35 Burst results for "Physicist"

The Second Kind of Impossible

Science Friction

01:51 min | 3 d ago

The Second Kind of Impossible

"In kurt vonnegut sr classic satirical sci-fi novel cat's cradle an atomic physicist has created this we'd new form of matter and he's accidentally formed horrible doomsday device. E calls the substance ice nine. And if ever this is nine makes contact with water of any kind including the say a piece of gets in the ocean or lakes and streams and immediately transforms it to this frozen form of ice. That's not usable. I would do the same to the water in our bodies. And that's just what it does in being phrase. The world's water is suddenly frozen solid by us nine within seconds when a thirteen year old american kid polston hundred that book. He was enthralled by this cautionary tale about the responsibilities of scientists for their inventions. That something else captivated him to really got me. Also thinking about this idea that sorta stuck with me over many years decades literally. That may be. There really are forms of matter that we didn't know about that. We thought were impossible and yet might be extremely important. Might even be ubiquitous in the universe now poll could never of knowing that this curiosity he's seines would spark a lifetime of adventures. Right is bill stock. Eight your heart out because this story will take you from the outer reaches of the cosmos. Not just any old meteorite. A special class of meteorites that would have formed near the very beginning of the solar system to the wilds of far eastern russia be country famous kamtchatka bears which are ferocious fares are at the level. Risley's bears the pieces ferocious

Russia Risley
The Youth Organization Spreading the Word About the Climate Crisis

UN News

01:14 min | 4 d ago

The Youth Organization Spreading the Word About the Climate Crisis

"We are here in the city of the czech republic with two young professionals talking about the issue of our time. Climate change on rush and christina. Zakho china are behind a nonprofit and awareness. Raising project called fact on climate christina is a data designer and journalist and also a student at masaryk university in on rush is a physicist by education and lecture on non violent communication by profession mccown broza from the united nations information centre unique proc. Welcome afternoon christina. How engaged are young people in the whole idea of taking climate action. Are they getting more and more interested in the issue from your experience. What i can see around me in my like my peers. Sir and friends are. I think we are engaged a lot but quite often. We are not sure what to do. So i can see people being interested trying to read them. Article also get some more information but then we don't know what to do with that.

Christina Zakho Mccown Broza Masaryk University Czech Republic Rush China United Nations SIR
Applied AI Research at AWS With Alex Smola

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Applied AI Research at AWS With Alex Smola

"Alex. Welcome to the tamale podcasts. Hey thanks very much for having me here. I'm really delighted to get the opportunity to talk to your listeners. And i hope everybody gets something us floated. I'm really looking forward to this conversation. I mentioned to you when we were chatting earlier. That i corner you at a reinvent like just after you joined. Aws and in perfect and typical aws fashion. You had nothing to do with a pr. Journalists type person and so this is kind of a Achievement unlocked moment for me. It's been a long time coming. I've been looking forward to the opportunity to chat with you. So i am also excited. We're going to cover a bunch of cool stuff. You're working on from a research and aws perspective and we'll touch on the event that you're heading up or participating in the m l. summit towards the end but to get us started i would love to. Have you just share a little bit about your background. How you came to work in machine learning of as i'm actually a physicist by training and this is saying that physicists aren't good at anything but you can use them flavor thing and i think that's probably how ended up with machine learning the flex along the story. Is that when it came to doing my master's thesis. I look around. Didn't find anything terribly citing at my university. And then i look making going do my master's somewhere else in the swath. They can t actually a young convos. The department at the time in the move up nate was mcmaster advisor and this was even at the time of really great opportunity of mind. You this laws in nineteen ninety five

Alex Mcmaster Nate
Easily Build Advanced Similarity Search With the Pinecone Vector Database

Data Engineering Podcast

01:37 min | Last month

Easily Build Advanced Similarity Search With the Pinecone Vector Database

"High of the pharmacy. So i did my undergraduate in physics. I thought i wanted to be a physicist and i do computer sciences and minor because i know anything about computers and i felt i'd be a pretty bad physicist if i didn't know how to code and oversee long story short. I fell in love with the computer science aspect of it. A of fell out of love with physics might phd with a focus on machine learning and and really heinisch michelle geometry functionality. Switch ends up being a very good foundation for machine learning might post stock in apply. The also opened a company that did realtime video search and then joined yahoo. Actually at yahoo was the first time was actually exposed to huge amounts of data like yahoo mail at the time was already like pretty massive so doing that skate was already kind of the first moment that you know there is a set of challenges out there that is beyond what our systems are able to do today. And it's been like that ever since spent Indian managing yacht was research lab Moving to eight years to build an organization called eight abuse. Tony i which is actually part of the bs building solutions like sage maker and others. Yeah in two years ago. Building you know moved into started pinecone so inconvenient neuron machining systems. Wine tie

