polls were wrong. If this woman who i've known for five years didn't feel comfortable telling me who she was voting for until i told her there's no way we'll no much was made that there were fewer undecided voters in this year's polls but also sounds like what you're saying is that there was even smaller number because those who said they were undecided or at least some of them voted for trump right or they were lying and they said they were voting for biden instead. I i think that that's definitely a possibility as well. Okay now why would they have said president biden. What been the reasoning there. That's the safe answer in this. Cancel culture environment that you know voting for vice. President biden was stackable incorrect dancer. But i think that I think that a lot of people probably unfit apply. I'm curious if you've gotten any feedback from people who read your column and said how dare you call us liars absolutely. Not every single person understood. Even i as someone who works in the media until the eleventh hour did not want to say i was voting for president trump. Because i knew that every time he does something stupid from then on out people with throw that calm back in my face and say this is what you signed on for whatever reality. I'm like. I signed a deal with the devil and i knew i was signing a deal with the devil and i'm not not raw about him. I'm not maga- it's it's an unfortunate situation and it is what it is something that really frustrated me in the wake of biden's election was people sort of saying koumba. Let's all come together and we're were you three years ago. Where were you last year. Why didn't you speak up for the covington. Boys and pete buttigieg was one of the people who was saying it and your staffer. Literally making lists of trump administration employees to blacklist them and to strip them of their livelihood and i think people across the spectrum have different opinions of people who worked in the administration. I know a million of them and they understood the deal that the that the devil that they made to and they were trying to uniformly serve our country and to mediate. Trump's trump. Nece and i think they did a great job and i am appreciative of the work that they did in every single department they worked in and they made it possible for us to come out of the last four years. Fine we're fine as a country and pete bridges people. His former staff are making lists of all of these people and pitas coming out. And saying you know. Let's all come together. I'm like okay. Put your money where your mouth is and publicly denounced what your staff are doing. Where is that being reported. I don't know where it's being reported. It's called the trump accountability project. And if you google it. I'm sure only conservative media are covering it because that's how it is. They had a website called trump accountability project. And it's time for people to put their money where their mouth is a little bit on this and no one is and michelle. Obama tweeted something the other day. That was you know. Half of americans who voted for him are x y. You know the whole litany of and this is not. I don't know how you move forward. When that when the former first lady is impugning the motives of half of the americans that voted for for trump. And you're not. You're not voting for racism. You're not voting for you. Know i think. I think that's a really simplistic way of looking at things. And it's also a really divisive and toxic way and if biden wants to actually move forward in a kun-bae off fashion say something about what michelle obama tweeted now. I want to reiterate what you said at the beginning. Bethany that this is just your theory. it's based on anecdotal evidence. There are many reasons why the polls might not have panned out this year. But let me ask you this. Not all pollsters work for media some work for politicians who are trying to assess what their constituents want. Do you think people understand that. Not being truthful about their preferences might undermine the whole democratic process. Do you believe that so. That's an interesting question. Because in some part it undermines the thesis of my piece because we saw that the internal polling that was done by campaigns was actually far superior to that of the media companies. And i think that people are more apt to trust a cloister that is not in the media because people don't trust the media dot readily and that distrust has been well earned by the media but the internals that we can gather that the biden campaign was getting told them to go to georgia and it seemed like a crazy idea and they were right to do so. So i i think that the internal polls that campaigns had were better than the media hat by. I don't think it undermines the democratic process because is not essential to the democratic process. It just it gives campaigns some idea of where they should be focusing and what their messaging should be but overall the democratic process is completely hinged upon votes. And that's really what counts at the end of the day well bethany. Thank you so much for. Your thoughts really intriguing thoughts. I really appreciate that. And i hope our listeners. Think about it i hope. I hope you've given them food for thought. Thanks

Bethany Biden Mandel President Biden Koumba Pete Buttigieg Trump Administration Nece North Carolina Maga Donald Trump Michelle Michelle Obama Google Barack Obama
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 6 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

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Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:33 min | 7 months ago

Nobody wears fur any more

"It's time to talk business. Now, with Dana Thomas, who's the paris-based? All of fashion operas the price of fast fashion and the future of closed Dan. Thanks so much for joining us. I must tell you that I have a relative who works in fashion and a little while ago. She very generously I thought started gifting me all these beautiful firs which she said she wasn't going to wear again I now understand why nobody's wearing her. Nobody's wearing for it took pita the people for Africo treatment of animals what thirty years to get this message through the heads of fashion industry players. But it seems like they're finally getting with the getting on board and they're slowing down or or banning. Nordstrom the. The American Department Store Big Department Store one of the few that. Actually is not completely shattered by the pandemic they managed to pull through Is Giving up selling furry will not be selling for I don't think for was a huge part of Nordstrom business. Nordstrom is a very middle market, suburban shopping mall kind of department store. So the for that they would sell would have been like the trim on your Parka or a little trim on a cough as opposed to a mink you wouldn't go to Nordstrom to buy a full length mink coat, but nevertheless there there disavowing vote as has macy's and Chanel a lot of brands have finally given up on it. I don't know what this is doing for the for instance, which is powerful and big industry and the for industry has made. Big Advances in over the years because of the pressure from Petah to make sure that that the whole. Farming, side of it was as humane as possible given you know in the end, you're killing animals for to wear clothing. You know more more humane certainly than the industrial agriculture side for cowhide for our handbags. But you know nevertheless, it seems like you know when they banned fog is in certain states. In the United States, this band for first serves feels like the same we're going to ban for not that anyone's really wearing it right now or that any can. Really afford it right now because they've all lost their shirts during the pandemic, but it's a good idea and maybe we should do it. So they're doing it and I think we're going to see a lot less than the streets but I mean all does and you point out that the house bill shoes I mean we're not talking about banning leather shoes. But you know. Gucci famously put out. mink trimmed Mules Apple seasons ago when I said Rubel Kelly took over the house and they were really popular. I remember seeing a woman on an airplane and I thought wow, that's really decadent. and. It feels really calm. It looks like it's probably really comfortable for an airplane to you WanNa you WanNa, wear something cushy on your feet. Right? I thought that is so decorated it feels like Louis Kettles and we won't be seeing at least being sold at Nordstrom. We won't be seeing those shoes anymore more. Then, and we don't have a lot of time but a very quick look at where we are in this case between tiffany and lvmh. Well, tiffany has decided to countersue. So I mean everyone's suing everybody else and it's it's just back and forth and back and forth tiffany says it did not experienced a managed material adverse effect during the pandemic and that basically lvmh trying to get a better deal, which is what we all believe it is and it says the lvmh's specious arguments are yet another blatant attempt to evade its contractual obligation to pay the agreed upon price for Tiffany and you know they're go to just fight this and see what happens I'm I'm interested to see how this plays out absolutely tiffany needs a sale and Wants it. Somebody's going to figure out the middle ground now? Why does tiffany need to sail? It's it's been in play for some time and it's it's kind of an a stuck place. They redid the store somewhat in New York. But it it a point where it needs to grow change or evolve at. It's kind of stuck an lvmh with its synergies and it's and it's specially it's retail network but also its whole marketing department everything would really give the brand a boost in a way that would take it to a new place tiffany's sort of motoring along but not great. Yeah. That's why it's been. The object of you know it's been. Looked at as a possible takeover lvmh just going to swoop in and buy a bowl the stock, and they still just may do that

