35 Burst results for "Pillsbury"

Podcast Critic and Creator Wil Williams Shares Her Origin Story

Inside Podcasting

06:18 min | 2 months ago

Podcast Critic and Creator Wil Williams Shares Her Origin Story

"Hello and welcome to a bonus episode of inside podcasting the show in which creators discuss their craft. I'm your host Sky Pillsbury. A few weeks ago I posted a post show episode in which my podcast friend, Ariel Nissim flat, and I discussed my interview with podcast critic and Creator. Will Williams during that episode, I revealed that due to technical mishap will and I actually recorded twice the interview with will, that I, shared with you a few weeks ago was our second recording. Today's episode is the first eleven or so minutes of our original discussion which I was able to salvage despite the technical mishap. So today, I'm releasing it for all of us here I. Hope you enjoy it. Will Williams. Welcome to the show I am so happy to have you with me today. I have been. Thank you for having Oh. Absolutely. I. Have Been Intrigued by you ever since I came across your posts on twitter you're one of the first people I came across where I don't remember what you were saying, but it was surely opinionated and. Could. It could have even been. You know a useful rant. I'm not really sure but I immediately knew this is someone that I want to pay attention to this is someone that I wanNA follow. So. For me to get a chance to just dive into who you really are because of course, at this point I have had the chance to meet you in person and we have had. Interactions they're still so much. I don't know and I have a lot of questions. So I read somewhere that you started listening to. Night. Vale and Lime Town that that might have been your first introduction to podcast. Is that right? So that was my first introduction to fiction podcasts by I was one of those people where I was listening to podcasts in a more general sense before I pods were even a thing I was downloading them on my desktop computers and listening whenever I could back in those early days of I tunes but Lime Town and Night Vale were definitely my biggest introductions to fiction, which then launched me into writing. So when you're listening to the other podcast prior to that, what happened that was different when you listen to night villain lime town that led you to feel like Oh maybe I wanNA play a role in this. In Twenty twelve, twenty thirteen. There were a bunch of fiction podcast being made and because I guess I kind of raised myself on traditional nonfiction podcasting things like radio lab and grammar girl and writing excuses when fiction podcast starting to make stir I was unfortunately in the camp where I thought that they were going to be good that they would be kind of. Poorly, produced or poorly written or kind of tacky. So I just didn't latch onto them, which is so embarrassing to see now. When I listened to night neil well, that's fascinating to me because of course. so closely to the genre. Yeah. When I heard Night Vale, it was kind of more of the same kind of thought of it as the exception to the rule, and I think part of that is because I was so set on this idea that you know all fiction podcasts kind of sounded like basically like a prairie home companion in my head that's what I was comparing it to and I liked that night failed did something so different in. So weird I mean this was again like. Twelve thirteen twenty thirteen, and back then lgbt representation, which is something that I think a lot of people fiction space take a little bit for granted now, not that we couldn't still be better, but we really had so little of that in an accessible fiction format and the main relationship in that podcast is between two men and later would go on to have trans characters and it felt really revolutionary to me and growing up in Arizona and specifically being in Phoenix for most of my life I. Latched onto. The weird desert setting usually the desserts here are basically exactly as bizarre feel feel feels like a documentary sometimes. I thought of it. Yeah. As like the exception to the rule I liked it but I didn't think it would be into more efficient podcasts but when lime town came around and my friend introduced me to it. I mean, it sounded incredible and I was working in my college radio station. At the time I had tried my hand out a little bit of production. So I knew how much went into it and it just sounded so good. They loved the writing and I've always been one four character study is and that's basically what town is like there is the mystery to it, but it's mostly vignettes of these fascinating characters and he just fell in love and then from there I just kind of dove headfirst into all the fiction I could find, and now here I am. So, you were at college at the time right were you what were you studying? Did you have parallel paths going like I'm interested in radio and I'm working at the college radio station but I- majoring in something completely different. Something completely different. I. My Undergrad degree is in English education. I was very bent on being teacher. I just worked at the college radio station for fun basically, and then you Kinda fell in love with and the more I fell in love with audio the more I fell in love with working at the station. And then I did my semester of student teaching. I graduated I worked as a substitute teacher for two months. End then hated it never been You hate it why? I loved teaching proper is loved being with the students but honestly I think that I was. I got way too emotionally involved in all of my students and to to this day. I still think back on students during that semester student teaching and wonder if they're okay

Lime Town Night Vale Williams Ariel Nissim Sky Pillsbury Twitter Vale Arizona Neil Phoenix
Interview With Skye Pillsbury

She Podcasts

05:29 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Skye Pillsbury

"I'm sure it's fine. So without further ado, let's talk a little bit too sky about leaving inside podcasting like she just made the announcement that not only was this her last season but that she would no longer be writing for inside podcasting which I don't know if you guys know this but unlike hot pod and Pod News, Sky Actually works for a company that has asked her to create inside podcasting. It's not her own is not of her own fruition. So what came about that made you decide? No Moss. So I have been percolating in my brain for a few months I had actually talked to inside about it about three months prior and. I feel for I say that I'm super grateful to inside it opens so many doors for me to meet so many interesting people you included and so I loved the experience of writing for them but it did feel after two years like I was I was really pouring my blood sweat and tears into the podcast and the newsletter. It just felt like I was every day that I was working for them and building this thing for them. Felt like a day that I wasn't building something for me it didn't feel that. Way In the beginning but once I, sort of like established myself a little bit I just had this nagging feeling that it was time to do something new and I don't know right now exactly what form that is gonNA take but I will be keeping people posted about that on twitter and there's a few different things I'm craving one could be more ownership over something that I create one could be working with more of a team because it was very much a solo effort and sort of crave like that's why doing this. PODCAST with you guys, it's so fun for me because you're my friends and it's it's you know the sense of community that I haven't really had and you know it would be nice to get paid more. You know no one goes into journalism to make a million dollars. So I had all of that. The other thing which I think is fine for me to share is that Jason who is my boss? He's the founder of inside wanted and had been sort of hammering me for a few months to make eight paid newsletter. He's done that with a lot of the other newsletters that inside produces an I really didn't want to do that I didn't feel that my readers were the kind of years that necessarily that all of them had like extra funds to spend on newsletters that you know is my news are critical to your workday probably not it's. It's a nice fun thing to read but I also didn't want to be writing a newsletter for like the twenty people that pay I mean I don't know how many people it would have been we had. Eighteen thousand subscribers so maybe it would have been more, but the point is that what I WANNA do is to write for a big audience of people who love podcast, and so that was another had staved off for months and I knew that it is certain point I wasn't going to be able to do that anymore. So that was a big reason to for me. To say I think I need to you know it's time for me to strike out on my own I have no, there's no bad blood. There are no hard feelings. Jason is a total work, but in a weird way I, kind of love him too and I definitely am appreciative to the company and everyone that I worked with they're just as your friend. I you've never. Said anything bad about Jason that I can recall. You've always said nothing but nice things about him and it sounds like your dilemma is the dilemma of every entrepreneur whether you knew you were one or not. Eventually we all do that where even if you're already working for yourself like for me as a graphic and web designer I was working I was doing projects hourly. And at first, it was six yards and our, and then I was like wait in three hours only making one hundred, eighty bucks that's ridiculous and then I then you move it up and then you move it up and when you're working for someone else you don't get anywhere near what you would pay as a consultant and you're still like, wow, I spent eight hours there. And I made three hundred dollars and also I, didn't know work that I get to keep crap. You want your own body of work you want your audience and your traffic, and when you're talented, you know you're talented and when you're good even if you're not marketing like you know that you're good at your job and therefore wants to do it on your own behalf. So I totally get that and I think it's a big conversation right now within podcasting is that. Specific to podcasting a lot of people are producing podcasts and not getting the same kind of deals especially particularly, I. Think people of Color. Not Getting the same deals as other people are getting from the companies that they work for you know Britney lose from the nod has been very vocal about that as well as Meka Yousef created tell them. I am these are conversations that are out there happening my situation was different. I was under no illusion that I was going to be able to keep. Anything, but it is that same feeling of like you know it is weird for me. I have to say that they might continue that podcast and they'll be completely different homes and yet it really was like my creation and you know hopefully, it will always be out there but it's time for me to build something for me whether it's writing podcasting even freelancing I don't know it. I want to be more in control of my own destiny as an and I loved the interaction with readers and if I had to make it pay walled that interaction would have really narrowed and you know what I loved about writing. That was just like I had a big audience and people who wanted to engage with the and I. Hope

Jason Twitter Moss Founder Meka Yousef Web Designer Consultant Britney
Our Season Finale Starring the Founders of She Podcasts and Skyes husband Don

Inside Podcasting

04:38 min | 2 months ago

Our Season Finale Starring the Founders of She Podcasts and Skyes husband Don

"Hello and welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discussed their craft. I'm your host. Sky. Pillsbury. This is a post show episode, but we're doing things just a little differently today I all chat with Elsie Escobar and Jessica Kupperman about last week's interview with sixteen nineteen producers, a Diese Egan and Anti Brown Jessica and Elsie our the founders of she podcasts a community that helps women and non binary podcasters through every step of their podcast journey. The pair met online years ago and joined forces to create a free facebook group that now has over seventeen thousand members. Jessica Elsie also hosts a really fun podcast called she podcasts in which they talk about all things podcasts, and they are the founders of she podcast live an in person conference I attended their inaugural event last year and it was wonderful. Their next event is scheduled for next. October. that's October of twenty twenty. One For the second half of our show due to popular demand I am bringing back my husband. We will take a look back at the season. I hope you enjoy today's conversations and I'll be back at the end to wrap things up. I am thrilled today to have with me, Elsie Escobar and Jessica Cup for men who are the founders of she podcasts. They are also the women I consider to be my podcast Mama's. Even. Though I am almost one hundred percent sure that I'm over than them both. So with that welcome Jessica and Elsie, I'm so happy to have you here. Think. You yes. All right guys you are my guest hosts and I'm your subject and I'm ready for you go. Just you have the questions I will chip in. Okay. There are so many shows and episodes right now in podcasting about race and racial relations. So why did sixteen nineteen speak to you specifically? Honestly it made me feel angry that I had not Known so much of what was talked about in this podcast. Hadn't learned any of it in school and I went to a very good public school and yet I felt like everything I was hearing felt new to me obviously I knew basic facts about Abraham Lincoln and the civil war and things like that. But I did not understand any of the nuance and I certainly did not understand how happened what felt like so long ago right it did sorta feel to me like ancient history did not understand how connected it was to our current world. For example, healthcare I had no idea that I mean our healthcare's. Louis it was mind blowing like the fact that we have the worst healthcare system of any developed nation and the fact that that can be traced. So clearly back to the fact that we did not want to allow black enslaved people or even black UNIN slaved people to have equal healthcare. You know the fact that we can trace that back is. Rushing and tragic, and it's tragic for all of us you know and those kinds of realizations just felt so jarring and I had a real emotional reaction to listening to the podcast both because I just felt so much more empathetic to people who are living the black experience in the US but also it was also emotional because I felt cheated of that knowledge and so the reason why I wanted to talk to the people and I still feel so incredibly fortunate that I was able to get them on the show and bring shine. Any kind of light on that for other people was incredibly rewarding and that's why I wanted to have him on on the show they. It's funny. I've thought about this like they talk in the episode about how they want to lift up Nicole's work and I felt that in talking to them, I was hoping to lift up their work and Nicole's work. You know sort of getting even more Meta here but just wanting people to recognize and see this podcast and maybe have the same kind of transformative experience listening to it that I did.

Elsie Escobar Jessica Elsie Jessica Jessica Kupperman Jessica Cup Nicole Pillsbury Twenty Twenty Facebook Abraham Lincoln United States Egan Louis
Obituary: Herman Cain