Yahoo Michelle Tony
Alan Turing: Thinker Ahead of His Time

The Science Show

02:34 min | Last month

Alan Turing: Thinker Ahead of His Time

"Alan turing one of the more original scientific brains of the twentieth century. Sheeran change the world. There are several sides to the story of exactly how he changed. The welder insiders the cobra. King bletchley park the impacts. You head on the wall. The other side of it is what feels most relevant to us today. Cheering invented the modern computer. Teach orange the lives of every one of us who whose work all play involved with computers. Jack copeland founder of the alan turing online archive. An eccentric englishman. Tragic figure and one of the top scientific brains of all time because he influenced so many different areas. According to the science journal nature. The scope of cheering is a chievements is extraordinary. Mathematicians will honor the man who cracked david hilbert decision problem and historians will remember him. As the man who broke. Nazi germany's a 'nigma code and help to shorten the second world. War engineers will hell the founder of the digital age artificial intelligence. Biologists will pay homage to the theory rhetorician of morphou genesis and physicists. Were raise a glass to the pioneer of non linear dynamics philosophers. Meanwhile a likely to continue to frown over his one line. As on the limits of reason and intuition if a machine is expected to infallible it cannot also be intelligent. He said in a nineteen forty seven talk to the london mathematical society. The biography alan turing. The 'nigma by andrew hodges was probably the first major work to bring this extraordinary. Scientists academic strengths and personal foibles to a general audience. Dr hodges a fellow in mathematics at oxford university he had very isolated sort of boyhood and his parents were often india. Father was an official in indian civil service. Very middle class. Sort of life sent off to foster parents. Prep school this public school. She wasn't his thing at all but then when he was sixteen someone broke into his world is design and now the boy called christopher volka and they share this great interest in science fundamental science thinking about things scientifically

King Bletchley Park Alan Turing Jack Copeland Alan Turing Online Archive David Hilbert Sheeran Science Journal London Mathematical Society Andrew Hodges Dr Hodges Germany Oxford University Prep School India Christopher Volka
How the Sun Could Spoil NASA's Trip Back to the Moon

Kottke Ride Home

02:07 min | Last month

How the Sun Could Spoil NASA's Trip Back to the Moon

"Nasa is supposed to go back to the moon in twenty four as part of its program but recently seemed like they may need to push that deadline back a few years and while it's never good to rush something as serious as catapulting human beings into space. The mit technology review points out. There's one reason it might be better if they stuck to the original timeline. And it's the sons faults. According to a new study published today in the journal solar physics were going to be seen some extreme space weather. Roughly around twenty twenty six through twenty twenty-nine exactly when nasa might go to the moon if the current twenty twenty four time line is pushed back. Now what do they mean. By extreme space weather mostly solar storms quoting the mit tech review. The surface of the sun erupts with gas and plasma ejecting charged particles protons electrons and heavy ions into the rest of the solar system at millions of miles per hour. These particles can strike earth and the moon in just a matter of minutes. Earth's magnetic field protects us from them but the particles can still fry electronics in power grids on the surface and damage critical that manage. Gps until the communication services space weather could be extremely dangerous for any astronauts flying to the moon or trying to live and work on lunar outpost at the surface life support systems and power could shut down and solar activity could produce life-threatening levels of radiation between apollo sixteen and seventeen says matthew owens lead author of the study and a space physicist at the university of reading. There was a huge space weather event. That would have likely been fatal. If astronauts had been on the moon the time and quotes and this is something that i learned from that apple tv plus show for all mankind which showed a solar storm occurred that disrupted radio communication on earth and created a dire situation for the astronauts on the lunar base. But how do we know that this is going to be worse in the latter half of the decade as opposed to in twenty twenty four. Because that's when the sun will be ending. Its eleven year cycle cycle twenty five which began at the end of twenty nineteen.