Tiffany Nordstrom Dana Thomas Lvmh Big Department Store DAN Africo American Department Cough United States Petah Macy Louis Kettles Gucci Rubel Kelly Chanel New York
Spider-Man PS5: They Recast Peter Parker

Kinda Funny Games Daily

04:11 min | 7 months ago

Spider-Man PS5: They Recast Peter Parker

"Number one, this I want you to know has bumped the original number. One story broke just a little while ago from the playstation blog James Stevenson community director over, and it's SOM- Nick Games put up a thing called included with Marvel's Spiderman Miles Morales ultimated on an ESA summit Marvel Spiderman. remastered details is what the blog post is talking about and it's talking about, of course, the whole voucher code fiasco that's been going on of Marvel's spider man remastered being included with Marvel's Spider Man Miles Morales alternate edition coming on November twelve. The Post. Reads as you would expect, it talks about of course Oh. Hey, we're very excited for this voucher code you're going to get hey, let's talk about the graphical updates they've gone above and beyond on the city environments it looks beautiful. It's always different things cabinet you scroll down comes gotTa pulled up here I go down like Here's what it looks like in four crazy. Okay. Here's the retracing. They see Spiderman in a reflection, but then you scroll a little bit further in read some tax in what do we find Gary? What a look at this a brand new face for Spiderman They've recast Peter Parker, I'm reading from the playstation blog. This does bring us to one of the bigger changes in order to bring the best performances to players with our next generation Marvel Spiderman Games we have recast the face of Peter Parker we loved working with John Bobby. Neck. buback on the original game however, to get a better match for Peter Parker, Slash Spiderman actor Yuri Lowenthal facial capture we have cast Ben Jordan to be the face model for Peter Parker on the playstation five council, he looks incredible in game in years moving performances take on a new life right now, if you're a video watcher, you see the doc spoilers Peter Parker scene were docked puts on the arms for the first time. They posted this full here with the new Ben. Jordan model, and of course, jury's still dialogue talking through going through it. Can you full screen? Kevin. Can we see that full screen just to get a little bit more intensity to what we're seeing here? I don't even know where to begin because if you want to talk about the amount of things I did not see happening with Spiderman remastered recasting. Peter Parker was definitely high on something. I hadn't even considered now granted I'm not inside INSOMNIAC, getting updates on what they're doing why they're doing it but. I I am shook Gary I. AM Shuki. Cabinet. If you click on the second link there the second one that will show you a side by side comparison with that on a different one. Side by side comparison, you can full screen that tweet with the original face of course was John buback, and now we're talking about Jordan of. You're alone fall. Famed voice actor Principia a million other things is still the voice both times around first reaction. Gary, widow, what do you think of this new Peter Parker? My immediate first reaction is watching those watching that clip again makes does want to go back and replay the whole gang because it really what a fantastic game that was. Almost forgotten how good it was. I would definitely go back and play the remastered. Strikes me is kind of strange change when I it's funny when I I play the playstation for. Spiderman game. One of the things that wasn't at the top of my list of things I liked was was the cafe seed strategy. I thought it was a little bit old. It wasn't a hundred percent like everyone has their own imaging had of like what pita pocket doesn't look like Tom Holland for me really nails it and obviously does for a lot of people Andrew, golf field for example, didn't you know it's like everyone's got their own Carrots should look like and over time that face model for Peter Parker especially with the voice because year he does a tremendous job as his voice. Grooming and by the end yeah. That's pita pocket. So for them to change it again now feels like a bit of a Curve Ball I. Guess Mostly Greg, the question is why why did they? Why did they feel they needed to change the face where they not happy with it? Like what why did they explain the why of all the all we have so far as his blog post we loved working with John The original game however to get a better match to Peter Parker Slash Spiderman actor Yuri alone falls facial capture capture. We have cast Ben Jordan as to be the face model for Peter Parker on the playstation console.

Peter Parker Spiderman Ben Jordan Gary Yuri Lowenthal Cabinet Miles Morales James Stevenson Community Director Nick Games John Buback ESA John Bobby Kevin Principia John TA Tom Holland
These CS:GO Coaches Just Got Banned For Cheating

theScore Esports Podcasts

07:59 min | 7 months ago

These CS:GO Coaches Just Got Banned For Cheating

"The go seen just got by gigantic cheating scandal and no I'm not talking about a bunch of nobody's getting caught hacking and the F. L. This happened at the highest level of competitive counter strike and three coaches were banned and on top of that, there's been a second investigation with up to potentially fifteen different cases of match-fixing happening at the semi pro level. It's been a rough month for couch. All right. So for a while now we've been streaming over a twitch dot TV slash the score, east sports with our talk show clouded, and if you love the stories that we cover here on donut mean well, you're GonNa love some of the conversations that we have over on twitch. We break down some of the biggest stories from East sports in streaming and we talk a little ship while we're at. So make sure you follow the channel and hit that notification button. So you know exactly when we go live and you can watch me get roasted for two hours straight the news. Of this cheating scandal broke day after esl one Cologne finished is published an investigation and they say quote we were made aware that by taking a combination of different steps of Bogin Cisco allows the coach of a team to become a spectator anywhere on the map unbeknownst to anyone else and so yeah, this coaching exploit as it's being called basically allows a coach to place themselves anywhere on the map and then swivel their camera from side to side and theoretically take any info that they gather from that and give it to their players. It's basically one giant broken cypher cam like in foward. Check this ship. Now, the bombshell at the heart of ESL's investigation is the fact that they've proved coaches from heroic MIB are and hardly talk use this exploit at multiple different ESL events leading up to esl one Cologne. Three teams competing at the highest level of counterstrike cheated in the investigation is said that the exploit violated quote section six point ten, five use of glitches and quote of esl's Rupel to be very clear is says that all of this happened prior to the start of esl one Cologne and that in fact, the exploit was actually patched out prior to the tournament started, and so these rulings are the result of a long investigation that just happened to be published at the same time that he also Cologne was finishing. The investigation also says at what tournament the coaches abused the exploit hardly coach Makino gun use the exploit at esl one road to Rio on six maps in three matches Perot's coach. Used the exploit at Dream Hack master spring in ten rounds on one map and Coach dead used the exploit at ESL one road to Rio in one round on one map on Thursday September fourth former NRP IP coach Pita admitted to abusing the coaching exploits during an EP L. Match Against Mel Sports back in two thousand eighteen and like I mentioned off the top these aren't just some punk teams cheating their way through F pl or some shit. This is the highest level of competitive counterstrike, its coaches and players competing amongst the best of the best and being found guilty of cheating in an online tournament with a prize pool of three hundred, fifty, thousand dollars on top of. That her minutes to win the European portion of one Cologne and they look fucking doing dominating some of the best teams in the world magic going from heroes to cheaters in the span of twenty four hours and the way we know about this exploit and the fact that coaches have been abusing it over the last few months is thanks to freelance East Sports, referees, me Kaos Lewinsky and Steve Dudin off they spent dozens of hours poring over thousands of different demos and meticulously documenting any time they thought the export was being used a big props goes out to those guys now unfortunately, coaches abusing this. Is, not limited to esl vets beyond the summit recently put out a statement that says basically that dead the coach for Mbr was found guilty of using this exploit and beyond the summit six in the most damaging part of the statement is where they said that dead explicitly knew how to fix the exploit and continue to abuse it anyway quote de demonstrated he knew how to fix the glitch while maintaining competitive integrity prior to see US summit six online by requesting technical timeout disconnecting and reconnecting which happened in the May first of match versus Mb. At, ESL. One Road to Rio and then from there, they go on to say that quote dead knowingly abused the coach spectator glitch to obtain an unfair competitive advantage and ours lower bracket round three match versus triumph at summit, six online on June. Twenty third and quote yeah. That whole give him the benefit of the doubt type thing goes out the window on this. Now, as you can imagine, the punishments handed down in the response online was both fast and fierce. Here's ESL's punishments. All three coaches rox hunting is banned from competing and coaching an ESL events for a year. Dead is banned for six months and hard legions. Makino gun is banned for wapping twenty four months or a full two years on top of that all three teams will retroactively be disqualified from the tournament in question while also forfeiting both their esl pro tour points and the prize money earned from those tournaments man you sell is not fucking around and. Beyond the summit band dead from the next to be Vance while also retroactively disqualifying maybe from beyond the summit six and they basically have to forfeit their prize money as well. Now, at the time of recording this, hardly June is the only team that's released a public statement on the matter and they basically said that they've dropped mechanica quote yesterday we received. A letter from ESL announcing the decision to ban or coach for two years. It was difficult for us to believe in Alexander's guilt but we had to conduct a personal investigation of this situation based on the results of internal discussions. We decided that the punishment from ESL was fair. We refuse to make any appeal and we are staying in the side of. The tournament organizers and and predictably lot of the responses from the scene on online. A whole bunch of you gotta be fucking kidding from pros to analysts to popular content creators. Of course, Brazilian fans everybody is thoroughly pissed off, and honestly people should be pissed off because while this exploit doesn't involve all hacks or a mocks or some other stereotypical idea of. It still seriously undermines the competitive integrity of CS go