TIME's Top Stories

05:52 min | 3 months ago

Obituary: Herman Cain

"Herman Cain helped define the American black conservative movement. He also set the stage for trump by Philip Elliott. Herman. CAIN remembered the nineteen ninety-six moment that changed his political trajectory as clearly as any in his life. The businessman was advising Jack Kemp's vice presidential campaign and accompanied the boss to the iconic Sylvia's soul food restaurant in Harlem for an event a man in the crowd shouted out to Kane and colleagues Black Republicans, there's no such thing. The. Same Man in canes telling called them Uncle Toms. The episode. So angered Kane that when he got home from that campaign swing, he switched from a registered independent to a card carrying member of the Republican. Party and over the next quarter century, the child of the segregated south became one of the best known black Republicans in the country briefly rising to be his party's presidential front runner for the two thousand twelve nomination and remaining one of the most quotable stars in conservative media. So committed to his party's stick it in the I e host was Cain that he flew to Tulsa. Oklahoma for President Donald, trump's first return to the campaign trail after one hundred thousand US corona virus deaths despite dire warnings from public health experts at that endure rally on June twentieth the stage four colon cancer survivor posed for pictures without wearing a mask and sat in the packed stands with fellow fans of the president on June twenty-ninth Cain tested positive for the corona virus. On July second, his aides announced he had been hospitalized while fighting the disease his twitter account continued to criticize mask wearing and to promote unproven endorsements of hydroxy. On. July. Thirtieth CAIN aides announced he had died from the White House trump attributed the death to the thing called the virus cain among the most prominent Americans to die during this pandemic who was seventy four In many ways, Kane and trump were cut from the same cloth neither had been elected to any political post before running for the White House, both delighted in needling the Republican Party's establishment and the mainstream press they shot from the hip campaigned in slogans and didn't much care to learn the details. Both men were dogged by allegations of sexual affairs and inappropriate behavior, and both denied the allegations they proved disqualifying for Kane who ended his bid in December twenty eleven under intense scrutiny. But they did not derail trump just one election cycle. Later, they were also both savvy exploiters of the media. In saying things they knew would provoke outrage and thus amplify the celebrity at the core of their bids indifference toward if not hostility against what had come before was a cornerstone of their strategy, not a flaw. CAIN was born in Memphis in nineteen forty-five to a domestic worker mother and a janitor father when his dad was hired to be the chauffeur for the head of coca-cola, the family moved to Atlanta where cain would graduate from Morehouse College. He then completed his graduate studies at Purdue University after civilian service in the navy from there Kane moved from engineer to executive with Pillsbury and its subsidiaries of Burger King and Godfather's pizza where he would be its CEO. In nineteen, Eighty Eight, he oversaw Godfather's. From, Pillsbury throughout the same time yelled positions with the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. That part of his resume lead trump to consider cane for a position in his administration a move that drew dissent from fellow Republicans who were not eager to revisit the allegations against Kane for three years. Kane led the national. Restaurant Association a lobbying arm for the industry that paid settlements to at least two women who detailed canes unwanted advances. His was not a typical career in his post. CEO Years Cain became a sought after motivational speaker and unsuccessful presidential candidate in two thousand and a Senate one in two thousand four. As, the tea party movement started to organize after Barack Obama's election to the White House. Kane emerged as one of its strongest spokespeople when the twenty twelve election cycle began kane decided to run the scrappy est of campaigns focused on untrue additional travel schedule that often seemed more like a book tour than an organizing effort. His novel nine, nine nine tax plan proposing a nine percent corporate business flat tax, a nine percent personal income flat tax and a nine percent national sales tax drew I rolls from economists but curiosity from voters. Antipathy toward front runner Mitt Romney proved sufficient to give cain a chance to rise in the late summer and fall of twenty eleven until his personal life just proved too much. But he didn't shrink from podcast life. Instead he became a ubiquitous voice and reliable critic of Democrats

Ceo Years Cain Kane Donald Trump Cain White House Mitt Romney Jack Kemp Pillsbury Philip Elliott Republican Party Godfather Oklahoma Twitter Harlem Barack Obama United States Tulsa
"pillsbury" Discussed on Radio Free Cybertron - All of our Transformers podcasts!

Radio Free Cybertron - All of our Transformers podcasts!

08:19 min | 3 months ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on Radio Free Cybertron - All of our Transformers podcasts!

"But. But that's about all about all. I have to say about it I like I said I like it I'm glad I got it and that is pretty much everything this week. Great Magic anything. nope nothing this week. John John You did are you there oh? Yeah. I actually got a lot of stuff this week. Oh boy. Let's see here I'm not gonNA go into too much detail on anything but in particular but I got I was one for two this week on the great chase for Neka. CARTOON TURTLES AT. Targets. It's gotten I I. Guess if you check twitter like now it's probably a seven on the dumpster fire scale like the eleven it was a week ago. It's not good. But it's also just not like you know total war but things are trickling into targets across the country very slowly interesting thing about Neka and jumper transformers you know in some cases target. Or stay retail associates don't like stock what they get They actually have like vendors come in stock stuff. This is more common in like food like chips and stuff at three am and a kroger. You'll see like the guys come in merchandise. Soda afternoon. Yeah. Different times and then Yeah. Your mileage may vary when you that guy but this happens in toys and specialty product to naked is one of those. So they have they have reps or the country that go into targets and So the next merchandise ships via like a ups or whatnot to the to the back of the target then once a week or so the Neka Rep will come goldfish that box out of the back of the target and merchandise the. The shelves where the number is supposed to be. So in theory, you know you have a perfect plan Graham right because the rep comes comes and does it. Unfortunately, of course, reality is what it is and You know as soon as target employees maybe figure out hey, there things in this box that are profitable or wanted by me or others lots of times. The next person will come around and what do you know that box is is not sealed anymore and Kinda picked through. So so that's become kind of an issue here in there with Neka but anyway at least things are shipping. And people are finding stuff sporadically. So I found the Casey Jones foot soldier to pack still looking for metalhead, but I, think I'll find him eventually. Easy. Yes Bill Casey. Casey's the better anyway I think eventually this fall I will find metal heads. So moving on transformers though got Greece bits I, gods today It's your here appeared. That's the target closest to me had their great toy refresh. So, what I walked in, they had at least three snap dragons a secret to pack Sky Lynx and a Earth sized prime, which apparently is still kind of like a sought after a thing and then slither Fang rungs. So I got most of that I got picked up Sky Lynx and Snapdragon, and then I also whilst over to the to the Lego I'll just to see what else They've refreshed and I think the street dates on the Super Mario. Lego kits is technically like August first or something like that but but they broke it hard and there were like all the big Lego kits for the Super Mario sets were out in the blind packs were out. So I picked up a couple blind a blind packs. Those are adorable You should google that they're worth a google but. What do we have in the pine packs. Whether there I'm sure there's GonNa be like multiple waves. So this is wave one there's ten there's ten of them they're like three or four dollars apiece, and they include stuff like like a bomb abso- Let's see what else they have. They have Do a couple of GOUMAS. JIMBO's they have coupons couple of Cuba's. Grunts from the Super Mario levels that you can kind of build out and they are all interactive with Lega. Mario. So that core like Lego Mario figure that comes in the starter kit he interacts with the little blind pack guys That's. A really impressive lego ecosystem they're building also, very expensive. that. And I think that's about it for me. So I haven't opened most of this stuff, but you know I'll get around to it. I'm still building that nineteen eighty bat mobile. How many pieces? three, thousand I think something like that. Yeah it's like twenty two or twenty, three bags. So I'm doing what? They should start measuring those big. Lego. Kits not by the number of pieces. But by the number of hours, it took their their play testers to put them together. Yes like. Selling eighteen our kit. Then I might not want to buy it. Excellent. Thousand. Yeah for sure That's it for me. So I'm by I have I have a couple of weeks of of toys to get through. So I'm happy about that. So, let's see. Yeah. Yes it leaves me on I. got. Corporate Zehr. The walks Iraq with a Citibank's. said that goes with it such. Pretty cool. So I can read live. All my favorite headmasters dubs stuff what's happened to the hit masters and they fight without Chrome Dome Yeah Oh I need to get a chrome actually don't have one I have I have generations crammed into So yeah, Zach actually the nicest part of it. He is so much better than three bruce is so much better. It's as much better than as Scorpion knock is over fortress maximus. stood. The heat before it Max but no scorpions much better. It is much much better we. If, we don't hate it. We're just disappointed everything's metroplex spectrum as deserved his own his own tooling. that. That's what it comes down to. Everybody? Yes. So I, it's pretty. I haven't had a chance to play with it as much. So at Lake but Zach is great. So I got that I got the. John and mentioned repugnant up our Megan. snapdragon. So snapdragon excellent robots really good jet. Told many two modes. There's Septran track can only has two modes. He's a dragon in name only off mood socks. Unless. There's some sort of hidden articulation in his abdomen that missing or we could just try forcing harder. Yeah I guess I could then you'll leader uncovered already there or you'll have made a new one I mean, it's possible. It's literally possible that I missing something but looking at photos and everything I. Don't think that I am. So it is lacking a little bit of articulation dragon mode that it needs. But the robot mode is excellent. It's dead on exactly what I wanted. So I'm pretty happy with that. I got the repugnant. It's cute with the little. Whatever they're called little not repugnant. But Unlike Unlike the short cons from that hot rod set, they actually transform into robots. What Pentagon yes. Yeah which is awesome. I need more of that. Yeah. They're pretty great. So. Now do you think those are like tiny changers? Short cons initially concentrates for my thought they thought they didn't right. I know we were wondering before the set came out. If those were tiny turbo changer molds, I don't remember. I don't remember the actual eventual finding. You know I'll be honest with you either I'll be honest with you. I don't remember if the the Shark Durkan's tidy number changes next week transfer or not. I. Don't remember them transforming somebody help me out. Did anybody. matted you open them do they transform? What.

Neka John John Bill Casey Zach google twitter Lego Mario Casey Jones Lega Graham Greece Megan. snapdragon JIMBO Pentagon bruce Iraq Cuba Citibank
BREAKING: Herman Cain Dies Of Coronavirus At Age 74 in Atlanta

The Erick Erickson Show

03:35 min | 3 months ago

BREAKING: Herman Cain Dies Of Coronavirus At Age 74 in Atlanta

"A political consultant who worked for Herman? Cain on his twenty twelve presidential campaign is announcing that he has passed away. from. covid nineteen. That's breaking news here in Y'all I'm not confide. This is not. Confirmed other than through Ellen. And I'm Yup. nope. It's IT's confirmed folks. Herman Cain has died of the corona virus. age seventy four. In Republican presidential candidate in two thousand twelve. Herman Cain ran his platform very famously was the nine nine, nine tax reform plan. He had been Fox. News contributor and a newsmax contributor newsmax is confirming his death He was admitted to the hospital on July first two days after being. DIAGNOSED WITH COVA night teen. Ten Days Prior, he had been at the Rally for the President they they don't know where he got the virus. And Herman Cain has now. Passed away He was the President of Godfather's pizza. He. Rose through the ranks He joined coca. Cola. He worked for Pillsbury. He was regional vice president for Burger, King, which at the time Pillsbury owned and then he took over. Godfather's pizza turned around made it a profitable company. And his big issue is marketing. He became the chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City in Nineteen ninety-five He was in the position for twenty months in nineteen in two, thousand nine you'll recall the president renominated him for the Federal Reserve. Board? He ultimately withdrew his nomination. He dabbled in politics in one, thousand, nine, hundred sixty was an adviser to the Bob Dole Jack Kemp Campaign for President He ran for the Senate in two thousand four. He was defeated in the primary by Johnny Isaacson actually campaigned for him in two thousand four. Now he beat colon cancer it was stage four and two, thousand six he was diagnosed with it the and then from two, thousand, eight, two, thousand, seven, of course, he had the Herman Cain Show in Atlanta? On WSB, I was actually hired in two thousand eleven to replace Herman on WSB Because Herman had decided, he was going to run for president and he had been in the line to replace Neil Bortz they needed somebody to replace Herman as a result. So they hired me Herman off and ran for president. He at one point was the front runner for the Republican presidential nomination, and then he the ultimately lost the nomination and came back to radio has has wound down his career over time and. Herman Cain now dead he was a good man. Seventy four years old affected by coronavirus virus. Prayers for his family. And for for those who knew and loved and worked with Herman Cain God. Bless him.

Herman Cain Regional Vice President Herman President Trump Pillsbury Consultant Newsmax Federal Reserve WSB Ellen Bob Dole Jack Kemp Federal Reserve Bank Johnny Isaacson Neil Bortz Senate Kansas City Burger Atlanta
"pillsbury" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

RAGE Works Network-All Shows

08:08 min | 3 months ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

"He said of course she didn't he can't act. I. It's amazing. They were just completely opposite. The way they approached roles you know Robert Mitchum kind of I think learned his lines and did it I think Marlon Brando. Worked had worked on the part. I don't know you know 'cause I've been around Brando what he's actually working park but I thought that was that was very amazing that he's he would say that Robert Rob of Marlon Brando can act. that. Okay. All right. What am I going to say? It's got me wondering. What actors did you use to like to watch when you were growing up that you tried to emulate near career? Well, I've always admired some of the rather they're not necessarily movie movie stars although I enjoyed Marlon Brando especially in the parts like on the Waterfront in the Wild Wild Streetcar there's some of the other parts he did I wasn't necessarily crazy about him I also very much liked Geraldine page who didn't really have that much of a movie career but I thought she was very flying actress Ruth Gordon. I really enjoyed with Gordon certainly Orson Welles. very very Mentioned it to Orson Welles and I mean I you know if I thought about it, I probably would probably. Come. Up with several more. But those are the ones that the moment that stand out in my mind. So at the also ask one other movie that you did that's one from nineteen eighty-three called. Stacy's Knights and that was the direct to`real debut of Jim Wilson and was also one of the earliest films for Kevin Costner in. And Jim Devon Force going to work together on many big hits like dances with wolves the postman bodyguard, Wyatt? Urp? You remember about working with Kevin Costner and Wilson. All right well. I never actually worked with Kevin because you know your show up on such different times time I, got to buy part I'm pretty sure that Kevin had already left or hadn't shown up yet whatever. what what I do remember about it is originally I thought. Well, this script is interesting it could possibly go somewhere. You know do well I thought to myself it just had that kind of thing about it. and I had a pretty good part in it. and then so I did it and then one day this is quite a few years ago I got a call from one of my daughters say Garth, you're on TV with Kevin Costner I said, no your mistake 'cause I didn't know that was Kevin Costner I said that you're a mistake and I never did it feel Kevin coster. Knows you chew you're on TV now. So what had happened is Kevin, has been nominated for Kademi Ward for with wolves and they were showing anything and everything that he had ever done apparently over and over and over again you know because of that and it was Stacy's Knights. So that's what I basically remember about it. I have seen it I I remember being being in Reno is where we did it and I've never been in a gambling town before fascinated by this quite often in the casino we were they're very late at night. because they didn't want to disturb the clients too much and the fellow who we did it in a place the film at a place called makes money tree which I believe is what out of business but they were having financial trouble in. And the fellow who took over the management of it for some reason or other decided that I was a movie star. and He he treated me royally I mean he would. He would buy me dinner. He would get me tickets to shows. You know free with dinner. That's not enough. Yeah I was just amazing. Yeah they're all I should've caught on with Kevin. You know he's WanNa became a movie star Yeah Yeah. It's amazing. We have mentioned your wife a few times and I'd like to actually hear it a little bit more about you and her hockey tell us who she was and how you guys met. Yeah. I was belong to a theater groups no longer exist on Quango Boulevard in. Hollywood or maybe slightly in the valley and She was a member there. and. It was a small little theatre maybe thirty or forty seats and she was sitting in the front row and above the stage was a large clock. which was accurate. It was you know within a few minutes anyways ticking away. And I never really approached her because I thought she is good look at. Pick up anybody she wants. So. Here's this clock pride above her. And I'm sitting right behind her. She turns to me and she says, do you know what time it is? Yeah. She excuse to talk to me. So, we we went out you know Etcetera Etcetera I was married at the time. but I really re but it was I was my first wife I've felt and I have a daughter in New York City by her I've felt my first wife was rather negative. About people about life. and. I thought to myself. I really don't want to spend the rest of my life with a person who has negative leanings. You know there's always down down down on things. And I I was first name was Jaclyn and her last name that under was male and as a model I believe. Jacquelyn Ford. But anyways Jacqueline was One Hell of a lot of fun could be where one hell of a lot of fun and So yeah, I left my first wife for Jacqueline you know. I mean she she is was a very, very unique person very entertaining. Very entertaining. Did you do any TV series or films together? You know actually we didn't know it at the time that we met, but we were on the same episode of the invaders. Right now. Right before star Trek. Yeah. She opens the show I believe the very first shot is of her and then I think play a doctor or something later in the show you know. So aside from acting, I also read that you started to become a professional photographer and I think the client I'm most curious to hear about is when you worked for playboy and Penthouse you tell us a little bit about that well at the time we did vixen of course and for Meyer of course, was a photographer during the Second World War maybe a cinematographer I'm not sure what he was doing. But anyway, he was a very low budget film vixen was a very low budget film which became very popular and he made a lot of money at but he said to me, you know Garth I guess I'd already was interested dockery. Why don't you do the sills on the show and with the rights to them but I'm not GonNa pay you for doing it. I said, okay fine. You know. So I didn't think much about it. Of course, they ran a whole spread in Penthouse magazine of some of the shots I took you know either the second or third or first issue pin house. And then later on playboy wanted to know if I had any. Photographs of Erica Gavin who played vixen and I said, no..

