10 Burst results for "Pierce Ryan Lucas"

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:06 min | 4 months ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian mayor show, the United Nations in a divided world, we'll talk about the speeches by President Biden and Ukrainian president, Vladimir zelensky, and secretary general Antonio Guterres warning that the United Nations charter and the ideals it represents are in jeopardy and will have a climate story of the week about how everyone at the UN is saying the word climate and what they may actually be doing about it. The Brian Leia show at 10 a.m. on WNYC. It's morning edition from NPR news, ami Martinez and Culver City, California. And I'm Steve inskeep in Washington, a federal appeals court declined to endorse special treatment for a former president. Instead, it blocked a ruling on classified documents. The federal court blocked part of a lower court ruling on paper seize from Trump's Florida residents. This lets the Justice Department resume its examination of around a hundred papers Mark classified. The lower court ruling named a special master to look over the papers. It said the extraordinary surge of an ex-president's home required extra steps to ensure quote at least the appearance of fairness. But the higher court pointedly applied the normal precedents and rules that apply to anyone else. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is covering the story, Ryan. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. I guess we should note the judges begin this ruling by saying this is limited. They were asked one narrow question and they answered only the question they were posed. Judicial restraint. What did they address? Well, the Justice Department appealed a part of a district court judge's ruling appointing a special master as I said to review the document seized at Mar-a-Lago. And there are two things that the Justice Department was asking from the appeals court. One of the appeals court to allow investigators to use around a hundred classified documents taken from Mar-a-Lago in the FBI's ongoing criminal investigation. And the other thing is that one of the appeals court to stay the lower court ruling ordering the Justice Department to provide the special master with those classified documents. Okay, so of all the papers seized their only focusing on the papers marked classified. This question goes to a three judge panel, one of them appointed by Barack Obama to appointed by Donald Trump, Trump appointed justices judges have a majority what did they say? Well, this three judge panel on the 11th circuit Court of Appeals noted that there's no evidence that Trump declassified the sensitive records that were found at Mar-a-Lago. Trump has made that claim in public, of course, but his lawyers quite notably have not said as much in court where they're under oath. The panel also rejected the idea that Trump could have an individual interest in or need for these roughly 100 documents marked as classified. And the panel also said that there's a strong public interest here in ensuring that how these records were stored at Mar-a-Lago did not damage national security. So what the appeals court ruling means is that the FBI will be able to use the classified materials taken from Mar-a-Lago in their ongoing criminal investigation now instead of potentially having to wait weeks or months for a special master to review them. And it also means that the FBI doesn't have to provide these classified records to the special master. And it's important to note here, this was a unanimous ruling, including the two Trump appointed judges. But they did leave some of the lower court ruling in place. Did this special master continue looking at the other documents? So special master Raymond diary will continue his review of the roughly 11,000 other documents. Yes. But he will no longer be reviewing the classified materials. But it's not clear that dairy, frankly, had much patience for the Trump legal team's arguments in the first place. There was a hearing earlier this week that Jerry had in New York, dearie expressed skepticism of the Trump legal team's resistance to providing evidence that Trump had actually attempted to declassify the documents he'd actually told Trump's attorneys at one point you can't have your cake and eat it too. Ryan reading this ruling, I noted the appeals court underlined how little Trump's lawyers have ever claimed on his behalf in court. Whereas you said they have to be they're under oath to rule for Trump, the court would have to find that the FBI acted with callous disregard for his rights, but his lawyers did not even claim that. How is Trump responding now? Well, there hasn't been any immediate response from Trump, but look, he's had a lot of other things to do with on another legal front. Of course, he was sued yesterday by the New York attorney general, who is seeking roughly 250 million in penalties and also to ban Trump his children, members of the executive team from doing business in New York State. So Trump has had a rough 24 hours on a couple of legal fronts here. And you have had a busy time as well. Ryan, thanks so much. Thank you. And pierce Ryan Lucas. The Federal Reserve raised interest rates by three quarters of a percentage point yesterday. It's the latest of several moves designed to bring down inflation and longtime fed watcher David wessel joins us. He directs the Hutchins center at the brookings institution, David good morning. Good morning. So not long ago, rates were around zero. Now there are three and a quarter percent. Why? Well, the fed is playing catch up inflation has proved much more persistent than it had hoped and expected. It wants to drive inflation down before inflationary psychology takes hold and we all begin expecting 6, 7, 8% inflation. So even though some prices are falling, notably will be the price of gasoline. The latest data suggests that inflation is infecting almost every part of the U.S. economy and the fed is responding. The only way it knows how. Raising interest rates to increase the cost of borrowing, so there's less spending, slowing over all demand to match the available supply. Here's how the fed chair Jay Powell put it at a press conference yesterday. We are focused on the thing I started with it, which is getting inflation back down to 2%. We can't fail to do that. If we were to fail to do that, that would be the thing that would be most painful for the people that we serve. So for now, that has to be our overarching focus. How much more are they going to have