ESL Cologne RIO Coach Dead Makino United States MBR Mechanica Perot Vance Pita Kaos Lewinsky Alexander DE Steve Dudin
A Visit with the Main Street Vegan, Victoria Moran

Plant Strong

04:00 min | 8 months ago

A Visit with the Main Street Vegan, Victoria Moran

"I. WanNa start off by asking you. So your brand is main street Vegan. Why mainstream? Vegan? Well it's a story actually rip I went to a pita fundraiser late in two thousand ten and they showed videos and I've been seeing videos like this for forty years. It took me quite a while to get from. Vegetarian Vegan back in the day. So I've been around this movement for ever. And I've seen those videos about things that humans do to animals but that night, my heart was extra. And all I wanted to do was write a check for one hundred, thousand dollars in hand it to the pita founder Ingrid newkirk and say here, go fix something but the check would have bounced. So I got on the train thinking okay. What's the plan B. and I literally had inspiration I don't know how to explain this. You know you could say God you could say angels on what all I know is that it came to me very clearly okay you don't have one hundred, thousand K. spare but what you can do is make your. Next Book Main Street Vegan, we want it to be geared to the young woman that you were in Wheaton Illinois in nineteen eighty three when you finally stopped messing around and became a one hundred percent fulltime Vegan it needs to have forty short chapters with a recipe at the end of each one and I'm just kind of taking notes in my head of I could do this, I can do this. So my wonderful literary agent sold the proposal to torture Penguin and the editor called to say so happy to have you happy to have the book. But. We hate main street. You need to change the title and they'd bought it. So I had to do something and I'm coming up with these other titles and they were so boring. But I kept trying to write and then I had a begin miracle and I really do believe that this is the age of those believed that this is the time when all these other ridiculous diets are going to go. The way of the dinosaur plant based is going to be the only thing that sensible people are interested in and the idea that we are killing our fellow beings and destroying the planet is going to start to look like are you serious people really did that? So my Vegan Miracle That day. Was Walking up Broadway. We saw somebody so famous, you can recognize him from the back and that was Michael Moore Now, he had liked another book that I had written a weight loss book fit from within, and so I just handed my card to the woman who was with him and a few seconds. Later I hear Victoria there is Michael Moore, following me up Broadway and we started talking and then we started talking on the phone and on one of these phone conversations I said the book that I'm supposed to write should be called mainstreet Vegan publisher hates main street he said they're wrong. Let me talk to him talk to them so. In a three way call with an Academy Award winner my editor in me he convinced her she convinced the higher ups and when she called to say Main Street Vegan is your title everything else started to pop and I've been given my mission for the rest of my life. So why main street because this thing that we do whether we're coming from the health or the environment or the animals or whatever this is for everybody this is not some elitist thing. We don't have to be rich. We don't have to be leftover hippies or punk rockers. We can just be who we are eat reasonably and love more and to me that's Main Street That is mainstream nuts. you landed on something that just resonated and you knew of his right thing. And I grew up two blocks off main street in Kansas City Missouri. So that may have had something to do with it and mainstream Vegan was at your eighth or Ninth Book Because you've written. Now Than Books Right I've written thirteen. So Main Street Vegan would've been eleven. And

Michael Moore Mainstreet Vegan Editor Ingrid Newkirk Kansas City Victoria Wheaton Illinois Academy Award Founder Missouri Publisher
How Sandy Chilewich Built Chilewich

How I Built This

04:22 min | 8 months ago

How Sandy Chilewich Built Chilewich

"Some of the most successful brands we've had on the show were incredibly simple ideas that didn't require much capital at all. Stacey Madison and a Sandwich Cart in downtown Boston at the end of the day, she'd cut up leftover pizza toasted in the oven and sell the chips in Baggies for a dollar eventually that became stacy's pita chips Lisa price wanted better skin cream. So she makes the shave butter and essential oils in her kitchen and pack them into baby food jars to sell at flea markets eventually that became Carol's daughter a line of Personal Care Products Kathleen, king baked chocolate chip cookies, and turn those into tate's bake. Shop. All three of these entrepreneurs used their most valuable asset, their own creativity. This was Sandy Chila, which is most valuable asset as well. Back in the late nineteen seventies in New York when the city was filled with struggling artists and squatters living in abandoned apartments, she and a neighbor decided to buy a few pairs of Chinese slippers and die them into different colors. That simple idea turned into a brand called Hugh and eventually they branched out into tights. After Sandy sold you. She launched in a second company called Chile each which is known for selling home products. Especially, place mats made from durable woven vinyl. Sandy grew up outside of New York and came from a family that had been in the leather goods business for generations. She says, she was pretty bad student. She went to Sarah Lawrence College, but ended up dropping out twice. So earn money she painted made sculptures and sold handmade jewelry. WHO's making a little bit from the jewelry one night a simple creative dewey yourself idea changed sandy's life. What happened is, is that emit I met a neighbor of mine in the loft building that I lived in in in New York City. So I'm living in Ohio it was. A factory building everybody was an artist in the building and one woman I who at that time she was an art teacher also doing some art but mostly teaching at her her name was Kathy Moscow or or. Was it Raza Moscow Moscow, Moscow and one evening we were together. We were Khalip tipsy drinking wine and I think we were in her loft and we were looking in her closet shoes and at that time all young downtown women what they would wear every day were cotton canvas shoes that we bought in Chinatown they were black and they were like really thin sole rubber back and that was cheap chic and. Like the flat shoes like flat yeah. Flat Jerry. Only Very Mary Jane's and they were three thousand, ninety, nine cents in Chinatown and we thought I don't know. How we thought this just occurred to us because we're both have our creative. We wondered like, why doesn't anybody make these colors and that night we one of us have clorox I had Ridi- and we bleached out the black it actually came out and we over died them okay and they look pretty great. You just thought we'll make them ourselves or friends or whatever. Yeah. Well, this'll be fun I. Don't know why I think sometimes, you just do it because it's fun to do it. So so we went we got more of them and we died a bunch of them and then we had building meeting in my loft or her loft. I can't remember and we had all the shoes out and everybody in the building they all said Oh, my God, what did you get? These are amazing this. So. Just died Mary Jane's because it seems so simple simple thing. Well, this is a time seriously were things were not available in a lot of colors this was before or around the same time that for the first time get t shirt and twelve colors like canal genes, which was one of the forerunners of this was just a couple of blocks away from us where you would get t-shirts that people would die at home and then sell because you couldn't get it t shirt in a hail teal