Kevin Costner Marlon Brando Kevin Garth Stacy Robert Mitchum playboy Kevin coster Ruth Gordon Penthouse magazine Orson Welles Jim Wilson Erica Gavin Jacqueline Reno Jim Devon Robert Rob WanNa New York City Geraldine
"pillsbury" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

RAGE Works Network-All Shows

06:31 min | 3 months ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

"And I had come to the conclusion by that time having been in Hollywood that they have a tendency to type cast you. If. You look like or seem life of very nice person. That's usually the kind of part you get. If you look like a gangster at is most likely the kind of apart you will get. So I was brought in to read for this particular part. And I kept in mind that this guy was Kinda, like Brash, it was a little one guy you know. So that is the way I behave not just when I was reading for the part but when I was being interviewed for the park. and. But when I after Reading For the part I thought to myself I take I. got this. I think I did really well. So a week went by and I called my agent at the time and I said his name is Phil. I said Phil whatever happened with the Star Trek. He said, well, everybody likes you but the director he thought you were a wise guy. I said wait a medic few. told me. That's what the part was well anyway. So it was water under the bridge at that point. Then, about a week later I got a call from the same agent saying garth guess what they couldn't find anybody. They liked better than you. So you do have the part. So that's how that happened. Very cool. Yeah everyone's cool right and is you know that that was the? Called Mirror. And that is one of the most popular of the episodes that that are been presented by Star Trek. In you know I think at that time also, the idea of a mirror universe was very new in Sifi. When you first read the script, what did you think about it well here again is say at the time at the time Char Trek was another show I I didn't think about it. I thought I've gotTA learn my lines. You know try to portray this character as presented and That's what I dealt with I didn't deal with. Better Watch show, you know better hone up on the rest of the show or all the other shows that are playing I just went in and did it I mean because what often happens is you can have an idea when you walk in to do a apart and then the director says, no, no, I, want you to do it this way I want more of this I want less fat. So it's not a good idea to really cement which you're going to do when you get there because he's very likely to change it. and. There's nice. May Have said I don't think I have is that I find that the? Film and Television is very much a director and an editor's medium. I don't really find it so much an actress media. Because there's so much they can do to enhance and or even ruined performance. You know. So that conclusion I've come to over the years because I personally think I've seen actors I don't think of her. But they come across really well on television and film, and so they're interesting uniquely and look at it. I've never really considered it before but you make a very good point about that. I'll I I really think. So I mean, apart sometimes I tell people that I say, how is it possible to get a candidate almost or an academy award performance out of a child who six years old? How does that happen you know as is the child who six or seven years old born a great actor or actress I don't think so I think they have equality and the director and the editor get are able to mold it. So it it it it becomes. Outstanding. That feeling about it. I mean, I have seen well known actors in parts which I thought they were not very good but I really believe that it's not the actor who wasn't good. It was misdirected or Miss cut as miss edited something like that. In other words they stayed let's say as an example back on medium shots where if they had come in for close up where you can see on television the emotion, the thinking process that the actors going through it gives a much more dramatic quality. Well, if you're on a medium shot, you quite don't see that. So that's why I say it's an editor's. Medium I think and and or directors media and sounds you know No Yeah. It's all sorts of things they can do. Thank, God. Maybe. So what do you remember about your first day of walking onset and getting your costume? What'd you think about Star Trek, the bridge and all that kind of stuff. Well, being all that sort of thing because I had never been acquainted to sort of set you know the kind of space thing it's very impressive. It's very impressive. You know what's going on the other thing you know that happened with that particular show Mirror Mirror is that You know it starts out my scene starts out with William Shatner walk out of an elevator, and as he steps out of the elevator, you see a fiscal up and hit him in the jaw I. Guess You know and Then they can usually cut to a commercial and then they come back but he William Shatner said I said you know I was willing to throw the punch but he didn't want me to. Thinking about it, of course, he did because here comes as young ambitious actor who wants to make it really looked good and he might accidentally. Hit him you want. So he had a stuntman come in and throw the punch. But you don't the angle of of where the camera is. You can't tell connection or not. Now, of course assumed this connection and you hear the noise. So you soon release been hit. You know. But anyway that that's Stuck, out of my mind, you know it's a time. Don't know you're not doing this..

director editor William Shatner Phil Hollywood Brash Sifi garth
"pillsbury" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

RAGE Works Network-All Shows

10:40 min | 3 months ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

"I would give up, go swimming instead. Of course that I wrote notes From my mother. Please issues guard. From school yesterday he wasn't feeling well. And of course, they were adopted. With her signature. Had So apparently thing either accepted it or decided it wasn't worthwhile while pursuing. I, don't know. But you know once I got to New York City, of course I I went to this high school performing arts. Therefore, I was surrounded with people who had the same interest before they are said that time taught not just drama but they taught music photography and dance all of those and strange that photography was part of that curriculum there I didn't take any the courses there. We were required to take some sort of a dance class. So once or twice a week, which is not my forte. SORTA ballet or maybe modern dance although I enjoy modern dance very much these days to watch not to do I don't have any. Talents here. I know sooner finished high school when I got involved with A little later or or in New York City, and one of the plays I was in was directed by a pretty well known at least theater director by the name William Ball and he directed a play call Ivanov which is a checkoff play. And he was involved mostly with classical theater and he knew someone or some people at Ashland Oregon and recommended that they see me and accept me as an apprentice a and they do just shakespeare there at actually or they did at that time they may do other place there now. and. So I got involved with doing summer stock mostly Shakespeare. But then I also did in Nyack New York where my mother then was living finally moved to. A play or they brought in what's called package plays with stars and I had the looked to play a rather large. Fart. Out With Joan Blonde del who was certainly very famous actress in the forties. Play by the name of Come Back Little Sheba where I played Arne. Ed while I was back on the east coast I went to Burlington Vermont did Shakespeare's Stratford. Group twenty players in Massachusetts. And people kept saying to me go if few should go to. Hollywood, you should go to Hollywood you know. So I finally I bet woman at young lady at the time in Burlington Vermont. I was doing Shakespeare and played Marquette Antony in Julius. Caesar. Here. Who is to have to? Their What was I? GonNa say. So Sh I went to Hollywood with Then she was an actress too and waiting for the phone to ring which never happened. For quite a while. Would do plays here in Hollywood and call agents up you really have to have had an agent to get into the studios in those days. And I couldn't get an agent down to see me in anything. But what? I did was a play that was directed by Bruce. dern. who you may may not be aware of, but he's super well known actor was up for an academy award a few years ago for his portrayal in Nebraska. anyways Bruce said to me God. He's he said, you know you're very good actor. Do you have an agent and I said no I don't have an Asian I can't get an agent to get here to see me and He said use my name tell them that Bruce. Dern told that you know say say to them that he suggested you come down and see him in this play. and. That's exactly what happened. I call some agents pretty well known agent came down to see me. He asked me he wanted me as a client I said yes. Yes. Yes. Of course of course. And I began to work a little bit. Then I think the very first show I did was an FBI with I think it was Brad Stillman but I'm not sure the actor's name. And then. You know I did a Mannix, all these shows. You mentioned on the show is that I read up on your Few things that are clearly missing like Mannix is not their feelings aren't there So that's always a problem with I'm glad I'm glad to actually talk to you to get more information. But accord I'm. The first ruler listen it was from twelve o'clock high. Played. It was a World War Two drama you appeared in was that your first? Day of work or is it is the first thing you did that aired That was the very first show I was ever in and the interesting thing about it is when they played, I never saw it and then I saw that somebody had a copy of it for sale and I thought well I'll I'll watch it I'll buy it and watch it and even though I do have credit. For playing this part, I have not in it I am not in in the television show at all. Cut, me out. I don't know whether it was because I was so bad. I don't think. So it was probably a question of timing. You know they have a certain amount of time to put the show together for the commercials and everything and they decided that it was something that wasn't needed and I ended up on the cutting room floor, but I have credit. Hit. Which I think is very funny. You're listening to act as being two different episodes. So we're both appearances cut or is there just some wrong information on your IMDB page twelve o'clock I know I never heard from them again, you heard from him again, but the year didn't run for very long time. You know what what happens here is you have an agent who keeps the Busy admitting you and a casting director somebody Mites you know and you get to go in and see these people but they never did call me back and who knows why you know but it's it's unusual actually to be called on the same show back again to do the parts that I I was doing although it did happen on the soap operas. Times I was called back now. Obviously, you've had so much experience in theater at that point, but twelve o'clock high being your first TV appearance, what was it like for you to walk onto the set for the first time and see everything see how different it was well, number one you you've you've feel is when you're on stage, you feel at least I feel I think most actors feel that there is an excitement of working in front of a live audience and there's an energy that is being put forth because you need to reject to an audience out there. the twelve o'clock high I stood around waiting naturally before they got to me and I thought my God these people are are not doing anything. They're just kind of talking. You know nothing. Really energetic. Here which is it's a different form of acting generally speaking I would say, and so when my turn came to actually do my part. which was a pilot. And it was full of exposition, which is very difficult to do I find because you have nothing to hang your hat on you do you're just trying to come up with numbers and times and things like that right? Where you're not involved emotionally where you have something to spring from. But the actor who was the star of the show I believe at the time wasn't there he had a dental appointment or something he was gone. So the very first time I ever appeared on television. I was literally talking to thin air. Nobody there. which you find later on if you continue. In this business that quite often if you're dealing with movie stars or television stars, they're not they're you know they have usually a standard that you can look back. So I found it very nerve wracking the the very first time I worked the other times I worked I mean is that recall I was? It wasn't exposition. It was talking to someone you know which I found a lot easier some not long after that, we come to your first star Trek appearance and that was hard of the second season of the show. So I'm curious before we talk about how you got onto the show. Did you ever Star Trek before before you got on it? No no I didn't. I had never watched it It was at that time for me. It was great I gotta part and show you know like any of the others. Oh, I gotTa Park. It didn't mean anything Oh look at this star Trek I love Star Trek. I didn't really watch much television for whatever reason You know just didn't interest me that much although I mean I did watch some of course but I never. No, I never watched star. Trek. Never had. Now, of course, I have. So, tell us not. I cast to appear on the show. Well, I got a call from my agent saying there's a part on a show called Star Trek keep in mind he said the part that you are reading for is a kind of a wise guy. And I had come to the conclusion by that time having been in Hollywood that they have a tendency to type cast.

Hollywood New York City Shakespeare Bruce director Caesar FBI Massachusetts Burlington Vermont Nyack New York Dern Joan Blonde Ashland Oregon Mannix Burlington William Ball Stratford Ta Park Ed
"pillsbury" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

RAGE Works Network-All Shows

02:20 min | 3 months ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

"Hi this is Gareth Mary. You may remember me for my part in Star Trek. Both in Mirror Mirror and the cloud minders enjoy listening to Turkey untold. Hello and welcome to trick untold the Star Trek podcast that goes beyond the stars on your host. Matt capitals. Today. We have the pleasure of talking to another character actor who appeared on the original star trek show from the nineteen sixties. Garth pillsbury appeared in two episodes of original show. His first appearance was part of one of the best episodes from the original series that has spawned many many follow ups that continue today, and that episode was mirror. Mirror there. He played a crewman named Wilson who protects captain Kirk from Mirror Chekov only get socked in the jaw as credited from the captain after he followed that appearance up with another role in season. In the episode of the cloud minders where he plays a troglodyte disruptor, a terrorist or freedom fighter depending on your view in the episode who's part of a group trying to gain more equal rights for his cave dwelling people against the culture and elitist people from the city name. Who Literally Live on the clouds? It's very much on the nose, but that kind of summarizes season three star. Trek doesn't it after Star Trek garth appeared in many other pictures typically falling in the category of what I would call exploitation films oftentimes but ultimately movies that just don't take themselves too seriously. One of those movies was written by Roger. Ebert before he'd become the world famous critic that many folks no from today however, he did get to work on one of the earliest films that starred Kevin Costner and he's got some good memories about that fill these days. Garth spans more time behind the lens as a photographer and cinematographer, and that includes taking fix playboy. Mr Pillsbury has had a very diverse lifetime of careers and at eighty two years old he shows no signs stopping anytime soon before we begin this episode I'd like to remind you to follow us on facebook twitter and instagram at trick on told all one word no spaces..

