35 Burst results for "Picasso"

Has the Vaccine Mandate Helped With Airline Travel?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:25 min | Last week

Has the Vaccine Mandate Helped With Airline Travel?

"I'd like to read to you something from last November. We're talking, let's see a half more than a half year ago. Two House Republicans are demanding the Biden administration provide a contingency plan to assure them the upcoming vaccine mandate will not affect air travel this holiday season. House transportation again, this is from last November, beginning of November. House transportation and infrastructure committee ranking member Sam graves, Republican Missouri and representative Garrett graves Republican Louisiana. Sent letters to transportation safety administrator, David Picasso, and FAA administrator Stephen Dickson, demanding the plan as the country, what does that mean demanding the plan? There must be missing a word. As the country looks ahead to the winter holidays. The congressman. Graves wrote that the agencies needed to hand over a plan showing the vaccine mandate will not interfere with holiday air travel given the central role they play in facilitating air travel, especially air traffic controllers, and airport security screeners.

Biden Administration House Transportation And Infra Sam Graves Garrett Graves David Picasso Stephen Dickson Missouri House FAA Louisiana Graves
"picasso" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:10 min | 2 months ago

"picasso" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"You can see the silhouette of a warplane in place of each pupil. The weeping woman is an evocation of overwhelming anguish caused by the atrocities of war. It encapsulates Mars compassion for human suffering, which she had photographed continually and sympathetically in her own work, in this portrait, it's almost as if she is crying in grief at others pain. Speaking out about his portrayal of Maher, Picasso revealed for years I gave her a tortured appearance, not out of sadism and without any pleasure on my part, but in obedience to a vision that had imposed itself on me. That vision and compass the photographers, political sympathies, and anti fascist stance, which he had grown to share. While the weeping woman can be read as a reflection of Mars distress within an abusive relationship, the muse herself refuted this intimate reading. All Picasso's portraits of me are lies, not one is Dora maar. She meant more to Picasso than tears and she knew it. Resolute in her beliefs articulate and persuasive, Maher was instrumental in encouraging Picasso's political awareness, which culminated in Guernica. She played an integral role in the creation of this epic mural, emotionally, creatively, and even practically. Picasso's depiction of the tragic suffering caused by war became yet more palpable in his next project piece the weeping woman. Far from a forlorn love stricken muse at his mercy, mar changed the trajectory of Picasso's practice. She deserves credit for the cataclysmic role she embraced in his career. Behind the weeping woman is Mars compassion, intelligence and political activism, all of which profoundly inspired Picasso's anti war art..

Picasso Maher Dora maar Guernica
Ginsburg's art, fur coat, awards in auction to benefit opera

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Ginsburg's art, fur coat, awards in auction to benefit opera

"IBM's IBM's IBM's IBM's from from from from Ruth Ruth Ruth Ruth Bader Bader Bader Bader Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg office office office office and and and and home home home home are are are are hitting hitting hitting hitting the the the the auction auction auction auction block block block block to to to to benefit benefit benefit benefit one one one one of of of of the the the the late late late late justices justices justices justices passions passions passions passions Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg love love love love the the the the Washington Washington Washington Washington national national national national opera opera opera opera taking taking taking taking part part part part at at at at least least least least three three three three productions productions productions productions over over over over the the the the years years years years now now now now some some some some one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred fifty fifty fifty fifty items items items items she she she she owned owned owned owned will will will will be be be be auctioned auctioned auctioned auctioned online online online online to to to to raise raise raise raise money money money money for for for for the the the the opera opera opera opera there's there's there's there's everything everything everything everything from from from from Picasso Picasso Picasso Picasso to to to to a a a a piece piece piece piece done done done done by by by by her her her her grandson grandson grandson grandson of of of of the the the the justice justice justice justice says says says says the the the the statue statue statue statue of of of of liberty liberty liberty liberty and and and and it it it it says says says says Baba Baba Baba Baba buddy buddy buddy buddy of of of of liberty liberty liberty liberty Potomac Potomac Potomac Potomac company company company company auctions auctions auctions auctions owner owner owner owner Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Haney Haney Haney Haney Wayne Wayne Wayne Wayne Steen Steen Steen Steen we we we we have have have have her her her her make make make make hope hope hope hope that that that that she she she she used used used used to to to to wear wear wear wear to to to to the the the the opera opera opera opera and and and and inside inside inside inside the the the the pocket pocket pocket pocket is is is is her her her her is is is is her her her her name name name name beating beating beating beating on on on on that that that that starts starts starts starts at at at at two two two two hundred hundred hundred hundred fifty fifty fifty fifty dollars dollars dollars dollars some some some some pieces pieces pieces pieces are are are are as as as as low low low low as as as as twenty twenty twenty twenty five five five five dollars dollars dollars dollars about about about about Casal Casal Casal Casal played played played played to to to to that that that that hundred hundred hundred hundred Ginsburg's Ginsburg's Ginsburg's Ginsburg's Watergate Watergate Watergate Watergate dining dining dining dining room room room room will will will will open open open open at at at at four four four four thousand thousand thousand thousand Sager Sager Sager Sager made made made made Donnie Donnie Donnie Donnie Washington Washington Washington Washington

IBM Ruth Ruth Ruth Ruth Bader Bade Ginsburg Ginsburg Ginsburg Gin Washington Washington Washingt Wayne Wayne Steen Steen Picasso Picasso Picasso Picass Justice Justice Justice Justic Liberty Liberty Liberty Libert Baba Baba Baba Baba Buddy Budd Liberty Liberty Liberty Libert Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Ginsburg Casal Casal Casal Casal Sager Sager Sager Sager Donnie Donnie Donnie Donnie Washington
"picasso" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

03:10 min | 4 months ago

"picasso" Discussed on Business Wars

"Hey, welcome to the special edition of the best of business wars daily. I'm David Brown. Joining us is Natalie robo meta journalist and business wars writer and Ed harrow, a TV writer and comedian. We were talking a little bit about purchasing online or going the old fashioned way, you know, door to door using a realtor that sort of thing. Some consumers, however, might find I buying a bit too risky, but there is actually an even more radical option that's available for home shoppers. Are you ready for co buying? Take a listen. Here's how it works. The company buys up a house usually a luxury house that's on the market with the intent of reselling it. But after purchasing the home, Picasso does something crucial. It turns the house into an LLC, which means that when it gets sold, the buyers aren't purchasing a house so much as investing in it. And there's not just one buyer for each house because of resells. There are 8. So basically 8 parties investing in this newly formed LLC. And each of those 8 parties gets the house for 44 nights a year. Sounds pretty straightforward, right? Like a modern house share, the issue, neighbors of these Picasso houses, LLCs, aren't thrilled with what the companies doing. If you live within earshot of a popular Airbnb, well, you know where this is going. When residents of one Northern California neighborhood found that Picasso had scooped up a house there, they feared the noise and traffic that comes with a revolving door vacationers, according to NPR. Because here's the thing. That neighborhood had already banned short term rentals like Airbnb. But folks who vacation in a Picasso house are not renters, so says the company. Their investors and co owners of an LLC. You can imagine how well that distinction went over with the neighbors. They circulated petitions and created an anti Picasso website beyond that there wasn't much the neighborhood could do in the legal sense. Because, well, Picasso was actually quite popular. It's solving a specific problem wanting a second home. But not wanting to throw down the money that an entire home costs. Picasso co owners pay 12% of the home's purchase price up front. That's less than a down payment for many, and then a monthly fee from there. So while the neighbors might complain, Picasso's doing quite well, thanks. The company went from launch to unicorn in 5 months. Picasso may be a unique model, but there are others in the fractional home ownership space. While Picasso co owners likely don't know each other, folks who purchase a house with Seattle based co buy, usually do. That company allows groups of people to easily go in on a house together. Koby connects groups with real estate professionals, mortgage pros and the like and helps buyers hash out contracts, specific to sharing a home with others. The companies may be solving different problems. But one thing's for sure, a hot real estate market will benefit them both. And if there's one thing the real estate market has been lately, it's hot. More ways to buy and share houses are coming to the neighborhood. Just not every neighborhood is all that happy about that..

Picasso Natalie robo Ed harrow David Brown Picasso co Airbnb Northern California NPR Koby Seattle
"picasso" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

04:22 min | 6 months ago

"picasso" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"And so there's been pushback, the mob rule mentality from people who have absolutely no idea what they're talking about, has forced certain companies like Discord to abandon doing NFTs and certain celebrities back down when people screech at them for how bad they are. And they're like, I've seen threads where, you know, I've interjected and said, you know, in the future, you're all going to be having NFTs and they're like over my dead body. I mean, they're so dogmatic about what they think is going to happen that what these things are. How long before all of them will be eating out of the NFT hands. Well, number one, they really should be seeing over my dead NFT body, not over my dead body. Let's just talk about that. Oh, and the other one. The other one that I love is they right click save as they're like, no, I wonder NFT. And so one of the ones that I posted was a vox collectible that I use in town star dot com. It's in the game that I earn. I earn about $200 a day from having these NFTs in town star. So when they say that, I'm like, oh, you do. Great. Well, let me know when you're making $200 a day with it. Of course, they go somewhere. Of course. What? How? One interesting about two things that I usually address with folks that are just too close minded to see the future that this can bring or is bringing already, but they want or not. Number one is I ask them, so what makes it van Gogh van Gogh Picasso Picasso? Google unique piece of art is also rare and bubble. I don't know, but let's analyze it a little bit more detail. What is it? Is it a couple $100 worth of linen and oil paint and some wood? Well, well, no, it's the old work on it, but okay, well, the artwork can be copied, and you can have numerous additions of it, photographs, replicas, et cetera. And they usually, most of them, very, really, they usually never get to the bottom line. They just don't understand what makes it Picasso Picasso. And usually fairly eye opening for them to hear well not the only thing that makes this the house to the council. Is Picasso's signature. Nothing else..

van Gogh Picasso Picasso van Gogh Google Picasso Picasso Picasso
"picasso" Discussed on Netflix is A Daily Joke

