9 Burst results for "Pink Wong"

"pink wong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:28 min | 4 d ago

"pink wong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition from NPR news. I'm Leila folded in Washington. And I mean Martinez in Los Angeles. The Biden administration has declared monkeypox a public health emergency. That's right, new cases have climbed above 7000 in the U.S., Health and Human Services secretary Javier basara made the announcement on Thursday. And we urge every American to take monkeypox seriously and to take responsibility to help us tackle this virus. And scientists have some big questions about the current outbreak, like why exactly is the virus spreading so quickly? NPR health reporter ping Wong joins us now to discuss what we know. All right, first off, I declare a public health emergency. While it does a couple things, it brings attention to the problem first of all. And secondly, it opens up funding and resources for federal agencies. Larry gostin, who's a health law professor at Georgetown, says it's about time they declared it. It's the textbook case for an emergency, it's a fast moving infectious disease that's crossed state borders. And we've had a really flawed and cumbersome response so far. Gostin says that the declaration opens up the toolbox for federal agencies and also injects them much needed urgency into the response. It comes a few days after The White House named an official monkeypox response coordinator whose job is to improve vaccine efforts and data collection, and the issue is that cases are really rising very quickly right now while testing has improved access to vaccines and treatments has been really limited. Now, it sounds like a lot of monkeypox cases are connected to sexual contact. I mean, should we all be thinking about this as a kind of an STD? Well, the CDC and the World Health Organization don't officially classify this emerging disease as an STD, but essentially transmitted diseases basically one that's spreading primarily through sexual contact, and that's what we're seeing with monkeypox right now. You know, the vast majority of cases in the U.S. are concentrated in the queer and gay community, primarily among men who have sex with men through physical skin on skin contact. And scientists are also looking at evidence that suggests that the virus can be spread through semen. Now, it can spread in other ways, so it is possible for anyone to catch the virus with sustained exposure. In what other ways and how transmissible is it? Well, the other ways you can get it are from face to face interactions with someone or from touching contaminated surfaces, but the data right now shows that it's really rare and that only happens if you're listening household for hours and hours with someone who's infected. Doctor Peter shin Hong is an infectious disease doctor at UCSF. And he says you're really not likely to get it from trying on a jacket at the thrift store or maybe brushing up against someone with a rash at a festival. Again, I mean, you'd have to brush against them like a scrubbing brush to then make an abrasion in your skin for that monkey box to then come inside you and then cause a lesion on your arm, which we haven't really seen in this outbreak. All right, so that's some good news right there. I mean, do we have any idea of when a person is contagious? Well, a person with monkeypox is thought to be most contagious when they have rashes and lesions on their body. Some people also go through this phase where they start feeling generally sick. They have a fever, a headache before they have a rash, and they might be possibly contagious in that phase. What we still don't know for sure is whether someone can spread the virus without having any symptoms at all. And that's something that's still under investigation. That's NPR health reporter pink Wong. Thanks a lot for the information. You're welcome. Big hurdle last night when it comes to the inflation reduction act, a climate healthcare and tax package. That's right. Last night, the final democratic holdout, kyrsten sinema, came on board, and Democrats are finally ready to introduce the bill in the Senate, and that's expected to happen on Saturday. All right here to tell us more is NPR's Barbara sprunt, Barbara, what broad senator cinema on board? Well, this is a major piece of legislation. It includes 300 billion in deficit reduction and 370 billion in energy and climate spending provisions. It's been a massive goal for Senate Democrats. But it also included a carried interest tax provision. So that changes the way that private equity income is taxed. And it was reported that cinema, a centrist Democrat, had concerns about that. She'd been radio silent on this all week, but late last night, she came to an agreement with Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer. And this really was not a linear process for Democrats. It wasn't a straight a to B, walk us through the twists and turns. Is it ever? That's right. This legislative deal is the result of negotiations that were kept under wraps between Schumer and West Virginia senator Joe Manchin. The deal has been months in the making. Manchin had backtracked his support for a larger bill last month saying he was hesitant to approve more spending with inflation being so high. A lot of Democrats felt deflated by that. But then last week, this deal surfaced, and there was renewed optimism for getting this done. And synonymous support is seen as sort of one more step in that direction. All right, so can Democrats pop champagne bottles have done deal now? Not quite. This will go through a wonky process called reconciliation. And the rules of that process are that each piece of the legislation has to produce a significant impact on federal revenues and spending for it to qualify. So the Senate parliamentarian has to go through everything and make sure that it's all proper. This process would allow Democrats to pass this all on their own with a simple majority, which is good for them because no Republican will vote for this. But because there's always a butt in the U.S. Senate. That means they have to get everyone in the family on board, and that's no small feat, even with cinema support. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who caucuses with the Democrats, has already said that he thinks the bill doesn't go far enough. But is he really going to be the one to vote against this and be the senator to tank the deal? It feels unlikely, but he has said that he may offer amendments to it. And that can sometimes throw things into chaos. All right, so what are the next steps? Schumer has said that the Senate will convene on Saturday afternoon, and they'll take up a procedural vote to begin to be on the bill. That debate could last up to 20 hours. After that comes what we call the vote a Rama, which is when all senators can introduce as many amendments as they want, they can even call for the entire bill, which is over 700 pages long to be read out loud. So it could last well into next week. There's some pressure to get this bill done sooner rather than later, the Senate has had a successful couple of weeks. They've worked across party lines to pass gun safety legislation, a bill that would produce, that would boost the manufacturing of semiconductors here in the U.S., which power everything from medical devices to chips on our phone. They approve Sweden and Finland's bid to join NATO. And although this is a Democrats only Bill, it's a massive victory for the Biden administration. It's something that they're going to want to capitalize on, not to mention campaign on for the midterm elections. And those might seem far down the road, but it's only three months away. That's NPR's Barbara sprunt taking us through all those steps of our thanks. Thank you.