Mirror Mirror Garth pillsbury Gareth Mary Mirror Chekov Matt capitals Kevin Costner Turkey Ebert facebook captain Kirk Roger twitter Wilson
What It Was Like to Interview Wil Williams

Inside Podcasting

05:24 min | 3 months ago

What It Was Like to Interview Wil Williams

"Welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discuss their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury? This is a post show episode in which I will speak with a special guest about last week's interview. If you haven't heard that episode in which I talked to podcast, critic and Creator Will Williams, I recommend you go back and listen to that first, and then come back and listen to the post show. Today my guess is Ariel Nissenbaum Latte. Welcome to the show aerial. I am excited to be here. Thank you so much for having me. You texted me asking to be on the show. I responded within ten seconds. Is that right you did did it was so sweet? And I could feel your enthusiasm Azam coming through my phone. I'm so glad an awesome moment. You never know like Don't really have the bandwidth or Don't have the bandwidth down. Nice so you do like one hundred different things in podcasting and so I'd love for you to introduce yourself then. Maybe you can also share with our listeners where you are right now. Yes, says it's unusual. Place I'll do that first so that the people know why. There are some strange sounds going on, so currently I, am at a farm in two harbors Minnesota. Minnesota, which is somewhere near Duluth, which is on Lake Superior, it is beautiful here I'm on a farm because I'm wolfing, which stands for a worldwide organization of organic farming I'm on my way across the US on a road trip and I thought this would be a fun stop, so if you hear chickens or pigs or dogs or cats or children that what's going on. This makes it so much more impressive that you said. Yes, excitedly to my invitation to come on this show. So I started ear. Buds podcast collective, which is a weekly email that sends a theme and five podcast episodes on that theme. Each week is curated by different person I also run a podcast. A companion to that newsletter called feedback with earbud sort of similar to what you do. Sky Inside podcasting newsletter and podcast, and then I also run another podcast called counter programming Sheron an Arielle. It's a distraction casts started during covid nineteen, and we talk about anything having to do with the word count or counter, so Count Dracula step counters, kitchen counters, anything you can imagine. We're also taking suggestions. I also work for cast box. Do Marketing and business development for them? They're podcast APP and then I help with the outlier podcast festival, and then I do anything that pops up. That has to do with podcasts because I love podcasts. It is very very impressive aerial. I'm so glad that you introduced yourself. Because I'm not sure I would have remembered everything so much, so I will also add on the sound front that the city that I live in chose today to pave our street, and so in addition to sounds of cows and pigs and children on areas, and you might hear on my end paving machines, going up and down and beeping, and doing all manner of things just really like twenty feet away from me, although it sounds pretty quiet at the moment, good, Luxemburgo is in charge of editing this. Exactly okay well, let's get to it We are here to talk about last week's show aerial. What? What did you think of last week's show yes? Oh, I know, will for a long time on twitter, and on other social media platforms, so to hear will chat about her work was really enlightening I. Have to admit that I am not the biggest consumer of audio drama slash audio fiction, and so listening to will talk about it was I opening for. For me I learned a lot, and then I learned a lot through you as well, and I imagine it was kind of some new materials you is that right absolutely and I mean that's one of the reasons. I I wanted to talk to her. Was that like you? I haven't listened to as much fiction, but also I think that someone who's making a fiction podcast has a really different the they're coming from a different creative place in some way. And there's obviously other things that are involved casting and you know working with actors is a completely different ballgame, so I was really excited to talk to her. For for that reason as as well as others mean actually I'll just go ahead and say it another reason why I was. Fascinated by what she was doing. Was that like me? She writes about podcast and. You know like Kerr. I decided to take the plunge and make a podcast and when you're writing about them there is this funny thing where you feel like. Is this supposed to sound like no what I'm doing or am I gonNA? Make giant mistake. And there's a little bit of risk I think with her situation. It's more risky than just doing an interview. Show that require scripts and. Things of that nature, but it was still I could still identify with her feelings of. This is a little risky. This is sort of putting myself out there in a way that I haven't put my out myself out there before and so. I felt a kinship with that and was excited to have her on the show for that

Minnesota Azam Kerr Sky Pillsbury Ariel Nissenbaum Will Williams Twitter Lake Superior Duluth United States Luxemburgo
A Podcast Critic Embraces Creation With Wil Williams

Inside Podcasting

06:13 min | 3 months ago

A Podcast Critic Embraces Creation With Wil Williams

"Hello and welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discuss their craft. I'm your Sky Pillsbury. Today I speak with will Williams you may know. Will from her work as a fiction podcast critic, but last year will decided to create a scripted audio drama of her own. She named the show Valence, and it's based on a trilogy of urban fantasy books. She wrote years earlier. But will decided to go one step further and create a companion podcast that documents the experience of making valence. It is called scoring magic, and it reveals the nitty-gritty behind script, writing casting, marketing, funding and a lot more. I asked will to be my guest on this show. Because I wanted to know what it's been like to create the kind of work she critiques and to document the experience have making the kind of work she critiques. All right, we drop into conversation now just after I've asked will what? It felt like to record herself telling her friends for the first time about her plans to make podcasts. It was terrifying. Turfing for a lot of reasons first off, it's always a terrifying to take a creative ambition and turn it from a daydream in something more real. I wanted to record myself I off because I knew that I wanted to make a documentary about making this fiction podcast. I've always loved arts documentaries, and it just felt natural, and like it would be a good resource for people. I also wanted to hold myself accountable. I am really good at talking myself out of creative endeavors, really really good at it so I was already terrified because they knew that. That this would make it something real. It would make it something that others could hold me accountable for. Did you have any misgivings about being a critic and making the thing that you critique like? How do I enter? The world is a career person after this like. Does it impact my job later? M I you know, do a gain or lose credibility from this. Do you know what I mean like? I would imagine that that all had to be rolling through your head. Oh, yeah, and it still does to this day. Tell us about that. There were a lot of decisions that were really hard about it I constantly way the two sides of it where on one hand I'm thinking. Does this make me to biased in different ways? Does this make it seem like all of my other work is just promotion for my own creative endeavors. How do I say this with shows that my actors are on and shows that my co writers could create things like that right? I feel like I have gained so much critical insight by actually creating in this space. That would have ultimately hindered my criticism i. have so much more empathy for the stresses that creators through I have so much more insight about directing and writing and formatting scripts, even and sound design in thinking about how your concept impacts your final creation I feel he was really necessary for me to make what I making not just for myself, but for how I write for others, yeah. It does come with some losses. A lot of people I work with know that if they are the main voice, actor or sound, designer or writer on something, I can critique that. are a minor role I. will critique that with disclosure, and that might mean that people read that review, and then say oh. This is too biased and don't listen to what they're making. But I'm very grateful that everyone I work with has been excited enough to work on this project that they have agreed to those terms and been very comfortable with that I'm so grateful for everyone I work with in many ways, but this is one of the biggest ones early on, if also reassuring that people would trust me in that way and. Be Okay with for going those reviews to work on this project that I care so much about so that's interesting. You told your actors and the people who worked on Valence. You told them up front because we're GONNA work together I'm not going to be able to review other shows that you're on at least in the sort of immediate future. Is that absolutely? Absolutely okay okay, there is an article in vulture by Sarah. holdren called I make plays I write criticism I am not my own enemy, and it really breaks down how to work in both of those worlds. There is this idea that all criticism needs to be objective in some way and holdren really breaks down like what does that even mean that's nothing. Yeah I I don't really believe in an objective review. Everything all the podcasts that I love are in some way informed by who I am as a person and I think that it's ridiculous to think there's anything such as objective, good or objective bad. All right is articles fantastic and really helped encourage me. So. What were the first things in making valence that you that you did? Was it starting the indeed go campaign? Oh, we did so much before the nego. In span of lake, maybe two months had the first half of the season scripted. We had auditions out. or guests are casting. Call out when we were listening to auditions will had done all of the on boarding paperwork that we needed to get to people. We were coming up with the Indie Gogo. It was a huge process that happened very very very

Sarah. Holdren Williams Writer
What It Was Like to Interview Shima Oliaee

Inside Podcasting

05:57 min | 3 months ago

What It Was Like to Interview Shima Oliaee

"Hello and welcome to fight podcasting the show in which. Discuss their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury. This is a post show episode in which two very special guests will talk to me about last week's episode in which I interviewed Dolly Pardons America producer. Mo only if you haven't heard that episode, I recommend going back and listening to it before you listen to this one that way, our conversation may make a little bit more sense. Today on the show I have with me, the two people most likely to remember my obsession with Dolly Parton. My wonderful parents welcome to the show, mom and Dad Hey. Hi there. Thank you so much for saying yes. Welcome On this kind of show you guys get to ask me questions. I have the first question here ready to go all right dad. Right. Do you feel a part of dollars America? That is a really good question Yes, I think am I mean I must be one hundred percent because I'm a fan, so I think by default that makes me part of her America, because you know I know who she is. I adore her like so many others. Of course that begs the question like what is Dolly, Parton America, and I think one of the points that she made in last week's episode was that Dolly is sort of this prison for everyone else's story? And I'm not sure that I have a particular story to tell but I think that the aura surrounding Dolly is sort of like. Everyone can be part of it. No matter what walk of life you come from and so I guess in that regard. Be Part of Dolly Parton America. She talked about the feelings of otherness enduring during her show. Do you resonate with that at all? I probably don't if I'm being really honest and. That's because I am very privileged in my life, so you know I am female. I'm white. I've had opportunities that many many people don't get to have. I went to college. I got a good job after college. I sort of did the things that I expected I would do. Thus far in my life. But I think that the way that I can relate with that was what Shima said about how she and Chad are both first generation Americans and you are a first generation American, Dad. And so you know what it made me think, and even in the show, because during the show Jad talks about how her dollies Tennessee Mountain home, reminds his father of his home. Overseas, you know of course I couldn't help but think about our family home in northern Finland, so of course I thought about like the listener. Any listener to this doesn't know is that I grew up going to Finland with you every summer and you know spending many many many many days. Not Whole Lot to do kind of like the countryside of Finland in this tiny town with a population of eight hundred people, where almost no one spoke English, and then of course I would spend a lot of time in Helsinki as well where people did, but you know I remember the excitement that I had the day that you got your citizenship when we were living in Hawaii. I remember you wore a suit and that was a big deal because you were is most of the time. So. You know I remember that feeling, but I don't ever feel I can't say that I ever felt other, but I. Think I knew that you at times felt authored. What about you? Well I guess what I was wondering about is. Dolly is also a what I would call a country girl. you got to know people who were definitely from the country, not from the city. That's true. Maybe I speculate that that may have had something to do with your level of comfort with Dali. Oh. That's interesting. Also expressed some interest in Loretta Lynn during that time. I loved Laura Adeline and I think I I remember i. read the Book About Her. Was the book called? Coal, miner's daughter, I don't know. I did identify with those two, but I don't know I can't like point to a memory where I connected those two things myself. You Know My love for them like I. Really Loved Donna Summer at the same time. She's not from the country and I think honestly I think. They spoke to my infatuation with Glamour, and even though I knew that they were from the country. It's sort of like they were like these unimaginable. Creatures all three of those women. They were like such a shiny thing, and then I love the music and I love to dance, but I think that I always had an interest in people who are different than me, and that's why like when we were in the countryside in Finland like I could hang out with Vinnie me. Who is the violin player? You know for hours or make friends with the girl who lived across the street Rita, even though we. We didn't speak the same language, and like really enjoy those people because it was like exposing me to this completely different way of life. You know just a way of life that I wasn't familiar with and I think that in a way Dali Donna. It sort of showed me a completely different slice of

Dolly Dolly Parton Dolly Parton America Finland America Sky Pillsbury Donna Summer Parton America Dali Donna Rita Producer Loretta Lynn Helsinki Tennessee Mountain Laura Adeline Shima Vinnie Hawaii Chad
Producer Shima Oliaee on Making Dolly Partons America