Netflix is A Daily Joke

04:29 min | 6 months ago

"picasso" Discussed on Netflix is A Daily Joke

"'cause it doesn't get any better with modern art either. I'll tell you that. I trip on the first hurdle. Pablo Picasso. I hate him. But you know, hiding, but you can't. And if you ruin your room on cubism, then civilization as we know it will come ball. JB's not wait. Grateful in this room. The way you live in a post cubism world. It's not the first thing we all write in our gratitude journals there. Oh, thank God. I don't like Picasso. I fucking hate it. He's rotten in the face cavity. I hate Picasso. I do. And you can't make me lock. Fine. But you got a lot. And I know, I know I should be more generous about him too because he suffered. He suffered a mental illness, but you see nobody knows that because it doesn't fit with his mythology. I think you're thinking of van Gogh. I'm thinking about them all, actually. But because Picasso, you know, he sold to us as this passionate virile tormented genius man ball sack, right? There's no room in that story for is that. That no, there's a rhetorical, but. He did suffer a mental illness Picasso did. He suffered badly and it got worse as he got older. Picasso suffered the mental illness of Missouri. Split the road. Did not, and I'll bet your I know how that felt. It's misogyny and mental illness. Yeah. Yeah it is. Especially if you're a heterosexual man, because if you hate what you desire, do you know what that is? Sort to shit out. Yeah, it did suffer from a mental illness. It's not a man then I have proof that he didn't suffer him mental illness, but not wrong. Yet they say that he's not misogynist, they're wrong. He was, if you don't believe me, let me provide you a cough from picky asshole himself. He said, each time each time I leave a woman, I should burn her, destroy the woman you destroy the past she represents. The greatest thought is to the 20th century. Let's make up. Great again, guys. Because fucked an underage good. And that's it for me. Not interested. But clear basil. You need it. Marie trees Walter. She was 17 when they met underage. Legally underage. Picasso was 42 married at the height of his career. Does it matter? It actually does. It does matter, but as Picasso said, no, it was perfect. I was in my prime tree, was in her prime. I probably read that when I was 17. Do you know how grim that was? Oh, I'm in prime. Oh, there is no view at my peak. But I wasn't upset at the time, of course, because I was learning about cubism. Now I should qualify this though. Jim is an is important. You know, it really is. It was a real game changer. Picasso freed us from slavery. People really did. You know, he freed us from the slavery of having to reproduce believable three dimensional reality on a two dimensional surface. Three point perspective, that illusion that gives the idea of a single stable worldview, a single perspective, Picasso said no. Run free. You can have all the perspectives. That's what we need all of the perspectives at once from above from below inside out besides all the perspectives of one. Thank you because what a God. What a hero. Thank you, but tell me any of those perspectives a woman. No, I'm not fucking interested. You just put a kaleidoscope filter on your cock. You're still finding flash files.

Picasso Pablo Picasso Marie trees Walter van Gogh Missouri basil Jim
'Our Broken Elections' Shows How Mark Zuckerberg Invested $350M in 2020 Election

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 8 months ago

'Our Broken Elections' Shows How Mark Zuckerberg Invested $350M in 2020 Election

"I need to go through the table at content so the audience knows the extent of your and vaness Picasso's a coverage here It's really it's really comprehensive taking advantage of the COVID pandemic to change the way we vote Another chapter the median president Trump's presidential advisory commission on election integrity the tool of choice for vote Thebes absentee ballot fraud the many ways election fraud happens Liberals dream legislation HR one and the threat to election integrity in the First Amendment Mark Elias Inc the legal general for the left Zucker box the center for tech and civic life vote trafficking automatic voter registration and rank choice voting a recipe for coercion fraud and confusion I mean you really have covered the entire playing field here You wanted to hit Zucker box Go ahead Well Mark you're a lawyer Imagine if a company that had a very spotty osha record and was really being bothered by the workplace enforcement rules for accidents decided that you know rather than clean up their act they're going to change the rules So what they do is they create a foundation of 5 O one three and they go to the local federal osha office and they say you know we're going to give you a whole bunch of money because we really believe in workplace safety All you have to do to accept this extra money which you can hire more bureaucrats with is sign a contract with us that you'll change your rules on a workplace management and enforcement And by the way those are the kind of the changes we want because they'll basically give us a pass Everybody would be outraged It would be a complete perversion of the regulatory process Well Mark Zuckerberg through his various foundations put in $350 million in the 2020 election and they went to all of these election offices around the country Most of them in democratic states almost all of them in swing states and said you know Philadelphia you've got a $10 million annual budget for elections How'd you like to make a

Vaness Picasso Trump's Presidential Advisory Zucker Mark Elias Center For Tech And Civic Life Osha Office Osha Confusion Mark Mark Zuckerberg Philadelphia
"picasso" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:58 min | 10 months ago

"picasso" Discussed on Ideas

"I just had fairly recently and to not even be able to connect with myself and my appearance and then to be told that my face looks like a picasso. Painting was hard picasso and his art would become a figure looming in hanley's life. I wouldn't say that. I was some junior art expert or anything like that. But yeah i definitely knew precaution. Wise i knew what specifically what cubist paintings looked like I knew that his work was all about you. Know in my mind. It was like an eye over here a nose over here. An era like over here in show as a as a kid. Young girl felt like a loss of innocence. Like i could no longer pretend that. I was normal or pretend that everything was ok into. Picasso became the source of pain but also fascination. I just went from feeling like there were times where i could be special and unique to feeling like i was completely subhuman and flawed and then i started to truly believe that everyone felt that way about me. The word ugly was in henley's life too. I don't think i really identified with it in some ways in some ways i did like i. It was like. I started to believe that i was ugly because i felt like i was. That's what i was supposed to believe when someone tells you and when people tell you over and over and over again you're different that you're weird that you're ugly they you're you don't belong all these things you do. Start to internalize it but on my own before then. I think there were times when i would get upset like after surgery when i was a kid. If i didn't look like myself anymore..

hanley picasso Picasso henley
"picasso" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:43 min | 10 months ago

"picasso" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Two Picasso at his his, uh, at his home, uh, near the Gulf, Juan in Entebbe. At that time, I think in Valerie, where he was working at the time, it would be great to have a photo of that. Uh, because Cary Grant was very interested in in all the arts, but I haven't been able to find one. But they were basically Hitchcock and because so working at the same time, they were certainly working with the same color palette. So if you want to find something of the spirit of this post war period, particularly the fifties were Picasso is after with his paintings, and you want to see it in the motion picture. Watch that film because it's a little bit of a time capsule to catch a thief. You look at that pallet and then you go to joie de vive from 1946 by Picasso, and it's all there. The beach. Is the ocean. All done in schematic simplicity. You have I A ship under sail on the horizon. Uh And you have this foreground with with plants in this sort of like jagged, rough sort of beach scape. With a beautiful high horizon, the ocean behind the light effects coming from the sun, the clouds in the sky. Basically, it's all kind of like a beautiful veil of a very powder blue and then you realize in the foreground These are not people so much. They are classical symbols of the past. You have centers and fawns playing their flutes. You have a dancing goat. You have this incredible. The central figure of a woman. Maybe Venus Aphrodite, e, uh, symbol of universal beauty playing a tambourine dancing. She's the tallest figure in the middle of the painting. Uh, Everything about her is is emphasized again, like Cuba's painting, the hair, the breast, the body, uh, hips, her legs but not done in any kind of a salacious way. It's all done in a way that you identify in the unity of woman in the rebirth of the world that's taking place after the war. Again I used. You know you're staying glass windows or something more recent the cartoons of Gary Larson when he was really putting out his cartoon he was criticized. I remember in the eighties at the time by people like like Charles Schulz. They were saying If you're going to do cartoons, you have to have a strip you You cannot have everything all in just one rectangle. It just it doesn't. It doesn't work. That's really not what a cartoon is supposed to be about. And Gary Larson went in his own way. Kind of like Picasso. How do you encapsulate everything instantly In one of you? We get that with Picasso in this painting, draw Div IV. He's using classical elements. He's using the figure of Aphrodite and in the center is actually his his his his mistress. Longtime mistress of the at the time, Francois Geo, who is still living I think at the age of 99 or 100, now, um and her two Children, Claude and Paloma, Uh, Picasso, Paloma, the great jewelry designer, for instance. Um uh, couture designer. Uh, as you know, uh, but here she is done completely, Um, schematically, there's no portrait image or whatever, but she's the inspiration of it. And again. She shows that the whole rebirth is taking through taking place through the joy through the comedy. Uh, just through really the analogy of joy. I can't think of a better word of all the participants. In the foreground of this painting, led by her hitting the timber, rain, and then all the other dancing animals. It is a beautiful painting to look at. It is the flat lose the sort of bluish pinkish whites of the light coming, you know, across the sea. The landscape in the foreground. It's Picasso taking the renaissance and modernizing it, which is already done in so many different ways. He's just picking it up in a new way with this one. So again, Joie de vive Now when you look at that painting, your sort of reminded Picasso He would go off in his own way, but very much like Raphael, standing on the shoulders of giants, who got so much of his inspiration from the artists of the older generation Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci. Picasso was not averse to borrowing from his contemporary artists, particularly his great friend, Uh, Matisse, as well as others. But then the artists of the old Masters too, so what we have here? Is Picasso's rendition of Utter Joy. That harkens back not only to Mycenaean, Greece and classical grace but also to the renaissance, also to the classicism of the 19th century and in France. End of the contemporary work of the 20th century. Those artists known to him, uh, particularly Matisse, and we can look at Matisse's beautiful, uh, one of his great pain. I'm looking at one right now. Done the same years because of joie de vive and that is Polynesia. The sky. Uh, now this is a silk screen and it is absolutely beautiful. It's in the Museum of Modern Art and Troy, France again done in 1946. This beautiful silk screen. Take a look at it called Polynesia, the sky and it is like you're lying on your back on a beautiful summer day and you're looking up, say In the trees or whatever. And you're looking at a flock of birds. In this case, doves flying back and forth. There is no perspective here. I always every time I say it always think I'm lying on my back in the ground, and I'm looking up at these birds. So you've got about eight birds going and all sorts of the Doing these wonderful pirouettes in the sky above you, and they are white doves. They look like origami sculptures and just thrown up in the air. Beautifully folded. The colour white is beautiful again. Like Picasso's palette. You've got various shades of blue and again like pecan wood, like Hitchcock's palette and to catch a thief. You've got these beautiful shades of blue everything from the costumes then reflected in the Mediterranean. And I've got to tell you recently, I saw A fabulous print that was done okay. In 17 59 talk about the influence of color on an artist. This was this was done by, um a painter Richard Paton, and then it was done made into a beautiful hand colored engraving and 17 59. In a commemorates the victory of the British Man of War the H M. H. H. M s Monmouth. Against the A French ship of the line. The food drill. Uh, the year before. I think I think it was maybe in the summer, June July of 17 58. Well. By February of the next year, This print was made Which shows if you like, naval battle, you know, prints and paintings. This is one for you. Not only is it a beautiful scene on the sea and the Mediterranean It has been done at nighttime. So you have a full moon lowering their oh, just over the horizon. You've got a cloud filled sky. So it's beautiful Study in grey with the sky. You've got the beautiful orbit the moon. They're casting its light over the Mediterranean. You've got the battle which actually was a battle of quite a few ships. This is kind of like a breakaway part of that battle between these two And the mom with defeats the food really takes it prisoner and you see them the mass coming down. You see the cannons going off a light effects. You can see the crewmen silhouetted on the deck. Even Uh, on the different ships. You can see if a flat you can see the sales coming down. You can see a man preying on a sale on a Sparv. One of the ships, probably the food rail in the foreground, praying Uh, all these little details, But the most beautiful element of it doesn't have anything to do with the war. And that is the palette. The color scheme of this print is gorgeous. If you want to look it up. It's Richard Paton. The defeat of just put in hmm. Monmouth, uh, 17 59 print you'll be able to get it that way. Uh, look at what the light of the moon does to the surface of the Mediterranean. That isn't just a simple blue that is hand painted, probably by a woman or a couple of women the way that they did it in those days the.