monkeypox Biden administration NPR news Javier basara ping Wong Larry gostin Gostin Senate Peter shin Hong NPR Leila pink Wong kyrsten sinema U.S. Barbara sprunt Health and Human Services Martinez Georgetown World Health Organization STD
"pink wong" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"pink wong" Discussed on NPR News Now

"The time for getting back together is in now live from. Npr news in washington. I'm korva coleman. The supreme court has released several opinions this morning. In case in the justices ruled six to three on a state. Regulation that gives organizers from farm workers unions the right to enter the property of agricultural growers. They can only entrance certain times to talk to workers but the justices the regulation infringes on the growers rights and is unlawful. In another opinion the court has handed a victory to a high school cheerleader in a free speech case. Npr's carrie johnson reports. The court voted eight to one. The school district violated her first amendment rights. The supreme court sided with brandy levy who posted vulgar messages on snapchat after she failed to make the versity cheerleading squad. The school suspended her from cheerleading. For the upcoming year but justice steven brier says that disciplinary action violates the first amendment. His majority opinion says school leaders can punish some off campus speech but that the cheerleaders messages that contain swear. Words didn't cause enough controversy to disrupt activity in school justice. Clarence thomas is the only justice who dissented carrie johnson. Npr news washington defense secretary. Lloyd austin says. He supports removing the prosecution of sexual assault and other related cases from the us. Military's chain of command npr's windsor johnston says house. Democrats are proposing legislation to address a rise in assaults in the military the measure introduced by congresswoman. Jackie speier echoes bipartisan legislation. That's pending in the senate. The bill would take the power of prosecution for serious crimes out of the chain of command and move it to independent military prosecutors. President biden has supported the bill when he promised earlier this year to end the scourge of sexual assault in the military. Npr's windsor johnston reporting an advisory panel to the centers for disease control and prevention is meeting today the examine rare side effects that may be linked to two of the three covid nineteen vaccines authorized for use in the us as npr's pink wong reports. Doctors are reporting some pfizer and moderna vaccine recipients are experiencing a temporary heart issue around three hundred. Young people have reported having heart inflammation after getting to covid vaccine. That's out of more than twenty million people. In this age group that were vaccinated. The condition appears to be very rare and mostly temporary. People generally recover in a matter of days. It also appears to be more common in young men than women advisors to the cdc will compare the risks of this condition to the benefits of receiving the vaccine. The group is expected to keep their recommendation that everybody over twelve should get the vaccine because the risks of getting covid are worse. These vaccine side effects tend to resolve quickly but the disease covid is known because of heart problems in some people ping pong. Npr news on wall street. The dow is down thirteen points. This is npr. A fresh heatwave is building in the west temperatures could hit the low one hundred's in the pacific northwest today. President biden says he'll host a meeting next week with western governors and officials in his administration. They'll discuss preparing for heat. Drought and wildfires reports are emerging that dozens of people have been killed in an airstrike in the northern tigray region of ethiopia. Npr's jason bobi and report from freetown sierra leone the bombing comes as fighting escalates in the area. The airstrikes hit a crowded market in the middle of the day. According to multiple reports ehthiopian soldiers reportedly blocked ambulances trying to get to the remote village troops from both east and eritrea have been battling local forces in the area from the to gripe people's liberation front the fighting intensified. Recently earlier this week ethiopia held regional and national elections but the polls did not take place in to guy due to the ongoing violence. According to the un the conflict has driven millions of ethiopians from their homes pushed three hundred and fifty thousand people to the brink of starvation and threatens spark a famine across much of the north of the country. Jason bobi npr. News freetown the united nations and germany are co hosting a peace conference about libya secretary of state. Anthony blinken is attending. So we're members of libya's transitional government a truce among the warring factions has held since last fall and libyan national elections are tentatively scheduled for december. Libya has been unstable since the fall and death of dictator moammar qaddafi about a decade ago. I'm korva coleman. Npr news from washington..