Inside Podcasting

06:34 min | 4 months ago

Producer Shima Oliaee on Making Dolly Partons America

"Hello and welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discussed their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury today? I speak with Shima Oli. Who together with Radio Lab Founder Jad Abu Murad produced the award winning show Dolly Parton America. And when I say award-winning, it's kind of personal for me. You see Dolly Parton. America beat out the show. You're listening to right now for the title of Discover Pods Best New podcast of two thousand nineteen. I guess I should also mention that there show just won a peabody award, and sadly inside podcasting wasn't in the running for that one. Regardless the fact that podcast I produced was in the running with a show about Dolly. Parton will always put a smile on my face when I was nine I idolized. Does I spent hours staring at her glossy album covers imagining what it would be like to be glamorous singer. And while that dream come true, it was still an incredible thrill for me to talk to Shema about this show. In case you haven't listened to the series yet. I want to play you a clip. This is from an episode called dixie disappearance in which Jad and she might take a look at some of the contradictions behind Dolly's iconic, persona. The episode centers around a wildly popular tourist event called Don. DIXIE STAMPEDE! It's a Rodeo style dinner theater, in which the civil war is acted out as quote, friendly competition. The word slavery isn't mentioned at any point during the show. In this club Shema and One through the experience of attending the event. Okay so basically! Warn you walk into the, arena. It's huge I wouldn't say it's a football field I would say it's like an Olympic size pool like with arena seats all around. It's like going to the Rodeo. Basically. It's like going to the Rodeo. It's like a ton of der- in the center of this massive oval. How many seats wasn't again? It was one thousand. Dolly Parton. And the whole conceit of this situation. Besides eating a tremendous amount of food, I mean a full chicken and pork line and some soup that has a lot of cream and a biscuit. It was a lot of food decides that. Blue quickly. find out your competition a friendly competition between neighbors. Five folks. Are. For. The whole arena is split in half on one side. You've got the north wind on the other side. And, the announcer who rides in on this horse on his steed. They just. He encourages each side to jeer at the other. Side fireworks. He asked you to kind of jeer at them. And then he goes to the South side and he tells us outside. Northern. Third. Foul smelling. Slobber all gas. Good here, way out of a wet paper bag there. Before we get started. You may hear a few names that you don't recognize. There's Aisha Harris who wrote a critical profile of the stampede after which Dolly removed the word Dixie from the events name. By the way we have put a link to that story in our show notes for this episode. There is also Dolly's nephew. Brian seaver as a kid Brian was talented break dancer, who sometimes performed onstage with Dolly he gives Shima and Jad a tour of Dolly's child home. In Tennessee's smokey mountains, Sarah's marsh is list. Who wrote a book about Dolly? Parton and University of Tennessee, Professor Lynn Sakho taught a class called Dolly Parton America, which is where the series got its name. Okay, let's jump into the interview. We kick things off with Shima revealing how she and Jad prepared for an introductory conversation with Dolly Parton. He comes up to me. This is this is actually kind of fun. He comes up to me. He has a book he like goes into the cabinet behind. My desk gets out a piece of yellow paper painted around up a tape. Sit around the outside of the book and he's like this top secret, but I needed to read this and then. I, need you to prepare me for a conversation with the person now as you know, I've already been researching and doing other things for his talk and other and other ideas that we're kind of cooking up for other series, and so he tells me it's Dolly, and you know so I read. This book is covered in yellow fluorescent paper. Which I think was unnecessary I don't. Don't think anyone cares so I read it I. Write all the questions, and are you writing questions like? Are you knowing okay? We're GONNA do this. Do you have any premise for the show yet? We're like what kinds of questions are you writing down? Just questions pop into your head as you're reading it or this was a very yeah. This is a very moment so this. This is just the introductory conversation. So I also think we just needed to have an introductory conversation you know before you even touch certain things and we were both green, which is the beauty of kind of a jazz reporting is? He's okay with like not knowing anything when he begins which I think. adds to kind of the journey. You go on when you start telling. Telling the story, so the listener is going on the same ride you on which is very, I think emotionally fulfilling so we didn't really know when we started we. We knew enough basics and I brought to him everything I found really interesting. The passages I had compelled questions. We go way went over them edited and he went to interview Dolly and he comes back. I listened to the tape. And you hear this in the third episode of the series where she's like even GonNa. Get a question in because ninety minutes goes by. After his first question, and she just does the Dalai magic

Dolly Parton Dolly Dolly Parton America Jad Abu Murad Shima Oli Peabody Award Dixie America Sky Pillsbury Founder Tennessee Football Aisha Harris Brian Seaver Stampede Professor Lynn Sakho Sarah University Of Tennessee
What it Was Like to Interview James Kim

Inside Podcasting

06:24 min | 4 months ago

What it Was Like to Interview James Kim

"Pillsbury, this is a post show episode in which a special guest and I will chat about last week's episode in which I spoke with James Kim the creator of the fiction podcast moon face. I recommend listening to that episode. If you can before you listen to this. This one. It should be right behind this one in your podcast listening APP now. It's time for me to introduce the personal. Be Speaking with today I. Am so thrilled to have with me Elena. Fernandez Collins, and my guess is that many of my listeners may already know who you are, but please introduce yourself and explain what you're working on these days. Hey. It's really wonderful to be here. Yeah, I am a podcast critic and a journalist. I write for places like the Bello. Collective podcasts movement, and the AV club and I specialize in fiction podcasts, so I write a newsletter called audio dramatic. That's all about fiction podcasts, and that's kind of my big wheel house. I actually have a question for you about that. The reason why I wanted to have you on the show is we've met in person. We met at podcasts movement actually, and that was a thrill for me because I've seen I've gotten to know you on twitter and social media and the Bello collective slack but I'd never had a chance to actually get to know you. And obviously your interest in fiction made perfect sense for this episode, but I wanted to know. Have you always been interested in fiction, or did you have a phase where you're listening to nonfiction? How did you get into this space yourself? I started in fiction podcasts I, actually spent a long time, not listening to any nonfiction podcasts because they weren't my jam I'm the opposite of a lot of people that I have met in the industry. Yeah, I! Get the feeling from a lot of people that I talked to. And myself included in this that nonfiction has been the gateway for so many of us and that moving into fiction. For some reason you know there's hesitation around that, and in fact, I think that you wrote a piece that was sort of like how to entice people who aren't interested in fiction. to expose themselves to the genre isn't is that right and we did that? Come from the conversations you had with other people, and they would say i. just don't know where to start or I'm not really interested. Where did that come from? That's exactly where it came from. It came from. You. Know me telling people that I. Want to start talking about fiction podcasts online, which is kind of how this got started totally by accident, I had a lot of people who I wanted to talk about podcast with, but we were in like completely different universes of podcasting like I would try their stuff and getting them to try. My stuff was also really complicated, but both of it was just couldn't find like how to Rub along together and like figure out which. which topics we were really interested in or which styles we really interested in. and so I I learned a lot about how to link nonfiction and fiction together in the past few years so. Thank you for humoring me by answering a few of my questions I know I'm here to answer some of yours so. We. Shift gears now take it away. So I. You told Paul Condo. In the previous polls show that the choices that you make in who to interview, come down to a combination of your personal fascination or history and podcasting that you think your audience can learn from. So what made you want to interview James Like what specifically about James, audio and creative history like? Put Him on your list. Yeah. That's a great question. So in his case, it was definitely the fascination with what he had created. I will confess that I am someone who has. Listened primarily to nonfiction and I think one of the reasons is that. I've never been a science fiction fan and I've never been a fantasy fan in books that I read in television that I watch with the exception of Lord of the rings which I am obsessed by so I can go there right and I love Star Wars. So for the most part I've listened nonfiction and I. Think what really grabbed me about. What James was doing was that this looked like something that could be. That was realist that was based on his life that didn't have. You know spaceships. Are you know going on a you know some kind of fantastical journey and looked like I mean it's sort of how he describes it in our discussion, like look like the slice of life story, and then after that grabbed me and really what I saw was the video trailer that he had made, and I was intrigued by that because I hadn't seen many video trailers that looked like movie trailers for podcasts before, and then I did some due diligence, did some research and realized will one of the reasons why this is? Realist is because it is actually based on his experiences and. And, so I had been looking for something to dig into. That was fiction I want to explore a fiction and this felt like how this feels like. It's something that I think I would that would resonate with me, not because I'm obviously I can't walk in his shoes. I am not Korean and I'm I'm not worried about coming out to my mom, but I felt that there was something human that I could relate to about what the story that he was telling and I was right. I will admit that when I listened to the first episode and he talks about this in the show. Live sex and I was you know a little lake water? Oh, like this is different than other things I've heard and but I realized that he wanted us to be in that space. Where maybe it is a little uncomfortable. Maybe you're. Really seeing an intimate side of this person that you're not used to seeing in podcast or in a lot of media I sort of thought. Wow, this is this is brave and then. I think it's. It's inherently relevant to the story. He's telling us well, but that's something that I realized as I continued to listen.

James Kim Pillsbury Fernandez Collins Twitter Bello Paul Condo
Tales From the Dark Web

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03:58 min | 4 months ago

Tales From the Dark Web

"This week's theme comes to us from Daniel Ocho and is called tales from the dark web. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says the Internet has a dark side hidden. Just below the surface, these podcasts will guide listeners through stories from the Internet's dark side where crime, drugs and murder are the currency of choice. Here are they episodes chosen by Daniel for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode comes to us from the missing Crypto, Queen and called Dr Rusia. It's twenty three minutes long. Dr Rouge promised financial financial, revolution and then two years ago, she disappeared. Why. The missing crypto clean is an eight part series from BBC sounds. The next episode comes to us from reply all and is called the snapchat thief it sixty nine minutes long. This week, a super tech support after Lizzie snapchat gets hacked. Things Start Getting Really Creepy Alex investigates. The next episode comes to us from case file, and it's called the Silk Road part, one and two. The first episode is eighty four minutes long, and the second is eighty minutes long. The Silk Road was an ancient network of trade routes that started in China in the second century BC via a combination of roads and sea routes goods like silk, paper, and spices transported from the producers in Asia to the markets in Europe. Eventually, it wasn't just goods that were traded. They're also ideas, customs, religions, and even diseases. The next episode comes to us from Lizard people is called Bitcoin was created by a rogue ai with Sam Baltar it sixty minutes long. Bitcoin is one of the great mysteries of the Internet. Age who exactly created it? Where's it going? How did it blow up so fast? What the fudge is a blockchain, and why don't I have won the delightful Sam Baltar of the equally delightful podcast? Weird work joins to talk about cryptocurrency and the possibility that the J. Cryptic coin was created by. Get this artificial intelligence. The next episode comes to us from breach and is called. Caution falling rocks. It's forty seven minutes long. The Yahoo data breach left three billion users private information vulnerable for three years before the public learned about it. How did it happen? And what can we learn from the greatest known data breach in history? Those are the episodes chosen by Daniel. Ocho for this week's theme tales from the Dark Web, follow along with the discussion of this week's podcast episodes by using the Hashtag dark web pods. Now for some podcast industry news from the inside podcasting newsletter. As always, thank you to Sky Pillsbury. Who writes the inside podcasting newsletter for allowing us to share it with our ear? Buddies on this podcast will share the top stories from this week's issue of the newsletter. I story. Sky Interviews James Kim on her podcast the inside podcasting podcast. James is the creator of the fiction podcast moon face a show. Time magazine named one of the best ten twenty nineteen. In Moon face a young Korean American man named Paul wants to tell his mom that he's gay, but they don't speak. The same language Paul Story is loosely based on James Kim's real life experiences. Next story layoffs public radio suffered a heartbreaking number of layoffs this week. Here are the details Minnesota public radio slash American public media has laid off twenty eight employees. APM has also stop production of live from here and the hilarious world of depression. Chicago public media has let go of twelve employees and has ceased production on sound opinions. Next Story. She. PODCASTS founder Jessica. Cup for men and Elsie Escobar have decided to postpone their organizations. Second Annual Conference until October twenty twenty one. It was originally scheduled to take place in Arizona later this year.

Daniel Ocho James Kim Sam Baltar Dr Rusia Paul Story Murder Lizzie Snapchat BBC Chicago Elsie Escobar China Dr Rouge Sky Pillsbury Time Magazine Arizona APM Alex Founder
Hollywood Isnt Telling These Stories

Inside Podcasting

05:32 min | 4 months ago

Hollywood Isnt Telling These Stories

"Hello and welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discuss their craft I'm your host Skype Pillsbury? Today. My guess is James Cam Creator of moon face a podcast.