Richard Paton Michelangelo Leonardo da Vinci Cary Grant Francois Geo Gary Larson Charles Schulz Claude 1946 Raphael France 19th century 20th century Matisse June July of 17 58 Joie de vive 100 Venus Aphrodite Hitchcock 17 59
"picasso" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

02:06 min | 11 months ago

"picasso" Discussed on Science Friction

"Occurred six hours apart so having an artist in your lead creating her artworks at banana scale. He's actually having outcomes for you. Scientists it's changing the way you think about the work. You do exactly. This is through scientific use of the data in using an artful well. That's exciting is certainly a lot of opportunities. What interesting questions does working with an atomic force microscope. Rise for you'd need physically paps you know this idea of making sense of what you see but you're not seeing anything. The instrument is doing that for you. So what are you looking at. And it's a translation. So that is i guess. A large area that a lot of different types of science performed at the nano scale the atomic scowl on the quantum scale is starting to come up against and i think really the issue is how to humans perceive of these scales and then engineer and keep working at these scales and imagining new new theories at scales if they can't grasp the physics or the environment that they're working in. And so this is where i think. Hot has a really important role to play that. It come in and suggest new sensory engagements with these areas. Artists doctor andrea wrestle and professor thomas on this episode from science frictions archive and you can catch more from our mighty. Scientists professors sheriff's three ram in another episode from the lavas in the lab of science friction. Where he was disarmingly personal. Delightfully say just google. It hit to our website and dive in from there and get your friends to subscribe to the science fiction podcast. You can talk to me on twitter as ever at natasha mitchell. And i'll catch you next time bye. You've been listening to an abc podcast. Discover more great. Abc podcasts live radio and exclusives on the abc app..

andrea wrestle thomas natasha mitchell google twitter abc Abc
"picasso" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

03:48 min | 11 months ago

"picasso" Discussed on Science Friction

"Way Suited up head to toe so not even a speck of scheme not even a random. Flake of dandruff will interfere with proceedings. Let's make andrea's new tool of tried. We've walked up to a big gray box. It kind looks like pottery kiln. It's got a glass door and inside are the workings of the atomic force microscope. Now when i say microscope people mod imagine a little lot microscope. The soda thing. They would've used in science class at school. This is not that in fact. It's not even using light at all. What it uses. The atomic force microscope uses is a very small probe. Sort of like a record. Stylus a stylus on a record player. So we'll be that. I be things using late too late. Bones of surface and i captured if you need to look at things smaller. We use a light microscope. So through lenses late strikes a surface comes back through so we can make things maybe a thousand times larger but if things are even smaller late is actually too big. Ladies form of waves and delayed we see starts at four hundred nanometers to compared to a nanometer. Four hundred times larger. So if it's traits it's going to strike a large volume bounces back off the surface of information that you're trying to read at the nanos scale. It just misses it completely exactly. It's a massive average and so it's like trying to remove a pin with jack ham so instead of lie or electrons or xrays the atomic force microscope uses something different to create images or representations of the services. It's pointed at touch would be essentially us what is like the tip of the pin is a single atom thick to an extremely shop. In your running it over the surface so it's going to look at every crevice bump and change the surface almost like an atomic scale braille. Exactly to is like cartography and hope people did maps long essentially scaled on billions of times so the actual instrument is much smaller than the large box itself and the external component is really to isolate the machine from vibration vibration any instrument. Interacting with something of a few nanometers is going to be very sensitive to environmental vibration even to the extent. Where if i was speaking in front of it it would pick up those vibrations and it had just might your image useless said. It'd be blurry scientifically are not necessarily blurry. I mean you'll see the quality of the images but it would alter the The quality of the data from a scientific perspective on the other hand Paul thomas has done a work where he utilized that for artistic means he actually read some of fireman's work to the sample that he was imaging. And so those vibrations became a part of the artistic works artist. Paul thomas is something of a guru in the small world of nanno art. He's written the main text book called nanno art the materiality of art and the light richard fireman is of course a bit of a girl in the world of popularizing science but not in fifty nine the physicist guy a trial blazing lecture titled this plenty of room at the bottom. He talked about the wild possibilities of manipulating and controlling matter at the atomic scale to make miniaturize computers and match else. They issued to fun challenges. Could someone build a tiny motor a nanno murder in fact that happened just a year later in nineteen sixty at his institution celtic. The second challenge wasn't possible to.

jack ham andrea Paul thomas richard fireman
How to Reverse Engineer Success with Social Psychologist Ron Friedman

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:25 min | 1 year ago

How to Reverse Engineer Success with Social Psychologist Ron Friedman

"Let's talk about that. Reverse engineering because you are a psychologist you study top performance in you. Discover something that you really weren't expecting through that process. I'd love to hear more. Yeah what i discovered. Is that most of the people have gone to the top of their profession. They're not relying on talent. They're not relying on practice. In fact there's a problem with the formula that practice will get you to the top and that problem is that you can't practice an idea you've never considered and so the best ideas don't come through hours and hours of practice. They come by looking at what the best in the field or doing and then working backward to figure out how they did it and that turns out to be a remarkably common approach among top performers. So how would you. Ron define reverse engineering. I mean i think a lot of our listeners. Understand it as a general term but like what is your definition. My definition is finding the best in a field and then working backward to figure out how they did it now. In silicon valley the idea of reverse engineering is very well known. It's how he the personal computer and laptops and even the iphone but what most people realize is that reverse engineering is also how stephen king and malcolm glide well learned to write and how painters like claude monet and pablo picasso learned to paint and even how judd appetite learn to write comedy reverse engineering turns out to be far more common than anyone realized.

RON Malcolm Glide Silicon Valley Stephen King Claude Monet Pablo Picasso Judd
Using Your Left and Right Side of Your Brain When Investing

Optimal Finance Daily

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Using Your Left and Right Side of Your Brain When Investing

"If all it took to be a successful investor was plugging numbers into equations. Full of greek letters. Then wouldn't anyone with a calculator be rich. It almost seems like the miracle gymnastics. You perform the worst. The result go read about that hedge fund run by a bunch of famous. Phd's and nobel prize winners. That blew up. I'm not saying the science of investing isn't important. You need math skills. What i'm saying is that there's also an art of investing like when i'm thinking about investing in a stock although listened to the company's pass earnings halls and read past quarterly reports and play with pass numbers. But then you need to make a guess about the future what my apple or zoom look like in five to ten years was my view of their management team how might their growth strategy evolve. Is there moat getting deeper and wider. The answers are totally subjective. And i've noticed the investors who really excel at assessing and judging the intangibles. Just use lots of common sense. They see things so clearly think so clearly. They also easily change their mind but don't change their mind easily. Which reminds me of the story about picasso. Have you heard it. It goes like this. Because i was sitting in a paris cafe when an meyer approached and asked if he would do a quick sketch on a paper napkin. Picasso politely agreed swiftly executed the work and handed back the napkin but not before asking for a rather significant amount of money. The admirers was shocked. How could you ask for so much. It took you a minute to draw this. No picasso replied. It took me forty years the longer you invest the more you realize that being good at investing has little to do with combing through mountains of data or spending hours crunching numbers to be good is blending science and art is hard data and soft data left brain right brain. Any artists will tell you that art is not knowing what comes next not knowing how the future unfolds you can never entirely no so the artist like the investor makes guesses. They might be wrong but they keep at it.

Gymnastics Picasso Apple Meyer Paris
A JPEG Sells for $70 Million, Creating a New Era of Digital Art Auctions

Business Wars Daily

03:51 min | 1 year ago

A JPEG Sells for $70 Million, Creating a New Era of Digital Art Auctions

"From wondering. I'm david brown in this business. Wars daily on this tuesday march twenty third. If you're an art collector with a spare seventy million lying around a rembrandt says on may be out of your reach. But you just might be able to score yourself. A lesser van gogh picasso or like someone last week. You own your own people digital montage. Oh you've never heard of people that's okay. He's not one of those guys. They teach art history class. Which makes it all the more remarkable one of his electronic art pieces just sold at auction at christie's for nearly seventy million dollars even though it only exists in pixels is the third highest price ever commanded by a living artist. According to the new york times people is a digital artist from south carolina. Whose given name. Is mike thirteen years. He's created a drawing every day. He started with pen and paper but now creates art. Digitally the record breaking piece titled everyday's the five thousand days is a composite of the first five thousand days of that project. This was also the first time christie's sold a piece of digital only artwork. It was purchased with the cryptocurrency ether. Another first for christie's something tells me you won't be the last either. So you're probably wondering why in the world someone would pay seventy million dollars for a pack a reproducible. Virtual file right. Something you can't touch or even hang on your wall. yeah. I know. That's what i was wondering. Turns out every day is is in just another pretty j. peg. It's what's called a non fungible token or nfc and if you're thinking is so tell me why that matters. Well you're going to need to stick with me for a moment. On this one in tease us blockchain technology for authentication. Now this blockchain is the same sort of thing that you find in bitcoin right. It captures information and shares it with a network of computers and once shared. There's a digital ledger. That records the data across thousands of computers. Making it impossible to manipulate or so goes the theory. So when you buy an nf it's quote minted to you. Meaning an ownership record is created across thousands of computers around the world. You own the original one of a kind file. I know it may seem complicated on the surface but it really is pretty straightforward essentially techie. Way of making a digital file one of a kind like a physical object even if others tried to make a copy. It's taking a photo of a famous painting. It's not worth what the original is worth. Entities allow users to own bits of video songs or images. Their popularity actually began years ago with a game. Called crypto kitties where people could buy in trade animated cats after attracting top venture. Capital firm says investors some crypto. Kitty sold well into the six figures. Lately they've turned into a blazing hot sector in art and collectibles. Sports stars like lebron. James and rob gronkowski have even gotten in on the action selling. Nfc video clips. In digital trading cards people has been at the forefront of this craze in february a short video clip he created sold for nearly seven million dollars in one weekend in december he made more than three million dollars selling his t's bad for a guy who calls some of his own work crap according to the times not to be outdone. Sotheby's has gotten in on the act last

Van Gogh Picasso Mike Thirteen Christie David Brown The New York Times South Carolina NFC Rob Gronkowski Kitty Lebron James Sotheby
Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

Tolbert, Krueger and Brooks

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

"Learn about NF tease. The price tag for some digital artwork is starting to rival classic paintings from Picasso and Monet. Mike Winkelmann. He's better known as people created a montage of 5000 days of digital art and then put it up for auction at Christie's. It's sold for a record $69 million unique Blockchain based digital image is part of the non fungible Token world or end empties are still being shunned by many in the art world as a speculative fat, But the eight figure price tag for the people Certainly caught the naysayers. Attention.