Anthony blinken Jason bobi Lloyd austin Clarence thomas jason bobi carrie johnson Jackie speier december washington Democrats moammar qaddafi korva coleman next week six one two last fall steven brier eight first amendment
"pink wong" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"pink wong" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Your elected officials by witnesses say that the moral action here is not to cheat the rules but to put pressure on the system to fix them. What about people with underlying health conditions Ping because they're often listed as a group that especially vulnerable, distinct from the general population. Um, but what counts for that Those conditions can be fuzzy. Is it, for example, fair to prioritize smokers who, to some people would have caused their own damage. Yeah, well, smoking is tied to health issues like long damage, and that puts people at higher risk of speak over it. We know and also to social ills like stress and poverty. And Gabriel Lazarow Moon, Joo's bioethicist at Baylor College of Medicine, says it's key to remember that the goal of the U. S vaccination strategy She used the scarce supply of vaccine. We have to save the most lives possible focus on risk, focus on exposure and just let's save lives, you know, Let's not focus on which of these lives we think might be more valuable for society. And let's just say, lives period. He says that if some people think smokers don't belong the list, others might have similar arguments for people with obesity or diabetes. Some might even argue that young lives are more valuable than old lives because they have more time to live. So it gets really complicated. Really quickly. NPR health reporter Pink Wong Thanks so much Thanks for having me Tomorrow on weekend edition Sunday with Lulu should like a Jawad was just 22 when she was diagnosed with leukemia like a lot of young people. It never occurred to me. That time wasn't in fact, limitless for new memoir between two Kingdoms joined the loo tomorrow by telling her smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. Theoretic ation of polio, highly contagious disease that can paralyze Children is considered. One of the world's great vaccination success stories. It's been wiped out in most of the world safe for a few pockets, including Pakistan. False rumors about vaccines, resulting in a resurgence of the disease. NPR's DEA Hadid reports from Rawalpindi. What this means for the country's rollout of the covert 19 vaccine. Four years ago. Pakistan with close to eradicating polio, Remember Then in a key moment, a video went viral that nearly upended Pakistan's mass vaccination campaigns. It showed a man shouting that Children were becoming sick after taking the polio vaccine..

