19 Burst results for "Ping Guang"

"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Covered 19 vaccine are gonna be arriving at hospitals across the country today. Yes, Some Americans got their first doses yesterday, which was the same day that the U. S death toll exceeded 300,000 people. At the Long Island Jewish Medical Center. Dr Michelle Chester, who administered the hospital's first shot, said help is finally on the way. Let's take advantage of this glimmer of hope, which is the vaccine. So we can move forward as a community as a nation and is a world we've got NPR Health reporter Ping Guang with us. Good Morning, Ping. Good morning. What can we expect for the rest of the week on the vaccine front? So those health care workers that we saw getting vaccinated yesterday kicked it off more than 400 sites around the country will be getting their first shipment today. Here's Health Secretary Alex aides are speaking in Washington D. C by Wednesday. Accident will be delivered everywhere from sites here in Washington to the shores of Guam to the northeastern corner of main All in all around three million doses of the fives of accident going out this week, and all states are really glad to be receiving these vaccines. There's a lot we need to figure out to get those vaccines into millions of people's of arms quickly. Remember, it was just authorized on Friday, so they need to train a lot of people on had a thought them and mix them and give them out. How do you assess people for potential contraindications and Make sure people come back at the right time for that second shot right? So and of course, all these first shipments there limited there's not enough to even cover all the health workers, right? When can we expect more supply? Well, General guess paranoia, the logistics lead for Operation Works. Speed says that every week from now on, states will be getting more vaccines. It is not a one and done delivery. It is a consistent flow of ordering preparation and delivery. It rolls out as vaccines were available, and more and more people get access to the vaccine every day. Harnesses. They're looking. They're providing. Look ahead, forecasted. States can plan ahead six weeks in the future, and now we've seen most of those first dose is going to health care workers so far, But next week, some states are expected to start immunizing nursing home residents as well through federal partnership with CVS and Walgreens teams from these pharmacies. They're gonna be visiting nursing homes to give shots to both residents and to staff. And as for he goes next, it's really up to the states who they prioritize. It could be people like essential workers or could be built people with underlying health conditions. The CDC is planning on coming up with more guidance on that one priority groups in the coming weeks. So we're talking about the Fizer vaccine that was produced in tandem with a German company, but we could be getting news of another vaccine this week, right? Yeah, Absolutely. So that's a big decision coming this week that could really increase the supply of vaccines on Thursday. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a vaccine from the drug company Madonna for emergency use authorization. Was the same process of the visor vaccine went through last week, and the maternal vaccines actually similar to the fires of vaccine and how it works, and also comparable and safety and efficacy. So if that one gets authorized, the government says they have six million doses of that ready to ship out. All right. NPR health reporter Ping Hong on the latest on.

reporter NPR Health Long Island Jewish Medical Cen Ping Guang Dr Michelle Chester Food and Drug Administration Ping Hong Washington NPR CDC Guam Secretary Walgreens Madonna Alex CVS
"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

"Movement to limit the no knock warrants that let police burst into residences without warning activists were inspired by the death of Briana Taylor, who was shot during a questionable drug raid on her apartment in Louisville last March. NPR's Martin cost has more. No knock legislation is being considered across the country this year in places like Kentucky, Ohio in New York, the one state that collects annual data about police. Forcible entry raids is Utah and the numbers there show that they're mostly used for drug enforcement. Connor Boyack runs a libertarian policy is to they're called the bear to us, and he says, it's timeto act on those statistics. Do we really want to be recognizing the lives of individuals for drug searches? As we've seen? We've seen it in Utah. We've seen it with Rianna Taylor was seen it elsewhere. We're losing lives over this, and so is it worth it? As legislation has drawn up, the activists are realizing that a simple ban on no knock raids may not do that much actual know Knox are relatively rare. Even the raid that killed Briana Taylor may not have been executed as a no knock. I was facing the door a taste. That's what we hear in this body camera video from the immediate aftermath of the raid. Taylor's boyfriend accuses the police of just barging in and shooting. But a cop on the scene denies that. No. Three times he starts warning. Don't try that. It's hard to make out there. But the cop in the video says no, no, we announced three times police search warrant. If that's true, then the raid was executed as a knock and announce, and a ban on know Knox would have stopped it. We actually have to be more stringent about all types of search warrants on de specially knocking announce warrants. That's Katie Ryan with a criminal justice reform group known as campaign zero. Flimsy legislation would not stop officers from technically knocking and announcing hitting the door wants saying officers than using the battering ram. You know and shredding someone's door. Because warrant policy and legislation has so few requirements, so they've expanded their campaign toe add requirements to knock and announce warrants, too. Their wish list includes things like limiting the raids to daytime hours, making sure the officers are in uniform and that the Intel about who's inside the house is up to date. But perhaps the most contentious of their proposals is the minimum weight time. They say Police should pause at least 30 seconds after they first announced themselves. Virginia State legislator Luxuries aired thinks that makes sense not announced. Wait for someone inside to respond to gather themselves, you know, make a decision about how they're getting ready to choose to interact with law enforcement. Before any additional action is taken. Aired. Got a package of warrant requirements passed in Virginia this fall. But the 32nd wait. Time was something she could not get through. It was called dangerous to officers. And that's the feeling of Thor feels. He used to be a SWAT commander in Colorado Springs. And he's now the head of the National Tactical Officers Association to have a blanket stipulation of a mandated time for waiting. Just increases risk, he says. 30 seconds may seem a reasonable wait time outside of a large single family house in the middle of the night. But outside, say, a small motel room containing a potentially armed fugitive 30 seconds would be way too long for those officers at the door. Feels believes fast paced. Forced entries should be a last resort. But they should still be there as an option, along with other approaches, such as partial entries or surrounding the residents and calling the suspect by phone. All of these are part of this whole risk analysis. That is absolutely the most critical component in determining what option is likely to be the most successful with the least amount of risk to everybody involved. He thinks the courts have actually got the balance right by telling police to be quote reasonable and how they execute a warrant. And if police go too far, the court can always throw out the evidence from the raid. But hell says he also understands what he calls the emotion coming out of incidents such as the death of Briana Taylor, which is driving this campaign to more clearly define what a reasonable police raid should look like. Martin cost NPR NEWS.