Nasa Matthew Owens University Of Reading Apple
"physicist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:48 min | Last month

"physicist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Physicist and a cartoonist and brought them together to discuss some simple but profound questions that people have been wondering about for thousands of years. But no one understood. Daniel and Jorge. Answer them in a fun jargon freeway. This is Daniel and Jorge, explain the universe. One of my favorite things. When we give our lecture about what we don't know about the universe is the questions we get from people in the audience. The best questions always come from the youngest audience members. I remember one time I gave a talk about liquid nitrogen in front of elementary school kids, and some kid asked me the question, he said. If light sabers were real, would they be made of liquid nitrogen on and that's not even know how to answer that. Totally stumped like a six year old. Wait, wait, wait. Star Wars is not real, like timbers are fictional horror head fictional? Yes. So you need to find some other defense against the invading arm Sapphire empire? Yeah, so the questions were fantastic way to understand. Haven't really communicated anything. Having people really understood what I'm doing. So that's why I love the live aspect of a presentation because you get that feedback from the audience. They're getting it. They're asking follow questions or they're totally confuse. Used and they're asking you questions that seem to make those things. Yeah. If only you had jet I'm line Trace. Daniel. Thieves are not the questions you're looking for. This'd is the podcast you looking for, however. Hi. I'm for him..

Star Wars Daniel Trace One thousands of years Jorge six year old one time things Sapphire
Creating Robust Language Representations With Jamie Macbeth

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:14 min | 2 months ago

Creating Robust Language Representations With Jamie Macbeth

"Are everyone. I am here with jamie macbeth. Jamie is an assistant professor in the department of computer science at smith college. Jamie welcome to the podcast. Thank you thanks for having me. And i'm super excited to dig into our conversation and learn a bit about your research what you're up to. Let's get started by having you share a bit about your background with our audience. How did you come to work in a and cognitive systems in particular. Sure so originally i was. I would say a physicist actually a mathematician physicist as an undergraduate in also sometimes a grad student. I then fell in love with computer. Scientists said in computer science in graduate school and towards the end of my career in graduate school. I also fell in love with the specific topic that i work on now which is artificial intelligence systems and cognitive systems for performing language understanding and the issues associated. With that. we're chatting earlier. You spoke a little bit more about the way you think about cognitive systems and kind of how that's different from a lot of the contemporary application of machine learning and ai loved eighty elaborate on that a bit for audience. Sure sure yeah. So those of us in the cognitive systems community were a part of the artificial intelligence community but people in the cognitive systems community are focused quite a bit more on using artificial intelligence as a vehicle for a better understanding of human intelligence and not particularly of using a i to just score well at particular tasks when do on the leaderboard i think some of the negative things that have been associated with artificial intelligence these days such as via season things like that have to do with there being a little bit too much hype around the systems. That people are building in the way. You're able to show good numbers at these tests problems and focusing less on the actual science. Okay what really can these systems do. So yeah in the congress distance community. Or i care much more about building that have a human like

Jamie Macbeth Jamie Department Of Computer Science Smith College Congress
Moving Machine Learning Into the Data Pipeline at Cherre

Data Engineering Podcast

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Moving Machine Learning Into the Data Pipeline at Cherre

"Hi by us on tiles on a data scientist cherry. Do you remember how you first got involved in the area of data management sites good of interesting routes in my career first and foremost physicists. In my condemning track originally was aimed for working in optics tonics when i finished my started working as a tonic designer for not to go communications company and then one day one of former post. Docs invited checkout chevy's office. He started working there at school. People come to get health and it was really kind of an immediate hits so jerry really met all the criteria that i have where it's still again. Perspective projects specifically the working on a really challenging problem defining domain model for bela states. There were working on high impact issue and it was work with smart people really smart people right so type. Problems is very challenging. And then what you're doing really to think about the real estate industry state as it is right now so the would be kind of what speed trading or is dead for the stock. Market's really changing the way the real estate market's looking at tech. So all that looked good. I joined sherry and they learned about the domain afield state so then who is one of the founders and learn about functional and object oriented programming test driven design micro services from medicine. Sterling is a senior engineer i learned about. Nlp knowledge grass from the awesome john madden or head of machine learning engineering. Who you've answered before. And zoya from ron beckerman bizarre. Cdo in data science professor. So it's been really great working all these people. It's been an awesome learning experience

Chevy Jerry Sherry John Madden Ron Beckerman Sterling Zoya
Have we solved the black hole information paradox?

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

01:44 min | 2 months ago

Have we solved the black hole information paradox?