to push up rates in order to get inflationary control? Well, they think a lot, the fed officials projections issued yesterday foresee another one percentage point or one and a quarter percentage point interest rates before the end of this year and further increases in 2023. Jay Powell repeatedly talked about the need for what he called restrictive monetary policy. So he used the word 11 times in his press conference, and that means raising interest rates high enough to reduce the demand for things, demand for services and demand for workers, basically the fed thinks the economy is growing too fast, and it's hitting the brakes. And interestingly, central banks around the world are doing the same. Europe, Switzerland, just today, the United Kingdom, the Bank of England, raised interest rates. Well, let me ask about the fed situation here in the past day at a mandate to hold down inflation, which means if they had to choke off the economy and drive us into a recession that, well, that was their job, and they were going to do that. They now have this dual mandate, hold down inflation, also try to hold up employment. Are they willing still to push us into recession and do they have to? So you're right, the fed has had a dual mandate for years, maximum employment and price stability. And right now they are saying, we think we need to focus on the price stability goal. They are saying we want to slow the economy so much that unemployment will rise. In fact, they projected that unemployment, which is now at a very low historically 3.7%. It's going to go to 4.5% next year. That would mean they expect that they will have a million more unemployed workers next year than we have now. They think this is the price of getting inflation down. And Jay Powell was explicit. This is going to be painful. And I guess we should be explicit about who will have the pain. Workers have been able to demand more raises, sometimes easily change jobs. That would become more difficult under this scenario. Absolutely, that's part of the fed plan. That's how the fed works. The housing market is taking a hit, mortgage rates have already doubled from 3% to 6%. And so the fed is basically saying that economy is growing too fast. That's pushing up prices. We our job is to get it down. That's what the Congress has told us to do. David, thanks so much for your insight. It's always a pleasure talking with you. You're welcome. David wessel is

Trump Justice Department United Nations FBI Brian mayor President Biden Vladimir zelensky secretary general Antonio Gute Brian Leia NPR news ami Martinez Steve inskeep fed Ryan Lucas Ryan Jay Powell Raymond diary WNYC Culver City
"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:54 min | 5 months ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A week and a half. It was chaos. Was the latest on the polio virus found in wastewater samples from another upstate New York county. More on that, but first, news headlines. Live from NPR news, I'm Janine herbst. Families of students and teachers slain at rob elementary school and Yuval di, are in Austin today, demanding that Texas governor Greg Abbott do more to prevent further mass shootings in the state. From member station Ku T, Kayleigh hunter reports that some gathered outside the governor's mansion this morning to play recordings of their lost loved ones. The voice of fourth grade teacher Eva Morales and other victims of the rob elementary school massacre echoed outside the walls of the governor's mansion. It was an emotional plea to the governor to address gun violence in the state. Brett cross is the uncle of ten year old uziah Garcia, who is among the 19 children and two adults who were killed in the shooting in May. This is all we have left because you do not give a damn. The families are also participating in a March for our lives rally at the Texas capitol. On Kayleigh hunt and Austin. A day after the Justice Department released a heavily redacted version of the affidavit used to justify a search of former president Donald Trump's South Florida home. Questions remain. Nearly half the document that spelled out the reason for the property search is blacked out and piers Ryan Lucas has more. The department described the affidavit as a road map to its investigation. And it said that releasing the affidavit untouched could compromise the very investigation that's underway. And so details about the scope and the direction of the investigation were redacted in the version that was released. So for example, in a section about the probable cause for believing that classified documents and government records were still at Mar-a-Lago, pretty much the whole section on that was blacked out page after page. In pierce Ryan Lucas reporting. More than three months into the outbreak of monkeypox in the United States, confirmed cases have now topped 17,000, but the rate of spread appears to be slowing. And piers Amy held reports, new cases have dropped about 25% in recent weeks. The major cities that experienced the virus earliest, New York City, Chicago, and San Francisco are all seeing signs of a slowdown, says CDC director doctor Rochelle Walensky. We're watching this with cautious optimism and really hopeful that many of our harm reduction messages and our vaccines are getting out there and working. More people at highest risk are getting vaccinated. At the same time, infectious disease experts say behavior changes among gay and bisexual men who account for the vast majority of cases have also been key. Though it's too soon to say whether the outbreak has peaked in the U.S., overseas in parts of Europe, where the virus was detected weeks earlier. Cases have been steadily dropping since July. Amy held NPR news, and one of the confirmed cases or 18 of the confirmed cases are pediatric cases. You're listening to NPR news. And in the WNYC newsroom, I'm Tiffany Hansen. New Jersey's attorney general is sending a warning to 30 landlords in the state. Stop discriminating against formally incarcerated people. WNYC's Karen yee reports on the new state housing law. The fair chance in housing act took effect earlier this year, saying landlords can't ban people with criminal convictions from applying for units. They also can't ask about someone's criminal history on a housing application until after they've conditionally approved the tenant, even then only crimes committed within a recent time frame or more serious offenses, such as murder or sexual assaults, can be used to deny an application. The attorney general's office says the 30 sided landlords have to change their policies and agree to training or else face civil penalties that can range from $1000 for a first offense up to $10,000 for repeat violations. And the virus that causes polio has been found in wastewater samples from another upstate New York county and state health officials warn of expanding community spread of the life threatening virus. The State Department of Health says the polio virus was detected in four samples from Sullivan county to each in July and August. Sullivan county is northwest of rockland county, where the first case of polio in nearly a decade in the U.S. was detected back in July, state health commissioner doctor Mary Bassett is continuing to urge residents to make sure they are vaccinated. And thanks to a new rural New Jersey residents will be able to get alcohol delivered to their doorstep, the state's division of alcoholic beverage control issued a ruling yesterday, allowing services like DoorDash and Instacart to deliver alcoholic