government CDC advisory Committee NPR News NPR Food and Drug Administration Elsa Chang Briana Taylor reporter Mary Louise Kelly Utah Ping Guang Los Angeles Washington Rianna Taylor Connor Boyack
"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The no knock warrants that let police burst into residences without warning activists were inspired by the death of Briana Taylor, who was shot during a questionable drug raid on her apartment in Louisville last March. NPR's Martin cost has more. No knock legislation is being considered across the country this year in places like Kentucky, Ohio in New York, the one state that collects annual data about police. Forcible entry raids is Utah and the numbers there show that they're mostly used for drug enforcement. Connor Boyack runs a libertarian policy is to they're called the bear to us, and he says, it's timeto act on those statistics. Do we really want to be recognizing the lives of individuals for drug searches? As we've seen? We've seen it in Utah. We've seen it with Briana Taylor was seen it elsewhere. We're losing lives over this, and so is it worth it? But as legislation has drawn up, the activists are realizing that a simple ban on no knock raids may not do that. Much actual know Knox are relatively rare. Even the raid that killed Briana Taylor may not have been executed as a no knock. Somebody was facing the door a taste. That's what we hear in this body camera video from the immediate aftermath of the raid. Taylor's boyfriend accuses the police of just barging in and shooting. But a cop on the scene denies that three times he starts warming. Don't try that. It's hard to make out there. But the cop in the video says no, no, we announced three times police search warrant. If that's true, then the raid was executed as a knock and announce, and a ban on know Knox would have stopped it. We actually have to be more stringent about all types of search warrants on de specially knocking announce warrants. That's Katie Ryan with a criminal justice reform group known as campaign zero. Flimsy legislation would not stop officers from technically knocking and announcing Hitting the door once saying officers then using the battering ram. You know and shredding someone's door. Because warrant policy and legislation has so few requirements, so they've expanded their campaign toe add requirements to knock and announce warrants, too. Their wish list includes things like limiting the raids to daytime hours, making sure the officers are in uniform and that the Intel about who's inside the house is up to date. But perhaps the most contentious of their proposals is the minimum weight time. They say Police should pause at least 30 seconds after they first announced themselves. Virginia State legislator Luxuries aired thinks that makes sense not announced. Wait for someone inside to respond to gather themselves, you know, make a decision about how they're getting ready to choose to interact with law enforcement. Before any additional action is taken. Aired got a package of warrant requirements passed in Virginia this fall. But the 32nd wait. Time was something she could not get through. It was called dangerous to officers, and that's the feeling of Thor feels. He used to be a SWAT commander in Colorado Springs. And he's now the head of the National Tactical Officers Association to have a blanket stipulation of a mandated time for waiting. Just increases risk, he says. 30 seconds may seem a reasonable wait time outside of a large single family house in the middle of the night, but outside, say, a small motel room containing a potentially armed fugitive. 30 seconds would be way too long for those officers at the door. Feels believes fast paced. Forced entries should be a last resort. But they should still be there as an option, along with other approaches, such as partial entries or surrounding the residents and calling the suspect by phone. All of these are part of this whole risk analysis. That is absolutely the most critical component in determining what option is likely to be the most successful with the least amount of risk to everybody involved. He thinks the courts have actually got the balance right by telling police to be quote reasonable and how they execute a warrant. And if police go too far, the court can always throw out the evidence from the raid. But hell says he also understands what he calls the emotion coming out of incidents such as the death of Briana Taylor, which is driving this campaign to more clearly define what a reasonable police raid should look like. Martin cost NPR news.

government CDC advisory Committee Briana Taylor NPR Food and Drug Administration reporter Utah Ping Guang Connor Boyack Alex Knox secretary Paine Louisville Ping Hong
"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The Koven 19 Vaccines now in development, have very strict storage requirements, including being capped it super cold temperatures. So how the shots be kept cold during shipping and who gets first access to the vaccine. NPR's Ping Guang has been looking into plans for getting a future vaccine from the manufacturer into the arms of willing people, And she's with us now hyping Harry. So let's start with those super cold requirements. How does the vaccine that needs to be stored in really cold temperatures get moved across the country in the world? Yeah, well, it depends on which vaccine we're talking about the tea vaccines that are the first furthest along in clinical trials. Both have to be kept cold, but to different degrees, So one is made by the drug company Pfizer, and that requires the coldest storage and he's kept it minus seven degrees Celsius, which is Close. The temperature of dry ice and visor has spent some $2 billion building their own global supply chain. So here in the U. S. They have an assembly center in Kalamazoo, Michigan, where Will be packing vaccine vials into dry ice pods and these pods will be loaded into boxes that can keep these ultra cold temperatures for up to 10 days, and they'll be moved around the country in cargo planes and trucks by carriers like UPS and FedEx. Now the modern A vaccine requires storage at minus 20 degrees Celsius, which is comparable more to a home freezer and that one would get distributed by the government, at least at first, so Madonna will get the vaccines to a government site. And from there, the government will work with a private contractor to get the vaccines out. Two locations like Hospitals, pharmacies clinics wherever there requested by states. Okay, so moving from temperature to distribution. How are these vaccines going to be allocated to each state? Well, the government says that they'll be providing them to states for free and governors have been asking. Well, How are you going to figure out how much each state gets.

Mary Louise Kelly Harry Ari Shapiro Ping Guang Pfizer Kalamazoo NPR FedEx Michigan
"ping guang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The Koven 19 Vaccines now in development, have very strict storage requirements, including being capped it super cold temperatures. So how the shots be kept cold during shipping and who gets first access to the vaccine. NPR's Ping Guang has been looking into plans for getting a future vaccine from the manufacturer into the arms of willing people, and she's with us now, I think Harry. So let's start with those super cold requirements. How does the vaccine that needs to be stored and really cool temperatures get moved across the country in the world? Yeah, well, it depends on which vaccine we're talking about the tea vaccines that are the first furthest along in clinical trials. Both have to be kept cold, but to different degrees, So one is made by the drug company Pfizer, and that requires the coldest storage and he's kept it minus seven degree Celsius, which is Close. The temperature of dry ice and advisor has spent some $2 billion building their own global supply chain. So here in the U. S. They have an assembly center and Kalamazoo, Michigan, where they'll be packing vaccine vials into try ice pods and these pods will be loaded into boxes that can keep these ultra cold temperatures for up to 10 days, and they'll be moved around the country in cargo planes and trucks by carriers like UPS and FedEx. Now the modern A vaccine requires storage and minus 20 degrees Celsius, which is comparable more to a home freezer and that one would get distributed by the government, at least at first, so maternal will get the vaccines to a government site. And from there, the government will work with a private contractor to get the vaccines out two locations like hospitals, pharmacies clinics wherever there requested by states. Okay, so moving from temperature to distribution. How are these vaccines going to be allocated to each state? Well, the government says that they'll be providing them to states for free and governors have been asking. Well, How are you going to figure out how much each state gets?.