"Universe is full of interesting and amazing things and none more mysterious than black holes and try black holes are these weird corners of the universe where we think secrets lie. We suspect that solution to the age. Old conflict between general relativity and quantum mechanics might lie right at the heart of black holes but of course nobody can see inside them. So it's incredibly frustrating to think that the answers to some of our deepest questions exist but are hidden from us. Does that drive physicist bunkers to know that there are out there but maybe they're trapped in a place where they can never get out. That's essentially the project of physics right. The answers are out there. The universe does contain these answers. And if you can come up with the right experiment you can force the universe to reveal those truth. That's basically how we accumulated all the knowledge that we have but yet frustrating to think that there might be places in the universe that nobody could ever look where information could hide forever escaping from even our most clever efforts to reveal them. You make it sound. Like viz are like paparazzi of the universe. You're trying to catch the universe. He no sunbathing and its portrait. Something i used to think of us as more like murder mystery detectives but yeah paparazzi. More positive way because the universe is beautiful. It deserves our attention. Yeah i guess. They're surprised to being the universe. We're just here trying to enjoy the beauty of the universe. You know and get it signature once in a while so we can sell it on ebay to the national enquirer or times magazine. One of those to whoever will take is part of the freebritney movement. I don't think there's a free universe movement where they're like. Hey physicist leave the universe alone. Some of the mystery no.

Times Magazine Ebay
New Force Of Nature Leaves Physicists Over the Muon

What A Day

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

New Force Of Nature Leaves Physicists Over the Muon

"Cancel culture might becoming for sir. Isaac newton assisting have discovered a new fundamental force the results are from the fermi national accelerator lab in illinois which has been doing experiments on me. Wan's milan's are subatomic particles that are similar to electrons hundred times heavier. Maybe even two hundred one times have year after a full year in quarantine. Thank you. this is why. I'm a professional physics. Comedian i go to the conferences. The experiment involved measuring the wobble of milan's any big magnetic field based on the most current model of particle physics. They should have wobbled at predictable. Rate when scientists recorded wobbling rate. That was faster than expected. They were led to hypothesize enu fundamental force was at play. Of course if you're not on hive like me might not mean a lot but people in the physics community are very excited. They say this finding has the potential to clear up galactic mysteries like dark matter. Look all good. Keep it up guys. Just let me know before you do something that all into a black

Fermi National Accelerator Lab Milan Isaac Newton WAN Illinois
Artists on the loose at the Large Hadron Collider

Science Friction

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Artists on the loose at the Large Hadron Collider

"At the beginning of the universe minutes after the big bang as temperature cooled the most fundamental particles of matter came into existence so neutrons protons photons electrons and others the basic building blocks of everything we know and see and much way died and to study these teeny tiny particles tucked inside every atom in the universe. invisibly are physicists. Nate this vast instrument one that occupies an entire vast landscape two hundred hectares of farmland. The contrast between big and small here cyber czar. We're about eighty eight meters underground. That the moment kilda. I'm jacob new-zealand. It's great we have people from all walks of life and all over provision who got physicists engineers computer scientists edmund people like me and they're all from different parts of the world i think from the star of the these filled like a mini country so i'm asking schroeder and i'm a experimental particle physicists. In i don't know somehow. When i leave sern i realized that i'm still honing in the normal world. I don't know some kind of refuge from everything else that is going on outside in the world and here science is what really matters. I feel like Since great that it's a kind of a political place you know. The relationship with russia never changed during the cold war with. We're about science purely about saying well not just science. I'm here for art to people as you'll hear science friction with natasha mitchell. Many meters underground this week and easter special from our archive inside the heart of soon. Just outside of geneva in switzerland home to the world's largest most powerful particle accelerator. The large hadron collider the hcc. Now this of course is the place where the elusive higgs. Boson particle was discovered. And where last week scientists hinted they just might have discovered a brand new force of nature or put it another way a violation in the standard model of

Kilda Nate Edmund Schroeder Natasha Mitchell Zealand Russia Geneva Switzerland Boson
Quantum Physics And Global Consciousness In Relation To Trauma