Mike Winkelmann Monet Picasso Christie
Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

Pat Thurston

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

"Tease. The price tag for some digital artwork is starting to rival classic paintings from Picasso and Monet. Mike Winkelmann. He's better known as people created a montage of 5000 days of digital art and then put it up for auction at Christie's. It's sold for a record $69 million unique Blockchain based digital image is part of the non fungible Token World, or N F. T s are still being shunned by many in the art world as a speculative fat butt. Eight figure price tag for the people has certainly caught the naysayers. ATTENTION By Mark Nieto. This report sponsored by Exit inaccuracy matters. Get a $5 rebate by trading up any non contact

Mike Winkelmann Monet Picasso Christie Mark Nieto
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Sandra Shave W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Boston Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Korir
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
#182  Beach Riot

DJ Force X in Conversation

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

#182 Beach Riot

"Over again thinking woman to play woman a riot so i was really scared when i go in the cdi. Because i was shall go gone to play how to do this. I am i going to be on this enough. We only had a few days. It was luckily at the first couple of tracks in. Who's nice crease. Squeaky by mean definitely pans in your home or anything taty flat space kill

Today Three Hundred Six Years First Podcast One Million Streams Last Year One Million Six Hundred Thirty Six People Later This Year Sixty Eight Thousand This Year Policy Code Single Time Code Picasso Riot ONE
"picasso" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"picasso" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"He was accused of stealing the mona lisa. Listen to my episode about the mona lisa for more about this story but basically he was accused by police officer in paris who just didn't like modern artists and assume that only a modern artists who hated classical art could have stolen it. He was often photographed wearing a black and white striped shirt. That shirt was known as a britain striped shirt and was the uniform of the french seamen in brittany. It had exactly twenty one stripes which represented the twenty one victories of napoleon coco. Chanel brought back in nineteen seventeen and that was one. Picasso started wearing it in his later. Life rumors floated around that he would often pay for his meals by just signing his name or doing a quick drying he wants refuse to do so saying quote. I'm buying a meal not the whole restaurant unquote in another anecdote. One of his fans in paris asked him to draw doodle on a piece of paper picasso then said that will be thirty thousand dollars what the fan replied then only took five seconds. Not picasso said that took a lifetime. Picasso was famous for being a ladies man technically. He was only married twice but he had many affairs and mistresses. One of his. Most famous affairs was with marie. Therese walter in nineteen twenty seven when he was forty five you notice on the street and approached her and said quote miss. You have an interesting face. I would like to do your portrait. I m picasso on boat which you have to admit is a great pickup line. She was only seventeen. And i never heard of him but they ended up spending years together and actually had a child. Three of picasso's children are still alive as is one of his ex wives. Francois gilo is still around at the age of ninety nine and painting inter studio in new york city. Perhaps his most famous work is gernika. It's an enormous wall-sized painting which was done in the cuba style in nineteen nine hundred seven. It was created after the bombing of the basque city of gernika by german and italian forces on behalf of the spanish government. He lived in paris during the german occupation during world war..

picasso Picasso paris Therese walter brittany Chanel britain Francois gilo marie gernika new york city cuba spanish government
"picasso" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"picasso" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Begin any discussion on picasso you. I have to start with his full name. The full name of the artist known as picasso given to him at birth is pablo diego. Jose francisco de paulo one nipple. Maria de las raimondo. Cipriano dias antigua trinidad ruis e picasso. Picasso is actually an italian name that comes from his mother early in his career. He was playing around with different names. He tried qasr and picasso which of his mother's and father's name avoided his father's surname of we just because it was too common in spain. He didn't think pablo breweries would stand out. He also may have been superstitious. His was a failed painter and he didn't want to use the same name he did for his work. He explained the decision to use the name. To hungarian artist george brasi quote. Picasso was stranger more resonant than ruis. You know what appealed to me about that name well. It was undoubtedly the double s which is fairly unusual in spain. Picasso is of italian origin as you know and the named person bears or adopts has importance. Can you imagine me calling myself ruis. Pablo ruiz giggle zeh ruis or one nipple. Men gave ruis end quote. Well he had a point so the artist we call. Picasso was born on october twenty fifth eighteen eighty one in malaga in his birth was difficult in the midwife who delivered him actually thought he was stillborn as mentioned before his father was a failed painter. Who mostly earned money teaching and serving as a curator for museum. He did excel in teaching art in so far as one of his pupils was his son. Picasso was taking lessons with his father at the age of seven and by the age of nine he had completed his first painting called les picador. It is a painting of a man riding a horse and a bull fight to be fair. It does not look at all like something a nine year old would create. Compare this what most kids have opened the refrigerator. And you'll see a huge difference when he was thirteen. His family moved to barcelona where he was admitted to the school of fine arts where his father had gotten a job is father persuaded the school to allow his son to take an entrance exam for the advanced class. The testing usually took a month and was for students much older than he was. Because finish the test in a week and was admitted. At sixteen he was sent to spain's top college madrid's.

picasso Picasso pablo diego Jose francisco de paulo Maria de las raimondo Cipriano dias trinidad ruis pablo breweries george brasi Pablo ruiz qasr spain malaga school of fine arts barcelona madrid
Turkey-Greece tensions escalate over Turkish Med drilling

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

02:07 min | 2 years ago

Turkey-Greece tensions escalate over Turkish Med drilling

"It is one of the Great Geopolitical Grudge matches Greece verses Turkey a venomous and heartfelt hostility long waged over everything from the most profound controversies of history and geography to what the correct name is. Four coffey served in small cups with lots of teeth itching sludge at the bottom and appears to be kicking off again. At issue, this time out is a disagreement over which of the resources buried in the Mediterranean Sea bid belong to whom the picture is very far from straightforward. Indeed, a diagram of the overlapping claims looks like the results of a drunk with an extra sketch trying to draw Picasso's Guernica from memory while blindfolded. But I simple if not simplistic version goes like this in recent years, immense natural gas reserves have been discovered or suspected in the vicinity of Cyprus. This potential boone is complicated by the fact that Cyprus remains actually if not legally divided the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus is recognised as a legitimate sovereign entity by nobody except Turkey fifteen seventy one is when Ottomans gaming. He's the leading country all this region. It's only forty miles away from Turkey Cyprus. DENVER. No one has to ignore. Turkey's interests until he's got until poet. Up to the others to to challenge Turkey nevertheless believes that self entitled to some of Natural bounty while Greece has worked with Israel and Egypt to establish infrastructure to develop and distribute the resources. Turkey. has drilled away to Cyprus's east. Turkey has also agreed with Libya's official but ineffectual government to establish an exclusive economic zone in the waters between the two countries subsequently overlapped by a similar agreement agreed by Greece and Egypt. On Tuesday the Greek and Turkish navies conducted rival exercises in the waters off Crete escalating matters to the it's all fun and Games until someone loses a worship stage,

Turkey Cyprus Turkey Northern Cyprus Boone Greece Mediterranean Sea Coffey Egypt Picasso Libya Denver Turkey. Official Israel
Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

"Collecting. A self portrait by Rembrandt has sold for a record $18.7 million at a virtual Sotheby's auction. Picassos, Giacometti's and Warhol's went for multiple millions, and someone paid 2.8 million for a Seascape trick tick by Banksy. That's almost double the top estimate. The top seller Miro's 1927 woman in a red hat it brought in almost $30 million the highest sale price in Europe so

Sotheby Rembrandt Giacometti Miro Warhol Europe Picassos
Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

WBZ Midday News

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Rembrandt, Miro fetch millions at Sotheby's virtual auction

"The big names in the world of art are going on the auction block. So the base holding it online sale featuring artwork that spans five centuries of art history from Rembrandt, Pablo Picasso, Banksy. The auction house is putting up 70 works of art from the 17th century to the present day of self portrait by Rembrandt expected to fetch about $20