NPR Pakistan polio vaccine obesity Baylor College of Medicine Gabriel Lazarow Moon Pink Wong DEA Hadid reporter Joo Rawalpindi U. S
"pink wong" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"pink wong" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me Scott. We've heard about people lining up at the grocery store pharmacy in anticipation. There might be some extra shots left over at the end of the day and often They're conspicuously young, healthy and certainly not in a priority group. What is the ethical call on that? Well, bioethicists say yes, it's totally fine for them to get them if it is truly going to waste with feeding from the Johns Happens, Bioethics Institute says the top priority right now is using all the vaccine. We have the worst possible thing that could happen in the context of a violent of visor. Madonna vaccine would be to have to throw even a single dose the way you know that waste could come from people not showing up for their scheduled appointments. Or last week, we heard about a freezer failure in Seattle that caused over 1000. Vaccines to thought once. But if you're healthy, young person with Loco vid risks, fading says there are ethically preferable things you could do in those situations. If you've got a colleague. Or a family member or a neighbor who's already in a priority groups and you can call them up and you can help them get there. Of course, that's better. So for someone like me who's under 65 works from home, it would be better to try and match that. Do so the president higher risk before I I go ahead and take it, Ping. If I'm not eligible to get it in my county, But I would be in the county next door, one of the ethics of wandering over the county line to get it. The answer in this case is no, You should not do that, because here, what you're doing is not preventing a vaccine from going to waste. You're actually taking appointment That's meant for your neighbor Faith. Fletcher, a bioethicist at University of Alabama says that kind of line cutting is a form of vaccine entitlement. There are 30 people. Feel justified and skipping the line and going county over our state over because there's so accustomed to having access. They're going to find a way that said many people have real frustrations with all the different rules and how it's going fast in some places and slow and others so If you think the rules are unfair, you should feel free to speak up to organize to email. Your elected officials by witnesses say that the moral action here is not to cheat the rules but to put pressure on the system to fix them. What about people with underlying health conditions Ping because they're often listed as a group that especially vulnerable, distinct from the general population. Um, but what counts for that Those conditions can be fuzzy. Is it for example, fair to prioritize smokers who, to some people would have caused their own damage. Yeah, well, smoking is tied to health issues like long damage, and that puts people at higher risk of speak over it. We know and also to social ills like stress and poverty. And Gabriel Lazarow Moon, Joo's bioethicist at Baylor College of Medicine, says it's key to remember that the goal of the U. S vaccination strategy She used the scarce supply of vaccine. We have to save the most lives possible focus on risk, focus on exposure and just let's save lives, You know, Let's not focus on which of these lives we think might be more valuable for society. Let's just save lives period. He says that if some people think smokers don't belong the list, others might have similar arguments for people with obesity or diabetes. Some might even argue that young lives are more valuable than old lives because they have more time to live. So it gets really complicated. Really quickly. NPR health reporter Pink Wong Thanks so much Thanks for having me Tomorrow on weekend edition Sunday with Lulu. So Laker Jawad was just 22 when she was diagnosed with leukemia Like a lot of young people that never occurred to me that time wasn't in fact limitless. Her new memoir between two Kingdoms joined the loo tomorrow by telling your smart speaker to play NPR. Or your member station by name. The eradication of polio, highly contagious disease that can paralyze Children is considered. One of the world's great vaccination success stories. It's been wiped out in most of the world safe for a few pockets, including Pakistan. False rumors about vaccines, resulting in a resurgence of the disease. NPR's DEA Hadid reports from well, Pindi What this means for the country's rollout of the covert 19 vaccine. Four years ago. Pakistan with close to eradicating problem Remember Then, in a key moment, a video went viral that nearly upended Pakistan's mass vaccination campaigns. It showed a man shouting that Children were becoming sick after taking the oral polio vaccine is.