Mary Louise Kelly Harry Ari Shapiro Ping Guang Pfizer Kalamazoo NPR FedEx advisor Michigan
"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

"Mari Shapiro, the Koven 19 Vaccines now in development, have very strict storage requirements, including being capped at super cold temperatures. So howthe shots be kept cold during shipping and who gets first access to the vaccine. NPR's Ping Guang has been looking into plans for getting a future vaccine from the manufacturer into the arms of willing people, and she's with us now, I think Harry. So let's start with those super cold requirements. How does the vaccine that needs to be stored in really cold temperatures get moved across the country in the world? Yeah, well, it depends on which vaccine we're talking about the tea vaccines that are the first furthest along in clinical trials. Both have to be kept cold, but to different degrees, So one is made by the drug company Pfizer, and that requires the coldest storage and he's kept it minus seven degrees Celsius, which is Close. The temperature of dry ice and advisor has spent some $2 billion building their own global supply chain. So here in the U. S. They have an assembly center in Kalamazoo, Michigan, where they'll be packing vaccine vials into dry ice pods and these pods will be loaded into boxes that can keep these ultra cold temperatures for up to 10 days, and they'll be moved around the country in cargo planes and trucks by carriers like UPS and FedEx. Now the modern A vaccine requires storage at minus 20 degrees Celsius, which is comparable more to a home freezer and that one would get distributed by the government, at least at first, so maternal will get the vaccines to a government site. And from there, the government will work with a private contractor to get the vaccines out two locations like hospitals, pharmacies clinics wherever there requested by states. Okay, so moving from temperature to distribution. How are these vaccines going to be allocated to each state? Well, the government says that they'll be providing them to states for free and governors have been asking. Well, How are you going to figure out how much each state gets?.

Mari Shapiro Harry Ping Guang Pfizer Kalamazoo NPR FedEx advisor Michigan
"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The City Council is considering legislation that would require the Department of Transportation to regulate all mope Ed ride sharing companies in New York City. Tonight. There's a slight chance of showers but way after midnight probably after 1 A.m. Cloudy tonight Love about 51 degrees Maura rain possible through the morning tomorrow, mostly again before noon. The cloud should blow away through the day, though it'll be mostly sunny by later in the afternoon high near 59. And tomorrow night the return of rain, but probably after midnight. Once again, mostly cloudy, low 51 It's 57 partly cloudy in Central Park At the moment, it's 5 35. Support for NPR comes from member stations and from CDW orchestration by CDW brings together experts, technologies and partners like net up to turn complexity into simplicity. CDW people who get it and progressive insurance Committed to protecting cars and drivers, whether on the open road or having a driveway moment while listening to NPR. Learn more at progressive dot com or 1, 800 progressive On a Tuesday. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The Koven 19 Vaccines now in development, have very strict storage requirements, including being capped it super cold temperatures. So how the shots be kept cold during shipping and who gets first access to the vaccine. NPR's Ping Guang has been looking into plans for getting a future vaccine from the manufacturer into the arms of willing people, And she's with us now hyping Harry. So let's start with those super cold requirements. How does the vaccine that needs to be stored in really cold temperatures get moved across the country in the world? Yeah, well, it depends on which vaccine we're talking about the tea vaccines that are the first furthest along in clinical trials. Both have to be kept cold, but to different degrees, So one is made by the drug company Pfizer, and that requires the coldest storage and he's kept it minus 73 Celsius, which is Close. The temperature of dry ice and visor has spent some $2 billion building their own global supply chain. So here in the US, they haven't assembly center in Kalamazoo, Michigan, where they'll be packing vaccine vials into dry ice pods and these pods will be loaded into boxes that can keep these ultra cold temperatures for up to 10 days, and they'll be moved around the country in cargo planes and trucks by carriers like UPS and FedEx. Now the modern A vaccine requires storage at minus 20 degrees Celsius, which is comparable more to a home freezer and that one would get distributed by the government, at least at first, so Madonna will get the vaccines to a government site. And from there, the government will work with a private contractor to get the vaccines out. Two locations like Hospitals, pharmacies clinics wherever there requested by states. Okay, so moving from temperature to distribution. How are these vaccines going to be allocated to each state? Well, the government says that they'll be providing them to states for free and governors have been asking. Well, How are you going to figure out how much each state gets?.

NPR CDW Mary Louise Kelly Harry Maura New York City City Council Central Park Department of Transportation Pfizer Ari Shapiro Ping Guang US FedEx Michigan Kalamazoo
"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

"The media doesn't like hearing it, But I say it all the time. Rounding turn campaigning in Michigan today, Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden blasted Trump's claim that the end of the pandemic is near. He also slammed Trump for not doing enough to fight the pandemic, racism and hatred in the country. State health officials have until today to submit their Corona virus vaccination plans to the federal government. The deadline comes amid several setbacks in vaccine trials. NPR's Ping Guang Has this update The Koven vaccine distribution plans for assigned just 30 days ago from coast to coast states have been working hard to pull their plans together to submit to CDC today. Chris Ares Hman, director of infectious disease of the Minnesota Department of Health, says it's been hard to make concrete plans with so much uncertainty. So it's just the framework initially and will have multiple it orations. So we're going to keep adding to it, obviously, as we get more and more information, but right now we've kind of just built a frame. Health departments are waiting on key information such as which vaccines will be okayed by the FDA and how many doses there will be. In the meantime, they're laying groundwork to make it possible for people to start getting shots as soon as the vaccine has authorized Ping Guang NPR news at the close on Wall Street, the Dow was up 112 points. This is NPR news in Washington and on a Friday October 16th. This is Casey AR W News on Larry Perella. Here's What's happening at 3, 32 and Update now on those unofficial ballot boxes at the California Republican Party has placed at locations in L, A Venter and Orange counties. State officials say they will allow the party's collection of mail in ballots, claiming Republicans agreed to new safeguards. But that's at odds with what Republicans say. They say that their ballot collection activity was legal that they will continue it and that they haven't agreed to any concessions. Earlier this week, you might recall images surfaced of metal filing cabinets that had been placed outside churches and gun stores. Attorney General Javier or by Sarah and Secretary of state Alex Padilla, then threatened the state GOP with legal action if the boxes weren't removed by yesterday, today, they said Republicans agreed to quote a number of significant concessions and that they would crack down on any unstaffed and unsecured boxes. For some Democrats, Senator Dianne Feinstein chose a bad time to reach across the aisle. At the conclusion of yesterday's hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney. Barrett. Feinstein heaped praise on Republican Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham. This has been one of the best set of hearings that I've participated in. And I want to thank you for your fairness In the opportunity of going back and forth. It leaves one with a lot of hopes. A lot of questions and even some ideas. Perhaps, um, good bipartisan legislation we can put together to make this great country even better. So thank you so much for your leadership. Those comments in a subsequent hug, incensed some Democrats. They say Feinstein undercut arguments against seating Cockney Barrett there. Also angry she gave a boost to Graham, the South Carolina senator in a tight battle for reelection against Democrat Jaime Harrison. Feinstein, who is 87, in the oldest member of the Senate, has stated she will vote against Cockney Barrett's nomination. A recent paper by researchers at UC Santa Barbara has found temperature and humidity could be key factors and how covert 19 is transmitted hazmat. Gillom has details on how the changing seasons might impact the way we fight the virus. The paper by scientists at UCSB and Stanford, which appears in the journal Nana, Letters, shows the transmissibility of the virus can very greatly depending on the temperature and humidity. As we've learned the primary way the virus spreads through respiratory droplets, the researchers found the droplets which are emitted when we talk and breathe, Khun Travel beyond the 6 FT, recommended for social distancing. In cool and humid environments that can travel almost 20 ft before falling to the ground. At the opposite end of the spectrum in hot and dry conditions, the scientists found droplets evaporate. However, viral fragments can hang in the air for hours and mingle with other particles. The researchers hypothesized that in summer airborne transmission could be higher while in winter contact with respiratory droplets could pose the larger threat. Support for NPR comes from it last year, makers of collaboration software like Jiro and Trillo 83% of Fortune 500 companies use at last into help team stay agile, alive and connected. Learn more that last in dot com. Infidelity wealth management, providing perspective on.

