35 Burst results for "Picassos"

A JPEG Sells for $70 Million, Creating a New Era of Digital Art Auctions

Business Wars Daily

03:51 min | 2 weeks ago

A JPEG Sells for $70 Million, Creating a New Era of Digital Art Auctions

"From wondering. I'm david brown in this business. Wars daily on this tuesday march twenty third. If you're an art collector with a spare seventy million lying around a rembrandt says on may be out of your reach. But you just might be able to score yourself. A lesser van gogh picasso or like someone last week. You own your own people digital montage. Oh you've never heard of people that's okay. He's not one of those guys. They teach art history class. Which makes it all the more remarkable one of his electronic art pieces just sold at auction at christie's for nearly seventy million dollars even though it only exists in pixels is the third highest price ever commanded by a living artist. According to the new york times people is a digital artist from south carolina. Whose given name. Is mike thirteen years. He's created a drawing every day. He started with pen and paper but now creates art. Digitally the record breaking piece titled everyday's the five thousand days is a composite of the first five thousand days of that project. This was also the first time christie's sold a piece of digital only artwork. It was purchased with the cryptocurrency ether. Another first for christie's something tells me you won't be the last either. So you're probably wondering why in the world someone would pay seventy million dollars for a pack a reproducible. Virtual file right. Something you can't touch or even hang on your wall. yeah. I know. That's what i was wondering. Turns out every day is is in just another pretty j. peg. It's what's called a non fungible token or nfc and if you're thinking is so tell me why that matters. Well you're going to need to stick with me for a moment. On this one in tease us blockchain technology for authentication. Now this blockchain is the same sort of thing that you find in bitcoin right. It captures information and shares it with a network of computers and once shared. There's a digital ledger. That records the data across thousands of computers. Making it impossible to manipulate or so goes the theory. So when you buy an nf it's quote minted to you. Meaning an ownership record is created across thousands of computers around the world. You own the original one of a kind file. I know it may seem complicated on the surface but it really is pretty straightforward essentially techie. Way of making a digital file one of a kind like a physical object even if others tried to make a copy. It's taking a photo of a famous painting. It's not worth what the original is worth. Entities allow users to own bits of video songs or images. Their popularity actually began years ago with a game. Called crypto kitties where people could buy in trade animated cats after attracting top venture. Capital firm says investors some crypto. Kitty sold well into the six figures. Lately they've turned into a blazing hot sector in art and collectibles. Sports stars like lebron. James and rob gronkowski have even gotten in on the action selling. Nfc video clips. In digital trading cards people has been at the forefront of this craze in february a short video clip he created sold for nearly seven million dollars in one weekend in december he made more than three million dollars selling his t's bad for a guy who calls some of his own work crap according to the times not to be outdone. Sotheby's has gotten in on the act last

Van Gogh Picasso Mike Thirteen Christie David Brown The New York Times South Carolina NFC Rob Gronkowski Kitty Lebron James Sotheby
Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

Tolbert, Krueger and Brooks

00:37 sec | Last month

Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

"Learn about NF tease. The price tag for some digital artwork is starting to rival classic paintings from Picasso and Monet. Mike Winkelmann. He's better known as people created a montage of 5000 days of digital art and then put it up for auction at Christie's. It's sold for a record $69 million unique Blockchain based digital image is part of the non fungible Token world or end empties are still being shunned by many in the art world as a speculative fat, But the eight figure price tag for the people Certainly caught the naysayers. Attention.

Mike Winkelmann Monet Picasso Christie
Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

Pat Thurston

00:43 sec | Last month

Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

"Tease. The price tag for some digital artwork is starting to rival classic paintings from Picasso and Monet. Mike Winkelmann. He's better known as people created a montage of 5000 days of digital art and then put it up for auction at Christie's. It's sold for a record $69 million unique Blockchain based digital image is part of the non fungible Token World, or N F. T s are still being shunned by many in the art world as a speculative fat butt. Eight figure price tag for the people has certainly caught the naysayers. ATTENTION By Mark Nieto. This report sponsored by Exit inaccuracy matters. Get a $5 rebate by trading up any non contact

Mike Winkelmann Monet Picasso Christie Mark Nieto
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
"picassos" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

03:53 min | 4 months ago

"picassos" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"He was accused of stealing the mona lisa. Listen to my episode about the mona lisa for more about this story but basically he was accused by police officer in paris who just didn't like modern artists and assume that only a modern artists who hated classical art could have stolen it. He was often photographed wearing a black and white striped shirt. That shirt was known as a britain striped shirt and was the uniform of the french seamen in brittany. It had exactly twenty one stripes which represented the twenty one victories of napoleon coco. Chanel brought back in nineteen seventeen and that was one. Picasso started wearing it in his later. Life rumors floated around that he would often pay for his meals by just signing his name or doing a quick drying he wants refuse to do so saying quote. I'm buying a meal not the whole restaurant unquote in another anecdote. One of his fans in paris asked him to draw doodle on a piece of paper picasso then said that will be thirty thousand dollars what the fan replied then only took five seconds. Not picasso said that took a lifetime. Picasso was famous for being a ladies man technically. He was only married twice but he had many affairs and mistresses. One of his. Most famous affairs was with marie. Therese walter in nineteen twenty seven when he was forty five you notice on the street and approached her and said quote miss. You have an interesting face. I would like to do your portrait. I m picasso on boat which you have to admit is a great pickup line. She was only seventeen. And i never heard of him but they ended up spending years together and actually had a child. Three of picasso's children are still alive as is one of his ex wives. Francois gilo is still around at the age of ninety nine and painting inter studio in new york city. Perhaps his most famous work is gernika. It's an enormous wall-sized painting which was done in the cuba style in nineteen nine hundred seven. It was created after the bombing of the basque city of gernika by german and italian forces on behalf of the spanish government. He lived in paris during the german occupation during world war..

picasso Picasso paris Therese walter brittany Chanel britain Francois gilo marie gernika new york city cuba spanish government
"picassos" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

05:18 min | 4 months ago

"picassos" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Begin any discussion on picasso you. I have to start with his full name. The full name of the artist known as picasso given to him at birth is pablo diego. Jose francisco de paulo one nipple. Maria de las raimondo. Cipriano dias antigua trinidad ruis e picasso. Picasso is actually an italian name that comes from his mother early in his career. He was playing around with different names. He tried qasr and picasso which of his mother's and father's name avoided his father's surname of we just because it was too common in spain. He didn't think pablo breweries would stand out. He also may have been superstitious. His was a failed painter and he didn't want to use the same name he did for his work. He explained the decision to use the name. To hungarian artist george brasi quote. Picasso was stranger more resonant than ruis. You know what appealed to me about that name well. It was undoubtedly the double s which is fairly unusual in spain. Picasso is of italian origin as you know and the named person bears or adopts has importance. Can you imagine me calling myself ruis. Pablo ruiz giggle zeh ruis or one nipple. Men gave ruis end quote. Well he had a point so the artist we call. Picasso was born on october twenty fifth eighteen eighty one in malaga in his birth was difficult in the midwife who delivered him actually thought he was stillborn as mentioned before his father was a failed painter. Who mostly earned money teaching and serving as a curator for museum. He did excel in teaching art in so far as one of his pupils was his son. Picasso was taking lessons with his father at the age of seven and by the age of nine he had completed his first painting called les picador. It is a painting of a man riding a horse and a bull fight to be fair. It does not look at all like something a nine year old would create. Compare this what most kids have opened the refrigerator. And you'll see a huge difference when he was thirteen. His family moved to barcelona where he was admitted to the school of fine arts where his father had gotten a job is father persuaded the school to allow his son to take an entrance exam for the advanced class. The testing usually took a month and was for students much older than he was. Because finish the test in a week and was admitted. At sixteen he was sent to spain's top college madrid's.

picasso Picasso pablo diego Jose francisco de paulo Maria de las raimondo Cipriano dias trinidad ruis pablo breweries george brasi Pablo ruiz qasr spain malaga school of fine arts barcelona madrid
"picassos" Discussed on Android Central Podcast

Android Central Podcast

04:56 min | 5 months ago

"picassos" Discussed on Android Central Podcast

"Are definitely offers a better experience for everything except camera. So. It's it's hard to justify that the three a has made a decent niche for itself a three fifty, get some competition from the Nord but the both phones aren't available in a lot of markets because we don't have the Nord, which is annoying and a lot of other places don't get the Pixel for a or didn't get the Pixel for a until like a month ago. and. Then we have the Pixel five, which seven hundred dollars is an area that already has a whole lot of competition. So it's always a how do you think that changes three months from now when a hundred bucks gets knocked off the Pixel five? And probably fifty bucks off the four five. Gee, I don't think before. To get one hundred bucks off to otherwise the Pixel five is going to just absolutely mooch most of the sales off that apart from the people who were like, okay. I like the Pixel experience, but I need a big screen. Because that's the real difference between the four, five g in the Pixel Five. The Pixel for if I G has a big screen and doesn't have wireless charging let's shift a little bit to talk about the you mentioned one plus Nord Nord is a brand that I don't know it doesn't have tons of CACHET. Yes. Yet in the West lot of enthusiasts. What it is because it was released in Europe earlier this year this three, hundred, seventy, nine pounds three, ninety, nine, euro phone. Snapdragon Simmons Sixty five gee, like a really solid mid range phone for not that much money. A lot of people were very impressed with it. weeks we you know android central exclusively announced that the company would be releasing. To, new Nord models both of the both of which would be coming to the US later this year that has now happened it's been announced. We have the Nord en ten five G. and the Nord and one hundred. So what we have are these two new phones and we don't have US pricing availibility yet, but we do have European pricing and the. Nord. En Ten five G. is. Basically a lesser Nord as we expected and it has a snapdragon six, ninety at six gigs of Ram, one hundred and twenty gigs of storage, and it has five g through that. Snapdragon six ninety is the first phone with that ships.

Nord Nord Gee Europe US
"picassos" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

01:32 min | 7 months ago

"picassos" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"For simplisafe. Milton's just dot com go there and Daddy Kit dot, com and the code is Kirke at twenty, five, twenty, five percent at checkout a pretty good deal anything else in the news while we're talking today so you. Know I was looking through twitter. I didn't see anything. Oh. No more Jerry commercials on that thing. That makes me laugh FTF baby. I'm not seeing any commercial haven't figured out what? I'm still not quite sure what it is neither my own more Pelosi thing. Pelosi attorney letter on San Francisco Salon owner this office is in possession of photographs, videos and witness information that the owner active and operating a business during the state homers similar executive orders limiting in store operations. Okay. So we're going to crush. The business. Lock her up because she embarrassed Nancy Pelosi wondering what an Asshole Evil Evil as I mean really what a terrible person she she got busted. She's she you know but that's what this is. What politicians do. I'm not ready to win on this matter I didn't know more more fat more information. Yes spits. People. Don't want you to be a politician like that. I think they do. They don't give them the bad boy candidate fine. The kind of humor you get just. Checking in Jesus Evanston funds can be an issue. Ford. Laughs this campaign from either one of you guys. Steve. Suck this one. We'll talk to you tomorrow. This was pretty reprehensible. I don't know how it can be anybody's idea of humor..

"picassos" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

03:44 min | 7 months ago

"picassos" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"Leu. My. Business I'M GONNA I'm GonNa give you the whole load didn't. Do because it's like he thought about. I'm going. I'm going to give you the whole. Is the time to heed the time. Wants advice from Teddy Roosevelt speak softly. and carry a big stick. and. Of quote I promise you The president has a big stick. Trump would say. And of quote. That's almost like he's reading something. I've told that Dale story before the on the AD reads. He did was the the effort which was and we played at once and he fucking bullshit she probably she was a dick move. We did It was during Valentine's Day wear like a chocolate or whatever. He's like. He's like you know. Whenever try this thing the in the end of these. Rights, you get fifty percents off from this thing please verbatim. We replay flipped out why? Because he'd Sucking Dale You say it's a Dick move but that's just like all. We did it to be digs though, but that's all. I'm saying is a bad thing. I'm just saying it's universally funny when someone reads something that was prepared for. Rhonda Shitting, who's was him shitting on the sponsors? Suffers I remember saying to him in the hall afterwards because we would always get along I would say tail why don't you just? Do it again today or it should be dropped. Have Fun with it. Then people pay attention to the read it's not insane and bad. It's a joke. I could easily see somebody I could see myself doing that simple mistake. Like, I'll read safe right now the SORTA simply safe it says. Intro the beginning, and then it says, please feel free to share your own experiences with simplisafe i. don't read that obviously, but they have simply safe. So I talk about that's-that's but I could see myself I. Didn't WanNA familiar with the product or Wasn't creatively Dale or so I think that's the thing is the felt exposed right whereas simplisafe that can talk all day because I have the product and I said that myself Kirkman a set up simplisafe himself at all you can do it yourself ted? Sellers. has done with. So yesterday we were talking about random style. You. said it was a call after we met. We actually put the phone down to. Dorsey. Always, want to make sure you feel comfortable. Okay. That's all during lunch and I didn't get a cook. Dinner, but we'll be but you know not supporting you, right? Okay. Yeah. No I know that. That I know. So what he's saying, I'm just a little uncomfortable with this relationship. Could you have a thick? You're running your own campaign worry about where I'm doing Yeah I suppose. So now mad them using a product both like to help take Ted be safe with. Simply, safe is a company that I stood behind. No matter we'll has well, here's the thing I'll say Ted. Seems. especially. Concerned about the safety of this point. That's what the Express to me is that he's concerned about the person who's running against this team, right? Now. But you know what? Now after we did this and we had dinner and ice cream and watch the movies he's not. He's not even concerned anymore. Because he has simply safe. All right. Simply safe I'll put this thirty say here but you get it for thirty cents a day you set yourself up completely professional monitoring keeps watch day or night ray police fire medical professionals. If there's an emergency set up under an hour peel and stick the sensors, exactly we need them no technician required no contract no pushy sales guys hidden.