Rembrandt Pablo Picasso Banksy
Artist Bruce Sulzberg on painting Rafael Nadal

The Tennis.com Podcast

06:36 min | 2 years ago

Artist Bruce Sulzberg on painting Rafael Nadal

"Welcome to the tennis dot. Com Pot guest. I'm one of your host. Nina Pantic joined in this episode by my co host. Irena Falconi! Hey, guys! How's it going? And we have a very interesting episode of everyone today we are with the owner artists of cells media. Fine Arts Bruce Cells Bruce Welcome thank you, thank you so much for having me. Bruce? Do you have a very interesting story? I don't think a lot of people know it has to do with Ross doll. You don't usually have artists on our show, so that's why this is very unique and special you wanNA. Tell everyone story when it comes to tennis. Even if you're not a player or coach or tournament organizer, so let's start with you know where you are in the world during this quarantine and how your life is going these days, it's been very interesting. Interesting just like I would say probably ninety nine point. Nine percent of the world is trying to figure out what the hell you're. GonNa do during his time. you know the one fortunate part about it as being an artist, I've been locked in the studio painting new paintings and working with different ideas and working with RAF and his team Carlos Costa to figure out new and inventive ways to drive in bill business and do things that we are currently not used to doing. So it's been. It's been a wild interesting two months of figuring that out. What's your interest level tenants? Do you play? How did you get into this? US Fascinating I'm actually one of those weird concoctions of I'm an artist athletes so I was a big time athlete. As a kid played eight years of Baseball's all-star in baseball play basketball. I was all star in basketball. Basketball led me. Tennis I was a basketball player. Freshmen in highschool and kind of got into. An argument with my coach basically just decided to leave basketball. And I picked up a tennis racket and I had just. It was a natural thing for me to do. And before I knew I, had a professional coach, and my coach was played played on the tour and played John McEnroe. He saw me play and before I knew I was training with some of the best players in northern, California. And so I played high school career. played college and I still train. I still training a tribe while afford the pandemic I was out there every week. just started getting back out there about a week ago when they released the courts, but tennis is definitely in. My jeans had so much, so that my son plays college tennis. I'm actually had a scholarship to Chapman University as I used to play and made teams freshman, and he's also coach now, too, so and even though he still in college, but yes, definitely in my blood and strange enough. Raw Molly the owner of art encounter. That is my distributor. It turns out the way that we got this deal with him. Was He was tennis player in his whole family's sex players, and when he saw the original painting that I did have all sprouted in hadn't seen them in years we. She just freaked out. Saying Oh my God. This is unbelievable what I told him. I have five hundred signed by the dog himself. Personally and myself and we did a whole thing back in the day. When we have this painting, he's like. Nope, that's it. We're going to do something, so it's been a very unique tennis story all the way around. I can honestly say I think it's been a while that I've actually heard someone say that. They're both an athlete an artist. When was When was the moment where you're figured out like? Wow, I actually have a knack for this whole painting thing. That was easier. I I was asking rg by the time. I was five six seven years old. My parents had me in special school. Special Art schools and You know it was something that they noticed when I was one years old that I can draw and I'd actually kept first painting I drawing than I ever did when I was one and They just knew my dad was artist. He never followed that trade. Actually went into corporate business, but my dad is very artistic used to do paintings. So I kind of had that gene in me. And I just knew at a very early age. That was what I was going to do my life. We hear so much about young athletes figuring out their skill set at a young young age at like three, four five, and to see that art is very similar as interesting for those who don't know the story Bruce is the owner of Salzburg Media Fine Arts, a broad range of professional sports team three. Of National. International athletes he got three D work of Rafa. Nadal for those are not watching this on video. It's behind him, but it's also going to be a link in our episode information. He's also got artwork of Muhammad. Ali Michael Jordan Prince. Fielder Dirk Nowitzki. Irk Nowitzki I'm not a basketball person. I'm sorry. Most importantly. It's the tennis painting that we're really here to talk about, and it's Three D. art, so I want to start with what is three art. What's the process for making an artwork like this before we get into the Roth story? This was very unique idea. That I came up with lean back in nineteen, ninety five, I was doing my very first art show at the New York our next on back in those days that was the largest art show in the world. Everything was painter of any place anywhere was there exhibiting in was at the Jacob Javits in New York City, so as massive and I back then you the jury to get in so jury to get an shared a booth with another artist, and when I was there, all brought was abstract paintings on canvas, because that's what I was painting at the Time Big Love Klee Miro. Picasso, that was kind of backroom basically, and we've been in the show for five days and insult. Damn painting and I told. My My. Fiance at the time in my mom was there with me. I gotTa Take I. Just need to go walk the show and I said. You know if I'm going to do anything in my life I've got to figure out how to do something that no one has ever done and for some reason and it's time. My Dad owned art gallery. Very very successful one back in San Francisco. East Bay and I just something popped in my head. work on glass. Just a glass on the second I got home I started Phil around layers of plexiglas and low and behold. That's how it was born I. Just we just figured out how to frame it how to do the whole thing in. One, doing where usually as an artist you paying on one level is a canvas most most of the time. You're just doing everything on that level of what I wanted to do with cigarette how to take a look at an image of a painting in break it up and put different parts of each of painting on glass, and then use spicer's to separate them, so there's space in between each layer. You get that natural three d look with no gimmicks, no anything no lighting. It's all based on different layers and different perspectives, so that's how it was born and. The risk on history.

Tennis Basketball Bruce Irena Falconi Nina Pantic Dirk Nowitzki Carlos Costa John Mcenroe California San Francisco Jacob Javits Ross Muhammad East Bay Baseball Chapman University Spicer Ali Michael Jordan Prince Phil Nadal
Helping Others During Lockdown

Mentally Yours

09:09 min | 2 years ago

Helping Others During Lockdown

"Save welcome to mentally oils. Thank you thank you for having me event. Thanks for coming on. So you're wanted with the Samaritans held on if you've been working with them actually not long about two years. I started doing it when I start work and I'd worked in a very busy high pressure job. That really left no room for anything else and when I stopped doing it uh suddenly thought I really would like to investigate Samaritans And it was thought that just came out of a clear. Blue skied at know. Why but it did I discovered that was a branch quite near me and I went to the information evening. I was really impressed with what I saw. And Went straight into the training and at all it all the way through. I was thinking if I feel this is quite right. You know just stop. It's fine but I never once felt it wasn't quite right and I've never felt wasn't right since And I look forward to shifts at Shelly. I find them really interesting and ment- mentally you know mentally stimulating and So I have no regrets about about volunteering tool. I think it's incredible. What am on the podcast. We always refer people to some of the end just because some people might have been Things come up if speaking about difficult issues and it's it's really fantastic to know that the Samaritans that just to listen in to have chats what sort of things that you deal with On a daily basis in terms of chatting to people oh my goodness Coolest issues are like snowflakes. There are two that are the same Era kind of broad categories that they can fall into such as `isolation loneliness mental health issues. Physical Health Issues Worries about work will finance family could be violence or abuse or things Those are very broad categories and when you to king to Kula it's completely incredible unit. You Cou- you couldn't you couldn't make up what some people have to go through And everyone everyone is different before Marson. I went to newspapers. And I thought I'd seen and heard do. But I realized when I when I became a smash in that hadn't even scratched the surface of what goes on in people's lives on a day to day basis. It's been very illuminating. Have you seen things change during the epidemic? Because I'm sure this Martin's being inundated during the stressful time interesting. We'll always inundated to be perfectly honest Shift and you take a cool and he put the phone down and immediately rings again. This just never any less up the calls. Just keep coming through and it's the same now And we have had a category added to the categories that we deal with one being covered. How the in my own experience of doing shifts through the lockdown I haven't had any cools specifically about Kovin. And when I think about it. I think that possibly mental health when it comes to mental health. It's a little bit like physical health. So people who have mentioned Cova to me have also go other issues. So it's a bit like you have underlying issues and then code and the challenges of coded Sorta the exacerbate these issues as it has done with physical health unit so the people who were suffering most with covert was the people who had underlying issues. And that for me. in the cools. I've taken has been the case. That people have got issues going on in their lives. May they may be prone to depression. They may be feeling very lonely. Anau lockdown has sort of those issues into much sharper focus. I haven't had anyone cool specifically about vid frightened of that actual many peop- law I think a lot of people to listening to the Picasso's probably relate to that because just vanik totally sort of from friends and even family who have sort of long-term half the she's Winstons if you sort of have anxiety General anxiety disorder that sort of become west because of to defensive in my case bipolar disorder in. They've been issues in terms of getting medication. Because of Kovic so it is also give lots of things become west sort of people yes I admit rishton about the unnaturally People with mental health issues and depending on how acute those mental health issues all often have quite a good comprehensive support cap package in place with the NHS and because of social distancing and because of not being able to see people face to face the many people with mental health issues. That support system has evaporated actually during lockdown. And we do. We do see people calling us because they can't any longer speak to that key worker. Will that support worker And Yeah I think I think it's. It's very difficult for people in that situation. Because the the package they used to be able to rely on. Isn't there the same thing happens a bit Christmas and Times like that holidays? People are away and doing other things. And it's a bit like that with lockdown some Jim Peas and mental health. Wise are offering example. Counseling defy laptops obsessions over the phone. I think it's probably pros and cons. Who Different people? I think some people find that helpful. Princeton's if you're depressed you might find easy to just sort of pick up the phone chat someone not she go into a surgery but then as he signed for a lot of people. If you're used to seeing the same pass in face to face it can be quite difficult to get used as a new way of talking to them or if together. I think doing what they can where they can. I think I think doing an incredible job. But it's inevitably gained be a bit patchy and maybe you'll key worker has to a self isolated is an can't be there for you I also had another cooler. He couldn't go to church for her. Church was a vital part of her of her weekly routine really was a point where she saw to touch base every week with the community that went to Sch- and suddenly that was taken from her and that was very hard So yeah it's it's people are finding that that regular support system has been taken away and therefore it leaves you feeling very on anchored and bit A little bit out of balance and I think there's no question that lockdowns been huge adjustment for all of us in. Its massive. What what has happened? In the last few weeks countries come to a standstill lutts huge. And you can't pretend it's no huge. It will have an impact on all of us to one degree or another. You know someone must have more resilient than others But you know being less. Resilient is not a sign of failure it is just the person you are and you may need some support and certainly smartened serve to support anybody. Who is struggling through this time?

Samaritans General Anxiety Disorder Kovin Marson Cova Martin Jim Peas Kovic Princeton NHS
Jefferson Hack on Why The World Must Not Be Complacent