Sandy Chila New York City Mary Jane Chinatown Kathy Moscow Moscow Stacey Madison Baggies Boston Sarah Lawrence College Tate Carol Hugh Stacy Ohio Lisa Price Khalip Jerry Ridi
Turn the Page

Forever35

06:11 min | 8 months ago

Turn the Page

"Kate How's life? Dory. Will first of all today in the New York Times Crossword? Yes. As now as now I'm an expert doing, Oh, I know what you're. GonNa say go on and I woke I woke up this morning to texts from a listener that was just like I can't wait for you to see the New York Times crossword like thirty two across and I was like, oh Six thirty in the morning, I'm like frantically getting onto the New York Times crossword thing. And it says. Skin care product and I was like Oh my God what and so it was five letters and so I just wrote in serum but then it turns out that was wrong. It was not serum but it was one of my other favorite products toner I know. I was GONNA say spoiler but I know sorry too late every it hustle away I mean whatever I also was like, ooh, maybe it's serum. But Alas. I mean, I even was self absorbed enough to think maybe the person who wrote this listens to the podcast and this is like a super secret Easter Egg. Listen, I had like the you are a writer. New York Times crosswords. Send us a smoke signal in across shorts will shortz if you're out there hydrating. Face. Hit US. Doesn't do all the players Mahjong themed crossword not too long ago. A really yeah. Did you feel like that was assigned to you the yes? Definitely. was made for me. I'm gene okay. I survived or my family made it through the first day of one hundred percent distance learning at home. You know shoutout teachers shut up parents and Guardians shutout school administrators everyone who works at schools I mean just shout out to everybody. But so great. Because We did it and They had a really good day. And I mentioning it because I went to trader Joe's for the first time in approximately six months Ah-ha. I hadn't been to TJ's like TJ's near me. All the teachers are tiny, but a new one opened up. Who never experienced new TJ's before. But I was like I'm doing it. I'm going to trader Joe's. I use the excuse that we needed frozen being Tuxedos and then I got there and I was like well, I'll load up my cart with like eight thousand bags of truffle flavor things. But it was. So it felt so good to be back in a trader Joe's I. Don't know how why to explain I I don't know how to explain why like the experience of a specific grocery store feels. Like being with an old lover or something. Do. You know what I mean. I was like Oh right My main goes strips are like, yes the frozen lot. Just. All, the TJ's and the things that we love in my house I stocked up on. So many snacks because story now everyone in my home like. We're all there and we're all kind of like in work mode like you know summer is over and we must provide. School lunch for her children during the day and I don't know why it feels different from lunch any other time but it just does yeah I hear that. I stocked up on. FROZEN SOUP dumplings, they'll eat those sound good. I. Mean I just was like, what can I serve these creatures for lunch. I made a little favor them today with. Charmed, charmed by and then I heard my lake second grader telling her teacher on zoom about it like we had a buffet for lunch which was really like I took out snap peas put them in a bowl I opened Hamas I caught up some pita bread. But it felt like a win and I'll take any win. I can get right now Louis. So that's what I'm to I literally eight. So many TJ snacks today just for the pure pleasure I'm jealous. A-. Have truffle potato chips that were so good. I, had never seen them before. I had a Pasadena Salad from them. I mean I just Tj it hard all day just like strictly trader Joe's and so into this for you. Yeah. Yeah. Thank you. I'm into it too and I also want to note that they have like new hand soap trader Joe's. we've never talked about really about a hand soap on this podcast and I feel like it is something I could I like kind of I don't WanNa say horrid I don't like misuse that term but I stock up on a lot of hand soap. But I'm a sucker for a sleek bottle and certain smells and I. Do feel like hand soap is an item where like I splurged on a fancy hand soap and I'm wondering is that a thing is that a scam like fancy hand soap the same as just like a regular trader Joe's Hanso with just a fancy name. Sores there's something special about a fancy hand well, okay. I think the answer is yes and no. So. So it's like a scam one can get behind. Yes. So like I love the smell of a sob hand soap, it is right ridiculously expensive like it's obscenely expensive I did splurge on it once and I was really happy. And then I just kind of stopped buying it because I was like. This is sort of ridiculous like I was kind of embarrassed even though I did really enjoy it but I think. It for me it has to be like, okay, this is like the thing I'm splurging on right now you know what I mean if you have one thing that you splurge on, maybe it's a night cream maybe it's a Sierra maybe it's hand soap. Maybe you don't spend on anything but like if you splurge on something. That that would be my thing for the month or something

New York Times Joe's. United States Kate Writer Hamas Guardians Pasadena Louis
"pita" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

03:04 min | 11 months ago

"pita" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Treatment plan a fifty thousand dollar case. A three crown case and Mrs. Jones needs an adjustment on her on her denture. What are the what are the? What's the likelihood that that is all going to get done in a quality manner right, so it's a balancing act. We want to be able to get that hygiene number up to thirty three percent. We Wanna see more hygiene patients. We want hygiene to be the lifeblood of the practice, but not at the expense. Of. Treatment plans not being accepted. Right, so you had to kind of find out where that that revenue number is per exam, so you're going to see that revenue number ramp up and then flatten out and then decline. If, you keep on adding more and more hygiene to a single provider. You're going to see that drop pretty quickly. And you'll find out what number that is just by analyzing the practice. You can look at historical numbers when you start to ramp up ramp up the marketing. and. You're seeing a bunch of new patients if the new patients are. Are Providing the the. The providers you'll start to see the average revenue per exam. Go down, drastically, okay. We can help you with that trying to figure that out. Reappointment percentage. Obviously, we want that to be as high as possible. You will have a higher. No show rates and the cancellation rates the higher you get above ninety two percent. Kevin Rossin. Tell. You don't want one hundred percent reappointment rate because you're basing your. You're forcing people to make a decision that don't want to make a decision right now, so they're just saying okay. Just do that and if that's not convenient for them, or they're not doing the research to know if they're going to be available at that time there, you're going to have a really high reappointment rate, but you're going to have a high no show rate as well. Eighty five percent is fine for reappointment rate. CASE ACCEPTANCE WE KNOW MR appointment percentage attrition rate. We've talked a lot about that. Active patients active in hygiene. We WanNa make sure that that number J Conway said of active patients that are actually active in hygiene is at least eighty five percent closer to ninety. You guys will be shocked if you've never checked this. I've done this all of my practices. We were like at fifty percent and some of my practices. The patients that were actively seeking treatment were not all active in the hygiene department. We want at least eighty percent of those people active in the hygiene department parallel percentage in the hygiene department, CDC says forty two point four percent set of American human beings. Adults have period Donald Disease. If you're not around thirty ish, and above then you're underdiagnosis. Just the law of. The reality of the way things are you're under diagnosing. And, that wraps it up for another episode of the dental podcast. Look forward to reconnecting on the next episode. Thank you so much for joining us today on the dental preneurs podcast.