Rhonda Shitting Trump Ted Dale Teddy Roosevelt Kirkman Leu. president Dorsey technician Sellers.
"picassos" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

05:51 min | 7 months ago

"picassos" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"Hey, I'm pregnant given. I think I think abortion I'm sure you would really say. Your. Our generation hundred bucks this week. So. That's what I'm saying what's the? Education is where I would agree with Steve Sharp a perfect world. You'd like you know obviously not to see it happen. That's what everyone agrees. Even most pro-abortion people agree that it's a bad thing in in we would want. Abortion you pro-life pro-choice rather no pro-abortion. There's there's part of that is there are people there are people out there who are like. Abortion but most people. Most. People agree that we'd be better off with fewer abortions this. Guys abortion like I don't write the check chief of staff. What's your taste? So that's your look. Abortion survivors right here we have statement. That's true. What a Sake Not GonNA play well. I think the media will understand its abortion Thursday or getting into the issues. It's election season might be tested political candidates. Type Ted's in abortion survivor to. Someone argue. I mean, is any part of you? Because, you you'll make a friend, right down. As he says workfront should you should you? Should you recuse? Friendship aside for the to be the moderator. I'll find a win friends as well. Like you guys. Work, together your travel together you've bonded the. Will be able to be neutral part of it, but they administer these debates in a way that is of great benefit fans. Okay. So you're the sole moderator of this debate. Yes. I may bring in some outside help for some specialists. Okay I guess I'm staying out of it. Think, it's only fair. Well yeah it seems very unbiased help trying. To be going on with us we. Get. We never put that put. That tiktok thing Oh. Yeah. The Nathan Free Offer yes. So he's a he's a just to set it up. He's like a second or something and the United States, Marine Corps but there's also A. Like two million followers on the Chinese Chinese APP it's called Tiktok China? APP. Reason one million would ever be verified dirty jokes. This this one why did you is person's favorite POKEMON CHARACTER Ash. I hate this fucking guy anyway I hate. To like cutting up. That's kind of why a marriage the. House black for that type. This. Well, like that slippy, very edited stuff I mean. So did he get kicked out of no terrier now with the so I think all of the older generation of Marines look at that as just a a violation of the code of conduct right? He's supposed to serve his names out there and everything they found it. So I'm sure he's going to face discipline I. Don't know if he'll be dishonorably different than military like you can't you can't you know. Especially, if you rise of Jewish people serving under you. Can, it's not part of the that's just not part of the deal but the other thing is like again because it really gonNA. Hurt him that much in the modern now, he's if he's got two million tiktok for. He's this shit. You're the sound from the city of Popular Holy Fuck is that terrible? I can pull up. TIKTOK. Again, I hate that Shit. Old. Know. I'm old I'm old it's. and. I do have less sympathy for like he's been. He's been removed from leadership roles. Okay. The three million followers. Jesus found someone's my space where they were doing. You know questionably racist Shit and pulled it and try to use against them. Now I thought. But now if you're putting it on Tiktok, it's like I have no religion you're in the middle of their military guide, their codes in the military. That's those are the rules about saying kick off TIKTOK. But he knows the deal. Just health to a different standard. Yeah. That's I mean that's some regular idiot fine again, it's also so fucking funny like maybe being purposely on funnier and I don't even know now it's it's. Not. It's it's supposed to Japanese anime because he's making Hokey Montross. That's A big. Push to his laugh is supposed to get a laugh. Funny because it's a wacky noise, I'm old I. Got I. Understand I don't understand. Where to hold sitting around pulling but that's not funny at least. Not Number. Though but that's just not that is not funny. There are people who are funny I suppose he's not one of them, right? I guess I can't pull up comedian you just got busted to the. Fifteen people came forward. Women came forward against them. You see this he was a comedian Ted talk as well. He's a comedian holly reporter had yesterday the day before thought. More christly accusations Oh. Yeah. If Not Tucker Tucker did not have any new Chris Cuomo yesterday he did not know he had the salon owner on actually did. That I mean, she just said I didn't set her up. This wasn't a setup issue Republican. Probably, I, don't know she looks like her Nancy have a similar philosophy when it comes to having worked. Hard being a woman that's that's all but she's. She's also a business owner. You know it's just like. She's more upset than than maybe. I'll look it up later but yeah yeah that's probably true. I don't care if I was just curious I. Mean you know she said that's the up also. So what Nancy close fucking stupid to wear a mask she deserves it fucking waving. Fingers around the. People. The other thing. The other things will dominate the news cycle. Today is trump yesterday. North. Carolina is doing his speaking to supporters and he says, so here's what I want you to do. You know twice yeah of that. Legal Mike. Campaign most of my. Most of my camping, five, thousand times present how you interpret it might be a felony we have the sound, the.

Tiktok Ted Nancy Steve Sharp United States Tiktok China chief of staff workfront Tucker Tucker Carolina Chris Cuomo Marine Corps Mike business owner holly reporter
"picassos" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

The Kirk Minihane Show

07:23 min | 7 months ago

"picassos" Discussed on The Kirk Minihane Show

"You guys. Breaking down, book yesterday. I listened to the podcast as well, and that was good that best I've already know break it down. To the book now that's good just. EARNS LOT CAST. I'm pet sell all day of the week I would take. Campers. Son Elber Blind Mike Knows. I don't get that what people were saying like, Oh, that's funny that he said I can't say that about my mom I don't get it I. Think you about your mom. Right. But I just don't I understand I understand what you say the word mom and have it be funny no but I think it's I. Think it's funny. He's acknowledging that you and your mom everything but is that what he's do i. Think he's saying they cut him often somebody says on but some of these mom. Yeah. I. Think he was he was expecting a dump button to be had. Greg. Hey. You can't use the word. Sports it. Says there I'm over? Much Fan you know although if I'm looking at the though it seems like. I callers her head supporters, Roy Ninety five callers. I suppose. That's interesting. Yeah. That's something that should be looked at five. Am I gonNA crunch the numbers I'd rather have the ninety five endorsement. I would also say that much they'll kind of guy like do you want him to endorse I'm glad I'm. Glad Mutt. We pretty this way Jimmy Stewart was the producer of mutton Merloni on day one is. A fucking crisis coming got the fuck out of their troops Jimmy Stewart's blonde like. Monroe Loney had sellers, Jimmy Stewart's the kind of guy if it looks difficult bales, he's Bhai Mike Guy. That's not what I meant. He's So. Read the writing on the wall that was disaster your I mean I saw somebody tweet this I forget it was who said maybe clamp campaign slogan should be clawing order I. saw half that's not bad. Wouldn't like that a lot of no no, it doesn't want the streets. Muslim dirty mutton Adam in the hand or the Ali. Frazier, you is. A three-star generals. Jesus thirty each. That many taking shots at you on the Oj show last night by the way. Was it? Yes. Criticizing you. Oh, well, that's all right. Is If I think the big thing you got to reconcile with and I'm a neutral party here because I'm debate moderator is Kirk tweet this morning. You're. GonNa have to find a way to explain that away I can't blame endorse. No I've endorsed endorsed anybody so far everybody I mean your Your opponent, your opponent is casting it as an endorsement. But Yeah I mean I'm sure he'll ring commercials. I'm very clear very, very clear. I am not endorsing blind Mike. Or to toews yet neither one. Okay very clear I'm not endorsing by Mike. Ted's either one of Ame. I'm just trying to you know this is this I'm here just right down the middle. I feel I feel like it's a big endorsement to get maybe not the biggest for the big one. I won't be kingmakers that's not my job and let the process play out through the nomination process and the conventions and the debates, and but the best man or woman whoever jumps in wins I think the other problem is going to be deep fakes I. Mean we're already seeing all these photoshopped pictures are I can't tell what's real. Shops yet maybe maybe some videos who's WHO MISSES PENIS HEAD? Who's your chief of staff? She. Doing she's working. She's doing some very big things like what very big things we'll get to that I mean you'll see some results. If you see a picture of video, thanks fraudulent Shinji reaching out to twitter to have flag manipulated media. With the trump campaign toys is a friend of mine and he's working on that. Wait a minute what your friend of Dorsey Oh. Yeah. Wow we're working on sometimes Okay. Good looking forward to it. So calm seaver would always tell me. When Tom seaver. Another good friend of mine, but he enjoyed the. I the only thing with us, a picture of and social media yesterday was having lunch. Mommy's. Seemed like he was having a good day. Which is nice. It was nice to go. What do you mean? That that's the way to go. She's the meal at a nice Italian talking about I just saw I don't know any I saw you had lunch here. Mommy's no longer was Tom seaver. Jesus said. Boy. Harper. I don't I cannot confirm nor deny. She died I know he lived and that was a great amendment of Blend Mike Supporter seventy five years. Old Tom Terrific. Yes. Well, yeah. Not If you look at the trademarks. True I. Thought. He was he pissed they were Brady. Got It. All right but even sick for a while he had He had Alzheimer's he had the the Robin Williams. What's that called Oh Louie shut them Jerry's mom fuck for the name of it. LOOK UP Steve Feeds. It's horrible That's why Robin Williams. His body right I think that's right. Yeah. He had them I. Think you also covert right seaver. I think I read that this morning it's Lewy body dementia. Yeah. So many five. Crew with the red sox remember US trade the Red Sox. Yeah. I. Mean we was by news also, he was older that point anything about. Forty. You mentioned topsy from me but they go. do you have that Pelosi sound yesterday? Yes. I agree with her? Set Up. So what she's supposed to know all the laws. Of Physics was a Republican immediate would be camped out of their house demanding the resignation off just again. Pick an easy one vodka trump. Yeah Just, any any republican anyone who is not a democrat? Well, I mean if was Susan Collins only be flipping out this. Oh, they totally would. Much it was vodka trump maybe even more now that's not true. Okay. She's F. Chuck Schumer would spend ten million salary fairly anonymous Repo Nancy Pelosi is high profile I'm saying you gotTa match the profile. So I would say vodka trump's more famous as famous as Nancy Pelosi right in American politics or whatever just picture that or the first lady. Well Yeah. But I mean I think Steve Say. Less alone saying, I. Don't think it would be as as as crazy as it was trump who was like a you know. Congressman who was a congress with? What's her face Nikki Haley would not be as big a deal, right? If someone who is currently in elected official with a vote over legislation sure. They would see the ability to and by the way. If they were finger-wagging like Nancy Pelosi was I'd be great with you. You deserve it right That your. But even if you hear the way, the person, the media, the report asks her the question. Do you have that sound because she says her she's like I have to ask this I have to know I think. She she says, I really have to ask questions. We'll know your job. That's please. Forgive me I mean she should. Be Resigning over this. It's fucking crazy. And it is again tonight harassing answer if you're willing to go into salons, that's why not just let other people. Because they want to keep everything closed until elections over I. Mean. That's that's just the truth. That isn't it. I saw Dave re tweet this morning another place in Boston closed down to see his tweet. Yeah. We're closed down shit. When does this end was the poor house? Or closest selling whatever could put Dave says, when does this can end?.

Tom seaver Nancy Pelosi Bhai Mike Guy Jimmy Stewart Red Sox Mommy Dave Roy Ninety Robin Williams Adam Mike Supporter Alzheimer twitter Jesus Nikki Haley Greg F. Chuck Schumer Susan Collins Frazier
Turkey-Greece tensions escalate over Turkish Med drilling

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

02:07 min | 8 months ago

Turkey-Greece tensions escalate over Turkish Med drilling

"It is one of the Great Geopolitical Grudge matches Greece verses Turkey a venomous and heartfelt hostility long waged over everything from the most profound controversies of history and geography to what the correct name is. Four coffey served in small cups with lots of teeth itching sludge at the bottom and appears to be kicking off again. At issue, this time out is a disagreement over which of the resources buried in the Mediterranean Sea bid belong to whom the picture is very far from straightforward. Indeed, a diagram of the overlapping claims looks like the results of a drunk with an extra sketch trying to draw Picasso's Guernica from memory while blindfolded. But I simple if not simplistic version goes like this in recent years, immense natural gas reserves have been discovered or suspected in the vicinity of Cyprus. This potential boone is complicated by the fact that Cyprus remains actually if not legally divided the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus is recognised as a legitimate sovereign entity by nobody except Turkey fifteen seventy one is when Ottomans gaming. He's the leading country all this region. It's only forty miles away from Turkey Cyprus. DENVER. No one has to ignore. Turkey's interests until he's got until poet. Up to the others to to challenge Turkey nevertheless believes that self entitled to some of Natural bounty while Greece has worked with Israel and Egypt to establish infrastructure to develop and distribute the resources. Turkey. has drilled away to Cyprus's east. Turkey has also agreed with Libya's official but ineffectual government to establish an exclusive economic zone in the waters between the two countries subsequently overlapped by a similar agreement agreed by Greece and Egypt. On Tuesday the Greek and Turkish navies conducted rival exercises in the waters off Crete escalating matters to the it's all fun and Games until someone loses a worship stage,

Turkey Cyprus Turkey Northern Cyprus Boone Greece Mediterranean Sea Coffey Egypt Picasso Libya Denver Turkey. Official Israel
Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:26 sec | 9 months ago

Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

"Collecting. A self portrait by Rembrandt has sold for a record $18.7 million at a virtual Sotheby's auction. Picassos, Giacometti's and Warhol's went for multiple millions, and someone paid 2.8 million for a Seascape trick tick by Banksy. That's almost double the top estimate. The top seller Miro's 1927 woman in a red hat it brought in almost $30 million the highest sale price in Europe so

Sotheby Rembrandt Giacometti Miro Warhol Europe Picassos
"picassos" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:43 min | 9 months ago

"picassos" Discussed on WGN Radio

"They thought they were really talking about Picassos and things like that. And we're worth a lot of money. Yeah, well, the guy eventually died any any. He didn't he? He owed a bunch of money. And instead of paying and care she had given up The people who had supported in paintings. Forest went in and ah and bought these paintings, then these are forgeries. Correct either forgery. That's absolutely right, right? And forest bottom. And brought him back to the U. S. And put him up in his gallery. And hey, at first, he didn't you know, he didn't say anything and people would come into his gallery and say, Oh, that gorgeous painting. It's just lovely Picasso or whatever whatever it was signed to be. And And force would come up and he would say, Well, you know, That's that's not really a Picasso. I think the guy's name was the hoary. Okay, that's actually painted by. Ah, a forger by the name of De Hori and all of a sudden people would take a step back and say, Well, that's horrible, And they would have no more interest in the painting. And Forrest would say, Well, what's changed about that painting? It was beautiful. 30 seconds ago. And now I mean Why, just because someone else painted it is it no longer a beautiful painting so people would buy these from him as the Horie's. He would make them sign a on agreement that they understood that it was a Dorie and not a Picasso or whatever. And now he turned the hoary into AA ee. I mean, everybody want wanted to have a DeLorean. He was smart like that very smart, and he is still obviously very smart. Like that, But he's clever, and he didn't do things in the usual way. He was very imaginative, very creative in his business, and that's how He became quite wealthy. There you go. All right, Dale, hang out, Okay? OK, Del Night cell is with us, and we're talking about this sort of amazing story about forest fen. What a character. Wow. Amazing! Ah, and his this this 10 year long treasure hunt just ended and we're talking with without who covered the whole thing on his website and had a blogger. And I will tell you talk about that. And some of the experiences that he had actually looking for the treasure. 3129817 200 phone numbers, Nick to Julia on W G. N Hello,.

Picassos De Hori Forest forgery Forrest Dale Nick Julia
Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

WBZ Midday News

00:20 sec | 9 months ago

Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

"The big names in the world of art are going on the auction block. So the base holding it online sale featuring artwork that spans five centuries of art history from Rembrandt, Pablo Picasso, Banksy. The auction house is putting up 70 works of art from the 17th century to the present day of self portrait by Rembrandt expected to fetch about $20