Senator Dianne Feinstein Cockney Barrett NPR Ping Guang NPR Trump California Republican Party Lindsey Graham Ping Guang Michigan Joe Biden Amy Cockney Chris Ares Hman Washington Larry Perella Khun Travel FDA Republican Senate Alex Padilla Minnesota Department of Health
States face Friday deadline from CDC to submit plans to distribute coronavirus vaccine

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

States face Friday deadline from CDC to submit plans to distribute coronavirus vaccine

"State health officials have until today to submit their Corona virus vaccination plans to the federal government. The deadline comes amid several setbacks in vaccine trials. NPR's Ping Guang Has this update The Koven vaccine distribution plans for assigned just 30 days ago from coast to coast states have been working hard to pull their plans together to submit to CDC today. Chris Ares Hman, director of infectious disease of the Minnesota Department of Health, says it's been hard to make concrete plans with so much uncertainty. So it's just the framework initially and will have multiple it orations. So we're going to keep adding to it, obviously, as we get more and more information, but right now we've kind of just built a frame. Health departments are waiting on key information such as which vaccines will be okayed by the FDA and how many doses there will be.

Ping Guang Chris Ares Hman Minnesota Department Of Health NPR FDA CDC Director
"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"After these headlines. Live from NPR news. I'm Laxmi, saying President Trump is promising America's senior citizens. They will be the first to get vaccinated for Corona virus and covert 19 treatment, and he claims It'll be soon. I'm moving heaven and Earth to safeguard our seniors from the China virus to deliver lifesaving therapies in record time and to distribute a safe and effective vaccine before the end of the year. Trump's remarks a short time ago in Florida seem to contradict the assessment of drug developers who say distribution of a safe vaccine of the general public likely won't happen until well into next year earlier today, Head of Fizer said the company won't be ready to seek emergency authorization of its vaccine until late November, provided all goes well. Scientists generally estimate at least a couple more months before data emerge on whether any of the leading vaccine candidates Actually work Well, former Vice President Joe Biden says. If the doctors are behind a vaccine, he'd be happy to take it. The Democrats campaigning in the Midwest today, a short time ago, his campaign announced. Abidin head again tested negative for Corona virus. His running mate, Senator Comma Harris, cancelled in person events through the weekend. She's tested negative as well, but to people who were on October 8th flight with her Have tested positive. All States face a big deadline. Today Cove in 19 vaccine distribution plans or due to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Here's NPR's Ping Wang. The Koven vaccine distribution plans for assigned just 30 days ago from coast to coast states have been working hard to pull their plans together to submit to CDC today. Chris Ares Hman, director of infectious disease of the Minnesota Department of Health, says it's been hard to need concrete plans with so much uncertainty. So it's just the framework initially and will have multiple it oration. So we're going to keep adding to it, obviously, as we get more and more information, but right now we've kind of just built a frame. Health departments are waiting on key information such as which vaccines will be okayed by the FDA and how many doses there will be. In the meantime, they're laying groundwork to make it possible for people to start getting shots as soon as the vaccine is authorized. Ping Guang NPR news in a snapshot of how one part of the U. S economy is faring under a pandemic, the retail sectors shown improvement details from NPR's Alina Cell Yuk. Retail sales are a key measure of consumer spending, which is the biggest driver of the US economy. And these sales have now climbed for the fifth month in a row stronger in September than in August or July. People spend more on almost everything except Elektronik CE. They went out to restaurants and bars, but more cars workout in camping gear. Clothing in department stores got the biggest jump in sales 11% in almost 10%. Both are still digging out of a historic collapse in the spring. A big question now is about holiday shopping in the end of the year. Economists warned that this spending will be shaped by the divide between stable higher income households and those less wealthy ones financially devastated by the pandemic. Alina Cell Yuk NPR news This is NPR. And this is WNBC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson. Addiction filings in New Jersey continues stacking up despite the state's ongoing moratorium on anyone getting locked out of their home. W. Nice is Carinae reports. Another 6000 evictions were filed in court last month, pushing the statewide total of landlord tenant cases since April past 30,000. While there's a ban on evictions through the end of the year, landlords are still allowed to start the process by going to court and records show. About a third of September's filings are from Essex County alone. Governor Phil Murphy has set aside another $12 million in federal aid to help those who can't pay rent. But housing advocates say that to drop in the bucket compared to the several billion dollars that's needed. For now, a bill that would give renters more time to make their monthly payments when the moratorium lifts remain stalled in the Senate. Manhattan's Chinatown is kicking off a week of events showcasing the arts and the community. Chinatowns Art's week will feature almost two dozen virtual an outdoor event starting today. One of them is a shadow puppet show that tells the story of a local group that performs mean opera from China's Fujio Province. It features songs sung by the Eastern Fudo Opera Association, and it's about their travels from Fudo to New York City. The show will play in the window of a store front on the corner of Mulberry and Bared streets each evening through Sunday. The full listing of events is online at think Chinatown dot a warg. It's 55 degrees and raining in south Brooklyn. At the moment, the rain should taper off sometime later this evening. We'll have alot of about 50 for its WN My CIA three or six Support for NPR comes from noon, a personalized weight loss program designed to give people knowledge to set new goals and the tools to stick to them For good. Learn more at.