"pita" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

08:08 min | 11 months ago

"pita" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"We just talked about this. AM Office Manager Protocol. The one that I forgot was downtime protocol so downtime protocol is basically what happens if the schedule completely falls apart. which in? Startup practices and some season practices that happens from time to time. You only need your cure. It's to be so Dang shot. Right if hygiene department is sharpening cure at every time, somebody cancels an appointment. You. Don't need three hours of curate sharpening. Right well, it'd be maybe more productive if they got on the phone and started working that recall list or the unscathed unscheduled treatment list. If you have those ready to go, and that's on the that's on the. Downtime Protocol then it would go straight to that is soon as the schedule falls apart, the downtime protocol is triggered. An everybody knows exactly what to do most. Times it's picking up the phone and calling because that is how you turn non-producers into producers by actually getting people reactivated getting people back in for recall getting PAT people back in for for. Treatment plans that haven't been. That haven't been started yet, okay? Are these documents assembled in one organized? Easiest accessible operations manual all right. Those are the questions that you're GONNA WANNA ask yourself just those one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight nine ten eleven twelve thirteen questions, if you can answer those questions that then and to the affirmative than you have an operations Daniel. Let me, tell you this about operations manuals as well. We're talking about a lot about just getting it done putting it together and having it as a working living fluid document that changes as it needs to be changed. I will tell you this one of the most important things about creating an operations manuals that you want to make sure. That there's authorship from your team. If you and your regional manager in your office managers sit down one weekend with a twelve pack of beer and a pizza, and knock it out over eighteen hours, and you're proud of it, and you put it in a binder. Ever these laminated. You're ready to go. You have that meeting on Monday morning and people look at you like you just grew an arm out of the top of your head. It will never get implemented. The stuff will never get implemented data. They have no ownership over it. You have to give your team authorship over all the systems in the operations manual. If they don't have. Over it, it will never get used. They'll be very expensive. Documents as far as time and energy that sits on your shelf collecting dust. If they have authorship. They will use it. Okay! Operations Manual again, Foundational Principles Mission Vision Core Values Protocol sheets accountability agreements. Pictures team review templates organizational charts videos. On boarding process meeting agendas. That's a lot of stuff. That's a lot of stuff so the foundational principles like I, said mission vision core values protocol sheets. How do we do everything in the office I? Talk about how many people have heard me use the term alien abduction manual. Get so imagine your team leads. Team leads. It's a nice spring. Day. Your team leads or having a Nice Cup of coffee out of starbucks sitting outside at a picnic table. So you got your office manager? You got your front office lead. You got your back office lead and you have your best hygienist and They're having a Nice Frappuccino out in front of starbucks. It's outside. Spaceship hovers overhead and stops right above their table. A tractor beam comes down. And they get sucked up in the spaceship and they're gone forever. Aliens. Just just abducted you're you're all star team. Well guess what the practice must go on. The practice must go on. We dust ourselves off and say man I miss those girls, but we need to hire for you girls. What are we going to do? All the systems are in their head. We need to take the systems out of their head and put them into the protocol sheets. We need to create an alien abduction manual for every single person in the practice. How do you do it? Miss All star. It's very very easy to do, Susie, you are so valuable. You're so valuable. You're the best thing that's ever happened to this practice. The practice would die without you. If you're -ducted by aliens, we'd all be screwed. Suzy, can you please just? Take a couple of days and write down what you do from eight to five. Then you turn those into protocol sheets. Then, all of a sudden. It's not so big of a deal. susie gets abducted by aliens okay. All right. Foundational Principles! This is the same slide. Okay item number, eight data, mining and analysis production breakdown per provider code. Average revenue per patient of an average revenue per visit reappointment percentage scheduled unscheduled treatment opportunities case acceptance percentage missed appointment percentage, attrition rate active patients active in hygiene, peril, percentage in the hygiene department and parallel percentage for active patients a lot of stuff. This is kind of a review because we've alluded to all of this at one point or another during this lecture, but these are the advanced analytics that you need to start mining. This is the data that's really really important to get that practice to be a struggling practice to get you to be more sophisticated business owner. The more sophisticated you can get with data points that actually move the needle. The more you'll be able to control the overhead and the more sophisticated. Your practice will be more profitable. Your practice will be so obviously production breakdown per eighty-eight code. If you're doing too many four surface composites than maybe we should probably. Think about treatment planning more crowns, obvious average revenue per exam. This is an interesting one. We have found by studying trends that we are so intent on saying hygiene thirty thirty three percent of the practice. You gotta get that hygiene that hygiene up your at eighteen percent. Let's get to twenty-five after we get to twenty five. We'll get to thirty after we get the thirty. We'll be at thirty three. We're so intent on doing that. It's so important to us to get that hygiene number up, but we did find is that there is a certain point where you reach a law the law of diminishing returns. If you start to see too many exams doing too many recalls and too many new patient exams. Say. You're like all right to calms hygienes good, but we're at twenty seven percent three columns of hygiene. That's cool. Right. Then you have to production columns three columns of hygiene. You're hopping around. Your hopping around and the patients are not getting a good experience after a certain point after a certain number of exams. The value of the amount of money that you generate per exam plummets. And that's different for every provider. It's different for every practice, I. Don't know what that is, but what we figured out that patients don't accept treatment if you're not spending enough time nurturing the relationship and explaining the treatment. Right so if you're doing three extractions and sinking an implant in opportunity to and you have to new patients and periodic, what are the chances? If somebody has a bombed out mouth, and you really really need to? Diagnosis or treatment plan a fifty thousand dollar case. A three crown case and Mrs. Jones needs an adjustment on her on her denture. What are the what are the?.