Rembrandt Pablo Picasso Banksy
Artist Bruce Sulzberg on painting Rafael Nadal

The Tennis.com Podcast

06:36 min | 11 months ago

Artist Bruce Sulzberg on painting Rafael Nadal

"Welcome to the tennis dot. Com Pot guest. I'm one of your host. Nina Pantic joined in this episode by my co host. Irena Falconi! Hey, guys! How's it going? And we have a very interesting episode of everyone today we are with the owner artists of cells media. Fine Arts Bruce Cells Bruce Welcome thank you, thank you so much for having me. Bruce? Do you have a very interesting story? I don't think a lot of people know it has to do with Ross doll. You don't usually have artists on our show, so that's why this is very unique and special you wanNA. Tell everyone story when it comes to tennis. Even if you're not a player or coach or tournament organizer, so let's start with you know where you are in the world during this quarantine and how your life is going these days, it's been very interesting. Interesting just like I would say probably ninety nine point. Nine percent of the world is trying to figure out what the hell you're. GonNa do during his time. you know the one fortunate part about it as being an artist, I've been locked in the studio painting new paintings and working with different ideas and working with RAF and his team Carlos Costa to figure out new and inventive ways to drive in bill business and do things that we are currently not used to doing. So it's been. It's been a wild interesting two months of figuring that out. What's your interest level tenants? Do you play? How did you get into this? US Fascinating I'm actually one of those weird concoctions of I'm an artist athletes so I was a big time athlete. As a kid played eight years of Baseball's all-star in baseball play basketball. I was all star in basketball. Basketball led me. Tennis I was a basketball player. Freshmen in highschool and kind of got into. An argument with my coach basically just decided to leave basketball. And I picked up a tennis racket and I had just. It was a natural thing for me to do. And before I knew I, had a professional coach, and my coach was played played on the tour and played John McEnroe. He saw me play and before I knew I was training with some of the best players in northern, California. And so I played high school career. played college and I still train. I still training a tribe while afford the pandemic I was out there every week. just started getting back out there about a week ago when they released the courts, but tennis is definitely in. My jeans had so much, so that my son plays college tennis. I'm actually had a scholarship to Chapman University as I used to play and made teams freshman, and he's also coach now, too, so and even though he still in college, but yes, definitely in my blood and strange enough. Raw Molly the owner of art encounter. That is my distributor. It turns out the way that we got this deal with him. Was He was tennis player in his whole family's sex players, and when he saw the original painting that I did have all sprouted in hadn't seen them in years we. She just freaked out. Saying Oh my God. This is unbelievable what I told him. I have five hundred signed by the dog himself. Personally and myself and we did a whole thing back in the day. When we have this painting, he's like. Nope, that's it. We're going to do something, so it's been a very unique tennis story all the way around. I can honestly say I think it's been a while that I've actually heard someone say that. They're both an athlete an artist. When was When was the moment where you're figured out like? Wow, I actually have a knack for this whole painting thing. That was easier. I I was asking rg by the time. I was five six seven years old. My parents had me in special school. Special Art schools and You know it was something that they noticed when I was one years old that I can draw and I'd actually kept first painting I drawing than I ever did when I was one and They just knew my dad was artist. He never followed that trade. Actually went into corporate business, but my dad is very artistic used to do paintings. So I kind of had that gene in me. And I just knew at a very early age. That was what I was going to do my life. We hear so much about young athletes figuring out their skill set at a young young age at like three, four five, and to see that art is very similar as interesting for those who don't know the story Bruce is the owner of Salzburg Media Fine Arts, a broad range of professional sports team three. Of National. International athletes he got three D work of Rafa. Nadal for those are not watching this on video. It's behind him, but it's also going to be a link in our episode information. He's also got artwork of Muhammad. Ali Michael Jordan Prince. Fielder Dirk Nowitzki. Irk Nowitzki I'm not a basketball person. I'm sorry. Most importantly. It's the tennis painting that we're really here to talk about, and it's Three D. art, so I want to start with what is three art. What's the process for making an artwork like this before we get into the Roth story? This was very unique idea. That I came up with lean back in nineteen, ninety five, I was doing my very first art show at the New York our next on back in those days that was the largest art show in the world. Everything was painter of any place anywhere was there exhibiting in was at the Jacob Javits in New York City, so as massive and I back then you the jury to get in so jury to get an shared a booth with another artist, and when I was there, all brought was abstract paintings on canvas, because that's what I was painting at the Time Big Love Klee Miro. Picasso, that was kind of backroom basically, and we've been in the show for five days and insult. Damn painting and I told. My My. Fiance at the time in my mom was there with me. I gotTa Take I. Just need to go walk the show and I said. You know if I'm going to do anything in my life I've got to figure out how to do something that no one has ever done and for some reason and it's time. My Dad owned art gallery. Very very successful one back in San Francisco. East Bay and I just something popped in my head. work on glass. Just a glass on the second I got home I started Phil around layers of plexiglas and low and behold. That's how it was born I. Just we just figured out how to frame it how to do the whole thing in. One, doing where usually as an artist you paying on one level is a canvas most most of the time. You're just doing everything on that level of what I wanted to do with cigarette how to take a look at an image of a painting in break it up and put different parts of each of painting on glass, and then use spicer's to separate them, so there's space in between each layer. You get that natural three d look with no gimmicks, no anything no lighting. It's all based on different layers and different perspectives, so that's how it was born and. The risk on history.

Tennis Basketball Bruce Irena Falconi Nina Pantic Dirk Nowitzki Carlos Costa John Mcenroe California San Francisco Jacob Javits Ross Muhammad East Bay Baseball Chapman University Spicer Ali Michael Jordan Prince Phil Nadal
"picassos" Discussed on Pod Dirty to Me

Pod Dirty to Me

09:44 min | 11 months ago

"picassos" Discussed on Pod Dirty to Me

"Didn't. So. That means it's. Right. Venus flytrap. That deep voice quincy. Rate, yes, you've seen. The inner. Come come on, and it looks like a big flyer on like that and those of flytrap be completely different. This is different. Women don't have hardly any lips. Yeah, I, know, and it's just like a little thing and some is just a clitoris. There's a million different you get. Let me ask you this question as a woman. Do you get like what you're different sex partners say how pretty your pussy is I liken it turns me on I to. Ally our all our pussies, pretty, you know. Knowing? You know they're they're not as. A few occasions where? He'll on there, and just you know just just playing admiring pretty. Pretty is and. This is the podcast. I it does work. But then I. Because I've heard it. Okay, do you? Like. Pussy. L. Reverse? Okay, okay when you're going down on a man. Do you ever say anything about whether? His Cock is beautiful or A Nice Cock. Do you say to everyone of them? Okay, so that answers your question Catcher I told that once not once, but by this one flight attendant obeying and she was like Oh you got two beautiful cock, and I was like Oh really. Love. I've never been to a beautiful car when I was at fucking cock so hard. One That's what that is. Yeah, she's just you didn't know the word. Hancock is A. Show me hard. Do. Surveys. On the flip side of that so is there such thing as an ugly? Pinas, as for lady. Is An unattractive peanuts? Like to Vini or Cockatoo Mu- really no, no, no, you ever heard found one with like really crazy curve in it i. have and it was actually at sex. I have knows it hit. I have nine, but I've heard some abnori abnormal different shapes and sizes can be. differently. A little bit to the side your mind. Again. Career! Dick's especially yeah, dixie different. Like the Rim of the head and the size and shape of the head of the penis, those are always different. But I haven't seen any that I've been like Oh shit. I have anything. They're all pretty similar. Could be in a construction. It was like related. Related. I'm not. You haven't been with anybody uncircumcised. I have been yeah. Yeah, I'm not. I'm not either now. It's hard. It doesn't even matter. You can't tell I needed that. Uncut that y'all have a lot more feeling a lot more nerve endings than cut. I hear that, too, but I don't know if I. Would, you know when these don't. Really lucky that you are uncut I. Hear that here. I feel like. I'm a season. I mean I'm not complaining, but what I have. Many. More nerve endings and their penis than we have an art. Regina like quadruple. Ascott what the we have many nervous. Snow. No. No, no, no, no! You don't I read bits? Wrinkle, the Clinton I have no idea. Curve endings and their. Penis has. On a nerve would like to see. Giant? Tortoise, yes. I thought it was the same. And got member the can't be the same. Income so much greater than yeah. Exactly, what's absolutely is that? Is that what it is in? Level I saw the pleasure allegra saying it's going to be more pleasure role, but you know what I think. It makes us jealous. Because you guys fucking keep going. We're like. We can't have multiple because we don't have to have another direction, so we can right. That's what I'm saying. If you say and you can hit. Up to six AM. Saying. FUCKING And then we're done. Looking. You are correct. With for so many years was determined no less than three every single time, and that's a good man. Yeah sometimes. I was tired. I'm like no one is good okay to work on. Sex when you date somebody who doesn't think they can have more than one night like I've dated somebody after they've done doing on. No Yeah. And then after the first one they get. Better they easier. You get stronger orgasms. My first one is the toughest one. The you gotta get it there. Do, you prefer an orgasm, any or Feel the contractions more without a Dick. You. You'd like as long as I come. I'm happy. I like it simultaneously because you can have. That's. An amazing one long ago, that that was working all three areas and I about what are the three year near anal? All the same time and I I think I heard. You're playing with your. Role at this. Time yes a wet and I was. Yeah. I think I. Have to say it was an. You are amazing women. Weird, you're lucky when you know that. Though because younger women I don't think. I didn't when I. I was just telling Van. Earlier last episode. That when I was younger I? Didn't I didn't know that I? Had never explored it, and now that I'm this age I'm like. You know. Exploring. Better. When did you feel like how long how how old were you when you finally got to the point where you're like? You felt completely open and free with trying anything. It's been a gradual a gradual process. It really depends on the partner. I feel really comfortable with sound It's been it's been gradual yeah yeah. I was lucky enough. That I was with somebody for a long time that know really comfortable with, but it depends on the partner really. And I'm forty seven. It doesn't mean the next partner I'm with I'm going to be really comfortable with it takes time for me I don't feel comfortable. Right off the bat. Yeah, so I, got another question. Okay, but mine was really early. Yeah, we're like really early on were like seventeen. 'cause I was just sexual. That was your question. No, no, no I'm answering the same thing town right? Yeah, no sexually able to try wanting to try everything and doing I don't young young I. Don't think I had an orgasm till I was twenty, two, twenty, three, twenty two. I have run like Shiva I was seventeen. I had like a thousand. At the time. I I I just didn't. Have my first orgasm until I was with the man that I was with for a long period. That'll make you love him. I, I know that will make you love him. What was your question? Okay now I remember. Okay so. When you guys are with somebody like okay. Say somebody new. Yes, okay, and you're you're. You like them and they like you and suffering. You'RE GONNA. Get in bed and have sex. Do you guys think you're good lovers? ME. Anybody would you do you? Go to bed right now. A supreme confidence thinking man I'm good. Yeah like how? How was your mindset? What do you think when you're? I never think that. I don't need. My biggest thing is only as good as the partner I'm with too I mean. I? It makes me WANNA agree. But, don't you know you're going to? Go in there, and it's just gonNA. Be Fun and free, and that's what I hope. mind. And if you feel that way more power to you I, feel that right? That's good. You've never seen random a wonderful thing I'm not. Maybe I'm not quite as confident. I'm just open. Yeah, no, I just said I hope I don't suck. I. Don't believe this. Okay..

partner Dick quincy Pinas Vini Hancock Regina Clinton dixie Van
Helping Others During Lockdown

Mentally Yours

09:09 min | 1 year ago

Helping Others During Lockdown

"Save welcome to mentally oils. Thank you thank you for having me event. Thanks for coming on. So you're wanted with the Samaritans held on if you've been working with them actually not long about two years. I started doing it when I start work and I'd worked in a very busy high pressure job. That really left no room for anything else and when I stopped doing it uh suddenly thought I really would like to investigate Samaritans And it was thought that just came out of a clear. Blue skied at know. Why but it did I discovered that was a branch quite near me and I went to the information evening. I was really impressed with what I saw. And Went straight into the training and at all it all the way through. I was thinking if I feel this is quite right. You know just stop. It's fine but I never once felt it wasn't quite right and I've never felt wasn't right since And I look forward to shifts at Shelly. I find them really interesting and ment- mentally you know mentally stimulating and So I have no regrets about about volunteering tool. I think it's incredible. What am on the podcast. We always refer people to some of the end just because some people might have been Things come up if speaking about difficult issues and it's it's really fantastic to know that the Samaritans that just to listen in to have chats what sort of things that you deal with On a daily basis in terms of chatting to people oh my goodness Coolest issues are like snowflakes. There are two that are the same Era kind of broad categories that they can fall into such as `isolation loneliness mental health issues. Physical Health Issues Worries about work will finance family could be violence or abuse or things Those are very broad categories and when you to king to Kula it's completely incredible unit. You Cou- you couldn't you couldn't make up what some people have to go through And everyone everyone is different before Marson. I went to newspapers. And I thought I'd seen and heard do. But I realized when I when I became a smash in that hadn't even scratched the surface of what goes on in people's lives on a day to day basis. It's been very illuminating. Have you seen things change during the epidemic? Because I'm sure this Martin's being inundated during the stressful time interesting. We'll always inundated to be perfectly honest Shift and you take a cool and he put the phone down and immediately rings again. This just never any less up the calls. Just keep coming through and it's the same now And we have had a category added to the categories that we deal with one being covered. How the in my own experience of doing shifts through the lockdown I haven't had any cools specifically about Kovin. And when I think about it. I think that possibly mental health when it comes to mental health. It's a little bit like physical health. So people who have mentioned Cova to me have also go other issues. So it's a bit like you have underlying issues and then code and the challenges of coded Sorta the exacerbate these issues as it has done with physical health unit so the people who were suffering most with covert was the people who had underlying issues. And that for me. in the cools. I've taken has been the case. That people have got issues going on in their lives. May they may be prone to depression. They may be feeling very lonely. Anau lockdown has sort of those issues into much sharper focus. I haven't had anyone cool specifically about vid frightened of that actual many peop- law I think a lot of people to listening to the Picasso's probably relate to that because just vanik totally sort of from friends and even family who have sort of long-term half the she's Winstons if you sort of have anxiety General anxiety disorder that sort of become west because of to defensive in my case bipolar disorder in. They've been issues in terms of getting medication. Because of Kovic so it is also give lots of things become west sort of people yes I admit rishton about the unnaturally People with mental health issues and depending on how acute those mental health issues all often have quite a good comprehensive support cap package in place with the NHS and because of social distancing and because of not being able to see people face to face the many people with mental health issues. That support system has evaporated actually during lockdown. And we do. We do see people calling us because they can't any longer speak to that key worker. Will that support worker And Yeah I think I think it's. It's very difficult for people in that situation. Because the the package they used to be able to rely on. Isn't there the same thing happens a bit Christmas and Times like that holidays? People are away and doing other things. And it's a bit like that with lockdown some Jim Peas and mental health. Wise are offering example. Counseling defy laptops obsessions over the phone. I think it's probably pros and cons. Who Different people? I think some people find that helpful. Princeton's if you're depressed you might find easy to just sort of pick up the phone chat someone not she go into a surgery but then as he signed for a lot of people. If you're used to seeing the same pass in face to face it can be quite difficult to get used as a new way of talking to them or if together. I think doing what they can where they can. I think I think doing an incredible job. But it's inevitably gained be a bit patchy and maybe you'll key worker has to a self isolated is an can't be there for you I also had another cooler. He couldn't go to church for her. Church was a vital part of her of her weekly routine really was a point where she saw to touch base every week with the community that went to Sch- and suddenly that was taken from her and that was very hard So yeah it's it's people are finding that that regular support system has been taken away and therefore it leaves you feeling very on anchored and bit A little bit out of balance and I think there's no question that lockdowns been huge adjustment for all of us in. Its massive. What what has happened? In the last few weeks countries come to a standstill lutts huge. And you can't pretend it's no huge. It will have an impact on all of us to one degree or another. You know someone must have more resilient than others But you know being less. Resilient is not a sign of failure it is just the person you are and you may need some support and certainly smartened serve to support anybody. Who is struggling through this time?

Samaritans General Anxiety Disorder Kovin Marson Cova Martin Jim Peas Kovic Princeton NHS
Jefferson Hack on Why The World Must Not Be Complacent