NPR President Trump CDC China Ping Guang NPR Chinatown Abidin Midwest Senator Comma Harris Joe Biden Laxmi Vice President America FDA Sean Carlson Alina Cell Brooklyn Eastern Fudo Opera Association Ping Wang
"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

"That crackdown comes in the form of cutting off Medicare funding to hospitals that don't comply. And draft documents obtained by NPR show that the government is now taking steps to begin those cuts. As NPR reporters Ping Guang and Selina Simmons Duffin have been reporting it's a change that could affect many hospitals. King joins us now to discuss Welcome to be here. Good to have you tell us what's in these documents you've gotten hold off. So we've obtained gas of guidance and letters that the government plans to send out to hospitals to speak. The letters remind hospitals to report daily information about covert 19 cases to the federal government. This is information about how many covert patients they have how many Ben leaders are available, and The federal government has been asking than demanding and now threatening to get this information from hospitals. The weight has Corona virus Task Force says they need the stated to understand what's happening, and the Department of Health and Human Services is trying to collect it. And paying in general. It seems like information sharing would be a good thing all around why our hospital's having to be prodded to comply? Yes, Some of this information is important for health authorities at all levels to understand things like which hospitals are filling up or running low on drugs for treating cove it, But hospitals are unhappy with the amount of information HHS is asking for and how they're asking for it. Early in the pandemic. Hospitals were reporting this information to the CDC using a system many had been using for years. But in July HHS, which oversees CDC shut down the city, see option for reporting and that created a lot of pushback. Politicians and public health experts were raising concerns that that was sidelining CDC in a pandemic. And for hospitals. The move also created a lot of headaches. They had to learn how to use a new system. They had to answer a lot more questions. We talked to Cary Crawl from the Texas Hospital Association. And she says, someone now has to go all over the hospital every day. To get that data. We're talking about bedside nursing type statistics in terms of covered patients versus adult persons, child and then you're talking about pharmaceuticals. So that's going to come from a pharmacy. And now hospitals are being threatened with the loss of Medicare funding if they miss a few days of reporting..

CDC HHS federal government NPR Medicare Selina Simmons Duffin Ping Guang Cary Crawl King Texas Hospital Association
"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Becomes available in the United States, there won't be enough doses for everyone right away. So who should get it First? That is the big question. Facing a committee advising the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the CDC That committee met today to consider vaccine distribution and vaccine safety. NPR's pink long is keeping track of this. Hello again paying alimony. Louise. So who is this committee who's on who's in the group, which the role Yeah, So the group is called the Advisory Committee on immunization practices, And this is a group of experts that reviews every vaccine. The FDA approves. It's a federal advisory group that's been around for decades and They make recommendations to the CDC director about things like who should get a vaccine and how frequently it should be given out. They usually meet three times a year. But since we're in a pandemic there now meeting every month to discuss the issues around a cove in 19 vaccine, Okay, So today was the day they had this all day meeting online. Of course. What was what was the agenda? Yeah, So today they focused on a couple things. They focused on safety on equity, and they also raised concerns about vaccine hesitancy. The group got a presentation from what one of its members on what's happening to ensure that a vaccine that has approved a safe And you know, there have been concerns to the public about is this something that's being rushed. Dr. Robert at Mar from Baylor College of Medicine is a committee member. And here he is at the meeting today. We want the public to be reassured that any vaccine that is I have gone through the appropriate word, Do you? And they didn't just talk about the safety of the vaccine. They also talked about ensuring the safety of vaccination. Cites 11 member of the committee, Paul Hunter, from the city of Milwaukee, mentioned that threats against Milwaukee's health commissioner led her to resign. So a CDC rep said that safety of vaccine sites is important and they'll be adding those considerations and their game plans for states. Wow. So many things to think about there. Okay. Meanwhile, they were expected to vote today trying to prioritize who would get a vaccine. First. They delayed the vote. How come Yeah, So the committee had initially planted vote as he mentioned on which priority groups to get a covert 19 vaccine first, But today, they said, they just don't have the information right now. The committee is considering four groups that are disproportionately affected by covert 19 its health care workers that care for covert 19 patients. It's essential workers and it's older people who have a higher risk of dying if they get the disease. And it's also people for medical conditions like cancer or obesity. Who could get very sick from getting it. Underscoring all of us is Theis you of equity. The data shows very clearly that black, Latino and native populations have been bearing the brunt of sickness and death when it comes to the pandemic, And if these communities can't get these vaccines, they will continue to suffer the most impacts from Kobe 19. So just briefly. What exactly are they looking for? To try to figure out who will get the first vaccines? Yeah, so the company is looking for data that's coming out from these three clinical trials that are currently underway. Here's Grace Lee, a pediatrics professor at Stanford and a committee member at today's meeting. For example of the benefits of balance in adults over 65 looks quite different than in younger adults that might influence the ordering and vice versa. They're also looking for information on how vaccine needs to be stored, and it's also going to be important to know how many doses will be available. And when that information is currently unknown, But as soon as vaccine is approved, the committee will have an emergency meeting to finalize recommendations. All right, thank you. Paying Thank you so much. NPR's Ping Guang President Trump is pushing hard to win the crucial state of Florida to do so. His campaign is targeting South Florida Latinos, and it sees young Latinos in particular as a way to expand his support. NPR. White House correspondent Franco Ordonez was in Miami last week, speaking with young Latino voters, and he begins by taking us to band practice..