rob elementary school NPR news Janine herbst Yuval di Kayleigh hunter Eva Morales Brett cross uziah Garcia Kayleigh hunt Ryan Lucas New York county polio Austin Greg Abbott pierce Ryan Lucas monkeypox piers Amy Texas Rochelle Walensky
"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:29 min | 7 months ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Overwhelming and it's hard to keep track of what's important. So take a listen to consider this a podcast from NPR and WNYC. In about 20 minutes, it brings you all of the essential national and local stories you need to stay informed and get through the day. What's the latest on the pandemic? How is the race for New York governors shaping up? And what is the city doing to address subway safety? Find out on consider this. Listen every weekday at 5, wherever you get podcasts. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve inskeep. Each hearing by the January 6th committee pushes responsibility closer to then president Trump. The committee presents more and more sworn depositions. Usually it's by Republicans, often it's people who worked for the president. Sometimes it's even from people who promoted his election lies. The result yesterday was like a video documentary, describing White House meetings from multiple perspectives. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been following these hearings, Ryan good morning. Good morning, Steve. Okay, the basic outline of events leading up to January 6th was known. Trump encouraged people to come to Washington and they did, including extremist groups, and they attacked the capitol. What do all these videos add to the understanding of what happened? What we saw and heard a lot from Trump's last White House counsel pat cipollone yesterday. He was interviewed by the committee just on Friday and cipollone said he agreed that the election was not stolen. That was a message that he and other top advisers like attorney general Bill Barr were also delivering to Trump. But Trump didn't want to hear it. Instead, he was listening to a group of informal outside advisers, Sidney Powell, former lieutenant general Michael Flynn, and Rudy Giuliani, and the committee zeroed in on a December 18th meeting at The White House that devolved into a screaming match, really. The committee showed a text from White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson, describing this 6 hour meeting as unhinged, Powell and company were pushing these outlandish theories about election fraud, cipollone side was pushing back. After the meeting ended, though, in the wee hours of the morning, Trump set out his tweet calling on supporters to come to Washington on January 6th for wild rally. What was the importance of that one tweet? Well, Democrat Jamie Raskin who co led this hearing yesterday along with Stephanie Murphy. They described Trump's tweet as in essence a call to arms. In the committee showed that after that tweet, Trump swallowers were galvanized, particularly online. Here's what Raskin said. Many shared plans and violent threats. One post encouraged others to come with body armor, knuckles, shields, bats, pepper spray, whatever it takes, all of those were used on the 6th. We also heard testimony from a rioter who stormed the capitol. Stephen Ayres, a former cabinet factory worker from Ohio, and he said he came to Washington because Trump asked him to. He said he marched to the capitol, didn't have plans to, but marched to the capitol because Trump told him to. And he said he left the capitol after Trump tweeted telling the rioters to go home. All of this is part of the committee trying to make its case that it's Donald Trump who is directly responsible for the events that happened on January 6th. Do they have even more evidence of that than they've shown so far? Well, they have another hearing scheduled for next week. It will be in prime time and the focus of that one is going to be on the three hours or so. On January 6th, as violence was taking place at the capitol, when Trump was not taking action to stop that violence. One of the thing, Ryan, what did Liz Cheney say, representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming sage just as everybody was getting ready to leave? Well, she said that Donald Trump tried to call a witness who the public has not yet seen in the committee's hearings. She said the person didn't answer the call and instead alerted their lawyer who then informed the committee, Cheney said the committee told the Justice Department about it and then Jenny said this. Let me say one more time. We will take any effort to influence witness testimony very seriously. Now the suggestion here, of course, is that Trump was calling this committee witness to try to influence their testimony. The committee's raised concerns about potential witness tampering previously, but this time, Cheney name dropped Trump, and that sends a message a very public message. I also, for the record, did get in touch with the Justice Department about this and it declined to comment. And pierce Ryan Lucas, thanks so much. Thank you. For more on the latest revelations out of the January 6th committee hearing, we go to Kimberly Whaley. Choose a visiting law professor at American university and the author of how to read the constitution and why Kim, thanks for being back on the show. Good morning, Rachel. You wrote in Politico that the Justice Department must indict former president Trump as a matter of accountability. Does the constitution and legal precedent allow for that? Well, there is no legal precedent, but it certainly allows for it and