The Business of Fashion Podcast

10:21 min | 1 year ago

Jefferson Hack on Why The World Must Not Be Complacent

"Hi. This is Imran at founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to another special edition of the podcast. Today I sit down. Virtually with Jefferson Hack founder Updates Media Jefferson and I have been able to have conversations over the past decade about the role of media. And there's probably no more important time to that conversation then now as we're all navigating the unfolding humanitarian crisis caused by this Pandemic which has now reached more than one hundred and seventy countries around the world with more than four hundred thousand infections and tens and tens of thousands of people who have died so. What's the role of fashion media in this context? And how do we? As independent media companies navigate the situation. What is the impact that we can have during this uncharted time? That's what I speak to. Jefferson up on this special episode. So here's Jefferson Hack inside Fashion Jefferson. Hey Ron how're you man? I'm here I'm happy to be talking to you and Thanks for inviting me. To be on the coast. Yeah no it's a pleasure to talk. You know actually. I was thinking this morning back to my very first interview with you that we did. Do you remember at the Sanderson Hotel. Oh that was a long time ago. That was our first. Theo F live event and ever and we had the conversation and it was rolling out on twitter and people were sending questions from all around the world. And this this is Kinda the same except you and I can't sit together But I'm really glad to have the chance to talk to you. I mean so are you doing you know I'm well. I'm in good health My immediate family are in good health. Everyone's kind of say an isolation my staff in good health has no. I'm a director emergencies taking place amongst the employees or In days media so for that. I'm just really grateful for that I feel blessed and you know as far as what's happening in the wider world and what's happening with Corona Virus Of course you know I mean. Words cannot really describe it. I think I find words quite inadequate to describe what's going on but you know if I had to pick one word. It would be about kind of adapt adopting adopting with of the changing circumstances. That going on so I guess on a personal level. That's where I'm at but yet is going to be a lot to talk about in this Picasso. I'll let you do you know how are you? I'm good also healthy and grateful and taking some time out every day to make space for some meditation and reflection and a walk in the park. Because we're still allowed to do that here in London and you know like you. I'm just kind of grappling with what's happening. There's so many different perspectives. There's so much information which is kind of when I thrive actually making sense of information overload But I find my brain is operating at a speed and a and a intensity level that is unusually high and so I'm trying to make sure I take those moments to pause and stop and reflect It's good it's good advice. I think you know it's the same for everybody. I mean it's as much as if it's a pandemic Susan Info Democ. You know we're kind of overwhelmed with information stotts all the different opinions analysis speculations and You know I think without kind of practicing self care. It's incredibly easy to kind of get sucked into things like fierro high brings. It or doing things that are harmful just to distract ourselves from the reality of what's going on and I think that's really kind of like natural human reactions. You hit on some really important points. I think you know that some of the things that we're really trying to inspire our audience with seventeen million Digital audience across the world across platforms. And you know one of the most immediate thing is is really the kind of you know the mental health awareness and just being able to be effective as a media in being able to influence people's Moods. I mean we can change the way people feel all that moves through the stories and the tone of the stories that we published so no. That was a a an incredible kind of role that media. Compla- in in this time of crisis all type of media specifically you and I were exchanging text messages the other day about you know how companies like ours independent media companies in this kind of global industry. Like what's what's our role and I'm I'm really curious to well. Yeah I mean that was exactly it. We were like texting each other. Because it's all about reaching out out right. It's all about you know being in touch with each other as independent media as a people in the industry who are active who are part of the community of people in in in in kind of in fashion in the UK in globally and an culture. And that's all I've been doing since this has been really becoming more and more of a crisis and I think that's that's what we've got is kind of our connections and are connected and staying connected as a huge a huge part of this the way that we're going to manage to navigate this. Yeah I wanted to start there actually so you know when when did the kind of penny drop for you that this was going to become you what it's become this kind of unprecedented situation in kind of a kind of modern in the last hundred years at least maybe since the Spanish flu and what was your initial reaction of how to manage it as the leader of this this media company possible level. You know I was still a woman fashion week into Paris fashion week. I didn't finish the week up but you know things are becoming much more evidence during that week that did this was becoming incredibly serious and Some of the myths were flying around with being busted. And some clarity was coming to the kind of you know. Health impact that this was going to have an and what was going to be needed by government in order to deal with that so you know. I think it wasn't really till Mellon went into lockdown that it really kind of began to be real and hearing the stories firsthand from clients and friends in Milan about what they were going. Through in lockdown really started helping inform a lot of our thinking at days so that's really the the unprecedented we had in the only way to recognize that it was well. You know that it was that it was likely to get much more serious but you know I think these things are always understood in hindsight and in the moment you know you always think oh well you know it might be contained. There might not come here. Things might not be as bad for us you know. I think that's part of kind of that was part of that was part of my early thinking but you know we. We reacted pretty quickly. I think is a as a media company before the government were telling people to Work will not clubs. We you know we already told staff to work from a meter ready during Paris fashion week. We telling our staff that if it wasn't essential for them to come into the office that they weren't required to come to the office because we wanted to keep people say so. Yeah that's the kind of thing and then when when it really became evident you know. I think our media reaction was one of you know this is a global state of emergency now and you know we have to face a humanitarian health. Disaster that You know we can be helpful and useful in In using some of our resources in some of our media to point directly to that. And we have judy of KETCHAOUA staff. So We'd been working on managing that and managing their work from home situation and then there's a carrying consideration for our audience which we just touched on before and really when we were texting. It was all about kind of understanding with questions we were. We were kind of In discussion about was like. What is the role of of media in this new reality? Yeah what what is our purpose now and I think you know where we had puppies before. Now it's really about focusing the clarity of purpose making sure that the row we're playing in the daily life of our audience is really bringing value

Jefferson Paris Founder And Ceo Sanderson Hotel Imran Founder Twitter UK Ketchaoua RON Theo F Director London Milan Compla Mellon
Lydia Fenet, Global Director at Christie's Auction House: 'I was making a third of what everyone else was making.'

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:31 min | 1 year ago

Lydia Fenet, Global Director at Christie's Auction House: 'I was making a third of what everyone else was making.'

"Today. Lydia fournette joins us on skimmed from the couch. She's the global director of strategic partnerships at Christie's auction house. She's also very lead benefit auctioneer and she's raised over half a billion dollars for charities around the world. Lydia has taken the lessons. She's learned while paving her own career path and has put them in her book for you entitled the most powerful woman in the room is you. Lydia welcomed the skin from the couch. Great to be here. You have the coolest job and we're going to get into but I just want you to skim your resume for us well. My resume is actually kind of short. I've worked at Christie's auction house in New York for twenty one years. I started as an intern and had worked at the company for basically two internships and then was hired out of an internship. I ran the events department for basically ten years on and off started at the bottom grew up in about five or six years in everyone above me left and the job was mine and it was during that time that I realized that there was a side business that you could do. There called benefit auctioning. So you're not the art auction. You're you're not on the Podium Selling Monet's Picasso's essentially you are the person who is getting on stage at eleven o'clock at night at a charity auction trying to raise money for a nonprofit when no one wants to buy anything and so those were really my two jobs for a long time about ten years into my career decided to launch a new department called Strategic Partnerships for the company which I now run globally and I run the large scale benefit auctions around the world for Christie's now as well so really fun job and I earlier love it. What is something not on your linked in that we should know about you. I am a mom of three. I am a veracious runner and I love more than anything to be with people. It's my favorite thing in the world. Have you always been like that? Yes absolutely I am a natural extrovert. There's no question about it. I always think it's funny when people say so. What do you do for downtime? I call my friends and hanging out with them. I try to former for trying to find more friends. The exact opposite quota and my husband too. He loves being themselves and always trying to get in the room to talk to him. And we're very different. Let's bring you into my fold so before we explain. Actually what your job is in day to day? I just want you to tell our audience because I think you are the rare person who's really been at the same company for their career. What is your best piece of advice for how to get hired as an intern fulltime? I think being persistent and really walking into an interview as an intern and making sure that they understand that. You're going to work hard. I know that sounds like the craziest thing to say because it seems pretty obvious to me but I can tell you that. I've probably had eighty or ninety interns over my twenty years at Christie's I can tell you the fifteen who I still remember. I think that internships are such an amazing opportunity to do two things meet people in a company and is that because I shredded paper. My entire first internship at Christie's but guess what the shredder was by the elevator. So I met every single person going in and out of there and I'll introduce yourself I mean people are standing there waiting and remember. This was pre iphone so there was nothing to do. I just stand there and wait but I would stand there and just sort of. Make an off comment about something. That was happening her. You know something as easy as still shredding which people feel sorry for you. They start to talk to you. They always knew I was so they'd always come back. And then there was joke you're still shredding and like I sure am how's your day going. You know just a quick introduction and all of a sudden they remember my face and so when I see them at an event later that week or checking people in special events there was sort of that name recognition that facial recognition so. I just think an internship is the time that people don't realize you get a recommendation from someone that you're interning with in a job. That's very senior in a company in that stays with you for the rest of your life. How did you get your foot in the door? At Christie's I knew nothing about the auction world. I grew up in a small town in Louisiana. My parents were not art collectors but I did a junior semester abroad at Oxford University. While I was there I read an article about the auction world. When Princess Diana's dresses were being. Sold for charity. Yes I remember. Yeah new talks about Christie's and it talks about this auction world and honestly if you knew anything about me my whole life is created in my mind so well. This seems like the place that I should work. I mean it's glamorous people travel. You're meeting all of these people to my earlier point and so I basically started talking about how he was going to work. At Christie's I ninety nine percent of the people I knew had no idea what curtseys was. But my dad who is just such a charismatic amazing man. We were at a Christmas party of a family friend in Baton Rouge Louisiana which is not a bastion of art collecting and there was a young woman who was doing her. She just started at Christie's as an assistant to an assistant. And so my dad pulled me over and he said you've been talking about this place. This woman actually works there and this is when I think sometimes the universe really. If you're open to it helps you in your path. I said to her. Can I get the internship coordinator because I was still in college at this point and she gave me her number and so I started calling this woman and it was so late in the game? I had no idea what I was doing. I was coming from Louisiana. The wasn't so as a New York everybody knew about internships and so I basically just calling her and she kept saying the same thing which was. Ot I'm so sorry you know. The internship program is full but remember there was no caller. Id and that day so had to pick up her phone. She had no idea and every day I would call for two straight weeks and I kept thinking to myself like there has to be a way to make her understand that I have to be there so I have to figure this out and so I would kind of right through a list of questions that I could ask her. That might make her. Think a little bit differently about me and so one day I just hit the nail on the head. I asked her. Can I just ask you something before you hang up on me which you tell me why? The internship has to be closed at thirty people and she said well you know we do museum trips in the afternoon and so yeah. I mean you all of a sudden I was like well. I don't have to go on a museum. It's fine you know and and so I sort of vocalized that I said well listen. I don't have to go on a museum field trip. I could stay and I'm sure they're GONNA be interns. Who were sick and maybe I could fill in over. I mean honestly one college that point. Let's be serious and I think she was so for me to just stop calling her. She said look let me think about it and she hung up the phone and then she called me back an hour later and said I could do a modified internship and I say now that I'm pretty. I went on almost every single one of those museums. You know that's the funny thing because of course someone doesn't show up you know when I hear the story. We're both kind of like smiling at you. Love the fearlessness. A love gutsiness that you had an end poise at a very young age. She just go after this. Both of us had a similar tenacity but didn't have your extroverted part to our story. It's hard exhausting to put yourself out there like that and people come to us for advice all the time. It actually was just talking to a girl yesterday who just as out of college and was trying to get advice on how to network and I was like you have an email address a corporal where you work the big building just email people just like what. What are you say? So very literally. What do you say when you call what you say when you email? I always think the key to networking and my father has the best catch phrase that you will use for the rest of your life which networker die He truly believes networking is the only reason you exist. Charlotte. I would say that the most important thing you WanNa do when you're networking is distinguish yourself from other people immediately. So what makes you unique? Because you can google anybody sitting across the table from you. And I think that that's what people lose and the networking element that makes it really difficult for them because they're trying to play the part of somebody else the easiest way to sell us to sell yourself because when you're talking about yourself in a way that feels authentic. It doesn't feel uncomfortable. This is who you are. So you're just putting yourself out there. What you have get used to is the take it or leave it quality of that and I think that that's difficult for an extrovert or introvert. You know nobody likes for somebody to shut them down but at the same time you'll never get anything unless you put yourself out there. I want to talk about something that I think is a common thing between the media world and the art world. Which is they're highly competitive. It's hard to get that first foot in the door and if you are lucky enough to get it you're usually working a ton and not getting paid a lot and the question that we get all the time is how do they think about that first job do they take the job that they really. WanNa take that. Is You know the internship right. And it's a hard choice and wondering what advice you have for people out there who are looking to break into these industries and also have real financial restraints. Absolutely I think we all have we restraints. We live in New York City or even the the outlying areas around the city. It's incredibly expensive. And so I say to people especially about the art world. Can you live without our? Is it the kind of thing that you've literally wake up every morning in think I have to be around it? It drives me is my passion in if the answer is yes then it probably makes sense for you to be an intern or to take a job that is going to get you on that track over time and it may not pay exactly what you want so you may have to get a second job to make that happen but you have to understand that. That is a choice that you're making it that is not your passion and you just want to do it because it looks fun from the outside and this is what. I wish I had said to myself all those years ago. Go and get a job that pays you what you want. And this is something that you can evolve as a side hustle over the course of your life and then you bring those skills to the place where you interviewed as an intern. And I think that that's one of those things that can seem kind of shortsighted and especially in this day and age where people are hopping from company after one year or six months. Or whatever if you really understand the trajectory of a career. It's long so if you do the work at the beginning and you get to a place where you are making a salary to afford the life that you want you can pivot into the art world. You can pivot into the media world and you have a skill set that you're bringing that you didn't have when you were applying as an intern so you will get paid for that. So people do get paid in these companies. They may not get paid what people in startups get paid but they do get paid. Sometimes you just have to start a little bit more mid level than you would when you think that you should start as an

Intern Christie Lydia Fournette Louisiana New York Global Director Oxford University Podium Selling Monet New York City Google Princess Diana Coordinator Baton Rouge Louisiana Charlotte
Talking 'Art' with Graphic Designer Adam J. Kurtz

The Futur

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Talking 'Art' with Graphic Designer Adam J. Kurtz

"My name's Adam J Kurtz and ever and calls Me Adam J K and basically. I made graphic designer who became an artist and author so I started with design and now I do a lot of other things that aren't designed Matthew who attended one of your talks. He said that you said something on stage which really connected with him. That you're okay with calling yourself when referring to yourself as an artist and that used to give you an allergic reaction. Can you tell me what that was about? Yeah I mean I think I think the word artist is really scary for a lot of people Because it is so broad and because you know we're we're sort of raised to think about artists like Picasso or something you know art in a museum and so if you're not on a museum you're not an artist but it's really up to all of us to define what art is and for me. I think it is really just sort of creative expression. It's making a feeling An intangible feeling into something tangible it's communicating a feeling that you had in some way It's a response or a reflection to inexperience. Really art is so broad and almost everything is and once I understood that for myself it became really liberating. An artist is just a is the easiest word for someone who makes does a lot of different things Do you do you define that in any way or connected or tie to the idea that if you make art for someone else and somebody else is paying for it. Then that moves you into commercial artor. That's an old term but Like what graphic designers do versus somebody who just has an idea once express something and puts it onto the world? I mean I think it gets dangerous when we start assigning labels and unlike breaking them down further and further because design is interesting. Where design is really sort of halfway between art and craft or art and craft and trade But then also you said commercial art and an even fine art is commercial right because people you might do one painting but it still for sale and then there's sort of this whole like fine art complex economy however you want to describe it where are being sold or artists monographs or the way work travels through museums and is used to bring like everything is commercial like we all have to exist in capitalism. So I find like it's often helpful to not get too hung up on the labels and part of that was was accepting. That artist isn't okay. Label and not being hung up on it and nothing scared of it in. When did you become comfortable with that term to describe yourself as artists? I don't know I guess a couple years ago. Maybe because other people called me in August I and I was like all right. That's fine okay. You didn't punch him in the face when they said that. I have never punched anyone in the face. Okay I have to say for myself. I think maybe it's from my my art school or my design school background and I think one of my professors told me that. And he said something like design is when you solve somebody else's problem and art is when you solve a problem of your conception and that's how I kind of stayed in that box for a really long time and so it wasn't until I think almost two decades in my career my life of anybody had said you're an artist. I would correct them. This is my version of punching them. A face on Magnolia designer. Make things for other people and get paid to do that. An artist like be like you said Picasso and all these other people is not so much the the expression or even how much money they make selling art but the fact that they just go off on their own and they solve a problem they want to communicate a feeling with the world. That isn't other derived its self generated and I put that line pretty hard in the sand but all that changed. I guess a couple of years ago when it started making videos on the Internet. Or It's like this is my form of art. Now you might not think of it as art How I express my feelings and communicate to the world. Yeah I mean I think that is that sort of a case of a well-meaning educator Saying something to you which. I don't disagree with But then you really. You really accepted that as hard fact for a long time and sometimes sometimes that happens with advice right as we. We take advice at face value. Maybe we don't understand the nuance or the context or the specific perspective and and we let that rule us or we let that impact us maybe more than the person who said it in the first place intended and so I don't totally disagree about You know client versus personal work. I think I think there's something there And that's maybe not how I would say it but I don't I don't disagree and so when you tell me that for like two decades you let that guide your understanding of yourself that makes me that makes me. Kinda sad because you've got all the tools and you make stuff for yourself all the time You're often your own client. And so that definition kinda stops working and I almost wonder like what what else would you have made? If you just started doing anything you wanted sooner.

Matthew Picasso Adam J Kurtz Allergic Adam J K Magnolia
Is Copying a Shameless Tactic?

Marketing School

06:19 min | 1 year ago

Is Copying a Shameless Tactic?