"pita" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

07:35 min | 11 months ago

"pita" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"To the office. I introduced them to the doctor I after treatment I escort the patient to the front office. Give the front office. The route slip with the day's treatment confirmed explain next treatment to the front office and the patient verify. The patient has a recall appointment. Excuse myself professionally from the patient. They rate themselves on. This entire worksheet is front and back. So, they are saying I do this at a level of a five and their office manager or me says. I think you kind of are more likely to. and. Here's why. It's very very specific, and it's very pointed, and you can integrate all of your core values in there. You can integrate all of your systems in there. This is how we do our monthly reviews. This is this. Is filed in their? In their team member chart and Now we have a record of what we've talked about. If there's any disciplinary action that needs to take place, or if there's anything that they weren't doing quite right, there's a record of it. And, then they get to actually great us. They get to assess us right and if if we if the assessment for us says that we communicate openly, and we provide a positive place. Positive Work Environment, and we're getting a one consistently than we know that we need to look in the mirror, not out the window, right? We need to be accountable for that. All, right. Okay quarterly calibration manning agenda, so we have a quarterly calibration meeting remember. We were talking about calibrating our communication calibrating the way that we explain procedures calibrating the way that we. Transition in the hallways calibrating the way that we deliver case. treatment. To. Delivering plans okay, so these calibration meetings. That's exactly what we're doing. We're doing scripting. We're doing role playing I love Tim McNamara's thing where he puts people on the hot seat like once a week. We do that every three months. Okay, same exact thing. Action Item. Number six the system is Asian start, so we talked about what a big huge daunting task! The system ization stuff is in your practice and get it which is why we created this template, which is going to get people to look at things and say Oh, shoot I have six things exactly missing from this template I need to work on this one next this next and this one next once I finished that type it up with our help. Then they uploaded into the operations manual template and that portion is done. For people that just have this. This overwhelm when it comes to even thinking about putting an operations manual together. I have the systems. -Ation Jumpstart. These are the three systems that I think that anybody can go back and remember. We're talking about Monday. Morning Dentistry, you can go back to your practice and implement the first thing Monday morning, and the entire sixteen hours going on seventeen hours. Now that you've spent in this room with us, we'll be worth it if you do the system jumpstart and you're not currently doing it. Okay, you ready. Guys tried to contain your excitement. All, right, thank you. And a day protocol. WHO's doing an end of day protocol? Downtime Protocol is doing down protocol. Office manager an protocol who's doing that. Yes listen to the PODCAST, don't you? End of day protocol whatever is driving you crazy in your practice. Whatever things you tell your team members to do before they leave. That aren't getting done end up on the end of day protocol if you could list seven. Per position that absolutely have to get done. Just eliminate all the protocols all a checklist. All the everything. Seven things that absolutely have to happen before you leave this office if you could boil it down to that. Put, it on the end of day protocol. They check it off. And, they put it in. They, literally check it off and they put it in the bin of the office manager. Okay, put it in the office. Managers and debate protocol been. Right, so they're accountable for the things that they check up. They can't leave out the door until they check it off and sign it and put it in the office managers. Ended a protocol box. Okay, so, what everything's driving you? The most crazy that are consistently not getting done. If. People aren't doing the trash if they're if they're not boxing up the lab cases at the end of the day. If they're charts are consistently not getting done. Put those on the end of day protocol. It will fix it. Okay. Here's the high. Post up calls route slip. Notes are accounted for all chart. Notes are done notice. These are dry. Erase like we laminate. It may dry racist, so we use them over and over again restock rooms. All instrument sterilized check production report to ensure your production is accurate. Today's practice production was versus the goal sign finalized production report and give office manager and of Day Forum is signed and given to office manager signed signature place in the box. Stuff gets done now. That's just a little tiny bit of accountability. It's a good way to dip your toe into the system. Without saying hey guys good news. We're GONNA. Do An operations manual? It's sixty two pages with start with page one go. So. This is one of the most important protocols because it's quite easy to do. You can implement it right away and stuff gets done. They start. They start to feel what a system is. Office should feel like okay. This is the Office Manager Protocol so the office manager is GonNa. Get a stack of. Protocols. She's going to get to the office before anybody else. And she's going to walk the office. If one of the end of day protocols for suzy was that she has to restock all the rooms, and maybe she's charged with the bathroom week. Then she goes, and she looks in the drawers of all of Suzy's rooms, and then she looks in the bathroom Suzy's good, and then she walks, and then she looks at the reception area, a reception area. Look like the picture and in the operations manual. Good thumbs up. How about the break room? How about the hallways all that stuff she does. She does a morning walk through facilities. Okay, then she's GonNa look at charts. She's GonNa Audit Charts. Charts make sure that everybody did that. She's GonNa. Make sure that she looks at the place where we put the lab cases for the UPS driver. She GonNa make sure those are all done. She's GonNa walk walk the walk the facility. She's going to get ready for her morning huddle. That's the office manager an protocol. Okay with the office manager, an protocol iffy, set it up the right way. You will start the day the right. There won't be chaos. You know that everything was done from the previous day and if it wasn't and we bring it up in the morning huddle. We want that morning huddle to be less than ten minutes, so people are consistently not doing what they say they did on the checklist than we have a problem. All right. Operations manual creation. We talked about this already. Are there formal written policies for clinical efficiencies and accountability, sterilization, billing and insurance issues, front and back office protocol, patient, flow, and Experience Hygiene Department Protocol Common, area protocol, beginning and end of day protocol downtime protocol..

"pita" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

07:30 min | 11 months ago

"pita" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Five day membership. Give it a test drive. Okay guys have a wonderful day. Hope you enjoy the episode and we'll talk to SAM by. Create a systems based cadence of accountability, so we talked about morning. Huddle Format Weekly. Growth Meetings, weekly office manager Supervisor Meetings Monthly team reviews and quarterly calibration meetings. Okay, let me show you examples of all of those this. Is a weekly growth meeting agenda? We talked about lead measures. Lag measures the world, wind and wigs. Because remember that. Lead measures lag measures. The whirlwind and wigs. So this very very simple agenda. Here is what you're. GonNa do I. Recommend you having your wig meeting your weekly growth meetings early in the week as possible so that you have all week to to gain momentum and to execute. Okay, we do on Tuesdays at eleven o'clock. Weekly growth meeting so right here is the format that we use obviously feel free to customize it. On Top, it's recognition. Recognition means that the first thing we start every meeting with is by recognizing somebody for doing something good. We have a wonder, woman, headband and a wonder, woman bracelet and a wonder woman pin. We happen to not have any males if we did, they would have to wear it to. If they got elected one woman for the week, but we elect a woman wonder woman for the week we take a polaroid of them. They get put up on the on the bulletin. Board and they get a twenty dollars starbucks gift card. That's every single week and that's just for recognizing them for being awesome. Right, we also had this little jar. That we write little notes. All week long got this from Tim Ferriss. And we put them into the job. Awesome looks like a fishbowl all week long we try to catch people, not just us, but each other doing something good doing something considerate doing something positive. We write it down on a little sticky note crumpled up, and we put it in the jar of awesome, so we get a wonder woman award every week. Everybody passes the jar of awesome around and read something Nice about somebody that somebody else's said. That's how we start every single meeting next we go to you. We remind each other of what the WIG is, so we say wig number one twenty five percent growth for the practice this year week, number two. Two, eight percent decrease in overhead WIG number three whatever that happens to be okay I recommend no more than three whigs for your practice for any given practice. You've got to focus. Okay so three whigs. We remind ourselves of that. Then we go to lag measures. We talk about the lag measures. Here's what's happening in the practice. Remember called lag measures because this stuff has already happened gay. Here's what happened last week. Here's how many reviews we got. Here's where overhead is. Here's where our collections is. Here's how much we are up or down as far as our production goals, we review lag measures, and then we talk about this week's the previous week's. Lead measures remember I talked about everybody gets up and says last week. My lead measure was to present floride to seventy five percent of my patients. I did that and the result was. We closed I. Don't know sixty percent of it next week. My lead measure is to do X. number of sealants. K. and I'll report back to you the next week. We do that for every single department. Every single person that is what we do per department and then current current weeks lead measures. Here's what I here's what I commit to doing for the next week. They say that in front of everybody and they have to report back the following week. That's it. It doesn't have to take an hour, but with our recognition. We'd like to take time spent time. Build rapport with each other. That takes about forty forty minutes to an hour. Get. All right then we have. The weekly from Office Manager Meeting Agenda so I'll talk to my regional managers once a week very very quickly. There's a couple of our newer office managers that I'll meet with, but usually I'm meeting with the regional manager, and here's what we talk about. We talk about the financial benchmark. Reports lag measures per department. Per Department and per practice we talk about. The provider benchmark reports, so we typically have a benchmark per provider, if it is a hygienist or an associate or a partner and we talk about how we're doing. How far off is this particular person doing as far as the benchmarks? Are they hitting their production benchmarks? What is their case acceptance looking like? If their case acceptance is hovering around thirty eight percent for that particular provider then we need to do some coaching on communication and treatment planning and case acceptance. Debrief from the departmental meetings so I will just say hey. What's happening in front office back office hygiene billing. Are they hitting their benchmarks? Are there any issues? Okay, good? Let's move onto the next budgetary concerns. The cava John just broke down. We need three new CAVA tron tips. Did you look? Did you shop for the best deal? Okay? Yes, all right. Go move onto the next thing, personal issues and concerns. What dramas happening in the office? I give that two minutes. I can't tolerate more than two minutes per practice per week. That's it you get two minutes of drama. Let me know and I'll cut you off in the middle of your sentence, no more drama than that unhappy patients and and refunds. have an unhappy patient protocol. If there is an open loop, somebody's pissed off. They lift negative review or they're unhappy about something because the lab screwed up the case for the third time. How is that being resolved? HOW ARE WE GONNA? Make that patient happy. What can we do there that is it? That's a fifteen to twenty minute office mannered. I'm usually doing it while I'm driving. But I do it at least once a week. My regional with my regional manager. My regional manager has these same conversations with their office. Managers sit simple that twenty minute discussion. Eliminates so much so much drama. Just that little tiny bit of communication. Okay. I told you guys earlier that we do monthly monthly. Team member of us so every single month, instead of every six months or every year. We're actually doing team member of you, and it's a self assessment, so there is self seeing themselves and built into the self assessments, our core values. And what we're expecting them. To provide as far as as far as the patient experience for instance, this is de la Assistant, self, evaluation assessment, and then they also assess the doctor, and they assess their office manager. They assessed the regional manager as well so they're assessing themselves. We're assessing them. We compare that number and then they assess us. Okay. I agree patients warmly the reception area, according to the standardized protocol and script one two five I see patient adjust headrest to comfort, and then I do I don the patient Napkin. One two five. I asked three non dental related questions and record the date and responses in our office designated in our office.