that we have a United States code, federal criminal laws that are set forth. And Donald Trump is now a private citizen. So so long as the 5 year general federal statute of limitations has not passed for DoJ actions, he's as vulnerable to criminal action as any other American, the internal DoJ memo saying you can't prosecute sitting presidents doesn't protect him. So it really comes down a to of course to evidence, and facts. But B, really, to political will, and I believe that one of the goals of this January 6th committee is to educate the American people to potentially warm them up to the concept that something needs to be done to reestablish guardrails around The White House or as I say in the piece we are basically green lighting widespread crime sprees in the Oval Office with unlimited sort of criminal justice and national security and law enforcement powers, military powers, because all of the other parts of the constitution primarily the impeachment clause that are meant to sort of as a stop gap or a slowdown sign for presidents have kind of gone out the window. Explain what the attorney general Merrick Garland has to weigh. I mean, is there an inherent risk in prosecuting a U.S. president even one who's left? Well, you know, there's definitely this idea of okay, there could be payback in the next administration and then we're just creating a situation where presidents are bullied by justice departments of opposing personal opposing political parties. But you know what, Rachel, you know, I think we're so far beyond those kind of old school considerations because what we saw yesterday was

Trump cipollone president Trump NPR news Rachel Martin Steve inskeep Liz Cheney White House Ryan Lucas NPR pat cipollone attorney general Bill Barr Sidney Powell Cassidy Hutchinson Jamie Raskin Stephanie Murphy Washington Donald Trump WNYC
"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

04:04 min | 7 months ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"Each hearing by the January 6th committee pushes responsibility closer to then president Trump. The committee presents more and more sworn depositions. Usually, it's by Republicans, often it's people who worked for the president. Sometimes it's even from people who promoted his election lies. The result yesterday was like a video documentary, describing White House meetings from multiple perspectives. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been following these hearings, Ryan good morning. Good morning, Steve. Okay, the basic outline of events leading up to January 6th was known. Trump encouraged people to come to Washington and they did, including extremist groups, and they attacked the capitol. What do all these videos add to the understanding of what happened? What we saw and heard a lot from Trump's last White House counsel pat cipollone yesterday. He was interviewed by the committee just on Friday, and cipollone said he agreed that the election was not stolen. That was a message that he and other top advisers like attorney general Bill Barr were also delivering to Trump. But Trump didn't want to hear it. Instead, he was listening to a group of informal outside advisers, Sidney Powell, former lieutenant general Michael Flynn, and Rudy Giuliani, and the committee zeroed in on a December 18th meeting at The White House that devolved into a screaming match, really. The committee showed a text from White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson, describing this 6 hour meeting as unhinged. Powell and company were pushing these outlandish theories about election fraud, cipollone side was pushing back. After the meeting ended, though, in the wee hours of the morning, Trump set out his tweet calling on supporters to come to Washington on January 6th for a wild rally. What was the importance of that one tweet? Well, Democrat Jamie Raskin who co led this hearing yesterday along with Stephanie Murphy. They described Trump's tweet as in essence a call to arms. In the committee showed that after that tweet, Trump's followers were galvanized, particularly online. Here's what Raskin said. Many shared plans and violent threats. One post encouraged others to come with body armor, knuckles, shields, bats, pepper spray, whatever it takes, all of those were used on the 6th. We also heard testimony from a rioter who stormed the capitol, Stephen ayers, a former cabinet factory worker from Ohio. And he said he came to Washington because Trump asked him to. He said he marched to the capitol, didn't have plans to, but marched to the capitol because Trump told him to. And he said he left the capitol after Trump tweeted telling the rioters to go home. All of this is part of the committee trying to make its case that it's Donald Trump who is directly responsible for the events that happened on January 6th. Do they have even more evidence of that than they've shown so far? Well, they have another hearing scheduled for next week. It will be in prime time and the focus of that one is going to be on the three hours or so. On January 6th, as violence was taking place at the capitol, when Trump was not taking action to stop that violence. One of the things Ryan, what did Liz Cheney say, representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming sage, just as everybody was getting ready to leave? Well, she said that Donald Trump tried to call a witness who the public has not yet seen in the committee's hearings. She said the person didn't answer the call and instead alerted their lawyer who then informed the committee, Cheney said the committee told the Justice Department about it and then Jane said this. Let me say one more time. We will take any effort to influence witness testimony very seriously. Now, the suggestion here, of course, is that Trump was calling this committee witness to try to influence their testimony. The committee's raised concerns about potential witness tampering previously, but this time, Cheney name dropped Trump, and that sends a message a very public message. I also, for the record, did get in touch with the Justice Department about this in a decline to comment. And pierce Ryan Lucas, thanks so much. Thank you. Hey, I'm Gregory Warner from the NPR podcast, rough translation. If you miss the part of travel that is about meeting people from all over the world, check out rough translation. Our latest seasons about saying no to work and experimenting with different work selves from the mandatory French lunch break. To the metaverse in Brazil. It's virtual me. It's all in a day's work at rough translation from NPR..