"I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to top talk of Valla Tornado going to talk about it. We're GONNA talk about well if copying is a shameless tactics of what do we mean by this. Exactly we're talking about Copying Neil. Yes Oh in marketing marketing. Your competition is doing something or other people in your industry even if they're not your competition they're doing something to grow their traffic to go. There leads to grow their sales now. The question Shen is if you copy what they're doing. Is that a bad thing. Or is that a good thing and a prime example of this is Eric. I've done it as well many times. uh-huh but Eric. Recently I talked about one of his new features on click flow and I submitted a product top and his new feature tells you if your content is decaying in other words is you're getting less and less traffic over time and what you should do to fix it and best of all the feature is one hundred percent free correct hundred percent free so one of the comments that someone left was. Hey you're copying us. This isn't cool. Some people got website. Most people didn't really care about some people got upset. Some people said I was copying even though I submitted Eric's Url and it wasn't my company the hot air to respond those funny funny enough. Some of them even hit up people on my team being like this and they're like this isn't Neil Company in their dislike. Sure it isn't okay. Sounds but in general you know is it okay or not and before before I answer that and I would. I'd love to answer before you Eric because usually I want you to break down. What was your logic behind doing this? So we launched a feature recalled content decay for click flow and basically the way we saw was that it's a feature so wanna give credit where credit is due. There's a content marketing agency called animals and they launched a they launched it on product called revive the last couple of months ago. Now here's how I saw it my logic behind. This is what I look at facebook and facebook has. The instagram has stories. FACEBOOK has stories right. They have to get the stories feature from they got up from snap. And so when I look at this I'm like okay. This is a good feature. It's a nice little lead magnet that we can use premium to get leads to drive into our software which fundamentally is not competitive with animals at all they might use it to drive leads for their content marketing agency but we have an entire software suite with a bunch of different features the testing. I'm not even GONNA go into all features but that's why the way I explain it when one guy came in I said look they have a really good feature and where we're using it to basically generate leads obviously to toll the US news but fundamentally were not competitive at all versus when you look at like a facebook copying snap that is they are competitive and they are copying but even in that scenario Ariel My personal opinion. But I guess I'M GONNA turn it over to you to answer first and then I'll give my thoughts on it because I think you wanted to answer i. So that's my logic behind it and turn it over to you. The reason I want an answer I guess is you who got the negative press for. I got some swale even though it wasn't me but the reason on answer. I is a want to give my neutral troll viewpoint on this no matter what business. You're in someone's GonNa copy a question of when you look at all these venture backed companies people copy each other. Google isn't the only player in around you know there's being who tries to copy their features. facebook tries to copy snap. Apple will copy whoever else. This is out there like Samsung. The list goes on and on and this is just the reality of the world that we're in now in most cases in marketing. You're seeing people copy things he's like all you're doing sem Seo or paper click or hey you're doing e books Ahmadou e-books or you did one on this topic I'm GonNa do at are you. Did a conference around inbound marketing marketing ominous do my own inbound marketing conference and as I mentioned the list goes on and on no eric did was he did that. What the software feature? That's not as common but it'll become more and more common. You see the bigger companies do that and I know they weren't happy with him doing so but the reality is Eric's not going to be the first. I've done this as well. I'm not saying this is great. And everyone should do. I'm saying this is the reality of the environment wherein if your competitors are doing something that's amazing that other other people love you better start doing it too or else your users are all going to go to your competitors and events. You're going to be out of business. It sucks but it's the reality whether whether you like it or not so when you think about copying it's not about hey is it cool or not. It's the reality is consumers. Don't care about the company Buzney as much as they did before what they really care about is experienced the price are they getting all the features that they want. And if you don't provide it someone else's and if someone else's and you're not you have no choice but to add it in. Yeah I mean that's well said the last part you said about the customer experience that's ultimately what you're trying to do. You're trying to. You're trying to help your customers now. Let's take it on a much bigger scale. Let's look at Amazon now. Here's people are complaining about this right now. Amazon is using the data that they have and their copy. A lot of people they copied Alberto products are copying a ton of different products. Right now because they know what works. What doesn't work now? Would you say that shameless. Some people might say shameless. Because it's hurting them or some people you might not like. Jeff bezos Amazon. But you know what tough luck. That's what happens and same thing with when I look at this podcast. A lot of stuff that Neil Ni- share. Guess what want. Sometimes I'll mention something or neil might mention something and it actually hurts. Someone's entire business. Because we reveal the niche dot. They're in at everyone starts copying right so copying is is. What does that quote neal is that I think it's something about Picasso? Great Artists Steal and nothing goes steel. Right but I'm saying if you're going to copy do something ethically and don't try to in my scenario. I'm not really hurting anybody right and again. We're not competitive with that company. So whether you are learning from podcast and you're copying tactic modifying it for yourself. That's exactly what I'm looking at it. I'm taking the feature which is Great. I'm giving credit where credit's due revive by animals and taking it and switching at a little because I'm I'm using to drive leads for a software not for an agency which is what they are

Eric Su Facebook Neil Company Amazon Valla Tornado Shen Neil Patel United States Samsung Neil Ni Jeff Bezos Apple Google Neil Neal Buzney Alberto
"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

14:01 min | 1 year ago

"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"It's not music that was particularly important to me and I thought the new one sounds fine. you know maybe prefer Robin Williams Will Smith but people develop such strong relationships to a recording that. I think that that it's there's also a danger going back in touching it up because the man Malcolm Gladwin has a podcast called revisionist history and I think the very first episode of all of them was this idea that you know if and I I refer to this a lot in our podcast by Bennie Julia in these those people are the prodigy's right. Those are the Picasso's. They're super prolific. It's so easy for them to do their sound and their sound is just is these sound and and you know the way. Picasso would be sitting at dinner and would just draw sketch and trade for food like he didn't care about the abundance of Music are Oh you know his equivalent of heart and then there was someone like Cezanne who wouldn't ever sign his name and he would go and to somebody's kitchen later on pulled down the painting and fix it forty years later because you see that I think that could work well. I love this prediction though and look forward to hearing things things that might not revise things punch them up. I think it's I think it's a really fun idea. I gave a speech recently about as more legislative stuff with songwriters in the state of the industry. You advocate for your work. Yeah and songwriters have to know that just because the way things are now it doesn't mean it always has to be that way. This industry is so young the Berne Convention is I think eight hundred eighty six so the copyright internationally speaking is hundred and thirty years old in the US really nineteen o nine and really the idea of recorded music happened around that at time but that was in reference to sheet music as we didn't have television really prominently till the fifties and you don't really have the record business into Elvis which is mid fifties fifties and then you get all these other guys like Polanco. You know and you get the beginning of the record business the record businesses super young. It's not not even seventy five years old as far as the mass consumption. I mean sure jazz. I record is nine hundred seventeen that that becomes all the rage and they're different moments in history where we have the record business has blips but really Elvis and then the Beatles and all this. This is the beginning of what we know as the record business. That's not even two generations away. That's our parents in UH. That's maybe our parents parents and if we're talking about you know kind of Elvis if you're really young but you're talking about a really short lived history in what we think think of as the way things have to be. It's okay for you to ask for things that aren't in contracts just because they aren't aren't there doesn't mean that they'll never be there. It's okay for us to advocate for each other. In a way where we change you know the last year and a half so much has changed range and what we're about to deal with so much changing for the music industry and it's partly because we're asking for things I think this is important for for all of us to look at our industry and say yeah you know it sure would be better if songwriters could split point yeah. It might be nice if we created. Some sort of you know a living wage where where were record companies release your music that they pay the statutory rate in advance they would you know the producer fee X. amount of dollars. It's okay to ask for some of these things. It's okay to ask the PR owes the performance rights organizations positions ask at BMI to help find us their collective bargaining of sorts to create healthcare. You know the grammy's should have a songwriter of the year all the other ones. Do we got songwriters attitude album of the year. So why can't we get a songwriter the year why is it that pop songs y you can qualify. I for country song and then they also qualifies for Song of the year. Why is it that pop songs. Don't have its own category. It's just really interesting. I just think it's important Jordan first of all the look at the industry the state of the industry and continue to talk about how we can find equity for songwriters other then just complaining about the way things are well. Maybe we could both do one more quick favorite moment. I have one that like to share which is in response. We've done some reporting recently on how the change towards a streaming based music economy alters thor's composition and songwriting and we. I found this material through some great reporting by Dan Coffin Aishah Hassan at courts parts. I want to play you a clip from our conversation. So the way that many music streaming services work is that songs generate money per play that means every time that there's streamed they generate a certain amount of money and that's very little so it ranges between zero point zero zero four dollars to zero point zero zero eight dollars and then if you don't play it to the very end and that rating goes down meaning that people don't listen to the song through as much then the song is less likely to make it into spotify really lucrative playlists which them streamed more because the amount of money is so little volume is really important. I think it's important to note note that artists right now. According to a report in two thousand seventeen they're only getting about ten percent of the music industry's total revenue but streaming is so important because that's how they're going to break out right and they're not going to be heard by audiences then less people are. GonNa buy their tickets for the concert. People are going to buy their merch so to be visible. It's really important to sometimes game the streaming system so more people listened to their stuff. You know it's cool. If you listen to all the let's see Beethoven's took fifth it starts with the hook the Dan. You know exactly what it is worried away. All those great classical songs started with the hook yeah and then they spend the whole peace referencing that Hutton well we have in spotify is actually that right now. We're going back to the idea of often starting with the hooker hooker starting with something like the hook so that way the listener knows exactly what they're getting into. They can hear the refrain they can hear the main part the greatest songs in history history that we talk about often start with the hook and maybe when we get into these long form albums albums and they're still a desire to hear that stuff and obviously is an artist. That's my whole. Mo but in those as long as you can go wherever you want musically but something really exciting right now is that there's no patience for the listener so we're not going through these long extended verses hoping that they're hanging on no instead. We're starting with the hook. Maybe the way sounds are always meant meant to be. We're starting with twinkle twinkle little star right off the bat you know what the song is called you know the hook because Aba Super Super simple done. We're doing that right now. That's what the DSP's have brought up is. Maybe we're going back to what songs things were in short. Sonata form. Maybe we went into the wrong way for awhile. Maybe we're back and view. That change is a positive thing. Aim is really exciting. One of the divisions in composition that I've heard has been what we call. We've been calling it the pop overture which is give someone a taste the hook up front. Maybe it's just a four bar bar'll intro. You have some sort of like reverberated or filtered out lead synthesizer which plays the hook and gets you in in your ear and then drops you into the verse as a way of giving you a taste of what's to come but not blowing out the entire climax right at the start and that's absolutely louis new songs. I hadn't heard that until the last couple of years we've all gotten used to the you know you start with diverse you know and there's a place for that but it's okay to start with with hooks and hooks her man. That's that's what makes sounds fun. Why are we going away from leg. More hooks more hooks more hooks. Just make them unique unique hooks and don't make them stock cooks but turn your friend there. There's a lot of reporting I've seen about this anxiety that are saunas getting worse because they're getting shorter or art analysis of lyrical content and suggesting the lyrics are becoming more redundant a lot of like large data set analysist system makes them sort of qualitative statement about music and the journalist are you on. I think address this beautifully on our show. I think that anxiety it's tied to like like Brevity in popular culture digital platforms as a whole people are concerned about you know like culture where we just respond to everything with a thumbs up or just an Emoji and we're just like scrolling through instagram videos or snapchat videos kind of number and I think this anxiety over short- shorter songs is or maybe the diminishing quality of music because of shorter songs is actually tied to maybe the diminishing quality of our communication or interaction with each other because of the way that social media has pervaded like society. Hell Yeah wrote. It's not the songs fault. This long for the raiders filed either though and again Dan if you're entertained and they're doing their job I think one of the mistakes had a lot of musicians and artists and songwriters doing right now. The trend right now is to do this. I'm GonNa read my diary radio and I'm an avoid all the math as much as I can and you know to just make sure that I so. I sound cool because I'm avoiding it and I liked it. They're starting to be this. Push back to some more like songcraft. I actually don't think things are really repetitive right now. I think K pop really has it right as part of the reason why they're succeeding so you're surprised every fucking sense but the idea of mumbling through a song along and saying was off the cuff is not is not as exciting as when you give somebody help set up some expectations and throw them for a loop and in a like or throw them whatever it exciting right now if you bring in your songcraft right now and you really do your your diligence as a writer. I think you'll actually win better in the next year and a half then you have in the last two makes me think of I mentioned break free that did and I love that song in particular because there are so many points where you think something's going to happen and it doesn't happen and surprised it has an introduction. That sounds like it's going to drop into some kind of like dub. Step thing that goes away and only returns in our throw after the post chorus. There's this crazy riser that happens and you you think again. There's going to be a drop. No drop and you keep getting lead in these directions that ultimately go somewhere. You are totally surprised and Asong on does that to me. It's the best but that's the difference in you know. I talk a lot on this. Show about how music is recorded. Music is an illusion Asian and it's not disappeared than how you guys talk about it but a good songwriter there if they're a magician if we're going to use magic as there as the metaphor the magician can do a lot of cool tricks and.

Elvis Dan Coffin Aishah Hassan spotify Malcolm Gladwin Picasso grammy US Bennie Julia Robin Williams Cezanne UH Beatles producer Jordan Smith Asong raiders Beethoven Polanco Aba
"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