Pakistan NPR polio vaccine Laker Jawad Seattle Scott Johns polio Madonna obesity Baylor College of Medicine Bioethics Institute president DEA Hadid Fletcher University of Alabama Gabriel Lazarow Moon Pink Wong reporter U. S
"pink wong" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"pink wong" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When it comes to getting a covert 19 vaccination Right now they're fine print changes State State County to County and that opens loophole. So we have NPR health reporter Ping Wong with us now to talk about the ethics of Who gets vaccines. When Whether it's never fair to cut the line. Thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me Scott. We've heard about people lining up at the grocery store pharmacy in anticipation. There might be some extra shots left over at the end of the day and often They're conspicuously young, healthy and certainly not in a priority group. What is the ethical call on that? Well, bioethicists say yes, it's totally fine for them to get them if it is truly going to waste with fading from the Johns Happens, Bioethics Institute says the top priority right now is using all the vaccine. We have the worst possible thing that could happen in the context as a vial of visor, Maturino vaccine would be to have to throw even a single dose away. You know that waste could come from people not showing up for their scheduled appointments. Or last week, we heard about a freezer failure in Seattle that caused over 1000 vaccines to thought once. But if you're healthy, young person with loco bit risks, fading, says there are ethically preferable things you could do in those situations. If you've got a colleague. Or a family member or a neighbor who's already in a priority groups and you could call them up and you can help them get there. Of course, that's forever. So for someone like me who's under 65 works from home, it would be better to try and match that do so the person at higher risk before I go ahead and take it, Ping If I'm not eligible to get it in my county, But I would be in the county next door, one of the ethics of wandering over the county line to get it. The answer in this case is no, You should not do that, because here, what you're doing is not preventing a vaccine from going to waste. You're actually taking appointment That's meant for your neighbor Faith. Fletcher, a bioethicist at University of Alabama says that kind of line cutting is a form of vaccine entitlement. There are 30 people. Feel justified and skipping the line and going county over our state over because there's so accustomed to having access. They're going to find a way that said many people have real frustrations with all the different rules and how it's going fast in some places and slow and others so If you think the rules are unfair, you should feel free to speak up to organize to email. Your elected officials by witnesses say that the moral action here is not to cheat the rules but to put pressure on the system to fix them. What about people with underlying health conditions Ping because they're often listed as a group that specially vulnerable distinct from the general population. Um, like what counts for that Those conditions can be fussy. Is it, for example, fair to prioritize smokers who, to some people would have caused their own damage. Yeah, well, smoking is tied to health issues like long damage, and that puts people at higher risk of speak over it. We know and also to social ills like stress and poverty. And Gabriel Lazarow Moon, Joo's bioethicist at Baylor College of Medicine, says it's key to remember that the goal of the U. S vaccination strategy She used the scarce supply of vaccine. We have to save the most lives possible focus on risk, focus on exposure and just let's save lives, you know, Let's not focus on which of these lives we think might be more valuable for society. And let's just say, lives period. He says that if some people think smokers don't belong the list, others might have similar arguments for people with obesity or diabetes. Some might even argue that young lives are more valuable than old lives because they have more time to live. So it gets really complicated. Really quickly. NPR health reporter Pink Wong Thanks so much Thanks for having me Tomorrow on weekend edition Sunday with Lulu. So like a Jawad was just 22 when she was diagnosed with leukemia. Like a lot of young people, it never occurred to me that time wasn't in fact limitless. Her new memoir between two Kingdoms joined Lulu tomorrow by telling her smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. He eradication of polio, highly contagious disease that can paralyze Children is considered one of the world's great vaccination success stories..