The Business of Fashion Podcast

10:21 min | 2 years ago

Jefferson Hack on Why The World Must Not Be Complacent

"Hi. This is Imran at founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to another special edition of the podcast. Today I sit down. Virtually with Jefferson Hack founder Updates Media Jefferson and I have been able to have conversations over the past decade about the role of media. And there's probably no more important time to that conversation then now as we're all navigating the unfolding humanitarian crisis caused by this Pandemic which has now reached more than one hundred and seventy countries around the world with more than four hundred thousand infections and tens and tens of thousands of people who have died so. What's the role of fashion media in this context? And how do we? As independent media companies navigate the situation. What is the impact that we can have during this uncharted time? That's what I speak to. Jefferson up on this special episode. So here's Jefferson Hack inside Fashion Jefferson. Hey Ron how're you man? I'm here I'm happy to be talking to you and Thanks for inviting me. To be on the coast. Yeah no it's a pleasure to talk. You know actually. I was thinking this morning back to my very first interview with you that we did. Do you remember at the Sanderson Hotel. Oh that was a long time ago. That was our first. Theo F live event and ever and we had the conversation and it was rolling out on twitter and people were sending questions from all around the world. And this this is Kinda the same except you and I can't sit together But I'm really glad to have the chance to talk to you. I mean so are you doing you know I'm well. I'm in good health My immediate family are in good health. Everyone's kind of say an isolation my staff in good health has no. I'm a director emergencies taking place amongst the employees or In days media so for that. I'm just really grateful for that I feel blessed and you know as far as what's happening in the wider world and what's happening with Corona Virus Of course you know I mean. Words cannot really describe it. I think I find words quite inadequate to describe what's going on but you know if I had to pick one word. It would be about kind of adapt adopting adopting with of the changing circumstances. That going on so I guess on a personal level. That's where I'm at but yet is going to be a lot to talk about in this Picasso. I'll let you do you know how are you? I'm good also healthy and grateful and taking some time out every day to make space for some meditation and reflection and a walk in the park. Because we're still allowed to do that here in London and you know like you. I'm just kind of grappling with what's happening. There's so many different perspectives. There's so much information which is kind of when I thrive actually making sense of information overload But I find my brain is operating at a speed and a and a intensity level that is unusually high and so I'm trying to make sure I take those moments to pause and stop and reflect It's good it's good advice. I think you know it's the same for everybody. I mean it's as much as if it's a pandemic Susan Info Democ. You know we're kind of overwhelmed with information stotts all the different opinions analysis speculations and You know I think without kind of practicing self care. It's incredibly easy to kind of get sucked into things like fierro high brings. It or doing things that are harmful just to distract ourselves from the reality of what's going on and I think that's really kind of like natural human reactions. You hit on some really important points. I think you know that some of the things that we're really trying to inspire our audience with seventeen million Digital audience across the world across platforms. And you know one of the most immediate thing is is really the kind of you know the mental health awareness and just being able to be effective as a media in being able to influence people's Moods. I mean we can change the way people feel all that moves through the stories and the tone of the stories that we published so no. That was a a an incredible kind of role that media. Compla- in in this time of crisis all type of media specifically you and I were exchanging text messages the other day about you know how companies like ours independent media companies in this kind of global industry. Like what's what's our role and I'm I'm really curious to well. Yeah I mean that was exactly it. We were like texting each other. Because it's all about reaching out out right. It's all about you know being in touch with each other as independent media as a people in the industry who are active who are part of the community of people in in in in kind of in fashion in the UK in globally and an culture. And that's all I've been doing since this has been really becoming more and more of a crisis and I think that's that's what we've got is kind of our connections and are connected and staying connected as a huge a huge part of this the way that we're going to manage to navigate this. Yeah I wanted to start there actually so you know when when did the kind of penny drop for you that this was going to become you what it's become this kind of unprecedented situation in kind of a kind of modern in the last hundred years at least maybe since the Spanish flu and what was your initial reaction of how to manage it as the leader of this this media company possible level. You know I was still a woman fashion week into Paris fashion week. I didn't finish the week up but you know things are becoming much more evidence during that week that did this was becoming incredibly serious and Some of the myths were flying around with being busted. And some clarity was coming to the kind of you know. Health impact that this was going to have an and what was going to be needed by government in order to deal with that so you know. I think it wasn't really till Mellon went into lockdown that it really kind of began to be real and hearing the stories firsthand from clients and friends in Milan about what they were going. Through in lockdown really started helping inform a lot of our thinking at days so that's really the the unprecedented we had in the only way to recognize that it was well. You know that it was that it was likely to get much more serious but you know I think these things are always understood in hindsight and in the moment you know you always think oh well you know it might be contained. There might not come here. Things might not be as bad for us you know. I think that's part of kind of that was part of that was part of my early thinking but you know we. We reacted pretty quickly. I think is a as a media company before the government were telling people to Work will not clubs. We you know we already told staff to work from a meter ready during Paris fashion week. We telling our staff that if it wasn't essential for them to come into the office that they weren't required to come to the office because we wanted to keep people say so. Yeah that's the kind of thing and then when when it really became evident you know. I think our media reaction was one of you know this is a global state of emergency now and you know we have to face a humanitarian health. Disaster that You know we can be helpful and useful in In using some of our resources in some of our media to point directly to that. And we have judy of KETCHAOUA staff. So We'd been working on managing that and managing their work from home situation and then there's a carrying consideration for our audience which we just touched on before and really when we were texting. It was all about kind of understanding with questions we were. We were kind of In discussion about was like. What is the role of of media in this new reality? Yeah what what is our purpose now and I think you know where we had puppies before. Now it's really about focusing the clarity of purpose making sure that the row we're playing in the daily life of our audience is really bringing value

Jefferson Paris Founder And Ceo Sanderson Hotel Imran Founder Twitter UK Ketchaoua RON Theo F Director London Milan Compla Mellon
Lydia Fenet, Global Director at Christie's Auction House: 'I was making a third of what everyone else was making.'

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:31 min | 2 years ago

Lydia Fenet, Global Director at Christie's Auction House: 'I was making a third of what everyone else was making.'

"Today. Lydia fournette joins us on skimmed from the couch. She's the global director of strategic partnerships at Christie's auction house. She's also very lead benefit auctioneer and she's raised over half a billion dollars for charities around the world. Lydia has taken the lessons. She's learned while paving her own career path and has put them in her book for you entitled the most powerful woman in the room is you. Lydia welcomed the skin from the couch. Great to be here. You have the coolest job and we're going to get into but I just want you to skim your resume for us well. My resume is actually kind of short. I've worked at Christie's auction house in New York for twenty one years. I started as an intern and had worked at the company for basically two internships and then was hired out of an internship. I ran the events department for basically ten years on and off started at the bottom grew up in about five or six years in everyone above me left and the job was mine and it was during that time that I realized that there was a side business that you could do. There called benefit auctioning. So you're not the art auction. You're you're not on the Podium Selling Monet's Picasso's essentially you are the person who is getting on stage at eleven o'clock at night at a charity auction trying to raise money for a nonprofit when no one wants to buy anything and so those were really my two jobs for a long time about ten years into my career decided to launch a new department called Strategic Partnerships for the company which I now run globally and I run the large scale benefit auctions around the world for Christie's now as well so really fun job and I earlier love it. What is something not on your linked in that we should know about you. I am a mom of three. I am a veracious runner and I love more than anything to be with people. It's my favorite thing in the world. Have you always been like that? Yes absolutely I am a natural extrovert. There's no question about it. I always think it's funny when people say so. What do you do for downtime? I call my friends and hanging out with them. I try to former for trying to find more friends. The exact opposite quota and my husband too. He loves being themselves and always trying to get in the room to talk to him. And we're very different. Let's bring you into my fold so before we explain. Actually what your job is in day to day? I just want you to tell our audience because I think you are the rare person who's really been at the same company for their career. What is your best piece of advice for how to get hired as an intern fulltime? I think being persistent and really walking into an interview as an intern and making sure that they understand that. You're going to work hard. I know that sounds like the craziest thing to say because it seems pretty obvious to me but I can tell you that. I've probably had eighty or ninety interns over my twenty years at Christie's I can tell you the fifteen who I still remember. I think that internships are such an amazing opportunity to do two things meet people in a company and is that because I shredded paper. My entire first internship at Christie's but guess what the shredder was by the elevator. So I met every single person going in and out of there and I'll introduce yourself I mean people are standing there waiting and remember. This was pre iphone so there was nothing to do. I just stand there and wait but I would stand there and just sort of. Make an off comment about something. That was happening her. You know something as easy as still shredding which people feel sorry for you. They start to talk to you. They always knew I was so they'd always come back. And then there was joke you're still shredding and like I sure am how's your day going. You know just a quick introduction and all of a sudden they remember my face and so when I see them at an event later that week or checking people in special events there was sort of that name recognition that facial recognition so. I just think an internship is the time that people don't realize you get a recommendation from someone that you're interning with in a job. That's very senior in a company in that stays with you for the rest of your life. How did you get your foot in the door? At Christie's I knew nothing about the auction world. I grew up in a small town in Louisiana. My parents were not art collectors but I did a junior semester abroad at Oxford University. While I was there I read an article about the auction world. When Princess Diana's dresses were being. Sold for charity. Yes I remember. Yeah new talks about Christie's and it talks about this auction world and honestly if you knew anything about me my whole life is created in my mind so well. This seems like the place that I should work. I mean it's glamorous people travel. You're meeting all of these people to my earlier point and so I basically started talking about how he was going to work. At Christie's I ninety nine percent of the people I knew had no idea what curtseys was. But my dad who is just such a charismatic amazing man. We were at a Christmas party of a family friend in Baton Rouge Louisiana which is not a bastion of art collecting and there was a young woman who was doing her. She just started at Christie's as an assistant to an assistant. And so my dad pulled me over and he said you've been talking about this place. This woman actually works there and this is when I think sometimes the universe really. If you're open to it helps you in your path. I said to her. Can I get the internship coordinator because I was still in college at this point and she gave me her number and so I started calling this woman and it was so late in the game? I had no idea what I was doing. I was coming from Louisiana. The wasn't so as a New York everybody knew about internships and so I basically just calling her and she kept saying the same thing which was. Ot I'm so sorry you know. The internship program is full but remember there was no caller. Id and that day so had to pick up her phone. She had no idea and every day I would call for two straight weeks and I kept thinking to myself like there has to be a way to make her understand that I have to be there so I have to figure this out and so I would kind of right through a list of questions that I could ask her. That might make her. Think a little bit differently about me and so one day I just hit the nail on the head. I asked her. Can I just ask you something before you hang up on me which you tell me why? The internship has to be closed at thirty people and she said well you know we do museum trips in the afternoon and so yeah. I mean you all of a sudden I was like well. I don't have to go on a museum. It's fine you know and and so I sort of vocalized that I said well listen. I don't have to go on a museum field trip. I could stay and I'm sure they're GONNA be interns. Who were sick and maybe I could fill in over. I mean honestly one college that point. Let's be serious and I think she was so for me to just stop calling her. She said look let me think about it and she hung up the phone and then she called me back an hour later and said I could do a modified internship and I say now that I'm pretty. I went on almost every single one of those museums. You know that's the funny thing because of course someone doesn't show up you know when I hear the story. We're both kind of like smiling at you. Love the fearlessness. A love gutsiness that you had an end poise at a very young age. She just go after this. Both of us had a similar tenacity but didn't have your extroverted part to our story. It's hard exhausting to put yourself out there like that and people come to us for advice all the time. It actually was just talking to a girl yesterday who just as out of college and was trying to get advice on how to network and I was like you have an email address a corporal where you work the big building just email people just like what. What are you say? So very literally. What do you say when you call what you say when you email? I always think the key to networking and my father has the best catch phrase that you will use for the rest of your life which networker die He truly believes networking is the only reason you exist. Charlotte. I would say that the most important thing you WanNa do when you're networking is distinguish yourself from other people immediately. So what makes you unique? Because you can google anybody sitting across the table from you. And I think that that's what people lose and the networking element that makes it really difficult for them because they're trying to play the part of somebody else the easiest way to sell us to sell yourself because when you're talking about yourself in a way that feels authentic. It doesn't feel uncomfortable. This is who you are. So you're just putting yourself out there. What you have get used to is the take it or leave it quality of that and I think that that's difficult for an extrovert or introvert. You know nobody likes for somebody to shut them down but at the same time you'll never get anything unless you put yourself out there. I want to talk about something that I think is a common thing between the media world and the art world. Which is they're highly competitive. It's hard to get that first foot in the door and if you are lucky enough to get it you're usually working a ton and not getting paid a lot and the question that we get all the time is how do they think about that first job do they take the job that they really. WanNa take that. Is You know the internship right. And it's a hard choice and wondering what advice you have for people out there who are looking to break into these industries and also have real financial restraints. Absolutely I think we all have we restraints. We live in New York City or even the the outlying areas around the city. It's incredibly expensive. And so I say to people especially about the art world. Can you live without our? Is it the kind of thing that you've literally wake up every morning in think I have to be around it? It drives me is my passion in if the answer is yes then it probably makes sense for you to be an intern or to take a job that is going to get you on that track over time and it may not pay exactly what you want so you may have to get a second job to make that happen but you have to understand that. That is a choice that you're making it that is not your passion and you just want to do it because it looks fun from the outside and this is what. I wish I had said to myself all those years ago. Go and get a job that pays you what you want. And this is something that you can evolve as a side hustle over the course of your life and then you bring those skills to the place where you interviewed as an intern. And I think that that's one of those things that can seem kind of shortsighted and especially in this day and age where people are hopping from company after one year or six months. Or whatever if you really understand the trajectory of a career. It's long so if you do the work at the beginning and you get to a place where you are making a salary to afford the life that you want you can pivot into the art world. You can pivot into the media world and you have a skill set that you're bringing that you didn't have when you were applying as an intern so you will get paid for that. So people do get paid in these companies. They may not get paid what people in startups get paid but they do get paid. Sometimes you just have to start a little bit more mid level than you would when you think that you should start as an

