2 Burst results for "Pierre Boy"

"pierre boy" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:53 min | 8 months ago

"pierre boy" Discussed on KCRW

"When Napoleon saw that he was not going to be able to retake, send a man he spent no time at all. Made a quick decision blasting he wanted was for the British to have it and he offered it to Jefferson's men who sub let says bought it for $15 million, about four cents an acre. Louisiana purchase nearly doubled the size of the United States. Meanwhile, Haiti the nation that made this possible immediately paid, he became a pariah. France refused to recognize the new nation. Also, United States was not about to recognize a successful slave revolution. That would have been way too risky. The U. S economy ran on slavery Americans In particular, slave owners were terrified that what happened in Haiti would spread like a contagion to the United States. Haiti's leaders were desperate for recognition so they could negotiate trade deals and bring in money. The country's presidents tried and tried. Finally, 21 years after independence in 18, 25 president Jean Pierre Boy made a deal. France would recognize Haiti and in exchange to process Haiti would pay. Reparations essentially to kind of compensate the planters who lost their property. The property, most of which was invested in human beings. People who have been enslaved or whose parents had been enslaved, were paying money to their former owners. Because they had their to be free. You heard that right.

Napoleon $15 million Jean Pierre Boy Jefferson United States France 21 years about four cents an acre Louisiana 25 president 18 Haiti U. S Americans doubled British
"pierre boy" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