Ping Wong State State County to County reporter NPR Seattle Johns polio Pink Wong obesity Baylor College of Medicine Bioethics Institute leukemia Fletcher University of Alabama Gabriel Lazarow Moon Scott U. S Joo
"pink wong" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"pink wong" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Prime minister says Crushing the two grand fighters is the only way to ensure stability. His critics say he's an authoritarians determined to centralize power in a vast and diverse country well, Ethiopia's mosaic of communities hold together or seized the opportunity to settle old scores. Ah, vast economic powerhouse Is Ethiopia, jeopardizing its success by entering into this conflict, How will neighboring states cope with an influx of refugees? Anomaly, prepared to mediate or will self interest and grievance, drive them to stoke the flames and escalate the conflict? Well, Ethiopia's internal battle destabilize the region. That's the real story for the BBC after the knees. Live from NPR news. I'm Shea Stevens, The U. S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is strongly discouraging travel over the Thanksgiving holiday to prevent the spread of covert 19. As NPR's pink Wong reports. The CDC is also just suggesting that Americans stay home by staying home. The CDC means celebrating the holiday with people you've been living with for at least 14 days before Thanksgiving. That's the amount of time it generally takes for people to show symptoms from a Corona virus infection. If you must gather of people outside of your household, say college kids coming home or family you're not parting with the CDC recommends taking extra precautions such as everybody wearing masks, opening doors and windows for ventilation and limiting the number of people with access to the kitchen and food prep. The CDC urges people to be as safe as possible and to limit their travel. This year. Thanksgiving coincides with the third wave of covert cases that shows no signs of abating. Ping PONG NPR NEWS, California Governor Gavin Newsom. Is imposing an overnight curfew that began Saturday in 41 counties with the highest infection rates. The orders to remain in effect until December, 21st Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading infectious disease expert, is stressing the importance of leadership during a pandemic More from NPR's Ryan Lucas thought, she says the cove in 19 pandemic is the greatest public health crisis in more than 100 years. In such a crisis, he says it is essential to provide the public truthful information based on science and data. The public needs to hear the truth as it is rather than as we might want it to be. He says that officials should provide regular public updates and lead by example. Transparency, he says, is critical when we falter in transparency understandably. Some people into stop believing what we say. Stopped listening altogether felt she spoke after receiving a distinguished service award from the FBI Agents Association. The ceremony was held virtually because of the pandemic. Ryan Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington One of President Trump's attorneys, held a press conference in Washington Thursday to push more debunked conspiracies about widespread election fraud. Details from NPR's Miles parks. President Trump's Department of Homeland Security says the 2020 election may have been the most secure in the nation's history. But even his other Republicans were elected in droves. The president's campaign team, including Rudy Giuliani, is still trying to argue that Trump was somehow the victim of a shadowy nationwide plot to steal the election from him. Give us an opportunity to prove it in court, and we will in more than two dozen unsuccessful lawsuit So far, the campaign has yet to provide any evidence of fraud. Chris Crabs, the election security official, fired this week for refuting the campaign's claims Tweeted that the press conference was the most dangerous hour and 45 minutes of television. This is NPR news. The federal government is carried out its eighth execution this year after the Supreme Court cleared the way 49 year old Orlando Hall was put to death last night for the 1994 kidnapping and murder of a teenager in Texas. Judges temporarily blocking the first federal execution of a female in Pate in Maine in nearly 60 years after her attorneys contract a Corona virus during a prison visit. It seems that Americans are not the only people trying to exploit cross border loopholes and getting into Canada as damn carpet Chuck reports. Some Canadian snowbirds have also found ways to skirt the rules. It's about this time of year that Canadians who usually spend their winters in the southern US pack up and head there, but with the borders closed a non essential travel Those snowbirds air using a loophole through pandemic restrictions to get their cars, trailers and RVs down south. Transport companies can ship the vehicles to the U. S. Since the border remains open to commerce, so they can use their commercial licenses to bring Canadian vehicles across. And although it's discouraged cross border air travel is still permitted. So Canadians arranged to pick up their vehicles in the U. S some transport companies or even offering seats on small charter jets. As part of a package for NPR news. I'm Dan Carp in Chuck in Toronto. The Vatican is being sued over its handling of sex abuse allegations against former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick. Last week, the Vatican released a report finding that church leaders on all levels ignored decades of claims against McCarrick. Who was too fraught last year at the age of 89..