Trump cipollone president Trump White House Ryan Lucas pat cipollone attorney general Bill Barr Sidney Powell Cassidy Hutchinson Liz Cheney Jamie Raskin Stephanie Murphy Washington Michael Flynn Stephen ayers NPR Ryan Rudy Giuliani Donald Trump
"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:02 min | 7 months ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"That, you know, I'll be in jail with my mother and same things like be glad it's 2020 and not 1920. And so this leads into testimony, we'll hear from other witnesses in the coming days about this wide ranging investigation into Trump's pressure campaign in January 6th. And Pierre's Claudia grisa was there on Capitol Hill. Thanks, Claudia. Thank you much. Ukraine's military pushed Russian forces back weeks ago from Ukraine's second largest city har Keef. Since then, Ukraine has been collecting the bodies of Russians left behind. And pierce Ryan Lucas explains why two brothers from a village outside Harvey are among those un burying Russia's dead. Leads us down a small path through fields planted with neat rows of potatoes and green onions. He stops in front of his vegetable garden, a fellow patch of dark soil bordered by a cherry tree and a blown out house. He says there was a crater here, a big one. There's only a dip in the ground now, but it was here that he found the first ones. The dogs were circle around, and there was a burnt out stump, sticking out of the ground. I thought maybe it was a cherry tree, but the cherry tree wasn't there. I know my garden. And I'm wondering what it could be, and then I pull on it, and it was a hand. It was the body of a Russian soldier killed in the fighting that destroyed much of this village of mala Rohan. There were 5 Russians in all buried in the crater, one on top of the other. This was back in April. He and his brother, vulva, dug them up and called the Ukrainian military, who sent people out to collect the bodies. We helped them out and that's how we started working together. By this he means his and his brother's work as volunteer grave diggers. They exhume the bodies of Russians who died in the failed attack on the nearby city of haruki. And so far they say they've exhumed around 20 Russians in all. Yore is not a large man. His hair is but short, his skin burnt by the sun, his voice raspy from the cigarettes he smokes on repeat. In peacetime, he looked after the local soccer field, did random jobs, and sometimes helped Barry locals at the village cemetery. And so after the Russian army swept into Mali Hahn in the first days of the war, he says he started helping bury some of the conflicts early victims. After the war started, I was making arrangements with the Russians so I could bury civilians that had been killed. The Russians had set up firing positions by the village graveyard he says. So many of the civilians who died had to be buried in gardens. Since the Russian withdrawal, he's been exhuming the villagers. Many of them, people he knew, and reburying them in the cemetery. And for him, there's a difference between burying his fellow villagers and the Russians who were at least indirectly responsible for their deaths. I feel different. I have tears in my eyes when I know the person, know them personally. But when it's just the body is just the body. Honestly, I don't care. Even so, he says he knows that somewhere, someone is suffering over the loss of each and every dead Russian he finds as well. The sad thing is even the Russian guys have parents, someone waiting for them, young guys, and it's set to realize that. This work of course is not glamorous, the smell of death can follow the brother's home. When Yoda first started, the village didn't have any water or power, so he couldn't even wash his clothes at the end of the day. My wife doesn't understand how I keep doing this job. Every time I come home, she asks, how can you do it? And she tells me to go wash, go clean yourself. Neither brother much likes this job, but it is a necessary one. And because of the heavy fighting that raged around harkey, there's plenty of work to be done. Including a few days later, when we

Ukraine Claudia grisa pierce Ryan Lucas mala Rohan Capitol Hill Mali Hahn Claudia Trump Pierre Harvey vulva haruki un Russia Russian army Barry soccer Yoda harkey
"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:56 min | 8 months ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Payment in rubles Moscow has demanded clients from what it deems unfriendly countries which includes EU member states pay for any gas that comes from Russia in Russian currency It's a way to sidestep financial sanctions against Russia's Central Bank over Moscow's war in Ukraine Russia had previously cut off gas supplies to Poland Bulgaria and Finland The Netherlands relies on Russia for around 15% of its gas lower than the EU average of 40% Rob schmitz and Pyrenees Berlin Russia's military is slowly gaining ground in its offensive in eastern Ukraine and pierce Ryan Lucas reports that includes its assault on the key city of severo Donetsk In the Luhansk region still in Ukrainian hands But Ukraine's grip on the city appears to be slipping After weeks of shelling and rocket fire Ukrainian officials say Russian forces have now entered the city and that there is fighting in the streets If Russia were to take several Donetsk it would give the Kremlin in essence full control of the Luhansk region one of Moscow's objectives Luhansk along with the region of Donetsk make up the bigger area known as the Donbass and it is in the Donbass that the heaviest fighting of Ukraine's war with Russia is now taking place Ryan Lucas NPR news the Donbass in eastern Ukraine Wall Street lower by the closing bell the Dow down 222 points that's down 6 tenths of a percent ending at 32,990 the NASDAQ down 49 points at 12,081 S&P 500 down 26 points at 41 32 You're listening to NPR news from WAB news in Atlanta I'm Emile moff at its four 32 Coastal Georgia's islands beaches and marshes are ideal habitat for all sorts of migrating birds and that means they're also pretty good for monitoring those birds Emily Jones went along with some scientists tracking whimbrels on a recent very windy evening.