Centers for Disease Control an Advisory Committee NPR Dr. Robert United States Milwaukee FDA Franco Ordonez Louise Florida Baylor College of Medicine Grace Lee Theis White House correspondent Ping Guang Miami director Paul Hunter Stanford Trump
"ping guang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR's pink long is keeping track of this. Hello again paying alimony. Louise. So who is this committee who's on who's in the group? What's the role Yeah, So the group is called the Advisory Committee on immunization practices, And this is a group of experts that reviews every vaccine. The FDA approves. It's a federal advisory group that's been around for decades and They make recommendations to the CDC director about things like who should get a vaccine and how frequently it should be given out. They usually meet three times a year. But since we're in a pandemic there now meeting every month to discuss the issues around a covert 19 vaccine, Okay, So today was the day they had this all day meeting online. Of course. What was what was the agenda? Yes, So today they focused on a couple things. They focused on safety on equity, and they also raised concerns about vaccine hesitancy. The group got a presentation from what one of its members on what's happening to ensure that a vaccine that has approved a safe And you know, there have been concerns to the public about is this something that's being brushed. Dr Robert at Mar from Baylor College of Medicine is a committee member. And here he is at the meeting today. We want the public to be reassured that any vaccine that is Has gone through the appropriate review. And they didn't just talk about the safety of the vaccine. They also talked about ensuring the safety of vaccination. Cites 11 member of the committee, Paul Hunter, from the city of Milwaukee, mentioned that threats against Milwaukee's health commissioner led her to resign. So CDC rep said that safety of vaccine sites is important and they'll be adding those considerations and their game plans for states. Wow. So many things to think about their okay. Meanwhile, they were expected to vote today trying to prioritize who would get a vaccine. First. They delayed the vote. How come Yeah, so the committee had initially printed vote as you mentioned on which priority groups to get a covert 19 vaccine first, But today, they said, they just don't have the information right now. The committee is considering four groups that are disproportionately affected by covert 19. It's health care workers that care for covert 19 patients. It's essential workers and it's older people who have a higher risk of dying if they get the disease, and it's also people, medical conditions like cancer or obesity, who could get very sick from getting it. Underscoring all of us is Theis you of equity. The data shows very clearly that black, Latino and native populations have been bearing the brunt of sickness and death when it comes to the pandemic, And if these communities can't get these vaccines, they will continue to suffer the most impacts from Kobe 19. So just briefly. What exactly are they looking for? To try to figure out who will get the first vaccines? Yeah, so the company is looking for data that's coming out from these three clinical Childs that are currently underway. Here's Grace Lee, a pediatrics professor at Stanford and a committee member at today's meeting. For example of the benefit with balance in adults over 65 looks quite different than the younger adults that might influence the ordering and vice versa. They're also looking for information on how vaccine needs to be stored. And it's also going to be important to know how many doses will be available. And when that information is currently unknown, But as soon as vaccine is approved, the committee will have an emergency meeting to finalize recommendations. All right, thank you. Thank you so much. NPR's Ping Guang President Trump is pushing hard to win the crucial state of Florida to do so. His campaign is targeting South Florida Latinos, and it sees young Latinos in particular as a way to expand his support. NPR. White House correspondent Franco Ordonez was in Miami last week, speaking with young Latino voters, and he begins by taking us to band practice..

Advisory Committee NPR CDC Dr Robert Milwaukee Louise obesity Franco Ordonez FDA Baylor College of Medicine Florida Grace Lee Theis White House correspondent Ping Guang director Miami Paul Hunter Childs Stanford
"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Becomes available in the United States, there won't be enough doses for everyone right away. So who should get it First? That is the big question. Facing a committee advising the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the CDC That committee met today to consider vaccine distribution and vaccine safety. NPR's pink long is keeping track of this. Hello again, paying lm a. Louise. So who is this committee who's on who's in the group, which the role Yeah, So the group is called the Advisory Committee on immunization practices, And this is a group of experts that reviews every vaccine. The FDA approves. It's a federal advisory group that's been around for decades and We make recommendations to the CDC director about things like who should get a vaccine and how frequently it should be given out. They usually meet three times a year. But since we're in a pandemic there now meeting every month to discuss the issues around a cove in 19 vaccine, Okay, So today was the day they had this all day meeting online. Of course. What was what was the agenda? Yes, So today they focused on a couple things. They focused on safety on equity, and they also raised concerns about vaccine hesitancy. The group got a presentation from what one of its members on what's happening to ensure that a vaccine that has approved a safe And you know, there have been concerns to the public about is this something that's being rushed. Dr. Robert at Mar from Baylor College of Medicine is a committee member. And here he is at the meeting today. We want the public to be reassured that any vaccine that is Have gone through the appropriate word, Do you? And they didn't just talk about the safety of the vaccine. They also talked about ensuring the safety of vaccination. Cites 11 member of the committee, Paul Hunter, from the city of Milwaukee, mentioned that threats against Milwaukee's health commissioner led her to resign. So a CDC rep said that safety of vaccine sites is important and they'll be adding those considerations and their game plans for states. Wow. So many things to think about there. Okay. Meanwhile, they were expected to vote today trying to prioritize who would get a vaccine. First. They delayed the vote. How come Yeah, So the committee had initially planted vote as he mentioned on which priority groups to get a covert 19 vaccine first, But today, they said, they just don't have the information right now. The committee is considering four groups that are disproportionately affected by covert 19 its health care workers that care for covert 19 patients. It's essential workers and it's older people who have a higher risk of dying if they get the disease. It's also people medical conditions like cancer or obesity. Who could get very sick from getting it. Underscoring all of this is Theis you of equity. The data shows very clearly that black, Latino and native populations have been bearing the brunt of sickness and death when it comes to the pandemic, And if these communities can't get these vaccines, they will continue to suffer the most impacts from Kobe 19. So just briefly. What exactly are they looking for? To try to figure out who will get the first vaccines? Yeah, so the company is looking for data that's coming out from these three clinical trials that are currently underway. Here's Grace Lee, a pediatrics professor at Stanford and a committee member at today's meeting. So, for example, if the benefit was balance, an adult over 65 looks quite different than in younger adults that might influence the ordering and vice versa. They're also looking for information on how vaccine needs to be stored. And it's also going to be important to know how many doses will be available. And when that information is currently unknown, But as soon as vaccine is approved, the committee will have an emergency meeting to finalize recommendations. All right, thank you. Thank you so much. NPR's Ping Guang President Trump is pushing hard to win the crucial state of Florida to do so. His campaign is targeting South Florida Latinos, and it sees young Latinos in particular as a way to expand his support. NPR. White House correspondent Franco Ordonez was in Miami last week, speaking with young Latino voters, and he begins by taking us to band practice..