NPR CDC Ethiopia President Trump Ryan Lucas president fraud Theodore McCarrick Prime minister Governor Gavin Newsom Dr. Anthony Fauci Washington U. S Centers for Disease Contr Shea Stevens BBC FBI Agents Association Dan Carp US
"pink wong" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"pink wong" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well King. Good morning. The meeting of the U. N. General Assembly, unlike any other in history is underway. The U. N is marking its 75th anniversary with world leaders addressing the General Assembly virtually because of the pandemic. In his speech, U. N Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez called for unity, saying he's particularly worried about the U. S. China Divide You must do everything to avoid a new gold watch. We are moving in a very dangerous line action. Our world cannot afford the future where the two largest economies split the globe in a great fracture. Each with its own trade and financial rules and Internet and artificial intelligence capacities. NPR diplomatic correspondent Michelle Kelemen is following all of this. Good morning, Michelle. Good morning. So some dark words there from the secretary general. Let me ask you broadly, though, before we before we focus in on those how is a virtual U N General Assembly going Well, it means a lot of talking past each other. I'm afraid. I mean, you know, there's not the usual diplomacy that goes on in the corridors of the U. N. While Gu Terrace was there in person. The rest of the speakers are all in recorded video messages. And this is the 75th anniversary of the world body, and the secretary general sees it as a foundational moment, a time for International cooperation to respond to the cove in 19 pandemic as well as an economic crisis in the climate crisis. But he really sounds increasingly worried about the divisions between the US and China, which is really paralyzed the U. N Security Council. The assembly just heard from President Trump. What did he say? Did he talk about China? Absolutely. You know, he started talking about the pandemic boasting about America's handling of it. Despite Really devastating death toll here in the United States, and he placed blame squarely on Beijing. We will end the pandemic and we will enter a new era of unprecedented prosperity, cooperation and peace. As we pursue this bright future, we must hold accountable the nation which unleashed this plague onto the world. China. The president called it the China virus. He complained that the World Health Organization is virtually controlled by China. Remember the U. S is pulling out of the W. H. O. Trump also used this speech to defend his decision to pull out of the Paris climate accord, complaining that the world has ignored China's quote, rampant pollution. They only want to punish America. And I will not stand for it, he said. Okay. So later today, we're going to hear from China's President, Xi Jinping, among others. Do you think he will respond to President Trump? Or does he have his own set of issues He wants to get out there? Well, you know, he actually spoke yesterday, too, at the celebration of the 75th anniversary of the U. N dit tout multilateralism and to support the rights of smaller countries. You know, China has been very successful in recent years in increasing its influence at the U. N and I've heard a lot of diplomats say that as the US withdraws China is just going to step in and even more. Interesting. NPR's diplomatic correspondent Michelle Hellman, Michelle, Thanks so much. Thank you. Okay, Here's a life or death question Who gets the first doses of the Corona virus vaccine? To be clear? There's not a vaccine to argue about right now. But it's by no means too early to ask who gets priority in the early phase when a vaccine is approved, But there's not enough for everyone. Today. A CDC advisory committee is considering what to recommend NPR's pink Wong reports. It's still unknown when a cove in 19 vaccine might be available in the U. S. But when it is at first There may only be 10 to 15 million doses available. That's according to Operation works speed the government's vaccine project, and it's just enough to cover about 3 to 5% of the U. S population. Dr. Grace Lee, a medical officer at Stanford Children's Hospital who's also on the CDC committee, says there's a lot of people who could really benefit from it. Those who have the highest risk of exposure those who are at risk for Sameer morbidity and mortality. Also, she says, people whose jobs are critical to keeping our healthcare systems and society running. And if you add those all together, we're talking about a lot of people. This accounts for more than half of us adults. That's the CDC is. Kathleen, Dueling presenting at last month's meeting of the CDC is Advisory Committee on immunization practices. The question before the committee is when you only have vaccines for 3 to 5% of the population, who gets it first. Ruth Faden is a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins Consulting on the World Health Organization's vaccine guidelines. She represents a consensus when she says those first doses should go to front line health burgers who are directly exposed to cove in 19. Obviously they're being placed at High risk of infection because they're taking care of people who are infected and infection. But even within the seemingly clear category, their questions about who a front line health worker is It's a doctor, a nurse. It's also hospital staff that careful and clean up after a Cupid patient's fading, says nursing home workers are in this Category two. They also are taking care of people who are vulnerable in many cases to serious disease and death if they contract coded preliminary guidelines from the CDC say it may also include pharmacy staff and emergency medical responders. A draft report from the National Academy of Sciences suggests that morticians and funeral home workers are also front line health workers because they handle covert victimsbodies and if everyone who might qualify as a health worker exceeds the initial supply. Lee at Stanford says that state and local authorities might have to focus it more health care worker vaccination sounds simple, but if we don't have enough doses, we still have to be really judicious and how we're implementing. This could mean restricting the vaccine. The parts of the state that are being hit the hardest, for example. And that's just for the 1st 15 million doses within a few weeks as manufacturing kicks.