15:07 min | 1 year ago

"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"Yeah so well well. It's a public debate in which Max Martin wrote the lyric and our underground day didn't sing it because it was grammatically incorrect and they had a dispute in the in the studio about this they have there's interviews there. Were talking about this and she said I don't want to sing it that way. I don't WanNa sing the wrong word and he's like. Nobody wanted the town right. He wanted the ride with the previous line analyst matter yeah totally and so when she sings the line it kind of sounds like now who have become where really and I think there's like she closes her mouth and gets a little at the end just as a like you know. Fu I'm going to right well. Let me let me tell you in in that world because my main collaboration home is is at maximum. If there's an M. at the end they know it. They discussed it and everyone in the room disgusted and my assumption is that I would assume Peter Karlsson did the vocals on that. My guess is that we could one text away from but if there's if there's something like that that's it that's a choice it only hip hop and country tree. I really art forms. They speak to English speaking audiences only knows just every dialing but when you're doing pop music at the level that Arianna has been doing in that specific style of of that song it's built for people around the world sing along to it so sometimes lear it can be secondary to the sound of the word and that's okay part of what is so compelling about her is there so much but the way in which which she pronounces her words is incredibly idiosyncratic. It can only be song by her in her unique way of saying that word informing forming that vowel I love it so that's our biggest dispute we've ever had and I think we have all sorts of other often. Just sort of musical logical questions Sion's that occur and we're constantly trying to convince each other things but I don't think if we were on shock jock radio or even on youtube that would allow for that back and fourth in which we all get to engage in hearing from different perspectives one of the thing I've learned from and the writer is is when I prepare for these interviews news and I was alluding to this earlier. I'm going through. Somebody's discography and Allee Willis talked about it and her. She's the one who wrote the theme from friends. You know amazing writer but when you look at somebody's discography when you see all these hits coming out. That's the easy time to ask questions Russians. The hard part is when there's this what looks like a two year low three year lull and anybody who's listening to this when you're going through a three year. Hello it's excruciating. You don't know what's going to happen but I can guarantee. Almost all of them are building something. That's when the writing those hits that's Aspen. They're figuring out what the next sound is. That's when they're writing their musicals. That's in their writing their long form whatever it is that's in the writing their TV show or their book book. It's always in this lull and then when it comes out it comes out in two thousand and twenty two and all of a sudden. It's like wow what a year all things happening for you. What's it like and that's really just a celebration of the struggle from the previous three four years and it's so easy to ask people questions about about the songs are released to just because of logic of course. You'RE GONNA ask that but the real questions aren't what's happening in the years that are good but I'm so interested in the years where it seems like nothing's happening to the outsider. I want to ask you about this. I was asked recently about do artists have less room for reflection and the opportunity to develop develop new work in that. There's such a demand for ongoing content. Release constant single drops alum after album get right on tour. Well okay so this depends on who the artist is in order not to segue but I'll just mention it so my day job is so much creating a song on on Friday that comes out on Friday to be done on Friday two weeks song cycle you know in the in the best case scenario. It's something they go to radio and they're willing to spend six months on but the cost of radios increasingly expensive the artists cares less and less about how much they're making on on any of these things things because they're making money on touring you know the artist who's patient who comes out with art ends up being being the Bruno. Mars is you know it ends up being the Adele's it becomes these artists that are the ones that are constantly celebrated uh-huh the ones who come out and try to play the content game they're successful for a while and if they have the correct amount of followers on their DSP's he's the algorithm will work in their favor and they'll make money regardless of the quality of the music but if you're trying to break in the business more is not more to me less than way less is more. If you spend a year five years ten years working on a project that's truly worthy of word of mouth mouth. You're more likely to have the success of switched on pop because it's word of mouth as we were discussing than it will be being successful because of the the amount of content. This is something I've really noticed that there has to be a real relationship. I don't think you develop a fan base off offers of as a fence on you have to have some relationship there. There has to be a real emotional connection that people have thing and when people wouldn't songwriters asked me for advice. I'm who who is your community. That who are you communicating with. Why do they need the thing that you're creating. Why does it matter and if you can't answer those questions very well. What are you making. What are you doing. You're probably doing it for for fame alone. The the discipline of the job is really important in a night. I talk about that a lot where treat it like. It's a job you know show up. Studier craft all the great artists in all different genres. All different art forms studied unless they were prodigies and those exist too but maybe for most of us who are in the world. You were probably not prodigies probably had to work at it and had to learn learn and you might have all the instincts in the world but assuming you weren't fourteen when you had your first major hit and you were you know your whole youth was not in the limelight because because of your prejudice ways you have to study and you have to keep studying you have to keep working on it and you're only job is to entertain your audience. This is not about you. All as a writer stopped showing me that you know how to right right so that way as a listener I'm affected. Take it about the listener not about yourself so this. This is a sort of a segue to one of my other favorite moments which was a competition that I had with Mike Posner. I believe you've also had on your show. Oh and who's the like sage wisdom of the of the songwriting world love the opening of his new record in which in the intro he basically says is if you don't have time to listen to this all the way through and just listen that's fine. Just don't listen right now. Come back to it when you have time because I'm trying to. I WanNa share something with you and it's going to be a magical thing. Just let's do it together and I think it was kind of a bold choice in speaking with him. I feel like I learn constantly all the ways in which the rules apply until the rules don't apply and I had a great conversation with him about his songs song about you which was a hit a few months back and there's this wonderful little line in there where he breaks all your expectations really into. They not rhyming like a lot of Ryan Yeah in my career and sometimes it gets in the way you did a book of poetry in I found some ways poetry was is a lot more real or like harder in Lega Detroit. SORTA ways harder in that. I don't mean more difficult means like grittier because you just say so. We're playing around with not rhyming a lot and I think that's really what makes the Song Dope to me still Alice Alison late in the first versus say since you've been going on thing to do as sleep until noon now a feel bad that should rhyme but it doesn't and that's really awesome to me. That's also also ricky reed song to Ricky Reed's credit the he wants to work with artists and doesn't necessarily think about songs as the priority even though he respects the song and he came from writing hits on some producing hit songs he's so into the idea of artists and artists pal and I think I think that's interesting that the things that you've brought up have been from what seemed to inspire US specifically our artis Addis from podcast. That's often about pop songs. what is it about artists that inspire by you versus pop songs or is it just coincidence. I feel like I'm always wrestling with this tension. That pop music is is both industry it commerce and it is pop art. Both these things are happening sometimes in very unequal measure these these scales are balanced very very differently per person per artists. You know I love work that like a great pop. Song just grabs you by the collar and the the a year worm is immediately in there and you're singing it after the first listen. I love a good hook but I always want more I want I want to be I want that song to evolve in go deeper and have more to offer the more times you listen to it. There's a lot of pop that can be Saccharin. You you get a taste of it and then on the second or third listeners like like it was it was great super sweet awesome and the by the third year listen. You're like too much sugar. Yeah me to sweep and so with all art. I want things that have those qualities of both. There's something immediate there whether you're musician or not there's something that just grabs you and the more you know the more the thing unfold and there's more beauty to the thing whether whether the composition and the things that I love about the song are intentional or not right like I I love for example breaking down Jillian michaels melodies. Her melodies are brilliant. They oftentimes have you sort of like internal logic to them where she'll do this tiny little step wise motif in the verse that comes back in the post chorus but then gets expanded upon and when I talked with transfer a few months back he's like yeah. That's stuff's happening happening in the room. It's it's not intentional but I love the way in which there can be that beautiful compositional. Wujek allows us to blossom and blossoming blossom and another thing is Liz. Mike Posner and Jillian michaels are all writers in the room who tend to be off the cuff tend to freestyle obviously they understand craft craft as well but all three of them really freestyle. La And what you get is what they spew out into the microphone almost more in jazz sense sure yeah edited you know Max Martin Sense and I love his work as well. I mean breaking down oops. I did it again and looking at the complementary commentary choruses and counterpoint that you know is like up there with Baroque style counterpoint is brilliant. I love that stuff. I think he almost has the inverse where you know someone who's so detailed and exact in his composition and yet the first time you hear it feels light and obvious and just like it just came out of anywhere and then you go deeper deeper deeper into it has more to offer one of the things that Tania's did on the last album where he would adjust the mix once they were released. That's something that I think we'll see more of. I mean right now. Just working on the show part part of the wrong man. There's twenty five songs in the show and they're different songs. The album like Wli like this shows. The thing is different. It's still growing and that's the way we're obviously not. Everybody's trying to do like an album into a show but the idea that art is not done we get it off when people do do a remix where they have somebody else coming on this on new feature that they'll re release the song with the new feature but like the idea that I don't know why artists can't go back and rewrite verse rewrite a pre chorus or chorus why they can't all the artists talk about what after they've toured how all man if they would record it now it would sound so different because they recorded it. They've performed a two hundred something time different of thousands of people you have a whole other perspective so I don't know why we don't go in and rewrite songs that have been released. Why just because it's out in the world. Can you not adjust it to make a better. I would imagine if Taylor swift went back and so you know what I could probably think of one part of this new song besides a precor school really fast but probably make that of course a little more exciting if she decided to do that you know no matter what but my point is. I bet she couldn't about everyone. Ruined listened to it. I like Everton better. We just did a piece about Aladdin and how there has been a very strong response to to Prince Ali in particular. A lot of people have been complaining. It doesn't sound as good the new the new version has compared to the old version and one thing we notice that it's a lot slower. actually a little bit slower. ABM slower and it's a half step down and maybe people are sort of feeling sluggish. We did this piece and then we got so much mail about how they hear the song and a myriad of different different ways including different emphasis different levels of swing in the music and these subtle differences that I'm I hadn't heard the original in a long time hadn't seen Aladdin since I was an adolescent and so I I didn't pick up on these..

writer Max Martin Mike Posner Jillian michaels Aladdin Allee Willis Peter Karlsson analyst youtube Ricky Reed Aspen Adele Sion Bruno Arianna Taylor US Alice Alison
"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"Decade after that trying to finally put an end to his involvement in the criminal justice system another show in the same week we took seven hours of a CNN I an climate policy marathon with ten leading Democratic candidates and boiled it down into a digestible twenty minutes explainer for you and and we closed out the week with an episode about gerrymandering that features AC DC and Metallica in somehow like a notch random way. Do you gotta hear hear it to believe it today. Explain now playing wherever your podcast playing you number two you you learn how to listen differently. When you listen to yourself speak and I can't recommend to any listener of any podcast I would imagine if everybody to take their phone out. Pick up their voice note and record their next conversation just for an hour. Whoever it's with I I you'll feel uncomfortable but you should do that ten times and listen back and find out how you actually communicate anybody who's hosted a podcast outcasts or who's edited their own podcast or anything like that and I don't edit ours but I've listened to a lot in the first ten episodes are vastly different than the most recent ten episodes roads and a lot of it is just from listening and I don't think I knew how to listen when I started this but I think I'm learning now now how to here and actually pay attention to other people are saying and I would imagine most people who listen podcast when they communicate to people they they may not be communicating how they think they're communicating so something is amazing amazing magnifying find glass. We'll stepping outside of what we've learned about music but just more generally about I love that your lessons are about essential qualities of being human in many ways. Act Act finding a motion and how we can with our peers. I love this format that we have because I think it's one of the few formats where people stop stop and think and consider maybe even proposed. Hey have you thought about something this way. Oh No I hadn't I have done this project with my my collaborator nate now for almost five years the only dispute we've ever had has been about an Arianna Eric and everything else happens on Mike in an an honest dialogue and discourse which is so different than the majority of our media landscape so I love that. This format allows lyric in break free when she sings now. How who I become who I really are. Do you know this. They know what was the way.

Arianna Eric CNN Metallica nate Mike twenty minutes seven hours five years
"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"We're GonNa let you try. They're stronger faster more reliable service service before you buy it as in on your own phone with your own number. That's crazy right but t mobile does their own thing right. Now you can test. Hess drive the T. mobile network free for thirty days or thirty gigabytes data without switching carriers but fair warning. You're going to want to switch because T. mobile has been relentlessly loosely expanding coverage with its low band six hundred megahertz spectrum more towers more engineers and more coverage than ever before so you can go even more places and T. mobile's right there with you. It's.

T. mobile Hess six hundred megahertz thirty gigabytes thirty days
"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

12:32 min | 1 year ago

"picassos" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"Hi hi? I'm Ross and I'm Charlie I'm from and the writer is and I'm I'm from switched on pop and we are doing a podcast together because we think our podcast together make sense. I think they do as they really complimentary yeah well. Why do you think Complement Each Other. We'll because I love how you dig deep into the personal life of a songwriter like what does it take to be a songwriter. Where do you come from. What is the story in all the anecdotes from the very beginning. It's kind of like fresh air for musicians like I really feel like I get to know people yeah and I think yours is interesting because what you guys tackle is much more into the mechanics of how music works in a way that ours ars dozen so feel together they they really both address pop music in the way that pop is consumed right now oh yeah and it requires ongoing conversation because it's one of the fastest moving art forms. We've both had this awesome privilege to have a microphone that we get to share with other people people in an opportunity to investigate how other people work in the world of pop and so I thought we fund to share some of our top three learnings and getting to do these projects objects cool yeah you want to go first Chore Yeah. One of my favorite pieces that we ever did was with Liz Liz. Oh I think it's just a phenomenal songwriter musician Russian performer. She's an icon and one of the things that I learned from Liz. Who is a incredibly adept musician is that so much of the the best stuff are happy accidents that come from lots of practice? You end it with the best reference ever the sister Mr Nancy Bam. That's why I even think about that. Yes so let's listen to the under your.

Liz Liz Mr Nancy Bam Ross writer
Creepy crawlies, Quarks and Counting

The Naked Scientists

11:33 min | 1 year ago

Creepy crawlies, Quarks and Counting

"Now with me to help answer the questions that you're sending us from the University of York behavioral scientists. She works on insects. Eleanor drink water. What have you been up to you telling elements yes. I'm very keen beekeeper and I made the mistake of not zipping up my the other day and and I can tell you that that that was bitterly regretted. The next day is very much a mark of pride among beekeepers but you're not appropriate beekeeper until you've at least one and flexes yeah. That's a bad thing when that happens but if you work with do occasionally gets stung how's it. How's it going the beekeeping fund. We've haven't absolutely lovely queen in one of heights at the moment. The other one's a bit more grumpy so they're a bit more of a it's true what my brother keeps. He says the same thing he said as the Queen's get older odor and also certain colonies just have a particularly aggressive behavior exactly something to do with the Queen's squirting out ramones that keeps everyone calm as the Queen Ages. She makes less all of them. Yes exactly that's that's. That's exactly it in the end the character of the Queen or you know the chemicals that Sheikh producers has a really big impact on on the behavior of all the other bees in the colony so so yeah so if you have a really nasty queen than you can swap out for really friendly Queen and some of the hive becomes a lot more friendly to work with credible. Yes some no. It was much opening unfortunately but yes definitely enough to be getting on with you so any questions you have about insects. Perhaps even bees stings beekeeping. Ask Ask Elinor. Dan Gordon's also with US dance and exercise physiologist is Anglia Ruskin University. He's also a Paralympian and it's going to world record and there was a lot of coverage in recent weeks about athletes using sports drinks and not been terribly good for their dental health. Yes about I think about ten days ago quite solarge raging study that was looking at elite athletes and they reported the dental health and elite athletes was was far far worse than the general population of Oh. The paper didn't fully attributed it to they wanted to make conclusions was they thought it was down to the con- sports drinks that are consumed which mostly these high carbohydrates looked sugar. How's your dentition during you got away with it. I think what an advocate in sports the practitioners do then just because you don't have energy to do the events no and I think in the end what they're really getting exposes has got to be greater scrutiny of the health of the teeth and the athletes when competing one of the things we have to do before we went to the Paralympics. We every athlete have dental check which sounds crazy things the limbic games actually you wouldn't think that teeth of that important but actually the worst thing you can have an. Olympic Games is fake and so one of the things that's really really being advocated. Now is that part of the Athlete Support Program Part of lifestyle management should be to actually monitor the health of the of the teeth warning people there. Is this risk they'll. They'll probably take more. Oh care about washing their mouth outs to get rid of that. I think yeah more used to math clean teeth more regularly for example as part of the training routine not so any questions about exercise exercise physiology how the body works sports and sports fitness. Danny man now next to Dan is friend. Let's see what did the wonderful. Fran is Cambridge University physicist. She is an astrophysicist cosmologists interested in how the universe at large works but you're a stand up. Comedian allows guys right. I'm GonNa do the horrible thing because then tell us a joke I won't do that going. It's going pretty well. I'm in writing a new show at the moment by kind of the philosophy of science and what we're doing when we're doing science so that has been a bit of a step back from the day to day if my research are you poking fun at it or you kind of making light of what life is a scientist and researcher is like is that I'm poking fun at but also I think a serious a serious element over and I hope people will come away knowing a bit more by you know I've been told I'm participating in the scientific typic- methods that I never really examined what that meant until now you're gonNA find out you're also saying to me just before we started about the story that came out earlier this year the first picture of a black hole or rather the first impression of of a black hole and that's going to be made into a movie rather than just a bunch started pictures. Now you're saying yeah that's right so you might remember the event. Horizon Telescope a few months ago published the first image of a black hole or more pedantically the shadow of a black hole support and then I can do a full color movie of the black hole which is going to be really incredible both in terms of what it will teach us about astrophysics in general relativity and also just just super cool you can just you'll be able to watch your black hole on youtube or you could just watch SANTELLI programs which amount to much of the same no content visible whatsoever. Thank you very much so anything to do with how the universe works and space anything that please send those questions in from be happy to consider those also with this bobby seagull who needs relief introduction. He's originally for comb -versities. Mathematician and teaches maths taught teach kismet and actually doing teddy program their movement have new going around the country looking at inventions and things going for those who made a reminder minded is the universe challenge icon the icon of icons. I'm his friend were. You're pretty you're pretty optimistic as well thank you that's very good areas and outgoing outgoing but we had a first series initially looking at a genius guy to Britain's traveling around minicar imagine like top gear meets. Qa but sort of exploring all the curious bits of Britain and the new series is called a genius guy to the age of Invention Sarah can I get back in on minicar go around the UK but this time it's quite chronological so looking from seventeen fifty thousand nine hundred and exploring Britain's discoveries and inventions in that period. Why did you pick that period because it's particularly golden period. There was some of the reason I I think it's the golden nature that period because if you look before that is sort of Britain still pre enlightenment before industrial times and then in that period of seventeen fifty nine hundred lots lots of invention discovers chemistry's discovered physics signed the word sign scientist comes into being Darwin Thompson so lots of great figures of science emerge any particularly stand out moment because there was are when you making telly programs they're always funny things that we never see on screen or or other things that are just well moments that you never thought you'd find yourself doing so so what am I stand up moments as she isn't a stand up moment for me but is a silent moment for the show so we visit the cabinet Cambridge and we get to hold one of the original cathode ray tubes at J J Thomson used. I was too much of a chicken to hold it. No I think it's like someone else's baby you can look at. I admire it but if you want to hold it no no no. I'M NOT GONNA hold the baby the big quite tempting to hold it and they go oops because the same thing sort of happened to me because because when I was in South Africa when I first went to South Africa when I was at a conference in this big American guy came up to me at the conference and he said tomorrow going to pick you up from your hotel and I'm going to take you somewhere and show you something something GonNa Change Your Life forever now. Of course you never met this guy you think I can arrange things and actually he took me to the University of the voters rand in Johannesburg where he's professor of Paleoanthropology. This is Lieber. Who's now been on this program. A number of times in this discovered not one not two but three new species of early human ancestor and he had in this wooden box the university the face the complete facial skeleton of the Taung Child which is the specimen which is the australopithecus holy type in other words all all of the Australia with specimens that we have early human ancestors maybe three million years ago so they're all compared to this one which was discovered by Raymond Dart at about one hundred years ago now and it's really fabulous. They've even got the endo cost the fossil remnant of the brain of this thing and I was holding this in my hands is three million years. Old is the only only one in existence and am I did get tempted to go whoops but Lee was very very cordiality hands undermine all the time. 'cause you think how this is just prices but I know exactly what you mean now for your home. If you guys in the studio we've got a little guess who that we run through these sorts of programs we give you a sequence of clues across the show and as the show unfolds unfolds we give you more of them and the first one. I've got here. It's it's an animal. Give you that much but can you work out. What makes this particular sound okay. That was the sound it makes any clues. you want to hear the other very fussy this lot. They won't hear it again. Okay anyone got any ideas seagull. It's not a bobby seagull. No okay more clues coming up eleanor. Let's kick off with this one view from Marianna. What which is the most intelligent insect do not base because maybe they well okay so I have been asked this before and this is always a really hard question because I am incredibly and I believe that all insects are incredibly intelligent in all sorts of different ways and we haven't even begun to scratch the surface of what insects can do it could be the case that we haven't even discovered the cleverest insect but if I was to choose one based on research about an individual it'll who's pretty clever. It might have to be the bees. I'm afraid some really cool research has shown that bees can tell apart the difference between different painting style so if you showed them a monet and Picasso you can get them to learn the differences and then be able to generalize to other paintings and also prefer. I don't know maybe that'd I'll be a follow up paper. I hope it would also they can tell the difference between people's faces and they can remember a face for two days which is incredible. There was also study that the the researchers at Queen Mary Invest of London published a couple years ago where they showed be another be rolling a ball into a goal and the be that was watching then how to get the B The ball into the into the goal and got a treat yeah it was social learning and more than that they they did a follow on from that which was even more cool so trained on one particular ball and they had other balls in the area which they blew down while they were learning but then in the in the second round they unglued the balls goals and the B. would learn the concept and then would apply it to closeable so then they would perform the same action but on a separate they weren't just learning out this ball goes in in in the hall they they could like generalize which is incredible if you think about it and what else could have favorite insect in the studio. Everyone should the CICADA. I know why you're going to come on prime number years. Don't every thirteen or seventeen years. Carter has emerged don't they they do to minimize the chances of their mating year. Coinciding with predators credited exactly that on a Friday afternoon these cicadas smarter than mice from Friday to look. Maybe even smart in nature eh provocative for Dan favorite insect realize possibly the butterfly just purely because I just love the whole process from Chrysalis the butterfly but actually just the sheer variety of butterflies just it's just mind boggling liotta amazing feats of navigation butterflies and monarch butterflies example all the way from Canada down to New Mexico geico kind of thousands of miles