Russia Luhansk Ukraine Moscow Donetsk Rob schmitz pierce Ryan Lucas severo EU Central Bank Bulgaria Finland Poland The Netherlands Ryan Lucas Berlin NPR news WAB news
"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:28 min | 8 months ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All the security that's involved for him to come in right It's going to disrupt people's daily lives Gallegos parents live near the shooter and helped his first victim his grandmother get help after she was shot Carlos a Fernández was born and raised in uvalde What I see is that these have happened before and seems like nobody really cares Nobody do nothing about gun control They never did Many people from the city agree ping Huang and PR news democratic senator Chris Murphy says serious bipartisan negotiations are underway over a new federal gun law package though many Republicans in Congress have said they won't back laws that limit gun rights Ukraine is offering stiff resistance as Russia intensifies its push for the key city of severa Donetsk in the east and pierce Ryan Lucas has more from eastern Ukraine Speller donuts is the largest city in the Luhansk region still under Ukrainian government control And for weeks now Russian forces have been hitting it with rockets and artillery and residents who have fled say much of the city is destroyed The governor of the Luhansk region said he had a says Ukrainian troops have been battling Russian forces at a hotel on the outskirts and he says the Russians have not been able to advance any further But Russ's military is pushing to the west and south of and appears to be trying to seize the last remaining roads into and out of the city To cut off supply lines and evacuation routes Ryan Lucas NPR news in eastern Ukraine Turkey's president says he can not approve NATO membership bids by Sweden and Finland even after both countries sent delegations to try to convince Ankara NPR's Peter kenyon has more from Istanbul Turkish media are quoting president Recep Tay Erdoğan is telling reporters after a trip to Azerbaijan that as long as he's president turkey quote can not say yes to countries that support terror joining NATO Erdoğan has accused Sweden in particular of harboring terrorists from the PKK saying they quote nuzzle terrorists to their bosom The Turkish president reportedly added that the recent meetings with the finish in Swedish delegations had not taken place at the desired level Every NATO member state must approve the entry of new members the historic move to join by the two countries was sparked by alarm over Russia's invasion of Ukraine Peter kenyon and Pyrenees Istanbul And you're listening to NPR news This is WNYC in New York I'm David first New Yorker is still processing the mass shootings in Buffalo and in Texas may have another cause for concern an upcoming Supreme Court decision that could make it easier to carry a gun in New York City WNYC and ruin vinegar has more For more than a century New York has had some of the strictest gun laws in the country but some experts think they could be scaled back or even struck down Robert spitzer is a political scientist at SUNY courtland and the altar 6 books on gun rights He thinks the existing laws work but expects the Supreme Court to decide New York's restrictions are unconstitutional And if that law is swept away it means a lot more gun carrying presumably even in the 5 boroughs of New York City never mind in upstate counties The Supreme Court decision is expected sometime in June And we'll hear more about that coming up in all things considered at 5 o'clock this afternoon here on WNYC Wednesday marks.