12:23 min | 2 years ago

"pierre boy" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Welcome everybody to speaking of art. I'm your host Edwin Hoffman that music is the soundtrack to the nineteen forty version of Rebecca directed by Alfred Hitchcock. And there's a reason why I'm playing that beautiful score by France. Waxman, you're starting off the program had the, the honours you know, of speaking with friends Waxman, son John on a couple of occasions on the show over the years. And he is a musicologist historian of his father's work, but highly knowledgeable about the adaptation of music to film. I mean a true historian and I enjoyed speaking with them hope to talk with him again. And the reason I played that was because I had the pleasure of hosting in announced on the show last week or a couple of weeks ago that I would be hosting a screening of Rebecca, that wonderful Joan Fontaine Laurence Olivier. Film that came out in April of nineteen forty at the historic, Redford theatre in Redford outside of Detroit, very close to Detroit on laws erode. It went beautifully. I just wanted to say something about that film about that theater. And then maybe a little bit about Hitchcock to along with other things today that theater was built. I think it was completed nineteen twenty seven the Redford theatre, and I've gotta tell you, we are so lucky to have in our immediate area, not only in Detroit, but also in Redford, and an aunt or historic theaters that have been around for decades movie, palaces of, you know, each one different than size, which really special about the Redford theatre, and the historic Michigan theater here in Arbor. Is that both have their original Barton organs? Which really neat about the Redford? Is that it is the same one in the same position ever since it was built, and you can get very, very similar feeling when you go to the Michigan theater, and it has played for classic films or for concerts that is very, very rare for the theaters to have the original organs that were most were just discarded, because, you know, films changed audience tastes change, and they got rid of the instruments, or they broke and they weren't repaired. It's fairly expensive and time consuming the keep them up. I actually have a nephew in Ithaca, who is not only studying in has very accomplished as an organist, but how to repair and even build organs. And you would imagine you enter a very small brotherhood when you're when you go in that direction, and, you know, I, I will mention him to organised in this area, or, you know, professors and other musicians. Oh my gosh. Yes, that they have a wonderful program there at Cornell and they know the chapel there. They know the instrument. That's there. So it's a very small fraternity of people who are able to do this not only play the organs, but repair them and build them if they need to. But we are so lucky in this area to have these two theaters that have their Barton organs, which was the top of the line at that time. And. In the case of the Redford what's fascinating about that is that as the theater was being built, the sounds of the instrument the capabilities of the instrument were built into the structure itself to maximize the acoustics. So truly the whole environment was built around musical instrument was just shows how important it was to the films at the time to entertain the audience and they still do that today at the red for theater. And from time to time I host the classic films, you know, that they will have their I'm going to be doing it again, by the way on Friday, July twenty six for a screening of planet of the apes from nineteen sixty eight and I will have a lot to say about that film, for number one. If you haven't read the book that the movie was based on by Pierre boy, planet of the apes planet. They seen him sometimes called monkey planet, or just normally translated as planet of the apes. You are missing something that was one of those times when I had a book in my hands and I could not stop reading it until I finished it. I think I finished the book it may be like three or four in the morning, and I was in high school. I've only read it once but I just stayed with it the whole evening into the morning and finally finished the book I could not put it down the Mark Walberg version of that film. I think that came out about twenty years ago that was more in keeping with the spirit of the book, I thought than the original movie, but I'm gonna have a lot of fun talking about planet of the apes about where it was shot. The location was absolutely fantastic. Although it was gonna be undergoing quite a lot of geographical change and development around the time, the movie was filmed, and also afterwards, where it is very, very changed now. But that all that area was also a cradle for the filming of some other movies that I'm going to bring up in that presentation. So I hope that you. Will come also as you did you know this past last week to hear me talk about Rebecca. I hope you'll come again to the historic Redford theatre only about thirty five miles away, when I'm going to be presiding over screening of planet, the apes and give the history alive of the stars and everything and try to capture that period in nineteen sixty eight probably the most volcanic year. Inter-nation history outside of the revolutionary war the civil war and the depression years. I mean, it was such a time that it was just talking to a historian the other day who thinks that was in terms of the last century in America. And changing societal norms. That was the fulcrum decade in that was the year nineteen sixty eight everything before was different from what came after it. So in the movie falls into that million. So I'm going to talk about all that. But I was just so struck with her beat before I started doing my research, in the film, I had not seen the movie about, maybe about five or so years. And I it's Hitchcock's first film when he made the move from England to the United States to Hollywood. He left after making trying to think what it was. I believe it was Jamaica in nineteen thirty nine and also that same year. The lady vanishes, two of his great English period of mystery thrillers. And they kind of set the stage for what he's going to do on a more elaborate scale in America, nineteen forty, you know, with Rebecca now this Rebecca and Jamaica. And of course, both. Written by the vastly talented Daphne to Maury who died in nineteen eighty nine long productive life, her her books, like like Rebecca which came out in nineteen thirty eight short stories like the birds adapted. Three of them. I guess, Apted by Hitchcock. You make in Rebecca and the birds the birds was a short story. And what's neat is. When you go back to the original source material, you realize that, like Stephen King. Daphne Maury was very influenced by her immediate environment where she was living at the time. And she was not a native of Cornwall in the southwestern beautiful peninsula of England, but she sort of adopting it as her home for most of her life and rents a beautiful house there that millet house, which was an early Georgian house built in the early eighteenth century, first half of the eighteenth, century and owned by the Rashleigh family from I think about fifteen sixty all the way to the present same family. That is very rare that same family his own this house for more than four hundred years. And she rented it released it for a long period of time from the forties up until about nineteen sixty nine and she renovated it and really brought it back because it had not been lived in for a while. You can see pictures of it online. You can see the typical type of beautiful steel engraving. Hand colored treatment from. In the early nineteenth century, you know, books, come out from time to time they would show, the great aristocratic houses, the manor houses, the castles of the stock, or see and also others. The baronets the of wealthy merchants the, you know, any important family seat was kind of like the way that we follow celebrities today. And these, these houses and the grounds would be the subject for artists, and for writers, and they'd come out with books describing a beautiful country homes around the British Isles, and they would come out anywhere from the late eighteenth century to the early nineteenth century in a way, they're kind of like an extension of the landscape architects, and the architects would be employed for the houses and the grounds themselves. Humphry Repton is one of the greatest of them in the late eighteenth, century. He was famous for putting together these books that he would show his clients, and it was really kind of a mockup of. Kind of like what twentieth century architects would do with many of their clients, like Richard Notre, and others to an extent Frank Lloyd Wright. But not so much where it would be really a collaboration. Notre was like this Humphry Repton almost two hundred years earlier was very much like that, what he would do is, he would put together a book where you would have the images of the house and the grounds as the existed, and then it would be almost like, kind of like a, like a color book that children would have in their first years, where you could pull on tab, and then you would see the extension. You would see how the landscape would be changed for a garden. You would see the new addition to the house, sometimes complete makeover, taking a house from the William and Mary period from the seventeenth century changing it into a Georgian and then pas or maybe even something a little bit more ambitious. Since we're coming into a very dynamic century, the nineteenth century with English architecture and he would show the before and after so the client would be able to look at these beautifully drawn watercolor by the artist himself. And these are very rare. They come up for auction. Very seldom these, I think his, his read books, just Humphry Repton Redbook, you'll know what I mean. If you see one that is advertised at an auction, or if you see it in a beautiful archival, antiquarian, library, either connected to university or not like the Rosenbach collection in Boston or elsewhere. You will see these are great repositories for these when they become available over the decades and to be able to see one open in front of you is just incredible. It combines everything that I've talked about, at various various times, over the years about English art, and then how that art was brought over to the United States, the English watercolours of the mid eighteenth century giving rise to the romantic movement in painting. And then, of course I in literature and the idea of the paranormal at the end of the eighteenth century, and what we consider gothic literature, gothic architecture, would take over after the first few decades of the nineteenth century actually would be given its first it's, it's, it's I birth with Horace Walpole in seventeen sixties with his house, strawberry hill, which was the first Neo gothic house in England and caused kind of like a..

Rebecca Redford theatre Alfred Hitchcock Redford Detroit Humphry Repton England Daphne Maury America Humphry Repton Redbook United States Waxman Richard Notre Edwin Hoffman France Mark Walberg Michigan Joan Fontaine Laurence Olivier