Centers for Disease Control an Advisory Committee NPR Dr. Robert United States Milwaukee FDA Franco Ordonez a. Louise Florida Baylor College of Medicine Grace Lee Theis White House correspondent Ping Guang director Miami Paul Hunter Stanford Trump
"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Revelations that President Trump understood the threat of the Corona virus early on and downplayed it to the public have riled the global health community. They say the president has unfairly blamed the World Health Organization for withholding information that he already knew. NPR's Ping Guang reports In the first week of February, President Trump told journalists Bob Woodward that the virus was deadly stuff here is part of the recorded interview published in The Washington Post. You just breathe the air. That's how it's passed. And so that's a very tricky one. That's a very delicate one. It's also more deadly than your You know you're even your strenuous flu's. In a March interview with Woodward, Trump admitted he deliberately downplayed the seriousness of the virus in public. The revelations are published in Woodward's new book on president Trump called Rage. He repeated some of the assertions again this week at a White House press briefing. I don't want to jump up and down and start screaming death death, and what is global health experts frustrated is that Trump put the blame on the United Nations Health agency for not warning the world's early enough about the virus. Jeremy Canine Dyke, who led the U. S government's response to global disasters in the Obama administration, says the recordings show the president's accusations against W H O Do not hold up these tapes queer that the very things that President Was accused in W. H O is failing to share you know specifically the legality and the transmissibility of this virus, where things he was already well aware of the president claims the Global health agency is to China centric and did not push China to reveal information earlier. He's used these claims to justify withdrawing from W. H O in the middle of a pandemic. Public health experts like Nancy Cox, former director of the CDC is influenza divisions say that move could actually prolong the situation could blame it on the D a challenge and pull out. Technical and financial support is absurd. It's just absurd. The president says he held back on sharing the dangers of the virus because he didn't want people to panic. But Jimmy Coker, a former ambassador and career diplomat says that misleading the public actually makes people feel like they can't trust the government. Way to avoid a panic is for the I'd like to have confidence that they're getting the right information that they need as soon as it's available to the authorities. Global health experts think Trump used chose escape goat because it's a soft target with no political based in the U. S and no ability to fight back. Larry Gostin, a professor of global health law at Georgetown University, also points out that taking the US out of has had big impacts on global coordination for this pandemic. United States leadership it's financed. Its moral authority is missing, and that is making a big difference in terms of the spread of covert worldwide. And if the US stops working with W H O on things like disease eradication and flew surveillance Nancy Cox, formerly with the CDC, says US researchers will lose access to conversations where countries share early information with each other. That means the U. S could be flying blind into future outbreaks were behind the curve in terms of Being prepared for the next influence the pandemic or pandemic of whatever disease emerges next. If Trump is re elected in November, his withdrawal from the agency will go into effect. July 2021. King.

Trump president Bob Woodward World Health Organization Nancy Cox US CDC United Nations Health White House Jeremy Canine Dyke Ping Guang NPR Jimmy Coker flu The Washington Post China U. S Obama administration Georgetown University
"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on KCRW

"Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, officials ordered swimmers out of the water today Charleston is preparing for possible flooding. Well Health Organization officials are telling Americans not to despair despite rising coronavirus cases and deaths. They say the situation is still fixable. NPR's Ping Guang The U. S. Is in a new phase of the pandemic where the virus is extraordinarily widespread, according to the White House Corona virus Task Force. W. H O is director of health emergencies Michael Ryan says the situation is getting worse. But he also says all states have access to tried and true methods for stemming the virus is spread. The difficulty for his old is sometimes we know the right path. The difficulty is choosing to walk countries in Europe and Asia have successfully contained outbreaks by quarantining people who are possibly infectious and educating the public on how not to get it. That raises questions about why the U. S. Has not been applying these lessons successfully in all cases. Ping Pong NPR news, Dr Anthony found. She has previously said some schools should reopen in the fall. But today warned against reopening schools in Corona virus Hot spots country's top infectious disease experts speaking via video conference with a group of physicians and medical students. Saying While the national default should be returned kids to school there may be some areas where the virus levels are too high. Twitter is under investigation by the Federal Trade Commission. NPR's Shannon Bond reports, The tack comedy could be on the hook for a multi $1,000,000 fine related to privacy violations. The FTC is looking into Twitter's privacy practices. The probe is related to what the Social network did with the phone numbers and email addresses that users provided for account security. Last fall, Twitter admitted it had been using that data to target people with ads for years. It's said that was an error and it would stop the practice. Now. The FTC is investigating whether Twitter violated a 2011 agreement made with the agency not to mislead consumers about how it uses their information. In a securities filing. Twitter says it is setting aside $150 million for a potential fine but could end up paying up to $250 million. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco stocks closed higher on Wall Street today, the Dow was up 236 points. You're listening to NPR and this is Casey ar w Larry Parole. It's a Monday, August 3rd, A very good evening to you. Here's what's happening at 70 for Seela has announced changes to its plans for classes during the coming fall 2020 semester. About 8% of courses will be offered in a so called hybrid form and the rest will be remote. After Thanksgiving, All classes will shift to remote on Lee, with limited exceptions approved by the by the school. The only on campus course activities will be lab studio and clinical classes, along with select hands on instruction. U. C L A is planning to offer campus housing to About 5000 students with occupancy limited to one person per bedroom buildings will be set aside. Four isolation of students who test positive for Coben 19 or quarantining of those who may have been exposed and dining facilities will be open for carry out meals. Cloth face coverings will be required for anyone on campus, along with daily symptoms checks. It has been another hard and busy day for firefighters battling the apple Fire. That's the wildfire that stretched from Cherry Valley into the San Bernardino National Forest. Fire Investigators today reveal the cause of the more than 26,000 acre fire they say was started by a vehicle malfunction. Fire officials initially said the cause of the fire was due to arson. Now the Riverside County Fire Department says a diesel vehicle had burning carbon coming from its exhaust system, citing eyewitness that that's because I witnesses that saw that yesterday, captain Fernando Herrera with Cal fire warned residents. It's going to be a long haul fighting this fire. Ordered evacuations and we place remain in effect. There is no time frame that we have. When we can start looking at populating any of these areas. This is a major fire.

Twitter NPR Federal Trade Commission Shannon Bond Riverside County Fire Departme Myrtle Beach Ping Guang Michael Ryan South Carolina Charleston Health Organization director Fernando Herrera W. H O White House Europe SAN Francisco
"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, officials ordered swimmers out of the water today Charleston is preparing for possible flooding. Well Health Organization officials are telling Americans not to despair despite rising Corona virus cases and deaths. They say the situation is still fixable. NPR's Ping Guang The U. S. Is in a new phase of the pandemic where the virus is extraordinarily widespread, according to the White House Corona virus Task Force. W. H O is director of health emergencies Michael Ryan says the situation is getting worse. But he also says all states have access to tried and true methods for stemming the virus is spread. The difficulty for us all is sometimes we know the right path. The difficulty is choosing to walk countries in Europe and Asia have successfully contained outbreaks by quarantining people who are possibly infectious and educating the public on how not to get it. That raises questions about why the U. S. Has not been applying these lessons successfully in all cases. Ping Hong NPR news, Dr Anthony found. She has previously said some schools should reopen in the fall. But today warned against reopening schools in Corona virus Hot spots country's top infectious disease experts speaking via video conference with a group of physicians and medical students. Saying While the national default should be returned kids to school there may be some areas where the virus levels are too high. Twitter is under investigation by the Federal Trade Commission. NPR's Shannon Bond reports. The tack comedy could be on the hook for a multi $1,000,000 fine related to privacy violations. The FTC is looking into Twitter's privacy practices. The probe is related to what the Social network did with the phone numbers and email addresses that users provided for account security. Last fall, Twitter admitted it had been using that data to target people with ads for years. It's said that was an error and it would stop the practice. Now. The FTC is investigating whether Twitter violated a 2011 agreement made with the agency not to mislead consumers about how it uses their information. In a securities filing. Twitter says it is setting aside $150 million for a potential fine but could end up paying up to $250 million. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco stocks closed higher on Wall Street today, the Dow was up 236 points. You're listening to NPR. This is WNBC in New York. I'm Lance. Lucky. State legislators say the Cuomo administration is stonewalling over how many nursing home residents have died as a result of the Corona virus. WN y Fred mogul reports for three hours, members of both parties castigated the Health Department for only reporting deaths inside nursing homes, but not how many residents died after they were transferred from nursing homes to hospitals. Only New York reports death so narrowly, Dr. Howard Zucker, the state health commissioner, acknowledged the Cuomo administration estimate about 6500 deaths is on the low side. State Senator James who fits from the Hudson Valley, asked by how much are we talking with the hospital deaths, 1000 25,000 Joker said his agency would provide more comprehensive data soon. The empty says it will activate new devices that installed after Hurricane Sandy to defend the transit system against tropical storm he say yes, the storm is expected to bring heavy rain and strong winds to the region at its peak tomorrow afternoon. Frank Giesecke is the chief operating officer for New York City subways. He says about 95% of sidewalk grates in low lying areas are now equipped to prevent water from flooding the tracks. We've installed the mechanical closure devices within those vents too close should a tidal surge be imminent, Officials say. Crews are also out testing drainage pumps and covers designed to keep water from flowing down subway stairwells into stations. Says customers should check online tomorrow for any last minute.