regional manager office manager Supervisor Meet Office Manager Meeting office manager whigs starbucks Tim Ferriss K. partner John
"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

16:19 min | 2 years ago

"pita" Discussed on How I Built This

"Holy low and behold pita chips. It's a chip, you know, and that was the very last day, that Mark ever cut a piece of bread. You Mark, eventually got married, right? Your business partners. And then you got married because you were together. Right. Yes, we had been together for a long time. And eventually, we just got married in, in ninety seven and always good. All right. Nine hundred ninety nine you get your production method down. Get the machines you need revenues growing. I have to imagine that there are big chip companies looking at you guys. Even though you're this tiny little New England based pita chip company and thinking pita chips. That's the new craze. Let's make pita chips and crush these guys. Not really. Because so at this point in time in the company as we just started to grow, it was also during the time of the no carb phase close. No, carb low, carb diets. Oh, yeah. And we rely here we are once again, we're making toast, and we thought, oh my God, that's gonna put us out of business. Like all these all these things along the way you think. Oh my God. That's gonna put us out of business. Oh my God. That's gonna put us out of business. But ultimately people loved the chips. It was something people ate all the time and it was becoming a staple in their cabinet. It wasn't just a one time purchase. Yeah. All right. So you guys are kind of operating under the radar but growing steadily. Do you remember the first year? You, you actually turned a profit like a significant profit was it was it in nineteen ninety nine or in two thousand on people say it takes three years. I would say it takes five right? So took some time. Yeah, but I guess you guys hit a million dollars in revenue around two thousand one which sounds super impressive to that mean that you guys were all making lots of money. Now, we really paid ourselves very little. And if anything we really weren't making anything because everything went back into, you know if we needed another oven. Well, you know, you don't buy this. You don't try that. You know this because you need another oven. Yeah. All right. So you guys by two thousand one you're starting to become more sort of stable in the production process. Just about. I think about five years after the two of you get married. You Mark divorce you decide to get a divorce that year. Yeah. But then you stay honest as fifty fifty business partners that this is not normally, how the story unfolds, like normally, this is very messy in traumatic in difficult. I mean it, it doesn't sound like that's what happened. Yeah. Like I'm not gonna say we didn't argue I mean, certainly we argued over a lot of things. I mean, there's a lot of tension and the employee's had to put up with us like mom. Iheart each other. And you know what? And they'd they'd go look. Oh boy. There they go. And they turn around, and they leave them room and, you know, and then, and then eventually everybody would come back to their desk. And, and, and that's okay..

Mark New England million dollars three years five years
"pita" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"To douglas pita kelly and he hails from the great state of florida you want when you get some memphis some good stuff okay well douglas just wanted to make sure that the mafia bought was parent when you buy some meth from florida and you wanna know if his good night what do you do if you buy them from florida and smoking in his not good what do you do let's go to fox thirty five orlando report police now that was very easy for deputies to solve the putnam county sheriff's office says this guy came to them he asked deputies to test his mess what was he thinking well he said he had a bad reaction to it and he wanted to press charges against the guy who sold it to him well they tested it it tested positive for mess and they arrested him round of applause the florida laura you never cease to disappoint okay look i understand when you go to a fast food restaurant and your orders messed up you complain okay if you went to a restaurant need to food and got food poisoning you complaint okay any place you went and spent money and weren't satisfied with what you receive you would complain so i understand why douglas felt like he should complain but i don't think customer complaints apply to drug buys.

florida douglas pita kelly memphis orlando putnam county
"pita" Discussed on Twinovation

Twinovation

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on Twinovation

"Yeah and full i clear is baby and now spending even less time like like i'm spend less time you like what do i want to eat i'm going to the groceries needle rule the grocery style like a goddamn franken i only need a little bit garlic but i'm twelve close they they don't last too long you have to do small batch spices otherwise three three to six months done done for the pod yeah wow i didn't know that a lot of old spices wanna use those spices hikes guys with another nice thing about this it's only ten dollars a meal so again you're saving money the grocery store and it really averages out to ten dollars a serving on this dental and what's nice is boys we got ourselves a code so you can cook the same pita pockets sweet potato pita packets that what the code is the code for thirty dollars off the first week so if you think about the number i said earlier was ten dollars a serving that's three servings okay you go to hellofresh dot com twins thirty in enter twins thirty okay that's hellofresh dot com slash t wins twin three zero and then you enter the code two three zero of it okay go there if you get the sweet potato pita pockets let us now because i loved it boys and then you want to say before we get back to the episode start straw strong fish oil hello.

ten dollars thirty dollars six months
"pita" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on KTRH

"All rights they want attach your tbone pita uh her pete based over ginny had more than a couple runins with the folks at petah echo have lost respect for anybody who who tries to greatest or a protest by only of naked women i mean ended sees me they're only thing you know is this they they have so they show up somewhere in la remember when they were throwing paint unfair cow yeah exactly so the pete of course stands in some circles four um people for the ethical treatment of animals live my own pta organization people eating taste the animals oh that's that's my version of beater environmentalists and pita says by the way you're willing to put up with this are pushing a meat tax yup i just knew this was going to happen you know i'll be talking about this for decades small groups of people they're entitled to their opinion bed tell us start trying to force it on the rest of us well here's what ashley burn socie director of campaigns four peter says we have never been closer to be tax and meet tax we have seen people including meat eaters realizing that meat is bad for their health it is taking this incredible toll on the environment people seem more open than ever to an excise tax on meet if we're going to tax dobacco if we're going to zach soda it actually makes sense that was similar attacks on meet that's the director adding at anything that is bad for you at some point time somebody is going to try the tax it is good nothing noah this is all about global warming y'all corcion because cows and methane and and all that slamming that's part of they can bring an coalition they can get everybody all the progresses ma you're never going to pry the tbone on hi how are they gonna get somebody who's raising their own cattle how are they going to tax they'll all though figure out something we'll try to do it you know throwing beer properties actor solving who knows some forty euro newsradio some forty ktrh haida would you like to get a great deal on a lease vehicle first of all are you interested italy's vehicle i would think you probably would be interested if you could get the car you'll want equip the way you want it as a monthly price that makes sense to you with enough miles legit can get around for you.