Luhansk Ukraine Fernández ping Huang Peter kenyon severa pierce Ryan Lucas NPR uvalde NATO Gallegos Ryan Lucas Chris Murphy president Recep Tay Erdoğan Donetsk Erdoğan Carlos Russia Sweden Istanbul
"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 8 months ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A specific purpose To kill a lot of human beings quickly The 18 year old gunman is charged with first degree murder and is being held without bail more charges are pending Russian forces entered the outskirts of the city of severo Donetsk in eastern Ukraine and pierce Ryan Lucas has more The governor of the Luhansk region said hey Hadi says Russian troops have advanced into the periphery of sveral Donetsk The city appears to be a key target of Russia's ongoing offensive in the Donbass region of eastern Ukraine Sveto donuts has a population of around a 100,000 people in peacetime although tens of thousands of civilians have fled the Russian onslaught Moscow's forces have pounded the city with artillery and rockets for weeks At the same time Russian troops have been trying to cut off the remaining roads into the city to fully encircle it Civilians who have managed to escape Ferguson recent days say there's little food to eat no power no gas and no water Ryan Lucas NPR news the Donbass in eastern Ukraine And that's the biggest city in the Luhansk region that is still under Ukrainian control You're listening to NPR news and in the WNYC newsroom I'm Tiffany Hansen as you've been hearing the last of ten people slain in the racist shooting in Buffalo earlier this month is being laid to rest today Ruth whitfield was 86 and was killed by a white supremacist who opened fire in a supermarket In addition to vice president Kamala Harris other officials present included governor Kathy hochul and attorney general tish James and New York City mayor Eric Adams New Yorkers reeling from the mass shooting in Buffalo and in Yuval Texas may have another cause for concern and upcoming Supreme Court decision that could make it easier to carry a gun in New York City Has more For more than a century New York has had some of the strictest gun laws in the country but some experts think they could be scaled back or even struck down Robert spitzer is a political scientist at SUNY courtland and the author of 6 books on gun rights He thinks the existing laws work but expects the Supreme Court to decide New York's restrictions are unconstitutional And if that law is swept away it means a lot more gun carrying presumably even in the 5 boroughs of New York City never mind in upstate counties The Supreme Court decision is expected.

Ryan Lucas Luhansk Ukraine severo sveral Donetsk Donetsk Hadi Tiffany Hansen NPR Ruth whitfield pierce Kathy hochul tish James Eric Adams Buffalo Moscow Ferguson Kamala Harris New York City Yuval
"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:44 min | 11 months ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That survival That's all coming up but first this news Live from NPR news I'm Janine herbst In the port city of Mario polo civilians have once again come under Russian fire according to Ukrainian officials dooming a second attempt to create a humanitarian corridor for people to escape and pierce Ryan Lucas reports for days intense fighting has raged on in the city where residents are enduring increasingly dire conditions City officials said the pause in fighting would start at noon local time and last through the evening to give Mary opal residents time to flee to the north but the Ukrainian National Guard now says the ceasefire has collapsed after Russian forces opened fire This comes the day after a similar effort to set up a humanitarian corridor in mariupol and another city in eastern Ukraine vulva broke down for the same reason Both cities have been pounded by Russian forces for days and the humanitarian situation is turning dire About residents say they have no heat no water and they say they're running short on food Ryan Lucas NPR news le vivo blast Ukraine The International Atomic Energy Agency says that Russian forces have cut most communications channels to Ukraine's nuclear power plant and appears just from Phil has more Russian forces took the plant after a fierce firefight last week Now the Atomic Energy Agency says they're in full control with all reactor operations requiring Russian military approval Russian troops have also switched off some mobile networks and Internet making it harder for the plants Ukrainian operators to communicate with the outside world The IAEA's director general Rafael grossi says he is quote extremely concerned by the latest developments at the site the zapper plant it's the largest nuclear plant in Europe Jeff brumfield and PR news Washington The U.S. says it's considering a ban on Russian oil and gas imports alongside European allies in Pierre Strauss Snyder has more Secretary of State Antony Blinken has traveling in Eastern Europe but he made time to make the rounds of the Sunday morning news program saying the Biden administration is considering a ban on Russian oil and gas We are now talking to our European partners and allies to look in a coordinated way at the prospect of banning the import of Russian oil while making sure that there is still an appropriate supply of oil on world markets That's a very active discussion as we speak Lincoln speaking on CNN State of the Union the Biden administration has so far resisted the idea because it would likely mean rising prices at the pump but blinken said President Biden discussed it with his National Security Council on Saturday Trial Snyder NPR news And prices at the pump are already on the rise jumping 11% over the past week to the highest level since 2008 as global sanctions cripple Russia's ability to export crude oil after its invasion triple-A says the average cost of a galleon gallon of regular hit $4 today up from 360 cents a week ago This is NPR This is WNYC Good evening on my own Levinson Starting on Monday New York City's bars restaurants and entertainment venues will no longer be required to ask patrons for proof of COVID-19 vaccination Mayor Adams announced the end of the mandate as cases decline in the city in Times Square on Friday He said he believes it's now safe enough to eliminate restrictions This is about giving people the flexibility that is needed to continue to allow not only safety but we have to get our economy back on track It's time to open our city and get the economy back operating Businesses can still require proof at their own discretion Adams also announced the end of the indoor mask mandate in public schools for kids age 5 and over The deadline for applications to New York City high schools is coming up this Friday but last minute changes to the process could be announced early this week A news report from chalkbeat said schools Chancellor David banks has been listening to parents concerns about the admissions process and could announce changes early next week Monday or Tuesday It didn't specify what changes he is considering The current process is a ranking system students and families choose their top 12 programs and are later informed about which school that they've been matched with And on this date in 1972 children show the magic garden made its debut on WPIX TV Hosted by two New York City public school teachers Carol damas demis rather and Paula Janis The New York Times called the half hour program cheerful low budget and inadvertently psychedelic Carol and Paula began each show with the hello song Open.