Intern Christie Lydia Fournette Louisiana New York Global Director Oxford University Podium Selling Monet New York City Google Princess Diana Coordinator Baton Rouge Louisiana Charlotte
"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Yeah. In one thousand nine hundred four after the liberation of Paris Picasso. Then sixty three years old began a romantic relationship with a young art student named Francois g low she was forty years younger than he was. Picasso had grown tired of his mistress door Amar Picasso and she low began to live together. Eventually they had two children Claude Picasso born in nineteen forty seven and Paloma Picasso. Born in nineteen forty nine. We've heard of her. Yes, Paloma Picasso was a is. I should say she's still alive is a fashion designer and a perfume. May my mom wears Paloma her perfume. It's very nice. It's very oriental. It's like a lot of Hetty powdery cents. It's good. She's fine. Palomas find she's she's very rich. In her nineteen sixty four book life with Picasso's yellow describes his abusive treatment and myriad infidelities, which led her to leave him taking the children with her. This was a severe blow to Picasso as a shame because so had affairs with women of an even greater age disparity than his and she lows while still involved with Sheila in nineteen fifty one Picasso. Hetty six-week affair with Genevieve LaPorte who was four years younger than Zillow by his seventies. Many paintings drawings and prints have as their theme and old grotesque dwarf as the doting lover of beautiful young model. Oh, yeah. You think his conscience was getting maybe because he was I mean, he was a handsome guy once upon a time. But now he looks he like officially looks like grandpa. Yeah. So. Jacqueline Roque worked at the Madora pottery and. On the French Riviera where Picasso made and painted ceramics? So Picasso eventually moved to the French Riviera and south of France. And like that's health for his health first health. Yes. Because so delicate there's a lot of like. Images of him in those. What are they called the the French striped shirts, Butto Butto shirts? Yes. Like with his pants rolled up splashing in the surf picturing when I think of him like, Johnny bandana. Yes, tyrone. Yes. That's definitely like the image of late Picasso. So this woman shackling Roque became his lover. And then she became his second wife nine hundred sixty one because it's I I finally died because I finally died. Exactly. She died in nineteen fifty five. Exactly. So the two were together for the remainder of Picasso's life. His marriage. Schroeck was also a means of revenge against G low with Picasso's encouragement, she low had divorced her. Then husband Luke Zemo with the plan to marry Picasso to secure the rights of her children as Picasso's legitimate. Heirs Picasso had already secretly married Roque after she low had filed for divorce sucks. I know he was take a cut. So if you will his strained relationship with Claude and Paloma was never healed. By this time Picasso had constructed huge Gotha comb and could afford large villas in the south of France. He was an international celebrity which often with often as much interest in his personal life as art. So he became kind of a tablet. Yeah. He was in the tabloids a lot. So in addition to his artistic compliments because made a few film appearances as well always has himself, including a cameo in shown Cocteau's testament of Orpheus in nineteen.

Claude Picasso Paloma Picasso Paris Picasso Paloma Jacqueline Roque Palomas Hetty France shackling Roque Francois g French Riviera Butto Butto Zillow Genevieve LaPorte Luke Zemo Madora pottery Cocteau Sheila Johnny bandana Schroeck
"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Of money because started his exclusive relationship with the French Jewish. Art dealer, Paul Rosenberg K, and as part of his first duties Rosenberg agreed to rent the couple in apartment in Paris at his own expense, which was located next to his own house convenient. This was the start of a deep brother like friendship between the two very different men that would last until. The outbreak of World War Two Kuklova introduced Picasso to high-society formal dinner parties and other dimensions of the life of the rich in nineteen twenties. Paris, they had a son Paolo Picasso who'd grow up to be a motorcycle racer and chauffeur to his father. Does this Picasso's first child so Kuklova insistence on social propriety clashed with Bakassi Baheen tendencies in the two lived in a state of constant conflict in nine hundred twenty seven Picasso met seventeen year old Marie Therese? Walter and began a secret affair with her was forty five K, right? Yeah. Well, subtle in. He does this a lot. He kept her a secret from his wife until nineteen thirty five when Marie became pregnant with their daughter Maya. So because those mayors to Clova ended in separation rather than divorce as French law required, an even division of property in the case of divorce and Picasso did not want coke Clova to have half. The two remained legally married until cloves death in nineteen fifty five. Oh, but she got out of their relatively unscathed the rest of his women that she gets them stuff. I think she what she did when she found out that his seventeen year old mistress was pregnant, she was like and to the south of France and grabbed her son, and they just moved down there. And you just of of wa. So we'll talk about the rest of his women in a second. But so during the nineteen thirties the minotaur replaced. The harlequin is a common motif in his work. His use of the Muhtar came partly from his contact with the surrealists who often used it as their symbol. And it appears in Picasso's Guernica, so the mentor and Picasso's mistress Marie Therese. Walter are heavily featured in the celebrated of large suite of etchings and arguably because those most famous work assist depiction of the German bombing of Gernika during the Spanish, civil war. No, now's guaranic. This large canvas and bodies for many of the inhumanity brutality and hopelessness of war. Picasso's Guernica is featured heavily in Simon Shamas power of art. He talks very deeply about the symbolism in the painting. He talks about this sorrel context by which the painting is painted again. I could spend an entire episode Burnica. But I'll just kind of give like a quick thing about it. So the painting was created in response to the bombings of grandpa Basque country town in northern Spain by Nazi Germany and talion warplanes at the request of the Spanish nationalists Franko Franco. Yes. Asked to explain it symbolism because said, quote, it isn't up to the painter to define the symbols. Otherwise, it would be better if he wrote them out in so many words the public who looks at the picture must interpret the symbols as they understand them. Grenada was exhibited in July, nineteen thirty seven at the Spanish pavilion at the Paris international exposition, and then became the centerpiece of an exhibition of a hundred eighteen works by CASA Matisse broth and on reluctance that towards Scandinavia England after the victory of Francisco Franco in Spain..

Paolo Picasso Marie Therese Paris Walter Paul Rosenberg K Clova Francisco Franco Spain France Spanish pavilion CASA Matisse Bakassi Baheen Simon Shamas Kuklova Muhtar Gernika Nazi Germany Grenada
"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"The left exhibit facial features in the Iberian style of Picasso's native Spain. So they Beeri and people were like the ancient of the Iberian peninsula while the two and the right are shown with African mask like features the racial primitivism of oakton these masks, according to CASA moved him to quote, liberate and utterly original artistic style of compelling, even savage force. So this idea of the savage, and this primitivism something that it kind of comes from this. Like, noble savage idea. Like once an imperialist country comes in and conquers, right? Another country. Then it moves from we need to like squash, these horrible savages to. Oh, look at how beautiful they are. Because now non-threatening anyway. So this happened in the American west and has definitely happened with England, and you know, Africa, especially but also India and other parts of right? The first so this early twentieth century time period where these people have been quote, unquote, conquered this is where this idea of primitivism in art really starts to like take off. And this is also Gatgang was another proponent of. This wasn't the demos of like a cover of somebody else's painting of the same name. It is I don't know. I don't. Think. So I do know that it's this idea of like nude women like congregating together and having a dynamic, okay hose was often used you see that a lot in like Greek mythological maintains. Of nymphs, and that kind of thing. So I think the idea was that he was looking back toward that. Okay. But I don't know if there was like a root on his stick in my head of the same name. He may have been looking at some medically on because he had the same kind of quality like that flat body and weird contours and like very. Like emotionless faces like mask like faces. Yeah. For sure. So. Yeah. So in this education of primitivism, an abandonment of perspective and favor of a flat two-dimensional picture plane. So it's very flat Picasso makes a radical departure from traditional European painting in this was also why it was so shocking to a lot of people. Right. So this proto cubist work is widely considered to be seminal in the early development of both cubism and modern art. And I wrote a lot about it. Because. My master's thesis was about like mask and masking. So that paper that I was like my first paper about it. I wrote a lot about demos avenue on. And then I remember I went to the MoMA like I was on a trip doing something else. I was just saying, you know, and I turned the corner and there was demos, and I literally like stopped in my tracks. I was like oh my God because I wasn't expecting it. And I had forgotten that it was at the mall. And it's huge. It's really really big. So it was cool. It was cool to say. There's a lot of weird stuff connected with it. And a lot of things you could really I mean, I could do an entire episode on Demoiselles, but I won't. Analytical cubism nine nine hundred nineteen twelve is style opinion because develop was Georgia Brock. So this is the beginning of cubism cubism, they used monochrome brownish neutral colors and both artists apart objects and analyze them in terms of their shapes Picasso and Brock's paintings at this time shared many similarities, actually a lot of times from fifty paces. You can't tell the difference between the two styles in one thousand nine eleven Picasso was arrested and questioned about the theft of the Mona Lisa from the Lou. Yes, yes. This is a little known thing. Happened suspicion for the crime had initially fallen upon the poet Guillaume Apollinaire due to his links to Gary puree an artist with the history of thefts from the gallery. Apollinaire implicated, his close friend Mukasa..