Twitter NPR Federal Trade Commission Shannon Bond Ping Hong NPR New York Myrtle Beach Ping Guang Health Organization Frank Giesecke South Carolina Charleston Michael Ryan Cuomo administration White House Europe Dr Anthony Joker SAN Francisco
"ping guang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"ping guang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Life from NPR News. I'm Shea Stephen's New York governor, Andrew Cuomo is ignoring federal guidance on reopening schools in his state this fall, Promo says in person classes may resume in areas where the corona viruses under control or regions, with the daily outbreaks below 5% over a two week period. New York school districts have until the end of the month to submit detailed re opening plans. As the Trump administration rejects. The CDC is guidance on school re openings. The World Health Organization has some ideas on what it says should be a key consideration. Details from NPR's Ping Guang Michael Ryan, director of W Hose Health Emergencies Program, says it's not helpful to fight over the terms of school re openings. We can't turn schools. Into yet another political football in this game. It's not fair on our Children, Ryan says. There is a way for kids to get back to the classroom, and there are many countries around the world, of which schools are reopening. Successfully. And safely. Because countries have dealt with the real problem community transmission. Ryan says The most important factor is to make sure that the spread of the corona viruses under control and that communities are able to keep it that way. Qinglong NPR News. The W. AY show also warns that the code that 19 pandemic will continue to worsen for long time. A federal court ruling could make it easier for women to obtain abortion pills during the pandemic. As NPR's Sarah McCammon reports AH federal judge says patients should not have to go to a clinic to get those pills. Myth. Oppressed Stone is a key element in the standard protocol for terminating an early pregnancy with medication. But the drug is heavily regulated, and patients are required to pick it up at a hospital or clinic under a doctor's supervision. Now a federal judge in Maryland is blocking the FDA from enforcing that rule, saying it puts patients at unnecessary risk during the Corona virus pandemic. It's a win for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other medical groups that argued the medication should be available by mail and pharmacies. In a statement, the anti abortion rights group Susan B. Anthony list Expressed disappointment with the ruling and accused abortion rights groups of exploiting the cove in 19 pandemic. Sarah McCammon NPR NEWS Washington Trump confident Roger Stone is expressing relief that he's not going to prison for witness tampering and obstructing a congressional probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Stone tells Fox News at the president's executive order commuting his sentence spared his life, he said. He's not healthy enough to be sent to what he called Ah Cove, it infested prison. I'm 67 years old. I've had a lifelong problem. Respiratory problems. I was facing what I really believed was a near death sentence. Stone claims he refused a plea deal with prosecutors details of the order commuting. His sentence were released on Monday. At the request of a federal judge who wants to know whether it also covers Stone's probation. U. S futures air higher in pre market trading following a mixed trading on Monday. This is NPR news. Former Trump Insider Jeff Sessions Spaces a runoff on Tuesday for his old Senate seat from Alabama. As NPR's Debbie Elliot reports, polls give a political newcomer and former all burned football coach Double digit advantage over sessions. Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions is fighting for his political life in a race to decide the GOP candidate to challenge vulnerable Democrat Doug Jones. President Trump has endorsed his opponent, Tommy Tub, Erbil. Still, sessions says he's most aligned with the president's agenda. Well, the pride that can And also it wishes But the people of Alabama will decide this race he's had to fight against. Trump's repeated criticism after sessions recused himself from special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation. Session, says he was following the law. Tub. Herbal accuses sessions of being weak when things got tough. Debbie Elliot NPR NEWS MOBILE, Alabama, Hundreds of US sailors were fighting to save a Navy warship that's burning at a shipyard in San Diego. Ablaze aboard the USS Bonham Rashard is burning below deck in an equipment area located above the ship's fuel supply. US. Coast Guard officials have hired to clean approved to put a containment boom in place in case of a spill. Blazes sent smoke building over the San Diego harbor. At least 59 people, including three dozen sailors have been treated for heat exhaustion, smoke inhalation and minor injuries as a result of the fire. I'm Shae Stevens. This is.

NPR News NPR Ah Cove Roger Stone Jeff Sessions Ping Guang Michael Ryan Alabama Sarah McCammon President Trump Debbie Elliot New York Tommy Tub US CDC World Health Organization Andrew Cuomo president smoke inhalation Trump Shea Stephen
Coronavirus: Airborne transmission cannot be ruled out, WHO says

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Coronavirus: Airborne transmission cannot be ruled out, WHO says

"The World Health Organization says airborne transmission of the current virus may be more powerful than first thought. NPR's Ping Guang has more. More than 200 scientists published a letter to the W. H O on Monday. They called for them to pay serious attention to the idea that the Corona virus might be spreading through the air further than the 3 to 6 feet recommended for social distancing. W. H O officials say they've already been considering the evidence for months. Doctor Benedetta Allah Grant C W. H O Expert on Infection Control and Prevention says there are some signs of the virus Khun spread through room, but that seems to take certain conditions. The possibility off airborne transmission in crowded closed the poorly ventilated setting, so cannot be ruled out. W H. O says they're currently summarizing the research on all forms of transmission. And plan to issue a brief in the coming days.

Doctor Benedetta Allah Grant C Ping Guang W H. O World Health Organization NPR W. H O