James Cam
How Ear Hustle Went From Winning a Contest to Becoming One of the Most Successful Podcasts of All-Time

Inside Podcasting

02:34 min | 5 months ago

How Ear Hustle Went From Winning a Contest to Becoming One of the Most Successful Podcasts of All-Time

"Hello and welcome to incite podcasting. The show in which creators discussed their craft. I'm your host Sky Pillsbury. You just heard the voices of visual artists. Nigel poor and former prison inmate Alan Woods. They are co host and Co creators of Ear Hustle which tells stories about daily life inside San Quentin prison. The show which came to life after winning a podcast competition was an immediate hit when it launched in two thousand fifteen the show got a ton of press won awards. It seemed to be the podcast that everyone I knew was talking about and then in two thousand eighteen. Something pretty incredible happened then. California Governor Jerry Brown Commuted Orleans prison sentence Brown credited Orleans work on the podcast as a significant factor in his decision after twenty one years earlier on walked out of San Quentin a free man since then early on and Nigel and the rest of the ear hustle team have continued to tell stories about life on the inside but they've also reinvented elements of the show's format and explored new narratives on the outside. I'm going play you a clip from season. Four of the show in it. You'll hear Nigel. An airline speaking with curtis a newly released inmate about something that's been on his mind ever since he got out of prison. So here's the million dollar question man. Are you still a virgin killing me? Why she turned away was GonNa Take Care of yes. I'm still a virgin. Sadly how many days have you been a probably close to seventy okay? So what I know. That guys insider very preoccupied. About how quickly guys are going to have sex when they get out. I am on the side of. What is the rush rush is at many of us like myself have been on the inside for twenty four years with out sex so now we come out. We think that we're going to run right into the arms of some beautiful woman was just happening. So you WANNA have sex. You could just have sex but are you looking for sex or relationship so to ask her problem. Tell us about that clip from a season. Four episode called. I want the fairytale which is about dating after prison. It's one of the many fascinating episode ear. Hustle has reported on from the

San Quentin Prison Nigel Poor Hustle San Quentin Jerry Brown Sky Pillsbury Commuted Orleans Alan Woods California Curtis Orleans
Post Show: What it Was Like to Interview Kara Swisher

Inside Podcasting

07:43 min | 5 months ago

Post Show: What it Was Like to Interview Kara Swisher

"Hello and welcome to inside podcasting. This is a mini episode in which a special guest will speak with me of how to interview Cara Swisher. If you missed my original interview with Kara go back and listen to that first and then come back and listen to this behind the scenes episode. It'll make a lot more sense that way and with that I will introduce my special guest. Today he is the man who is on the phone with me dealing with my stress at the very beginning of last week's episode. My husband Dawn Pillsbury. Welcome to inside podcasting Dawn. Thank you sky. Feel like I've been waiting for this moment for the last two years have been living living living. The podcast living the dream and just been waiting for an invite to participate. So thanks for having me on board. I'm excited I think. I'm uniquely positioned to drive some insights out of this episode because I really was breathing and living it with you over the past. It seems like six to eight weeks. Now yes you have been and you've been sort of in the background this whole time and this is your here your fifteen minutes don well. I might be twenty but I'm looking excited to be in the foreground. Let's start with care. Swisher is a pretty good get. I would say for any podcast but especially a little podcast. Like inside podcasting. Can you just remind me and your listeners? Can how this came out sure. So I actually met Eric who I mentioned at the beginning of the interview with Eric is her producer and I think we exchanged email prior but I met him at podcast movement at some party that they were having and he gave me his business card and I remember. This is kind of funny. I am. I never keep business cards like people. Give me their business cards and to be honest I just. I'm not one of those people that's like. I don't have a Rolodex like I just figure we'll be able to get in touch with you over email or whatever but I kept his because I thought it would be amazing to have care on the show and having worked in technology and I even was at a party with her once in the nineties and even then I remember being like. Wow that is Cara Swisher. So she's just always loomed really large so when I met him there was no way I was going to give up that chance to pitch him and so when I got home I literally just I sent him an email and I was like. Do you think there's ever would ever be away that she would come on. And you know I gotTa say it was pretty easy I mean he got back pretty quick and she was in the middle of. She's about to have a baby and so we delayed in the interview for a little bit but aside from that I mean that was really the only roadblocks and and of course that was for a good reason while shows you that you just have to ask people sometimes and it might be easier to get a yes. Anybody thinks exactly well. Speaking of phone calls the phone call itself at the beginning of the episode is pretty hilarious. I had actually forgotten the you'd recorded it And when you played it for me the first thing in my mind was how annoyed I been. You had basically not listened to me and it wasn't just like last week. It was telling you for weeks that your battery was dying. So what was the very first thing that went through your mind when you realize that you couldn't start the car? Oh my God that I'm an idiot. I mean I of and of all days like to have that happen and I knew I had to call you because it even though you've been saying it over and over again like I guess it didn't really register until my car wouldn't start then I was like okay. He was he was being serious But luckily it all worked out. Thank God I was stressed in and sweaty when I got to her office but I made. Is there any chance that you'll start drinking more seriously? Now probably not will? Obviously you know. I've got a front row seat and I kind of feel like I'm in the room for putting this interview and really all your interviews together but this one particular We a lot about the some of the stories that she shared some of the things that she's done. You can obviously all those into the episode. Can you share a couple stories that you wanted to put in but yes there were some things that I did cut out for time sake and also I think when you are? I'm making a podcast that is targeted to you know. I'm hoping that the people who listen are like diehard fans of podcasts or podcasting themselves so I have to think about like what's important to them so because I grew up in and around the Silicon Valley. I've known of Cara for a long time and I knew that she had had political aspirations. She'd actually announced that she wanted to run for mayor At one point and so I her about that and I did think that her answer was interesting although her interest of like well we have a new mayor now and she's doing a good job and I wanna see how that goes. I want to get in the way of that but you know I still think it could have been interesting to leave an but the reason I took it out was because I just didn't see that that would be to someone who doesn't know Cara and he's only listening this because they want to understand the mind of someone who builds who's building a podcast You know that wouldn't be as relevant to them so I took it out for that reason. All that was a hard hard one to cut. So let's get to the interview itself. It's a great interview and there's so many stories that care has and she she just can't stop sort of talking about sort of the exciting things you've done to the people she knows but. I wonder if that make it tough for you because I know you had prepared a ton of questions and there's more than a couple times where care kind of cuts you off and starts going in a direction that she whether she wants to go there or not. She's going there. She owns all the land. Remember so what are you? How are you able to kind of adjust on the fly? When you're interviewing someone like Cara who can take over the conversation so that is a good question? I think I something going for me in that. I only brought in note cards and I think psychologically had no cards with like words on them rather than like questions written out which I sometimes do have when I'm doing an interview completely remotely and not seeing anybody even on a screen so I just had no cards. Which made me feel? I did it because I didn't want to be like this. Lame nerdy person. Who came in like all her like questions. Pretty sure not something that carrot does and might not respect so. I was like okay just look like a reporter and like just have my note cards and whatever but I think that the advantage of that was that made me feel much more loose loot sort of loosey-goosey like I kind of go with the flow. So and you know what I was also prepared for that because Kerris wisher is. That's her style like she she for people who was Rico decode. They definitely know like Edo. She just cut people off all the time. It's kind of like her in a way signature. I think it drives some people crazy. I know this actually because people have told these though but other people like me really enjoy it because I feel like she's just like this bulldog it's like you've just like let her out of Lake. Who knows where he's coming at? You and I love that about her so I didn't really mind it. I actually Kinda thought like Oh. I'm getting the real Keira you know but I I yeah I did have to pivot a little bit and I was okay with that. I was somehow survived it.

Cara Swisher Dawn Pillsbury Kara Eric Keira Kerris Wisher Lake Silicon Valley Producer Reporter
Satire in Strange Times Week

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03:56 min | 6 months ago

Satire in Strange Times Week

"This week's theme is satire. In strange times. The curator is Becka James. Here's why Becca chose the sleep. She says hello is Becka. James and the theme I chose is Satire Strange Times. I chose this theme because we're living in an exceptionally strange time and satire has the power to help process. What's happening and improve humanity by criticizing. Its Bali's and foibles. It will also allow us a hearty and necessary laugh. Here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Becca along with short descriptions of each one first up is OPR's very fatal murder podcast. The episode chosen is the first ever of their first season in case you don't follow. Pr closely that acronym stands for onion public radio. It's from the onion. Expect very ridiculous levels of satire. Podcast made me laugh out loud. It is perfect the now times that we are in the next episode comes from a podcast called a woman smile and it's called a woman smile. Stylish it's thirty minutes long. Here's the description of the show. Women's smile is a podcast. Where Pattie Harrison and Laura Ramirez talk about well but especially the gentle and kind nature of a woman smile satire. Women are not gentle or kind. The next episode comes from a radio. Play called Lindsey. And it's called one God damn name. It's a fictional retelling of the story of the making of the parent trap and it is perfect. This first episode is mysterious and serious and will make you feel weird in a good way. Next up is an episode from a podcast. Called this Branchburg episode is called. Everybody wants to see my teeth. This podcast is about the fictional town of Branchburg New Jersey. In this episode. We meet Donald Franson who has a tying business. People come into the shop to have their ties tied each morning. And then what? I'll leave you on that cliffhanger. You must listen to learn the fate of Donald and the last recommendation comes from a podcast called bubble and is called hunters in this show. We meet Morgan. Who's pretty good at killing monsters? The narrator is topic. Evanston an actor and a writer who first came to the cultural consciousness at age twelve which she started a fashion magazine named rookie. The Morgan part satire. The taty stuff Israel. Why didn't you start a fashion magazine at twelve are the podcast and episodes recommended by Becca James this week for our theme Satire Strange Times? Hopefully these episodes will make you laugh a little and take your mind off. Reality Becca does satire. Thanks herself you can find out more and follow her on twitter at record flames. That's W. R. E. C. K. A. Flames each week in our newsletter which you can find and sign up for on our website ear buds podcast collective dot org are curator's have a chance to show off something that they love a project and nonprofit anything. Here's what BECO- wants us to know about. She says if you're looking for more podcast recommendations checkout vultures coverage where I write weekly comedy wrecks and long-form reviews and features also constant listener created by podcast obsessive and writer for the Av Club's pod mass. Ben Cannon is a great place to go for even more suggestions follow along with the discussion of this week's theme by using the Hashtag satire pods. Now it's time for podcast news each week on the show. We share PODCASTS. Industry News from the inside podcasting newsletter which is written by Sky Pillsbury. Here we go. I the inside podcasting. Podcast is back for season two. This is a show hosted by skype. Pillsbury where she interviews podcast creators about their craft in this coming season. Get excited to hear from Cara Swisher of Rico Decode Nigel poor and Alan Woods of ear. Hustle Moon Faces James Kim and so many more amazing creators

Becca Becka James Sky Pillsbury Donald Franson Writer James Kim Branchburg New Jersey Morgan Pattie Harrison Twitter Ben Cannon Cara Swisher Murder Laura Ramirez Israel Evanston Alan Woods Av Club W. R. E. C. K.
"Your Next Big Idea" Week

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04:16 min | 7 months ago

"Your Next Big Idea" Week

"This week's theme is your next big idea. The curator is Daniel Brooks. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says hi. My Name's Daniel Brooks nine. The host of the unlocking creativity podcast theme. I've chosen is. You're next big idea. The reason I've chosen this is quite simply running away from changing our whole lives. These podcasts are going to help inspire you to go in and discover yours. Here are the PODCASTS and episodes chosen by Daniel. Monday's episode comes from the Tim. Ferriss show and is called Eric Schmidt lessons from trillion dollar coach. It's one hundred and four minutes. Long Eric. Schmidt is a technical advisor and board member to Alphabet Inc where he advises its leaders on technology business and policy issues. Eric joined Google in two thousand one and helped grow the company from a Silicon Valley startup to a global leader. In Technology. Tuesday's episode comes from design matters with Debbie millman and is called Lisa Khandan. It's thirty six minutes long in this episode. A conversation with artist and illustrator. Liikanen about getting started creatively. Wednesday's episode comes from creative. Boom ranking on big regrets being different and discovering life begins at fifty. It's fifty eight minutes long. Rankin is the British photographer publisher and film director renowned for his portraits of Bowie and Bjork and for being co founder of dazed and confused. We chatted to the fearless man behind the lens about his career. And we're surprised to hear him open up about his childhood. His father his regrets and mistakes. This is an honest delve into the heart and mind of one of the biggest names. In photography Thursday's episode comes from Happy Place and is called. Joe Wicks it's forty nine minutes long in this episode. The body coach himself turns up at ferns door to discuss being a father of two meeting. Your work goals and being named Gq worst-dressed of the year Friday's episode comes from unlocking creativity. And is called. Darren Brown the creative mind. It sixty two minutes long about this podcast. Daniel says creativity is the power that allows us to imagine a world. That isn't our world yet to consider what doesn't yet exist and make it exist. Welcome to the PODCAST. That will help you make that happen. Those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Daniel. For this week's the your next big idea. Listen in and let us know what you think you can find these episodes and listen to them as a playlist on Pod chaser just had to pod Chaser DOT COM and type in your next big idea into the search bar and the playlists will be right there for your enjoyment joined the discussion of this week's theme by using the Hashtag creativity. This is usually the section of the show where we bring you podcast news since the news is so filled with corona virus and Kobe nineteen lately. There's honestly not that much podcast industry news instead skype. Pillsbury who writes inside podcasting the newsletter? We usually read our stories from is asking for your participation she writes. I'm determined to keep this community connected so while we live through this bizarre moment in history. I'll publish reader submitted issues of the newsletter. I need your help to get this done. Please send me any or all of the following one episodes or podcast that have brought you. Joy provided relief over the past. Few weeks sky will share them in her newsletter and may eventually start a Google spreadsheet where people can add browse information at their leisure. Please include a link to the show and explain why it has been helpful to you during this time two stories about how the pandemic has impacted or not your work as a creator. Feel free to mention your show in the context of your story. Three stories about how the corona virus has impacted your ability to listen to podcasts or your interest in them four requests for help with your podcast need an editor a guest. Anything else. Five any ideas you have for future reader submitted issue you can send sky any and all of your suggestions return on twitter at sky. Pillsbury that's S. K. Y. E. P. L. L. S. B. U. R. Y. You can also reach her by email at sky at inside dot com. We'll be back next week with podcast. News and PODCASTS. That are keeping US happy during the Super Weird time.