Dan Gordon Britain University Of York Scientist Queen Mary Invest South Africa Queen Ages Anglia Ruskin University OH Cambridge University United States Bobby Seagull Raymond Dart Horizon Telescope Carter Geico
"picassos" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"picassos" Discussed on KTRH

"Picassos and the original Texas declaration of independence come by our I ten children for an experience you won't forget Houston coins dot com Katie our rates traffic is driven by the Gulf coast windows dot com traffic center this report is sponsored by Mercedes Benz of west Houston experience souls obsession with customer service at Mercedes Benz of west Houston located on I. ten at highway six your new school could be a Mercedes Benz come by or is it Mercedes Benz of west Houston dot com now the latest news weather and traffic newsradio seven forty K. T. R. H. I heart radio station the U. S. takes direct military action against Iran I'm Corey Olson at six o'clock on newsradio seven forty K. T. R. H. traffic and weather together here's Katie London crystal was in a problem spot on forty five north bound up in fourteen eighty eight an accident of walking off to the left lanes as a slow moving out of of the woodlands add forty five Gulf freeway in down a bill for Howard Avenue right there it's locked into right lanes also one still a remains on the southbound side of forty five at Woodbridge edible technical accident it just clear from the east valley north on ramp to Spencer highways with back open I Katie London in the Gulf coast windows dot com twenty four hour traffic center very little of weather radar tonight just couple straight storm drifting off to the north lots of humidity though barely getting below eighty tonight and mid nineties on Friday and Saturday storm coverage going up like this weekend and early next week and I think our temperatures drop.

Picassos Mercedes Benz Houston Iran Corey Olson Woodbridge Katie London Texas Gulf K. T. R. H. seven forty K twenty four hour
Famed Auction House Sothebys Sold for $3.7 Billion

Business Wars Daily

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Famed Auction House Sothebys Sold for $3.7 Billion

"The business wars daily is brought to you by Staples work is changing, but Staples is changing right along with it. The new Staples delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Monday, June twenty fourth. Sotheby's the famed auction house just closed its biggest sale ever. It sold itself to French Isreaeli businessman Patrick, dry for three point seven billion dollars dry. He is a telecom and cable industry tycoon. He founded European cable company. I'll tease in two thousand one and has a reputation for building a global business empire through acquisitions and aggressive cost-cutting. But the Wall Street Journal has already reassured art lovers to mention Sotheby's employee's the dry. He won't bring that cutthroat strategy to his newest acquisition rather, he's buying the auction house for art's sake. The journal says and art lover himself draw. He owns works by Picasso Matisse and Chagall and. His long admired the auction company, which was founded in London in seventeen forty four at least now draw he plans to hold onto Sotheby's for the long term and help it grow the first step. He intends to take these private ending. It's thirty one year stint on the new York Stock Exchange. The idea is that going private will help Sotheby's compete with its arch-rival Christie's Christie's is a private company also owned by a French businessman, the two companies often scrap over lucrative consignment deals to sell multi million dollar artworks in collectibles to seal those deals auction houses often discount their commissions, but as a privately, held business Christie's had more latitude to shave its commissions and make big deals than Sotheby's did since Sotheby's had to report those details to shareholders that latitude makes a difference over the last year. Both Christie's and Sotheby's have done well, booed by a healthy economy. But in absolute terms, Christie's fared better than Sotheby's by more than a half of a billion dollars. Christie's is seen as the winner in the art collection duopoly in part because it has captured some gasp worthy deals in 2017 it sold a rediscovered Leonardo Davinci painting for a record price of four hundred fifty million dollars. And last year it sold the art collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller for a record price as well. Eight hundred thirty five million dollars under draw. He's ownership Sotheby's should prove to be a more aggressive rival, and that won't just be an in-person auctions, but online as well. The company intends to expand on a strategy that already started boosting its digital sales are collectors still politely raised their hands at live auctions to bid on old masters, but more and more often younger art buyers are bidding online, Sotheby's soul, two hundred twenty million dollars worth. Of art online last year up twenty four percent from twenty seventeen the Wall Street Journal reported, it's too soon to know whether taking Southeby's private, and pushing online sales will help Sotheby's surged past Christie's or not. But one thing is clear Patrick draw. He is already proved himself to be artful at growing companies now. We'll see whether he'll be successful at painting, a new future for Southeby's. From wondering this is business daily if you like our show, sure would appreciate a review and a rating on your favorite podcast app. I've David Brown, and we'll be back with you tomorrow. Business wars. Daily is brought to you by Staples. The world of work is changing faster than ever before a week ago open floor plans were in. Now, they're out the pace of our evolving work lives can feel overwhelming. But Staples can help not the old stables, but a new Staples that delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired work may be constantly changing. But Staples is changing right along with it to support you. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change.

Sotheby Christie Staples Staples Dot Patrick Wall Street Journal David Brown Picasso Matisse Southeby French Isreaeli European Cable Company Leonardo Davinci David Rockefeller London Latitude York Peggy Chagall
Stephen Brunt on Tiger Woods: What kind of heroes do we want?

The Big Story

19:23 min | 2 years ago

Stephen Brunt on Tiger Woods: What kind of heroes do we want?