NPR news Janine herbst Ukraine pierce Ryan Lucas Mary opal Ukrainian National Guard mariupol Ryan Lucas International Atomic Energy Ag Atomic Energy Agency NPR Rafael grossi Jeff brumfield Pierre Strauss Snyder Secretary of State Antony Blin Biden administration Union the Biden administration blinken President Biden
"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"pierce ryan lucas" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Live from NPR news I'm Lakshmi Singh The United States is deploying more than 3000 troops to Europe to strengthen NATO defenses and PR's Franco ordos reports President Biden says he warned Russia that this would happen if president Vladimir Putin continued to escalate President Biden briefly spoke about his decision to move U.S. troops as he was leaving a White House event Who's in the beginning As long as he's backing aggressive then we're gonna make sure we reassure our data allies in Eastern Europe that we're there in article 5 is a secret obligation This is the first significant movement of U.S. troops as allies looked to deter Russia from attacking Ukraine and avoid war The White House officials also made clear that U.S. troops are not heading to Ukraine But will support allies along the NATO alliances eastern Flank closest to Russia Franco ordonez NPR news The White House Well the president is reviving the cancer moonshot initiative a program to accelerate research and treatment development it began during the Obama administration when Biden was vice president At The White House today Biden told a gathering that funding the advanced research projects agency for health will help millions of people in the U.S. avoid and beat cancer The goal is to cut the cancer death rate in half in the next 25 years at least by 50% And to turn more cancer and death sentences into chronic diseases that people can live with To create a more supportive experience for patients and their families Biden notes a cancer remains the number two cause of death in the U.S. I can only two heart disease the president lost one of his sons bow to brain cancer in 2015 A key witness in the first impeachment of former president Donald Trump Alexander vindman is suing the ex-president son as well as Rudy Giuliani and to other people And pierce Ryan Lucas reports a lawsuit alleges that vindman was targeted in what he describes as a deliberate campaign of witness intimidation and retaliation Former lieutenant colonel Alexander vindman served on the National Security Council as a Ukraine expert during the Trump administration He testified before Congress in 2019 during impeachment proceedings against former president Trump about a phone call Trump had with Ukraine's president a call that was central to Trump's impeachment And the lawsuit filed in federal court in Washington D.C. binman says that after agreeing to testify he became the target of a concerted effort at intimidation to try to deter him from testifying And later retaliation after he did so In addition to Donald Trump Jr. and Rudy Giuliani the lawsuit also names former Trump White House communications officials Dan scavino and Julia Han as defendants Ryan Lucas and PR news Washington The Dow closes up 224 points or more than half a percent and the day at 35,629 This is NPR From W ABE news in Atlanta good afternoon I'm Jim burris Our time is four O four Police are offering up to a $2000 reward for information that leads to the person responsible for murdering a security guard in downtown Atlanta early this morning APD says the 28 year old guard was fatally shot while working outside of encore hookah bar and bistro on lucky street Police released surveillance footage of a man who was involved in a dispute with the guard after being asked to leave The guard was taken to Grady memorial where he later died his name has not been released Anyone can submit an anonymous tip at stop crime ATL dot com or by calling four zero four 5 7 7 tips A bill to effectively end gun carry licenses in Georgia is moving forward among its promoters as a group of out of state activists featured in the NPR investigative podcast no compromise Co hosted by W a B E's Lisa Hagan Governor Brian Kemp is one of scores of Republican state leaders who have been pressed to support policies like constitutional carry which make weapons carry permits optional These laws have swept some 18 states in less than a decade as part of a movement of gun rights activists who scorn the National Rifle Association as weak on guns Among them is Aaron door the oldest of a group of Iowa brothers who raise money promoting absolutist gun laws Here he is at the capitol responding to democratic senator Elena parent Tuesday Is it the case that no right is absolute I would not agree with that when.

President Biden U.S. Ukraine cancer Biden NPR news Lakshmi Singh White House Russia Franco ordonez NATO Obama administration Donald Trump Alexander vindman NPR pierce Ryan Lucas vindman Rudy Giuliani colonel Alexander vindman Trump administration