Daniel Brooks Eric Schmidt Pillsbury Google United States Debbie Millman Darren Brown Happy Place Twitter Gq Worst-Dressed Joe Wicks Ferriss Editor Skype Kobe Rankin Lisa Khandan Alphabet Inc Advisor
"Brain Food" Week + Coronavirus Podcast Recommendations

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05:36 min | 8 months ago

"Brain Food" Week + Coronavirus Podcast Recommendations

"This week's theme is brain food. The curator is Ariel Retro. Here's why Arielle chose this theme. She says hi their minds. Ariel and the theme. I chose for this week's newsletter is brain food. I chose this theme because usually when I eat I just sort of been hailed the without thinking or chewing for that matter so this newsletter felt like the perfect opportunity to kickstart my brain and to get me to put a little bit more thought into what. I'm eating where it came from. And maybe the story behind to hope you enjoy here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Arielle. Monday's episode comes from Radio Cherry bomb and is called climate. Change Food and you. It's forty six minutes long in this episode is your favorite food headed for extinction. Climate change is causing farmers around the world to rethink what they grow and how they grow it which is going to impact what you eat in the very near future. This climate change food connection is the subject of Mandal's important new book. The fate of food will eat in a bigger hotter smarter. World Tuesday's episode comes from the Food Program and is called Pints of progress. The brewers changing attitudes to learning disabilities. It's twenty eight minutes long in this episode brewer and broadcaster. Jay Go wise visits breweries where a progressive approach to employing people with learning disabilities is pouring away. Preconceptions helping tell the story is Michaela. Overton a brewer at ignition in Sydenham south London a brewery founded to create meaningful work for people with learning disabilities which has gone from glorified homebrew to running to taproom selling their beers in this program. We follow their collaboration with London. Brewer Gipsy Hill to make a beer as part of the social brew. Collective Wednesday's episode comes from copper and heat and is called food delivery APPs with homeroom. It's thirty five minutes long in this episode what happens when tech startups backed by venture capital create food delivery. Apps and a whole new system that is relied on by restaurant folks across the US we chat with the folks at home room to go the takeout only location of the Popular California Mac and cheese restaurant about how these APPs have affected their business. David Yaffe Bellany business reporter from the New York. Times joins us to talk about some of the larger National Trent's Thursday's episode comes from point of origin and is called a tale of two yogurts. It's fifty eight minutes long in this episode. The tale of two yogurts and the fight to protect goes fishing villages and waters is all about preservation. It keeps US alive and teaches us how to live this episode features guests. I'm Rita Gupta of the food. Radio Project SANOJA. Very Qadri of Diaster Echo and food writer cookbook author preempt Krishna. Friday's episode comes from gastropod and is called the United States of McDonald's. It's forty eight minutes long in this episode. Mcdonald's is mind boggling. According to Adam Chandler author of the recent book drive through dreams it sells roughly seventy five burgers every second and served sixty eight million people every day. Equivalent to one percent of the entire world's population the Golden Arches are thought to be according to an independent survey more recognizable as a symbol than the Christian crosses around the world. Chandler told us in this episode. We tell the story of McDonald's but more importantly we explore what it has to say about who we are those. Are The podcast recommendations chosen by Arielle for this week's theme brain food? Listen and let us know what you think you can find these episodes and listen to them as a play list on Pod chaser just had to pod Chaser DOT COM and type in brain food into the search bar and the playlist will be right there for your enjoyment. Join the discussion of this week's theme by using the Hashtag Brain Food. This is usually the section of the show where we talk about. Podcast news brought to us by the inside podcasting newsletter skype Pillsbury. The writer of inside podcasting actually manage to put out an episode of the newsletter. This week. That didn't even mention corona virus which is super impressive this week instead of stories from inside podcasting we're going to direct you to sign up for the newsletter at inside dot com slash podcasting and in lieu of. Podcast news. I'M GONNA shout out a few podcast. Creators AND PODCAST. Industry folks who've been tweeting about podcast news as it relates to the corona virus. I make sure to check out. James Cridland his twitter handle is at James Cridland that C. R. I. D. L. A. N. D. He's the founder and editor of pod. News Dot net. Which is an awesome podcast newsletter? That goes out every single day. He's got a lot of statistics. You might find interesting. Plus he's keeping up with all the PODCASTS that are being launched to cover the pandemic next checkout alley award the host of the podcast apologies in each episode of Allergies Alley Interviews Different August about their profession. Her most recent episode is with not one but four allergists each covering a different aspect of the corona virus situation. This episode is entertaining but it also gives some practical advice for how to stay safe. Plus she's keeping up with the news on twitter. Find her at Ashley Ward. That's A. L. I. E. Ward Last. Twitter highlight goes to Michel Yousef at twitter. Handle 'em Yousef that's the letter M. E. U. C. E. P. H. Michelle is a podcast producer. And she put out a tweet. That perfectly shows the connection between corona virus. Podcasts and podcasts advertising. I'll let you see that tweet for yourself when you follow her. That's all for our twitter recommendations. We'll be back next week with podcast news from the inside podcasting newsletter.

Arielle Twitter United States Mcdonald Ariel Retro Writer Brewers Michel Yousef Adam Chandler Brewer Gipsy Hill James Cridland London Ashley Ward Golden Arches California Michaela David Yaffe Bellany Rita Gupta
"Dinner Conversations with Comedians" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

04:24 min | 9 months ago

"Dinner Conversations with Comedians" Week

"This week's theme is dinner conversations with Comedians. The curator's are Andrew Steven and Dan odd hoot. What a hoot. Here's why Andrew and Dan chose this theme. What does the food you eat? Say about you. Have you ever been surprised about something you found in your friends? Fridge does the ratio of takeout containers to homemade meals. Say something about who you are. There might be more truth to the saying. You are what you eat than we ever thought before. Here are the podcasts and episodes chosen by Dan. Andrew. Monday's episode comes to us from green eggs and Dan and is called Ego Modine. It's sixty five minutes long in this episode ego. No deem from Saturday night live and Dan discussed the food habits of a certain late night. Tv show who has the best Jolliffe Rice gones are Nigerians and also what the Hell is? Joel Rice Tuesday's episode comes from dining with D. N. K. and is called Pete Holmes and Becky. Rims it's ninety seven minutes long in this episode Pete. Holmes comes on the show to talk over. Everyone and becky reams comes to the rescue to cook more food. Wednesday's episode comes from the sport full and is called Asaf Man. V is a human tour. Ducan it's twenty one minutes long. The former daily show correspondent talks food and his trip identity Indian British American. Us off man. V is not a fan of American food excess except when it provides the perfect metaphor for his own try cultural upbringing. He talks about making sense of his dueling identities his love of peanut butter and the fight he had with his father over a big gulp catch his new podcast loss at the Smithsonian from stitcher Thursday's episode comes from Doboy and is called. Pf changs to with Kula villa sack. It's one hundred sixteen minutes long in this episode. The incredible cool APP returns to the show to discuss her history with. Pf changs an American Chinese theme chain restaurants. Plus a gooey edition of snack or wack. Friday's episode comes to us from high and mighty and is called the fifth annual Thanksgiving Eve Power Hour with Nick Wider Nicole buyer and Betsy storrow. It's eighty four minutes long as you listen to this episode John Gabbert and his guests. Nick Betsy Nicole are still sleeping off their hangovers. So crack open a beer. Those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Dan. Andrew for this week's theme dinner conversations with Comedians. Listen and let us know what you think you can find these episodes and listen to them as a playlist on Pod chaser just Jason Dot Com and type in conversations with comedians into the search bar. And the playlists will be right there for your enjoyment. Join the discussion of this week's theme by using the Hashtag comedy. Dinner is usually the section of the podcast where we share. Podcasts NEWS. From the inside podcasting newsletter. This week we're going to direct you to go to inside dot com slash podcasting to read sky. Pillsbury's right up of last Friday's PODCAST UPFRONT PRESENTATION. Which took place in La? I was there and I sent. My hot takes as well as my lukewarm takes to sky. She then wrote about them and now here. I am telling you to go read them. I was also at podcasts movement. Evolutions this past week in Los Angeles and it was a great time. There were tons of informative sessions. Fun giveaways an amazing networking opportunities. Look forward to some write ups this coming week and I'll definitely recap them in the podcast next episode and I solely pillow. Don't tell Danner jared the founders podcast movement. Were you at podcast movement. Are you listening to this? Podcast for the first time since you saw me onstage. Welcome to the Party. Now onto our sponsors. Thank you to Cyrus Media and a cast for sponsoring this week's show from Siris. You know that music isn't just background noise. It shapes your world and your life Cyrus media a network run by music fans for music fans gets this to o Cyrus creates podcasts and experiences that connect you deeply to the music that you love for shows hosted by your favorite artists to inside stories behind festivals historic concerts and the companies and communities that bring music to life visit. Oh Cyrus pod DOT COM to tune in and share the group. That's Oh S. I. R. I S. pod Dot Com and from the score. Bank robber. Diaries tells the tale of notorious criminal. Joe Loya Follow. His story from abused child to King of the heist with producer. Ben Adere in the first show from studios a original content arm and western sound. Listen wherever you got your

DAN Andrew Steven Jason Dot Com Los Angeles Asaf Man Nick Betsy Nicole Pete Holmes Becky Reams Fridge Jolliffe Rice Ben Adere Ego Modine Cyrus Media Danner Joe Loya Joel Rice Doboy John Gabbert Nick Wider Nicole Producer
"pillsbury" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:23 min | 9 months ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"They as good as the Pillsbury out of the is good is the Pillsbury you just die makes you want to die in like a million times better than the bill you would never eat a Pillsbury cinnamon after you eat one of the settlement so give it a secret agreement right yeah you do it all for you do also do all thing getting in the pan all lined up and then you pour forget to half a Cup a Cup of heavy cream over a wall and then you pop them in the oven we and yeah and I eat five or six of them and I get really sick my my mom used to work at this deli when I was growing up and there was this older white lady she must await three hundred fifty pounds and for good reason because she made these things they called sticky bond sure sure sure and it was I don't even know how to describe it they were like cinnamon buns but like next level she had gotten the recipe from her mother they were from the south there was enough butter in there to give you a jammer it's like two miles on evil now as we're talking about this you are getting hit of dopamine everyone is getting ahead of me right now really yeah so you're so yes all chat about how even thinking about things gives you certain hormone releases that have you Sir think certain things that's how that that's all I guess experiment right there that's salivating of your mouth and everything that's all hormone releases but we have an answer for a couple weeks so we've reset our dopamine levels and it's so good that way now so you because if you here's I think about and I will move on if you can even eat something you get one pleasure point now Hey goes away a couple minutes later you get one pleasure point now if you don't eat something sugary yet no pleasure points but you get to contentment points the last forever hello that's how I visualize it anyway hi dear this video not sure who the audio is do deals with warm one for sixteen yeah I got it when fired off yes please.

Pillsbury dopamine
"pillsbury" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:26 min | 11 months ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The weather outside is frightful since the well it doesn't and I the light when we finally kiss good night going if you will my there was as long going but if you move over gingerbread there's a new cookie for the holidays Pillsbury has teamed up with lucky charms there's gonna be a lucky charms cookie dough sounds delicious.

Pillsbury
"pillsbury" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on Innovation Now

"To ensure the safety of prepackaged foods for he is that shave our future. What if the problems NASA faced when planning its first the enlisted Pillsbury to tackle the problem. The food manufacturing company quickly hiring process from raw materials to the processing environment and onto did in Pillsbury's own factories for two decades the US government IOS initial principles developed to protect astronaut food when we first journeyed.

"pillsbury" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on KTRH

"All right it's a pleasure to have Michael Pillsbury with us the great but the one hundred year marathon how are you Sir thank you Marc are done I'll let doctor what's that doctor doctor for you yes thank you well yeah I could use a doctor about now not necessarily yeah that Canada I've got a bookmark well thank you you know it's a pleasure and one is you some questions I kind of think the president is pretty much playing it right with China agree or disagree agree and is there other other other things he might want to do or should he just sit back now and see how these tariffs and other things take hold hi I think he's got a menu of options ways to escalate the Chinese themselves use the word escalate today and in the story they have been quite a nasty sense the last three or four days so I think they're still listening to some of the Obama people including people who have been reassuring China this is All blush or the president is erratic and just what you know just wait for the democratic president from now I think they're misreading the president trump determination so I do think he's considering additional escalations steps you can take this and what additional first well two points what escalation could China taken in our economy is twice the size there is and then the next question is are Clinton and Obama people other than going on TV actually advising that government well I would say advising because that makes is a felony if save his visor foreign government for pay and if they don't register.

Michael Pillsbury Marc Canada president China Obama Clinton one hundred year four days
"pillsbury" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Want a para tickets to see peer Gent performed by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra that is Friday March twenty second in hindsight all four one two nine two to ten twenty caller number ten. From her. No. This radio. Twenty seven at Pittsburgh International at six thirty on Paul Rasmussen the FAA and NTSB have arrived in Ethiopia to join the investigation into Sunday's crash of a Boeing seven thirty-seven max eight that killed one hundred fifty seven people. The opium airlines crash is the second in several months. Some lawmakers are calling for grounding the airliner in the US as his happening in other countries. But the FAA says it considers the planes safe here. CBS news travel editor Peter Greenburg, especially at safe because we haven't figured out the investigation results one particular crash. However, the pilots that I'm talking to you were telling me manageable, meaning not every pilots and thoroughly trained in the new systems are plane, which may have resulted in the crash of line air, six months ago. Boeing says it has been working on a software enhancement for the seven thirty max eight cents that line aircrash off Indonesia in October. Jury selection begins today in the trial of former east Pittsburgh police officer, Michael Ross spelled charge. With criminal homicide in the shooting death. Antoine rose twelve jurors four alternates from dolphin county will hear the case after a judge ordered the panel should come from outside Allegheny county due to extensive pretrial publicity attorney William cosstalk tells Katie k ATV Dauphin county was chosen because it's racial. Demographics are similar to Allegheny county. Gracious, a big factor in this case young police officer, you have a young unarmed African American seventeen year old boy that was killed Ross pelt is accused of shooting rose as the unarmed team ran away from a traffic stop last June. The shooting set off a series of protests that shut down streets and blocked intersections often during the evening. Rush-hour city leaders want to be prepared in case the demonstrations return, Pittsburgh's emergency management is therefore meeting with some downtown businesses today to prepare them for possible unrest as well. As the Saint Patrick's Day parade and some sporting events. Detroit. Police have yet to make public bodycam video to counter Allegheny county controller Chelsea Wagner's claim. She was injured by an officer. And wrongfully arrested last week. A Detroit News reporter did see the police video and reports it shows both Wagner and her husband were intoxicated and swearing it. Officers at one point a hotel security guard asks police to kick Cari, mostly out of the Westin hotel because guests were being awakened the newspaper. Also reports Wagner told police she was the highest ranking female official in allegany county. The last of the American embassy staff in Venezuela is pulling out as conditions in the country deteriorate. Venezuela is struggling to restore electricity following several days of blackouts in deepening political crisis. The US has been leading an international effort to oust socialist, president nNcholas Maduro and replace him with opposition leader, one Guido who vows to hold a new presidential election. Pillsbury? Flour is being recalled. Due to salmonella fears. CBS's mad piper has details. Hills vary parent company hometown food is conducting a nationwide recall of flower packaged under the popular Pillsbury brand due to concerns that the product may be contaminated with salmonella the FDA has urging consumers not to eat the recalled products sold at retailers, including Publix in winn-dixie more than twelve thousand cases of the recalled flour was sold at grocery stores nationwide. The expiration dates for the affected flower is April twenty twenty Matt piper. CBS news in sports. The penguins in caps will play tonight PG paints arena..