The Healing Place Podcast

02:57 min | 3 months ago

Quantum Physics And Global Consciousness In Relation To Trauma

"Welcome everybody to the hill in place podcast. I'm your host terry while rocking very excited. Have with me today. Dr william t. Kenny and he is a radiologist but also author of the conscious whole which is an award winning book a novel. And we're going to dive into that and talk about What it's about and other wonderful subjects Quantum physics and the conscious whole global consciousness Yeah so welcome. Thank you very much for having me. I really appreciate it apso Summer radiologists the area. Tending william t. Kenny a real name is william t. randazzo and So as radiologist. What i'd do his i Some adopted to medical school and did six years of basically advanced training after medical school and will be radiologist lee read xrays. See ts. mri's ultrasounds we also do minimally invasive procedures with x ray guidance and training I learned about physics. Also had an interest in physics before pursuing radiology and when i was in medical school Learning about dna and the nucleotides in dna is they'll tie small molecules and with mike and of interest in physics. I was thinking about how physicists study. The small particles the the subatomic particles atoms in protons and electrons and the laws of physics. Those following Generally speaking kind of you know. Put those into the category of following quantum physics and a lot of people probably heard about quantum physics in. it's essentially the study and the science of the very small things in nature. So you're talking adams. Small molecules protons in the parts of those Adams as well in the laws of physics day obeyed are very strange when you put them in the context of our everyday lives and they don't really make sense and their couple reasons might not make sense. They might not make sense. Because we don't understand that world completely which is probably the most state and you can make. We don't really understand it. We don't know what it's doing but those particles do very strange things and so when i'm sitting my medical school class was than ten years ago learning about dna and they're talking about the nuclear tides. Dna is little tiny parts of dna that basically determined the code and that code determines what our bodies look like and how they function disease in health and everything that we kind of know about the body and describe the medicine as being permanent pieces of matter that inside of our dna in but when you read the quantum physics literature they described little tiny particles as being not fixed as being a potential and being things that could be both. They're not they're things can exist many states

William T Dr William T Randazzo Kenny Terry LEE Mike Adams
Recommender systems and high-frequency trading

Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science?

01:34 min | 3 months ago

Recommender systems and high-frequency trading

"Maybe before we get into what tuning up means from from your perspective. Could you just give us a little bit of background about yourself and how you got into doing what you're doing now. Sure i started out getting a phd. in physics. theoretical and computational. So a lotta another physics guy. I know all of that. I don't know what percentage we have on the show but it it is a high percentage and daniel is a physics too. Yeah i'm feeling very left out at this point if this gets spread far and wide. It's a it's a popular subject and the world's only room for so many professional physicists. So yeah so. It's doing a lot of computer. Kind of lends itself to an industrial job and either in kind of finance or in technology and that was an east coaster from new york. So that kind of drew me towards finance a little bit but ultimately i wanted to go into industry because i really wanted to build things that kind of work like kind of like most engineers can have the story. They grew up as a little kid. Working with legos or an assassin erector set or some other kind of a building toy. Like this the fun of research for me was that i got to do something new but i felt like there was something missing under. There's like the end is a paper and as wonderful because you get to kind of communicate with the world but you don't get the kind of wind it up and watch it. Go the like the toys. I built on all those still had some of that desire. And that's kind of what brought me into industry and finance in

Daniel New York
Calories: What are they?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:00 min | 3 months ago

Calories: What are they?

"Let's start with what a calorie is and how we know. How many calories of food contains a calorie is a unit of measure like an inch or a kilogram only instead of measuring length or wait a calorie measures energy. Technically a calorie is the amount of energy it takes to raise one gram of water by one degree celsius. Calories can be measured using something called a bomb calorie meter. Isn't that name. You might even have built a crude version of a bomb category meter in sixth grade science class. In broad strokes submerge in a bucket of water. And you put a thermometer in the water and then inside that submerged chamber you set something on fire. The heat generated by the combustion raises the temperature of the water in the bucket. And you can measure that with the thermometer. And then you can calculate the amount of energy or calories were in the thing that you said on fire so we used to use bomb calorimeters to calculate how many calories a given food contains these days. However it's much more common to estimate. The number of calories based on how much protein fat and carbohydrate food contains and those amounts can be determined through chemical analysis. Now when we're using the word calorie in relation to food by the way we are actually referring to kilocalories. Sometimes you'll see calories abbreviated as k cow. And that's what that refers to when we say that a food contains sixty calories. It really contains sixty thousand calories but all those zeros would be a pain to deal with. So just lop them off and believe me. This drives physicists. chemists absolutely nuts that. Why do we need to know how many calories food contains well when we they just food. We don't literally set it on fire in our stomachs but our bodies do release it's stored heat or energy and then we either use that energy to power our biological processes or if we've taken in more energy than we need we store it for future use if we habitually in more energy than we use we gain weight so we use calories as a guideline to determine how much food energy a person needs. We need enough to fuel growth and maintenance but not so much that we start storing a lot of fat there are calculators. I'm sure you've seen them. They can estimate your daily calorie needs taking into account your age sex height of activity level and then there are databases and labels to tell you how many calories are in foods however as james implies in his question. There are few problems with this system. First of all those calorie needs estimates. Can be way off. You can plug your details into an online calculator and be told that you use eighteen hundred and forty seven calories per day but look you need to take that number with a truckload of salt. Energy expenditure varies hugely from person to person. Even if you. And i are the exact same height weight age and sex and we do the exact same workout. You could burn four hundred calories more or less than i do. Every day and energy needs can also be affected by genetics body composition hormones drugs and a million other factors and moving targets and just to make the whole situation just a little bit more ridiculous. Those readouts on your treadmill peleton fit. Watch or diet tracker that. Tell you how many calories you burn doing. Various activities are only slightly more accurate than asking the magic eight ball. But wait. there's more calorie counts for foods are also not as reliable as you think those numbers that are listed in your calorie counting app represent average values foods so even if you are measuring or weighing your food with great precision well. This apple may be a little bit sweeter than average. That banana might be a little less ripe. This not might have a little bit more fat. Even for packaged and processed foods. The calorie count. That's shown on the nutrition. Facts label is just an average of variation of plus or minus. Ten percent of that value would not be at all surprising. Secondly those calorie counts are estimated using formulas that may or may not be one hundred percent reliable it was recently discovered for example but the standard formulas that were in use for most of the last hundred years. Were overestimating the amount of energy that we humans are great from nuts. More modern methods suggests that owens for example provide about twenty percent less energy or fewer calories than we previously thought