China CDC NPR President Trump United States World Health Organization NPR News Michelle General Assembly U. N. General Assembly Steve Inskeep president America Dr. Grace Lee Secretary General Antonio Guti U. N Michelle Kelemen National Academy of Sciences
"pink wong" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"pink wong" Discussed on KCRW

"A motorcycle and a cement truck it's three fifty a KC R. W. thanks for being with us this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelley and I'm ari Shapiro coral reefs are dying around the world and a new study suggests a way to save them the study of the Florida Keys shows that a lot of the stress on corals comes from local sources which means there are things local communities can do to help the corals NPR's pink Wong reports Brian the point has watched half of Florida's corals die off in the past twenty years watching the decline of court what we he has been heartbreaking I live in the Florida Keys and when I moved here in the early nineteen eighties I had no idea that we would be losing these corals the point a professor at Florida Atlantic University has spent his career studying corals at the leaky roof and the Florida Keys he's the lead author on any paper out in the journal marine biology it analyzes thirty years of data he's collected and its conclusion is actually hopeful you've got quite a story here would you put all this together that there actually is hope for coral reefs after all how does he figure a study which showed that warming temperatures were killing off corals but as data actually showed that the corals biggest problem was another human source too much nitrogen it comes from badly treated sewage as well as fertilizer and topsoil from people's yards and farms it feeds blooms of algae that block out the light and also throws off the nutrient balance in the water and make the calls more likely to catch disease to go through coral bleaching and to die Michael fox studies coral reefs at the woods hole oceanographic institution he wasn't involved in the study but he appreciates its long term view we're starting to have enough data to really track the impacts of local scale structures to quarrels over long enough time frames to understand how the communities are changing James Porter at the university of Georgia co authored the Florida study he says that in the past most scientists and the public figure that there was little we could do to help corals unless we fixed all of climate change what our study shows is that taking care of one off from the land which is a local phenomenon that can protect coral reefs to put this is our findings from Florida can apply to reefs around the world and that better sewage and storm water treatment might give corals a fighting chance at surviving climate change ping long NPR news.

Mary Louise Kelley Florida Keys Brian Florida professor Florida Atlantic University marine biology James Porter NPR ari Shapiro pink Wong Michael fox woods hole university of Georgia co thirty years twenty years
Florida Keys, Brian And Florida discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

02:16 min | 3 years ago

Florida Keys, Brian And Florida discussed on All Things Considered

"Coral reefs are dying around the world and a new study suggests a way to save them the study of the Florida Keys shows that a lot of the stress on corals comes from local sources which means there are things local communities can do to help the corals NPR's pink Wong reports Brian the point has watched half of Florida's corals die off in the past twenty years watching the decline of court what we he has been heartbreaking I live in the Florida Keys and when I moved here in the early nineteen eighties I had no idea that we would be losing these corals the point a professor at Florida Atlantic University has spent his career studying corals at the leaky roof and the Florida Keys he's the lead author on any paper out in the journal marine biology it analyzes thirty years of data he's collected and its conclusion is actually hopeful you've got quite a story here would you put all this together that there actually is hope for coral reefs after all how does he figure a study which showed that warming temperatures were killing off corals but as data actually showed that the corals biggest problem was another human source too much nitrogen it comes from badly treated sewage as well as fertilizer and topsoil from people's yards and farms it feeds blooms of algae that block out the light and also throws off the nutrient balance in the water and make the calls more likely to catch disease to go through coral bleaching and to die Michael fox studies coral reefs at the woods hole oceanographic institution he wasn't involved in the study but he appreciates its long term view we're starting to have enough data to really track the impacts of local scale structures to quarrels over long enough time frames to understand how the communities are changing James Porter at the university of Georgia co authored the Florida study he says that in the past most scientists and the public figure that there was little we could do to help corals unless we fixed all of climate change what our study shows is that taking care of one off from the land which is a local phenomenon that can protect coral reefs to put this is our findings from Florida can apply to reefs around the world and that better sewage and storm water treatment might give corals a fighting chance at surviving climate change ping long NPR

Florida Keys Brian Florida Professor Florida Atlantic University Marine Biology James Porter NPR Pink Wong Michael Fox Woods Hole University Of Georgia Co Thirty Years Twenty Years