Chelsea Wagner officer Allegheny county CBS Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra FAA Detroit US Peter Greenburg Pittsburgh International Venezuela Matt piper Pillsbury Dauphin county Boeing salmonella opium PG
"pillsbury" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"America. This is chapter two on Friday, June ninth eighteen ninety three a month after the opening of the great fair in Chicago, George Pullman, and his friend the moustachioed retailer Marshall field sat down a dare with two hundred men in the ballroom of the Aberdeen hotel in Saint Paul Minnesota at the head of the room, a model train fashion from flowers stretched across the table, the tracks wheels and cow catcher glistened with tin foil, a newspaper reporter referred to the assembled guests as the big guns of the west railroad. Tycoons governors bankers the tireless strivers of industrial America. In addition to Pullman and field, they included grocery wholesaler, Franklin mcvie. Flour Miller, Charles Pillsbury, Bill Pillsbury, South Dakota, Senator Richard Pettigrew and many prominent railroad men, including John Egan who had held high positions with the Canadian Pacific and the Saint Paul Minneapolis. Manitoba lines the men come to celebrate the official opening of the great northern railway whose main line began in Saint Paul. And now ran all the way to speeches sound in Washington. Local merchants were confident that the road would make their city a hub for the immense resources of the northwest, including wheat, lumber cattle, apples copper and iron or it come to honor one of their own big shoulder one eyed man with a full beard and a shaggy fringe green hair around his balding scalp. He was the proprietor of the great northern the man known as the empire builder James Jerome hill after a meal served by liveried waiters a postmaster predicted that future scholars reviewing the progress of humanity from the peak of the twenty first century would stand in awe when they contemplated the eighteen ninety s this wonderful age of iron and electricity. Big Jim hill. Then rose to assure his guests at the president era was as promising as any time in the past ten years thunderous applause in the waving of two hundred handkerchiefs signaled the big guns. Approval. In fact, he'll had completed his railroad in the midst of an economic crisis bewildering proportions. One of his main Wall Street backers Jay Kennedy Todd was too busy coping with economic catastrophe to attend a colleague reported a hill that Todd has been. Pene down his leg for the last month businessmen and speculators across the country had reason for high anxiety four days after the great fair opened in Chicago. The bottom had dropped out of the US economy. One of the first effected with Steven van, Colin white Wall Street's most daring speculator known as deacon white for his somber dressy and invested heavily in shares of the national cordage company managers of that rope manufacturer had gab gobbled up competing firms and tried to corner the market in hemp imports. It was one of the many business trusts the day legal conglomerations of companies that allowed investors to exercise virtual monopoly control over industries like sugar led and whiskey..

America. Chicago Jay Kennedy Todd George Pullman Saint Paul Minnesota James Jerome hill Charles Pillsbury Saint Paul Jim hill Senator Richard Pettigrew west railroad Franklin mcvie Saint Paul Minneapolis Marshall field US Bill Pillsbury John Egan Canadian Pacific Aberdeen
"pillsbury" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"But on the wall things are going. Well, we're all getting along even the moment feels like Christmas partisan politics. Nobody can stop the show because the other side goes for something that's meant to score political points. And then the tit for tat begins. And then it just gets absolutely useless in terms of the conversations we have that so many political conversations are totally useless. Right. Totally totally useless because people are routed into whatever their beliefs. Are they're locked into echo chambers. They love I news stories all the time that are. So just flat out, obviously wrong that are so clearly fake sourced that are absolutely nonsense. But it's created and put together to appease your current beliefs right to feed into what you already think, and you get that positive feedback. Loop going and the echo chambers in silos give you what you want and we continue to be divided. We'll never get a political system in this country where people are actually just talking about the issues and not playing games. I hate the political games. They're fine. They they apparently like them more than just actually having a conversation because that's what everybody was doing their scoring those points one by one. I don't know if you guys have seen this clip. I guess it's I I don't know. I'm I'm taking a guess here. I think it's going viral because I think the Oprah YouTube account reposted it. But I thought this was funny. It was like a flashback clip from Oprah Winfrey. Show way back in two thousand six I don't know if they do this anymore, but they used to have a Pillsbury bake off contest where the whole would compete, and if you want, and you got the best recipe, you got a million dollars a million bucks. And you also. Got a big tour of all the different media outlets that we're following along for Pillsbury second great ad campaign viral before viral way back when and so- Oprah her show in full swing at the time has this Pillsbury bake off contest winner in for her baked chicken and spinach stuffing that won a million dollars the recipe won her a million bucks. You win the whole competition. And the lady goes through everything here's the recipe. Here's how you do it. They do this. And you do that. And Oprah goes to take a bite, and this is the part when you're supposed to go. Oh my God. Delicious, and Oprah doesn't like it. Bad cookie. The lady the lady because just say you like it, even if you don't like just say like it. Where's the salt and pepper in this thing? Gillies zalm. She win this contest. To get so far. If if Oprah's not going to like, I don't know she she did not make something that Oprah was down with. Here's how..

Oprah Oprah Winfrey Gillies zalm Pillsbury YouTube million dollars
"pillsbury" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bill than Donald Trump. And the nice part is this not me saying, that's prime minister Netanyahu. But what about the president? What about the divides in this country? Mr president. What about healing the divides in this country? We wanna see it here. One of the things I think that can help heal is the success of our country. We are really successful. Now, we've gone up eleven point seven trillion dollars in in worth. You know, China's come down tremendously tremendously. China would have superseded us in two years as an economic power. Now, they're not even plus China got rid of their China twenty-five because I found it very insulting. I said that to them. I said China twenty-five is very insulting. Because Janet twenty-five Megyn twenty twenty-five. They're going to take over the world. I said that's not happening. And we've got way up. They've gone down. And I don't want them to go down. We'll have a good meeting, and we're going to see what we can do. But I have to say this billions of dollars will soon be pouring into treasury from taxes that China is paying for us. And if you speak to Mr. Pillsbury who probably is the leading thirty on China. He was on the other day saying he has never seen anything like it. And you know, who else hasn't China has Mr President? We're going to try and make a deal with China because I wanna have great relationships with president Xi is I do and also with China you're talking about.

China Mr president Donald Trump president Xi Mr. Pillsbury prime minister Netanyahu Janet Megyn seven trillion dollars two years
"pillsbury" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on 790 KABC

"The restaurant critic is gonna join us because costco is redoing their menu well you know they got rid of the pillsbury doughboy today they did that well what happened to him so smucker which is the company that owns like the jams and everything they're actually trying to sell pillsbury because they say they're trying to make lean because all americans wanna be lean now they don't wanna eat all these good stuff like the pillsbury stuff oh wow when you said that something happened to the pill pillsbury dough boy i thought kevin spacey get him to apparently not all right so in california we got a huge homeless problem it's not just it's skid row in downtown los angeles it's at skid river in orange county it's in palm springs it's in the san fernando valley all over the place and san francisco is now starting to lose conventions because people who come to the conventions feel like it's not a safe city for them to travel to and one big medical association based out of chicago said addio thanks but no thanks they're not going to san francisco and if you look at tourism in san francisco tourism at the mosconi center represents about one point seven billion dollars of san francisco's economy that is a huge problem for the city by the bay it's a huge problem for california joining us to talk about this is the columnist for the san francisco chronicle film matere phil thanks so much for joining us well it's an interesting topic and as you pointed out it's one that touches just about every community in california these days it used to be something that we thought was pretty much exclusive just to northern california the bay area san francisco but it's spreading to the central valley and it takes an emotional toll on everybody there's questions about health and some of these cancers in san francisco it's taking a financial toll as you pointed out you know forty million dollars convention said no they didn't feel safe on the streets of san francisco and you know we get a lot of press about our tech business up here being the big driver of the economy is the fact is the tourism is a nine billion dollar business total in san francisco and it hires most blue collar workers here and it is the biggest employer and so when somebody says no because what they're seeing or feeling on the streets that's news what's the city going to do about it and what's the state gonna do about it because if you look at the political hierarchy in the state of california a lot of the people who call the shots come from san francisco whether it's our us senators are in our current governor the are likely next governor the lieutenant governor nancy pelosi leadership in the state legislature a lot of them come from that part of the world what are they going to do about it well that remains to be seen i'm not sure they were going to do things the question is are they going to do anything to change it you know where to blame as well in the media years ago we came up with the term homelessness and that'd be catchall phrase for everything that was going on the streets whether it was somebody living in chance or somebody acting out because they're mentally ill or somebody using drugs or being neighboring and passed out it all got under the rubric of.

costco forty million dollars seven billion dollars nine billion dollar
"pillsbury" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Pillsbury doboy if he was missing a hand that could be as hand yeah that's true it would be a little too big because that hand is like the size of the pillsbury though boys entire body but cash we didn't see in the pills per doboy where's he'd been warehouse he'd been up to you know dharam him anymore none of that would be a hooker he dollar wing i would do that that's a durable and looking at them right now to see if he even has hands he doesn't have fingers sales like now behind his like myths i miss that little guy i he shows i feel like i saw him a couple of years ago due in as little as you and love that were talking about him as if he's a real what like i think i saw him down at walgreens on and the other day those people who talk about real house allies are soap opera of and you're like why it is your he's dropping and they're talking about so and so had so and so's baby okay we are a we'd better their food news yeah okay area kim kozel lists also of foods that we don't know what they actually mean gene okay so there was actually this is a foreign food survey that was done in england so might be different here in america that these were actually foods that people didn't quite know what they were and chilwata most people knew what an essential ottawa's but six percent of people actually thought it was an animal found in the jungles of south america shut your face yeah wow and then they think they were probably thinking of chinchilla us yes that makes sense i guess i do this all the time now that just iin if i don't know it's something is i kinda do what you do with the word association like oh i know what that is all okay with food yeah okay next one rahm men 24 percent of people said it was the name of a religious festival people think they were probably dan yep yep yep and i always say i never just say rahman i say rahman noodles hm which is might be redundant i don't know yeah i think yeah i would normally say rahman his the package joey said i thought rahman noodles yeah but you don't always have to call anything i mean.

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"pillsbury" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on WCHS

"Law giving free housing to church clergy this federal trial court ruling is unlikely be the last word look for the trump administration to see this is the newest toronto in an ongoing culture war with an appeal likely that could make its way to the us supreme court and it's abc news legal analyst royal oakes latenight talk show host took their shots last night at disgraced hollywood executive harvey weinstein harvey weinstein was fired by his company 'safer being accused of sexual harassment not good they said if he keeps up your wind up with his own show on fox news that of course is jimmy fallon this is jimmy kimmel what's the difference between harvey weinstein and the pillsbury dole boy when the tolls very doboy offers a role he doesn't ask you to watch them take a shower for harvey weinstein has been fired from his company after numerous complaints of sexual harassment sexual a calculations fashion designer donna karen is apologizing after praising him karen told daily mail reporters on a red carpet in los angeles on sunday that harvey weinstein is done some amazing things she says she's good friends with he and his wife he also says that maybe some women are asking for trouble by the way they dress and presenting themselves the way they do she says her statements were taken out of context and adds that she is truly sorry to anyone she's offended this is abc news my name is jim mcgovern lost both legs in vietnam my victory was proving a disability is not a limitation june's humbled virtually mobbed victory is going from homeless tall at dav we're on a mission helping veterans of all generations get the benefits they've earned i'm cici my victory was finishing my education when america's veterans win we all win help us support more victories for veterans go to dav dot work i'm sherry preston abc news.

jim mcgovern vietnam abc pillsbury dole executive hollywood analyst sherry preston america toronto los angeles donna karen jimmy kimmel jimmy fallon harassment harvey weinstein harvey weinst us
"pillsbury" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"pillsbury" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Change and so that's one out became part of the burger king cooperation cooked pillsbury owned burger king along with a number of other businesses and the president of the company to talk with me when i told him that i wanted to be president of one of those berries businesses one day uh his first response was are you looking for my job harmon i said no no no no must while another look not looking for your job but he said that we needed some management some leadership longterm in our restaurant division burger king so i went and talk to the people the burger king and i had to give up my vp title had to give up my into a park and had to give up the bonuses up i was getting a vp of pillsbury which i was in that job by the way for about three or four years to get all that stuff done and the and went on with the burger king they put me in a restaurant and hit the bar in all the various positions in the restaurant work my way on a fast track program into the burger king organization which i did ended up managing them burger king restaurants and then after about six months in training then they move me to the philadelphia region i was a vp so i had to give up vp job and go back to another vehbija work my way it back up the debt and they're one day i got the call we like for you to become president godfathers pizza fc it wow but as result of not only hardworking working performance but also timing well in.

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