ginny pita ashley director excise tax peter zach soda global warming italy
"pita" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Download they still claim it's in the public domain david will have to sue them to get it taken down what she says he plans to do there is just one other thing that should be mentioned about mary though there were a bunch of monkeys around when the self these were being taken that day and pita consulted with the primatology is to works with a crust of black macaques she's the one who identified nerudo as the monkey in the famous selfie but david says that's not right a new chose a male i am i distinctly remember it being female i ha i am i to stick november that pink rim and which there the may the female macaques half basically what you're saying is is that nerudo making claim himself yes it's the roman keen court he's taking credit for an artistic work that was actually made by a female monkey you're had i think well the feminists amongst the ships of start to protest by mature she's not the first lady money to have that kind of experience the it's in the nature of both humans an monkeys twohorse around in front of cameras but at the uniquely human characteristic to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars years of our lives to go to court appearance and then get us those wanted the beaches of i shall named coming up the efforts act was about a monkey horsing around next up we have a horse monkeying around that's in a minute recyclable radio when our program continues.

david mary pita
"pita" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This isn't the first time pita has tried an argument like this in the courts in 2011 these you'd see world on behalf of five orcas at sea world orlando nc world san diego orcas are huge like 20 to 30 feet long and they way about six tonnes they typically travel around seventy five miles in a day peters said the keeping these orcas at seaworld in small concrete tanks against their will to perform for human entertainment that was slavery pita lost that case but seaworld has agreed to end its captive orca program after the last of their 27 orcas dies to understand why pita's pursued in cases like these you have to consider two very different pictures about how the world works in one of them humans or at the top of the food chain either because god wanted it that way or because we figured out how to use our opposable thumbs so well that we could hun and gather until the soil and build cities and create copyright laws we make the rules for everything else in this world and the other picture and this is oone pita has hanging on their wall humans are not at the top humans or just another mammal walking round on earth and if we're gonna give ourselves certain rights as humans we should extend those rates to our fellow animals you guys are saying humans are not superior to other animals were were not a we we are just another member of the animal kingdom um and it it's it doesn't you know it it's just prejudice and hubris that prevents us many times from from seeing.

peters human entertainment seaworld pita food chain six tonnes 30 feet
"pita" Discussed on USA Today

USA Today

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on USA Today

"The blast book were sort of in full on rebellion mode against the evil capital and you know for most of that movie pita withheld who put is play by just hutchison i'm who sort of the main love interest for differences kenneth averaging liam hemsworth gail as kind of they're in the corner trying to get with her but she's like not interested and he was held hostage by the evil capital for most of the first part one and when they got hit back at the end of it he had been brainwashed into heating her like the two of them see each other and he literally tries to kill her at the end of that movie i'm because there isn't spoiler alerts that i shipped on their but hopefully if you're the trailer for the new movie you've seen it the other one so like they're they're they're still finding the rebellion they've had some victories they've had some defeats they're kind of canisters being drafted into this role is like a p r person but she rather just kind of like fight she's not cheat she's famous but she's not really good at being famous and so a lot of attention in the book at least is from her wanting to just like roller per sleeves and fight and the rest of the mine be like no you gotta mix beach as you got to rally the troops like that's how you can contribute and she's also like really messed up at this point because she's like been through whole on it um but so you know it's definitely looking like there's gonna be a lot of the whole war thing like it looks much more like a war movie has posted the first one was kind of like a a table setting movie this one's like getting really into the action i'll just gonna say i've only seen the.

pita hutchison liam hemsworth
"pita" Discussed on USA Today

USA Today

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on USA Today

"Kelly lawler from the mothership podcast and what you just heard was the trailer for the very very cool hunger games mocking j part two two which is out november 20th i believe yes it is it is the final of the last one in hunger game series now for move these three bucks um so this is this is the last thing we're going to get permit the last time that have learned skimpy cannons so it's obviously sounds like super mega epic is what can you kinda set the table a little bit about johnny so when we left are characters the end of mocking j part one and so these two movies are are breaking up the blast book um we're sort of in full on rebellion mode against the evil capital and you know for most of that movie pita withheld who put is play by just hutchison i'm who sort of the meaning of interest for differences kennis average eaten liam hemsworth gail it's kind of they're on the corner trying to get with her but she it's like not interested and he was held hostage by the evil capital for most of the first part one and when they got hit back at the end of it he had been brainwashed into hating her like the two of them see each other and he literally tries to kill her at the end of that movie i'm because there isn't spoiler alerts that i should have done there but hopefully if you're watching the trailer for the new movie you've seen it the other one so like they're they're they're still finding the rebellion they've had some victory is they've had some defeats um they're kind of cannabis is being drafted into this role is like a p r person but she would rather just kind of like fight she's not cheat she's famous but she's not really good at being famous and so a lot of attention in the book at least is from her wanting to just like real a leaves and fight and the rest of the mind be like no you gotta mix beaches you've got to rally the troops like that's how you can contribute and she's also like really messed up at this point because she's.

Kelly lawler johnny pita hutchison cannabis liam hemsworth
"pita" Discussed on USA Today

USA Today

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"pita" Discussed on USA Today

"The blast book were sort of in full on rebellion mode against the evil capital and you know for most of that movie pita withheld who put is play by just hutchison i'm who sort of the meaning of interest for differences kenneth averaging liam hemsworth gail as kind of they're in the corner trying to get with her but she's like not interested and he was held hostage by the evil capital for most of the first part one and when they got hit back at the end of it he had been brainwashed into heating her like the two of them see each other and he literally tries to kill her at the end of that movie i'm because there isn't spoiler alerts that i should have done there but hopefully if you're watching the trailer for the new movie you've seen it the other one um so like they're they're they're still finding the rebellion they've had some victories they've had some defeats they're kind of cannabis is being drafted into this role as like a p r person but she would rather just kinda like fight she's not cheat she's famous but she's not really good at being famous and so a lot of attention in the book at least is from her wanting to just like roller per sleeves and fight and the rest of the mine be like no you gotta mix beaches you've got a rally the troops like that's how you can contribute and she's also like really messed up at this point because she's like pin through hold on it um but so you know it's definitely looking like there's gonna be a lot of the whole war thing like it looks much more like a war movie as opposed to the first one was kind of like a a table setting movie this one's like getting really into the action i'll just gonna say i've only seen the first one but just between that and would have seen so far mocking j like it's totally from tone yeah and the other one thing i was gonna ask two is we ran into this a little bit with the hobbit last year were kind of felt like the movies had a lot of padding compared with the do with the books do and this is just judging from the first marking jay to get a sense of that like.

pita hutchison cannabis jay liam hemsworth