"Hey, it's Jordan, and I've podcast for you. Commons is Canada's most popular podcast about politics last season. They tried to answer the question how corrupt is Canada this time around. They're investigating our national addiction oil the currency's featuring host Arshi man is called crude. And it's about Canada's relationship with the oil industry. The good the bad the ugly and the weird you'll find Commons wherever you get your podcasts. So go check it out. I'm going to try to tell you today's story the way all probably tell it to grandkids someday. There was this guy a golfer named tiger. He was the best golfer in the world probably ever, you could argue if you wanted to, but nobody who'd watched him play would listen to you. And if that was our story, it would be a boring one, but it's not anyway, tiger was the greatest he had it all the fame money commercials endorsements beautiful wife and adorable children. But he was also a jerk. There were a lot of stories about this. He was rude to fans who wouldn't give kids high fives or sign autographs. He had his caddy yell at people who was a notoriously bad Tipper. He was a sullen guide to play with. He was robotic with the media, and none of those things mattered because he was the greatest until he wasn't just after two on Friday morning. Thirty three year old Tiger Woods. Drove out of his house alone. His car I hit a fire hydrant then a tree police after that crash. His wife left him. It turned out he'd been cheating on her with dozens of women across the country. His sponsors dropped him. Almost as fast as she. Did Ben details of his affairs came out, and they were humiliating. I want to say to each of you simply and directly. I am deeply sorry for my irresponsible and selfish behavior. I engaged in his knee gave out and then his back and even when he felt good enough to play golf. He was bad at it. And then despite surgeries his backup worse and worse until he could barely sit down without pain. He needed a spinal fusion surgery he had it just so he would be able to play with his children in his old age. He said but afterwards he felt better. So about two years ago, he picked up a club and tried to play again, and he could and he started getting better at it on the rest. Well, we'll tell you the rest, but you probably know how this ends. Then he doubted we'd ever see it. But here it is. Turn to glory. So it's Tiger Woods. Now. Redeemed? What is it about him that compels so many of us to root for him despite his flaws? What does the way we cheer for tiger tell us, but the kind of stories that were drawn to and about the kind of heroes. We prefer. I'm jordan. He's rawlings. And this is the big story. Stephen Brent from sports net is one of our favorite guests to talk to you. Whenever sports gets bigger than the games on the field. Why did everybody I know even with people on my production team who don't care about sports watch golf on Sunday? Well, let's see because the greatest golfer of all time came back under what seemed like impossible circumstances in rows right to the top of the sport in a after being written off for really good reasons over the last several years, especially over the last five or six years because he because Tiger Woods is a ground-breaking figure culturally. The people who don't know the wouldn't know Jordan Spieth of walked up their driveway know, who he is the he's he's an icon and a groundbreaker. So we has significance beyond the game. He plays. And because we all love a good redemption story, whether it's true or not we all want to believe that if you turn your life around if you do the right things instead of the wrong things if you follow the rules. You will be rewarded somehow in the cosmic sense. And for a lot of people. I think that's what it felt like I I'm not sure if the greatest I'm trying to think is this. Latest comeback story in sports history. That's a big one. Right. And I have a personal bias on that. Because I saw George Foreman. When the heavyweight championship at age forty six having been away for eleven years, and then come back as a big fat guy had people laugh Ataman lose nine rounds of a fight Nakagawa the tenth. So that was pretty good. But this that probably just me, but otherwise yet may potentially the greatest comeback story in the history of sport, a nostalgia moment for some people. I yeah, I get creeped out thinking of nineties style. Just somebody my age at doesn't nineties is like yesterday. But there's it's an established a moment, you know, this kind of the big three right there. Right. So within the sport historical greatest of all time, and the redemption narrative, and the and the style jet for a certain generation who remember remember when way way back in those nineteen nineties tell me about that. Because that was something that everybody was talking about right after he won is that moment twenty something years ago. Now when the world saw Tiger Woods for the first time. Do you? Remember the first time you saw Tiger Woods. That's good. I know not specifically. I certainly remember the first master's I remember talking about him in the US amateur. I remember him being out. You know, what I know? I take that back. You know, when I saw him the first time, I was at home as a teenager, a young teenager. Maybe not even a teenager yet. And after school. My parents watched the Mike Douglas show, which was a talk show that was on every day like five o'clock in the afternoon, and that's the famous show where they were L. Whereas whereas all man brought him out as a six year old and he had calls. I saw that show. Do you remember when Tiger Woods became I guess the Tiger Woods that we talk about? When we talk about the beginning of this story. When is lapping the field at the masters. I'm one of those moments when he just did something that when he seemed on another planet when he seemed different from all of the rest when he separated himself and that puts him on a very short list with Jordan and alley and what was it like watching him in the late nineties and early two thousands. Well, the guy so I'm not a golf guy. I have to. So is this I read like, I quit playing golf is fourteen. I walked off the course on the second hole. I hated hated the people here that the clothing, I did everything. So I just laughed. I literally just walked off in the middle of the game. And that's why we're talking you. Because this story is golf, so I hate golf and everything about it. But no, he was he was like a he was a superman, right? He was this. And and again, the nontraditional nature in terms of golf the whitest of sports. Yeah. Those days more so than now. But the idea that you could be, you know, someone other than a rich white kid, and and take on the sports or the way they're with Williams sisters and tennis the same that you could you could kind of just going to throw this back through all of that back in people's faces planned courses that were segregated up. You know within my lifetime. Yeah. There were courses that I remember remember the commercial? I think that Nike did about that. He was the first black person to ever play on some of these courses that he'd been playing. Yeah. I do remember that. And that was you know, again, that's a very so you felt like this was righteous to that that he was kicking down those doors and breaking those barriers and thumbing. Knows that the racist and the racist traditions and golf news, you know, total package now that that said the other side of them was completely unknowable. You know, we saw him. He was again public use a public figure, and he's a six year old to a degree. And he was kind of a brand Ike on it was like, Jordan. He was universal. Right. You could you could show that picture in any continent on earth and people say, oh, that's him. But he was impenetrable. He still is I have no idea who that guy is I really don't you know, has left people try to figure it out. And a lot of very fine writers have taken a crack at it. But I have no idea who what's inside them. Do you think we know him better now than we did ten twelve years ago? I think we would like to think we do again, I think under pretending that we know these people is important to us because it gives meaning to something that's otherwise meaningless which guy just put myself out of out of a job here. But you know, it doesn't really matter this stuff. Right. It doesn't. It's funny. You're like putting a little white ball and a hauler Gorna touchdown or scoring a winning goal and overtime and hockey game. Then add up a whole lot. You know, it doesn't even add up to what your doesn't add up art adds up to you know, with art. You can say the the art is the is what's important. So we will forgive people when number one you don't need to know the personality of the person producing yard you. Appreciate the art as a separate thing from them. And number two, you forgive them their sins. Right. Doesn't matter miles Davis horrible person. Right. Like one of the worst people ever, but produced sublime transcendent, revolutionary, art. And that's enough. You don't have to care about him. But but fleet was that's the thing. It's different. Because this no one's I. Yeah. I know it's you can argue make the argument that it's art, but you know, games come and goes Gore's, come and go somebody wins somebody loses. Like I've been doing. I've been writing about this stuff for a long time. It it. It doesn't add up to a la- beans, but if we can give it meaning, you know, if you can kind of imbue it with meeting and say, there's a human lesson here. And there's a human involved in this. Then I think it kinda justifies it. So I think that's part of we want to turn this into a parable. We wanna turn sports into a parable. That's how we understand the world is, you know, through parable as someone who. Who tries to do that and turn sports into those lessons for us. What did you think when I guess when Tigers false started when the news broke of the car crash and the details of that came out any stepped away? I you know, I felt like Klay like the rest of us. You know, it was it was interesting because it was kind of a flash of humanity in there he'd been so packaged and so protected in so manufactured, and, you know, both as a player, you know, by his father, and then certainly by Nike and everybody else who were in the image business image management business to to to be around tiger. I was a couple of times golf tournaments. And you know, there's no, you know, sense of what was behind this thing. And so, you know, I think that there is well, it's what the gossip industries built on right that they're kind of the Makarius thrill of oh, they're like us, aren't they? They're just like us. As a real under the Nike. Yeah. But especially on a flawed Cuban, right? So yeah, he may be rich, and he may be handsome, and he may be may have this beautiful wife. And but really he's like, you know, the the bad guy down the block, you not like you because you would never know that he was like the bad guy down the block. He has flaws. He's he's he's human in a so, but I I think there's a little bit of glee that goes without sometimes kinda, you know, the the whole shot and Freud thing, right? That you're you're you. I think a lot of people kind of were excited about it. You know, in some ways and said there, you go, you know, you may have thought you were something else. But here's what you really are. But I think it would it mostly revealed was a guy who I again, I'm not going to I wouldn't try and put a framework aunt and say, he was you know, all about golf and then never developed the other dimensions of his humanity. I have no idea. Like, I I don't know who the guy is. I don't pretend. But I think the impulse there is to say, yeah, he's he's a he's he's a flawed human being like the rest of us. And again weirdly to take some satisfaction from it. Well, there is that narrative that we probably like to put on. Sports stars because they're bigger and faster and better and richer than us that they are missing out on an essential part of humanity because they had to focus on this game since they were three years old. And they missed the whole rich tapestry of life that we got. Yes. No. And that's a great point. Right. That is a great point that, you know, the those character lessons you learned by being a really crappy little league player, right? For instance, or how to sit on a bench or being dumped by various girlfriends or ignored by others or just understanding failure that these guys were believed they were impervious to it. But in fact, you know, everybody gets their come up at some point. But again, that's that's kind of a religious theme. Isn't it? It really is. Yeah. Well, it's the it's the new idea of the human experience. Right. And that we all kind of go through the worst valleys in our lives. And it's what comes after that makes it worthwhile. Theoretically, you're radically. Yeah. Theoretically, or you know, it could be just all pointless, which would be another another more bleak way to look at it. We'll how unlikely was the next peak after that Val. Because it wasn't just the personal life scandal. It was like I mean you cover lots of athletes who try to come back from Steph. If I asked you five years ago, Steven what's the chance that I see? Tiger Woods win another green jacket snow slim two years ago. Right. Look, it's not about and it's not about the personal life stuff in this sense. Because look he was quite capable of winning golf tournaments while his personal life was apparently you're Radyr chaotic he managed to keep those things separate as when it was the physical stuff. It's one is back when you know, this guy who could barely bender bent over to pick something up off the floor two years ago the back. You can't swing a golf club with with that. You know, I think physically that idea that no matter how hard he worked his body at broken. And that's you know, way that it was not it did not appear to be able. So he could try as hard as he wanted to and he can live as clean life as you want to do and all of those things, but it didn't matter because this machine was broken. So I I don't think anybody hearing those stories from twenty sixteen twenty seventeen about his back kind of whispers because. It wasn't very public thought. You know this. No, there's no chance right? He can't go out there and compete. We can week out. And then he kind of comes back, I guess about a little over a year ago now and starts playing golf and laying. All right. And even then I don't know about you. But it was like watching an older athlete play out his years with some semblance of what he used to be. But not the same person, certainly the British the British Open right in the open championship. Right. Where you come thought. You know, he's he's not that far off and it's not like, but it's a different year. Right. It's a different vibe was a different vibe in at the masters because you know, the the old vibe is the, you know, I'm going to I'm going to destroy you. I'm going to destroy the golf course, which is what really I'm going to destroy the rest of you in this tournament. And that kind of Uber confidence that he had. I thought the most interesting thing watching that last round was watching him play the eighteenth hole, so carefully so super carefully. Right. Because you know, again, I would have been it would have been just insane you up there and hit a driver at that point, you know, because God knows and and but just. Kind of watching him play a really safe bogey to win that tournament. That's that's not in some ways. That's the anti-tiger. Right. It's just but it was it was smart. It was the right thing to do. And really the way he won that the way you try in that last round was by being kind of dog it and watching and consistent and then watching other people fail around him. It wasn't like he just sees them by the throat they had to fail. So that's a little different. If we're going to do the metaphor thing. Again, he humbled himself in front of the eighteenth hole. And is that can we read into that anything about his new life? I mean, a lot of people talked even before this tournament about how he just wanted to win for his children. Right. And he wanted his kids to see daddy win. And that's not the old tiger. Yeah. And who knows who knows who knows this guy enough to actually say that. I have no idea. I think he probably likes being tiger. Yeah. And I thought the and the chance to be tiger one more time at forty-three. That'd be pretty cool. Right. That'd that'd be an yes, it'd be great to have it. Do it in front of your children? Who'd never really got to experience it in to shut up the nose of everybody who ever said anything about you, there'd be a lot of things that you would take satisfaction from. But again, this is a guy who has programmed to be that that thing that character that kind of golf playing robot from the time he was a toddler, and you know to have that. It's right Thompsons got a new book about kind of greatest the kind of the the nature of some of the greatest of all time athletes him Jordan criminal for the other two are, but is his take on tiger is among his takes on tiger. Now, he's a great writer of golf and a Greg. I was around the sport is you know, that he thinks tiger hated the sport that whole first phase that he he was incredibly good at it and hated every minute of it because it had been forced and imposed upon him. So again, if I'm going to play amateur shrink here, I could talk about them being liberated in this second half and doing it for himself and for his own reasons rather than someone else's reasons and not having the daddy figure hovering over in them and being the daddy himself. And but like now, I'm a sports I'm being a sports writer here. Just extrapol-. I saw that column come into view. I just don't know if it's true, right? I honestly don't I have no idea. I I've no idea we know what lies in his soul. But I don't have any idea. What lies in most people souls? Right. It's we, but we go seeking it. We go seeking that story. Yeah. We're trying to find the meaning we're trying to find the meaning. Yeah. It's and you know, and then tomorrow, we'll try and find the meaning and something else. But this one looked the one thing as a sports writer sports writers people. I was asked to do cheer. We cheer for stories. Yeah. I've been lots of press boxes. Lots of press rooms everybody. Cheers for the story. Everybody got what they were cheering for and you'll end fan through the really that's what fans want you wanna. Yeah. You support your team and you support the uniform. But man, there's nothing like a story is there. Well, here's the question. Then how come I was and probably you were certainly millions and millions of people were cheering so hard for a guy who objectively from the little that we do know about him, isn't that great guy at least hasn't been and cheering form as a huge underdog went objectively. He's one more majors than anybody. But one person and he's one hundreds of millions of dollars because we're flexible. We as a species are very flexible, I wanna feel like we shoot for a real underdog. But we can you know, you can turn it. You know, think about watching the March madness if you have no real rooting interest. And so there's two schools on there. You have no idea who they are. You have no idea who those players are. But you can construct something around that game where when you know, east west North Dakota state beat somebody you go. That's the greatest thing I've ever seen your route informant that basket goes in. And then you go onto the next thing we we do construct stuff like that. And you know, he's like that the idea of the fightback that's really fight back from adversity fight back against the impossible. And the character stuff as I said, it's tricky we could because sport has been a place where we've confused being good at something having great motor skills or winning the genetic lottery, or, you know, working hard or all this up at everybody works hard. Right. We we do confuse I with character. Sometimes those things are blurred might that. You know that he's a character guy. You know? That's that's why that's why he succeeded. Not because you know, he was born this way. A or had some advantages or because there's something else inside. We got we go for that. And a lot of time and the flip side of his we're we're quite willing to ignore the opposite with where somebody could be like Michael Jordan's. Not a nice guy. Right. There's not really any suggestion. That Michael Jordan's a nice go. No there's like with tiger. There's plenty of stories to the contract. And you know, Allie was a terrible husband and a crappy fodder by and large. Now, there's also a political social components rally. So that's you know, it's a little bit different. But as I was saying before about, you know, the separating the art from the artist you can do that with our, you know, Pablo Picasso is bad guy. Right. Really bad guy. But it didn't stop anyone from treating him as Picasso during his work that way. Well, you don't have to cheer for Picasso. You don't and you can see you know, it. It gets tricky with the, you know, the Woody Allens of the world, you know, it gets it gets into some dicey territory there. Maybe I'm not sure anybody's going to listen to a Bill Cosby monologue the same way anymore. But but sport, the two things are connected. The two things are connected, and we'd like to you know, we want to kind of link those two things. Say this guy triumphed or this woman triumphed. Because a yes, they were very compact because they worked harder because they had more of that grit and character in, you know, Royal jelly, we we really we seek that. And I'm not saying, it's not true. But I think it's more that we needed to be true. Or we want it to be true sometime like it's a chicken or the egg did tiger win again because he became a better person or because he's winning again. Do we just think he became a better person Ingo? Yeah. And his backup better. Yeah. That to actually could swing a golf club dad like he may he may be a great guy now and totally, you know, Saint Paul on the road to Damascus had a moment where hang on when everything's clear down. And I'm not going to do all those terrible things anymore or maybe just got healthy. I don't know. We'll never know. But the, but the, but the former is way more compelling than the lab. Thanks, Steven bye. Stephen Brennan from sports net hates golf, but loves narrative that was the big story for more from us. You can find us at the big story, podcast dot CA or at frequency podcast network dot com. We are also up in your social media at frequency pods on Twitter on Facebook and on Instagram, and you can always reach us at v big story. F P PIN on Twitter as well. We're in your favorite podcast app. No matter which one it is. And we'd love a rating or a review. We've us comments. We love comments, apple Google, Stitcher. Spotify you pick where there thanks for listening. I'm Jordan he throwing we'll talk tomorrow.

Golf Tigers Tiger Woods Michael Jordan Nike Canada Jordan Spieth Steven Pablo Picasso United States BEN George Foreman Tiger Mike Douglas Bill Cosby Hockey Spotify Twitter
Never-before released Dr. Seuss book coming this fall

America Tonight with Kate Delaney

03:08 min | 2 years ago

Never-before released Dr. Seuss book coming this fall

"New Dr Seuss book coming out this fall? It's going to be in bookstores on September third. It's the finished manuscript by the late children's author, and it's the basis for Dr Seuss's horse museum random house's children's books announced the illustrator Andrew joiner completed the text which has a look that's very Susie as they say and wholly his own the book features horse art work by Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock among others and includes cameos from such Seuss favorites as the Grinch and the cat in the hat member. Dr Seuss whose real name was Theodor Geisel died in one thousand nine hundred ninety one. There was another release in two thousand fifteen what PECH get which was a. Best seller so fair or foul. I guess I'd have to really see the book to see if it was a fair attempt. But in historically, those things don't work out. Very well retry to finish geniuses work for them after they pass away. I don't know. It looks pretty good to me though. It looks good. But I it is weird. He's he's he's gone. So they're taking of this finished manuscript. I'm going to be a wait and see to. I can't really I'm not going to be fair foul until I see it. But I've seen clips of it. And it looks. It looks pretty good is what I'll say. I think it looks pretty good. But I don't know I agree with you. I what's it called the jury's out. It is called. Oh, the horse. Just say, I don't even know. I can't even remember Dr Seuss is Dr Suess. Horse. Museum. I think it's such a fine line behind like honoring somebody who's passed away. And then just riding on their coattails published book and make some money. Like, I mean. For example, like prince like after he passed away his family or whoever was in charge of his state did a bunch of things that he was vocal about not doing. I did it. Anyway. They charged for the ticket, of course, because they're making money on it right now, if this was like, a big charity foundation where they're gonna donate these books to like schools around the country or something like I would be one hundred percent on board whether or not it was a good project. But I'm sure that they're just a I'm actually you know, what I'm just going to go with foul. Wow. You just changed your mind. Go with foul. I'm on the fence. I wanna see it. I I'm going to see

Dr Seuss Theodor Geisel Seuss Andrew Joiner Pablo Picasso Pech Jackson Pollock Susie One Hundred Percent
"picassos" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"picassos" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Okay. You ready? All right, so Picasso. Spoiler alert was a real asshole. All right. Are any of these guys? Nice guys. I think there's gotta be some nice guys. I haven't done. It was maybe nice guy. You know, what Monet was a nice guy. Okay. He took on like six kids. He he like built a beautiful garden. He had a bunch of students. I'm going to say Monet was a nice guy Picasso. Not like in an especially not nice way. So let's start Picasso was born. Pablo the Jose Francisco powler one Naple Massena oh Monday. They'll also remedial Cipriano de LA Santisima Trinidad Reuss e because so I lost you at the fourth name. Okay. And that list so without articles of which there are six in his name. He has six articles in his name Picasso was baptized with fourteen names. Any particular reason, they're just various like saints and family names that they just tossed on him. He was the only boy in his family. So. Boy's name. He got every boys named going back to like the fourteen hundreds did not fit to easily and like the church registry. No very tiny lettering. Some none was just like. Literally Jesus give me strength. So he was born on October twenty fifth eighteen eighty one in the city of Malaga in the end allusion region of Spain. He was the first child. So he was not only the only boy who was the first child of Don Jose, Ruiz Blasco and Maria Picasso Lopez. Picasso's family was middle class and his father was a painter specialized in naturalistic depictions of birds and other game for most of his life. Ru is was a professor of art at the at the school of crafts and a curator at the local museum. So an art background ruses ancestors were minor aristocrats. I'm gonna tell you right now. It feels weird to talk because I haven't talked much three days I land Steve to talk to sometimes, you know, when you're married to somebody. You don't need to talk all the time. Can't tell them every thought the pops in was headed. So this is strange anyway. Because so showed a passion and skill for drawing from an early age, according to his mother his first words where peace peace, which is a shortening of Pius, which is the Spanish word for pencil. So he's not he's not pizza, which I think was my. I I. Actually, my first words were ozone away. And the reason being is because I watched a lot of Sesame Street, and you know, they taught you how count vanish..

Maria Picasso Lopez Picasso Monet Cipriano de LA Santisima Trini Malaga Naple Massena Spain Pablo Ru professor of art Steve school of crafts Don Jose Jose Francisco Ruiz Blasco twenty fifth three days
"picassos" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"picassos" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"And welcome to misinformation a trivia podcast for ladies and gents who have cool trivia and sticking it to anoint teams at pub quiz where your hosts I'm Lauren, and I'm Julia jewel high Lord. Hi, I barely made it here fairly like house. Yes, I had not left my house in seventy two hours because of the snow and the cold. It was two degrees listening, and I finally bottled up put my Russian hat on made of real Kepa barrel or whatever. What is it? Sewer rats rat won the giant rat, something tria. Oh, gosh. Yeah. Yes. But yeah, I got here. And then I couldn't find a parking spot. And then I finally like like drove piles. Yeah. Yeah. Nutria? That's it the nutrients made of nutria, which is the giant rat. It's not though, I think it's fake. So I made it here because I'm committed to the might ask if you are lucky enough to to not live in and you you didn't get twenty two inches of snow this weekend. I mean, we weren't the only ones man it was very cold in a lot of places yet. I think upstate New York. The brunt of it. Absolutely buffalo just got socked. Yeah. As per Yash. I it took me about two hours to dig my car out of its parking space, and then I refuse to leave for the rest of the day because I put two hours of digging out that parking space. Yeah. You cannot Abro just swoop it and take it. No. That's not how that works. And I was like, well, if I really truly had to leave I would like put some lawn furniture, the parking space, and then guide the car dealership today was like I wouldn't pay attention that I just drive right over at Rochester. Valley does not respect the lawn chair larger. Larcher? Hold the same way that Pittsburgh does. Well, what you should do is just have Josh bundle up spread eagle in the middle of the parking spot because they're not gonna hit a human person. Well, that's a felony. Melanie, no matter who you are. So there's that I hope all of you are staying safe in warm, and that no one got hurt or cold to cold or lost any limbs or digits because it's it's bad out there, folks, it's real bad. So on a on a better noting. We're going to I'm going to get we're gonna get warm Berga. We're gonna warm ourselves right on the on the warm fire on the hot flames of knowledge, and we're going to get. Did you love that transition hot flames of knowledge? Yes. The what I'm gonna call this one. So this is what are you some kinda Rembrandt part four Picassos hot flames of knowledge..

Abro New York Berga Picassos Rochester Melanie Josh Pittsburgh two hours seventy two hours twenty two inches two degrees