Picasso Georgia Brock Guillaume Apollinaire Spain theft Africa Gatgang Gary puree England India Mona Lisa Lou
"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"He was just being like a fly by night artists and people love that. Oh, because so you're so witty. So in nineteen ninety seven Picasso joint an art gallery that had recently been opened in Paris by Daniel, Henry con wiler. So con- wiler. You might recognize he was German. Art historian and collector who became one of the premier French art dealers in the twentieth century, you don't know him from that, you know, him from his portrait called a portrait of Daniel Henry con wiler by Picasso, which was one of the like cubist paintings doesn't even look like a human person. It's a lot of Browns and goals and whites opposed it. But that was like the premier piece of cubist art that kind of all of cubism kind of came from. Okay. So he was among the first champions of public. Assoc Brock and the cubism that they jointly developed so cubism, and I'll talk about this in a second. But the two main artists of cubism were Picasso and Georgia Brock so Picasso's African influenced period. So it used to be called his primitivism period, which we do not use primitive anymore. All right. Don't use it. That was only two years nineteen o seven and nineteen nine and it began with his painting the demos Zales Donyo. Yes. Yes. This is in the MoMA. Because the pay this composition in style. Inspired by IBM sculpture. But repainted the faces of the two figures on the right after being powerfully impressed by African artifacts. He saw in June nineteen o seven in the graphic museum at Pallada Trocadero when he displayed the paintings to Quainton ses in his studio later that year. The nearly universal reaction was shock and revulsion. Matisse angrily dismissed the work as a hoax Picasso did not exhibit demos publicly until nineteen sixteen because he got such a bad reaction. Former ideas developed during this period directly into the Cuba's period that follows kind of an early cubist work the work part of the permanent collection of the MoMA portrays five nude female sex workers in a brothel on carrier avenue Avignon street in Barcelona. Each figures depicted in disconcertingly confrontational matter. And none is conventionally feminine the women appear slightly menacing and are rendered with angular and disjointed body shapes the three figures on.

Picasso Daniel Henry MoMA Assoc Brock Browns Zales Donyo Georgia Brock Paris Matisse Pallada Trocadero Cuba Quainton ses IBM Barcelona two years
"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Utilizing orange and pink colors, and featuring many circus people acrobats and Harlequins known in France's Sultan, bunks Solta monk. Something about the harlequin comedic actor usually depicted in checkered patterned clothing became a personal symbol for Picasso's. This idea of like, the creative fool the the clown like the person kind of on the outskirts of society, he really liked loved that also not for nothing Costco was hot hot hottie. He was only like five four. But he was he had like these superintendents is and was gorgeous. Like he was real good looking. I mean, you're not gonna find it very attractive after all this stuff. But he was unequivocal be handsome, dude. So at this point Picasso meant for non VA behemoth artist who became his mistress. He met her in Paris in nineteen oh four and Livia appears in many of his rose period. Paintings many of which are influenced by his relationship with her in addition to his increased exposure to French painting. But let's talk about for Nantes. K so their relationship was to pest you ass-. Both were jealous lovers and their fights often exploded into violence nevertheless, Picasso painted over sixty portraits of her when Picasso finally chief successes and artist he began to lose interest in Fernande, and she as she reminded him of more difficult times. So he was like, ooh, you're starting to me out. 'cause you're reminding me of how what I was hungry and people didn't know who I was. So he broke up with her in nineteen twelve and he left Libya without a way to carry on living in the style to which she. Become accustomed. So she had no legal right to expect anything from him since she was still technically married to her. First husband. Okay. She she married like super young like six and then she wanted to leave her husband, but you couldn't afford to get an avoidance. So she just like ran away and changed your name. So twenty years after her relationship with CASA she wrote memoirs of their life together. By then Picasso was the most famous artist as age and the publication of VA's memoirs carried commercial potential. She was like, let's cash in on this. So the memoir which was entitled Picasso and his friends was published in nineteen thirty in serialized form in the Belgian daily soi despite Picasso's strong opposition he hired lawyers to prevent the publication of the series and only six articles were published but the payments he received help her to improve her lifestyle somewhat. But she spent it quickly. So she eventually died at eighty nine after writing too because so to get an allowance from him after agreeing to never write about him again. Wow. Yeah. So that's for Nantes. Also the rose period. Remember in my last one song about boy and horse nigga with horse. Yeah. That's a rose period. That's a boy leading a horse f why? By nine hundred five because became a favorite of American art, collectors, Leo and Gertrude Stein. Their older brother, Michael Stein, and his wife, Sarah, also became collectors of his work and Gertrude Stein became a principal. Patron? Okay. She quired his drawings and paintings and exhibited them in her informal sell on at her home in Paris. And this is also where he met Matisse. I mentioned that in the Matisse episode the Stein's introduced him to American art collectors the cone sisters, I mentioned them before to they also began to acquire Picasso and Matisse's paintings and eventually oh, Stein, moved to Italy, Michael and Sarah Stein became patrons of teeth while Gertrude continue to collect Picasso. He made a portrait of her now in the met. It's very famous portrait of color. And when someone commented that Gertrude did not look like portrait Picasso replied, she will. Yeah. Yes. Because it's not a flattering portrait faces very flat. Her nose is very wide. She looks very like stilted her faces all like one kind of like beigey Brown color. It's not a flattering portrait. So the fact that he was like she will like I'm just I'm just being real about the aging of women, especially lesbians. You know what? I mean like he was just being an asshole..

Picasso Gertrude Stein Sarah Stein Nantes Costco Livia VA Paris France Fernande Libya Matisse principal Leo Michael Italy twenty years
"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Yeah. So my parents were like, why do I said Ocho Guay because I was three. And my parents were like what does she keep saying Ocho Guay? And then my dad happened to be in the room one day while I was watching it counting. And he was like, oh my gosh. Her first words are eight and nine in Spanish, a bastardized version of eight and nine so what I'm saying is a genius, okay? From the age of seven certain talking when you were three. That part. Wow. Oh, what a sick burn. I mean, I don't know. How old I was man. Did you hear did you hear her cut me deep like that? All right. Anyway, from the age of seven because it was definitely talking. And so was I he received formal artistic training from his father figure drawing and oil painting Ruiz. His father was a traditional academic artisan instructor who believe that proper training required disciplined copying of the masters and drawing the human body from plaster casts in life models. So as a young child Picasso was drawing nude models is basically what I'm getting from this. His son became preoccupied with art to the detriment of class work on one occasion. His father found his son painting over his unfinished sketch of a pigeon, observing the precision of a sons technique apocryphal story relates res felt that the thirteen year old Picasso had surpassed him and vowed to give up painting apparently paintings by him exist from later years. So he didn't actually do that. But there's this. There's this definite. Or a Picasso was a young genius. And he didn't take any like formal instruction. He just everything like sprung out of him like like out of. Like just out of nowhere because he was so amazing. So. In eighteen ninety five because I was traumatized when a seven year old sister cheetah died of diptheria after her death, the family moved to Barthet Luna where we took a position at the school of fine fine arts, I won't say it like that. After this Picasso thrived in the city regarding it in times of sadness or nostalgia as his true home. Res preceded the officials at the academy to allow his son to take an entrance exam for the advanced class and the process often took students a month, but Picasso completed it in a week. And the jury admitted him at just thirteen years old, of course, of course, because he was amazing as a student because elect disciplined but made friendships that would affect him in later life. Did he what name did he go by you went by just Pablo Papa he he actually went by Pablo Picasso? Okay. And that's how he signed his early work juvenile AM. And then after a certain point he just signed his was his dad's last name because I was his mother's last name and through Spanish tradition. You combine your father? Your mother's name hyphenated. Now, I think but at the time it was you would use the article an okay why great? Thank you. Oh. Yeah. Anytime so his father rented a small room for him close to home. So we could work alone at thirteen. He left alone when he was thirty. Yeah. He he let him. The nineteenth century in in some places. You would have already been married children. So that's true with our twenty th century eyeballs. I guess oh. But still. Whatever. So he checked up on him numerous times a day apparently and judged his drawings, but the two argued frequently. So he was eventually sent to Madrid rail academy the artist December Nando, which was the country's foremost art school. They dropped out soon after enrollment because again school is not his bag. He learned the most from the pro anyway, and he would go and look at inspirational works from the likes of of Alaska's Goya, and especially Greco, I had a professor in grad school who was a real snobby snob, and he insisted on calling of Alaska's Vela his French name. Okay. But no one call new. Yes. So whenever he would talk about like, you know, the whoops of venacuro. We would all look at each other like who's talk yet out like people would open up their laptops, and like Google Vella who is this. He was just a snap..

Pablo Picasso instructor Picasso Ocho Guay Google Vella Greco Alaska Barthet Luna Pablo Papa Madrid rail academy diptheria professor thirteen years thirteen year seven year one day
"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"picasso" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Okay. You ready? All right, so Picasso. Spoiler alert was a real asshole. All right. Are any of these guys? Nice guys. I think there's gotta be some nice guys. I haven't done. It was maybe nice guy. You know, what Monet was a nice guy. Okay. He took on like six kids. He he like built a beautiful garden. He had a bunch of students. I'm going to say Monet was a nice guy Picasso. Not like in an especially not nice way. So let's start Picasso was born. Pablo the Jose Francisco powler one Naple Massena oh Monday. They'll also remedial Cipriano de LA Santisima Trinidad Reuss e because so I lost you at the fourth name. Okay. And that list so without articles of which there are six in his name. He has six articles in his name Picasso was baptized with fourteen names. Any particular reason, they're just various like saints and family names that they just tossed on him. He was the only boy in his family. So. Boy's name. He got every boys named going back to like the fourteen hundreds did not fit to easily and like the church registry. No very tiny lettering. Some none was just like. Literally Jesus give me strength. So he was born on October twenty fifth eighteen eighty one in the city of Malaga in the end allusion region of Spain. He was the first child. So he was not only the only boy who was the first child of Don Jose, Ruiz Blasco and Maria Picasso Lopez. Picasso's family was middle class and his father was a painter specialized in naturalistic depictions of birds and other game for most of his life. Ru is was a professor of art at the at the school of crafts and a curator at the local museum. So an art background ruses ancestors were minor aristocrats. I'm gonna tell you right now. It feels weird to talk because I haven't talked much three days I land Steve to talk to sometimes, you know, when you're married to somebody. You don't need to talk all the time. Can't tell them every thought the pops in was headed. So this is strange anyway. Because so showed a passion and skill for drawing from an early age, according to his mother his first words where peace peace, which is a shortening of Pius, which is the Spanish word for pencil. So he's not he's not pizza, which I think was my. I I. Actually, my first words were ozone away. And the reason being is because I watched a lot of Sesame Street, and you know, they taught you how count vanish..

Maria Picasso Lopez Picasso Monet Cipriano de LA Santisima Trini Malaga Naple Massena Spain Pablo Ru professor of art Steve school of crafts Don Jose Jose Francisco Ruiz Blasco twenty fifth three days