James Apple Owens
A Conversation With Carlo Rovelli On quantum physics

Science Friction

05:46 min | 3 months ago

A Conversation With Carlo Rovelli On quantum physics

"This beautiful closing same in telling quantum physicists color ravelli's bestseller the order of time where he reflects on beethoven's mississippi lameness. The song of the violin. He writes is pure beauty. Pure disparition pure joy. We are suspended holding our breath. Feeling mysteriously this must be the source of meaning that this is the source of time. It's very color ravelli. These intellectual free spirit with radical routes and a passion for poetry and literature art and science. The whole rich smorgasbord. Caller was recently named one of foreign policy. Magazine's one hundred most influential global fingers. He works in italy. France canada trying to understand the deep mystery of how gravity works at the quantum level. He writes popular opinionated columns in italian newspapers and popular sites books that have really struck a chord with fans worldwide amongst them seven brief listens on physics. And he's two new books. Are there places in the world where rules are less important than kindness and out this month. Ease helgoland color joins you an eye on science fiction from canada this week on the tesha mitchell and we started out by reflecting on the way in which this pandemic as tiny virus with a will spread is challenging the hubris faces but then we got bigger or a bigger. Thank you for having me. I love how you describe. We humans as being the species of little creatures living on marginal planet of peripheral star in one of billions of galaxies in the cosmos a senior in an essay that you've written about the astronomer copernicus and he's he's a revolutionary challenge that with and so us with was center of the universe. But somehow i it seems to me that we leave with these pre copernican prejudice that certainly at the level of the ego. At least we do. Yeah as a spacey's we still cast ourselves at the center of the universe. And i wonder if you think if we didn't do that if we sensed that we would just an arbitrary player on an arbitrary planets round by hundred million galaxies. Do you think we would position. Different eggo formerly yes. The fact that we are obviously irrelevant on the larger scale of the universe. It doesn't mean that we have no meaning. It doesn't mean that we care about is meaningless we are. We're certainly nothing right. Our son is one out of two billion stars in our galaxy is nothing in our galaxy. One out of probably a billion billion golics's in in the world just creating team prepared killing. Someone is actually candid that right in the last decades it was realized that it was many more than what we saw today. So so we're even smaller than we thought we were more inconsequential. That's something we scanned by that. But that's not the trolley deal of us that make what we care about important for us. Thinks are important for us just because what we are. I love the woman i love. Not because she's universe because she's the woman i love that and so it's for for us. We are important for ourselves. I find it to if i give me. Serenity doesn't give me anguish it sort of relaxing to know that we do our best. We share what we can love what we can. And that's and we appreciate the this life. Yes your initial university studies in the classics i think and then and then onto physics and then onto a phd in meaning to the world of of quantum theory and quantum gravity. Bit on curious to know what that classical training brought to your physicists. Self from early on because all have read do who have raised. You know that you have a great passion for poetry and literature and physics sees is part of all that fear sciences. It's a complex center price that requires the collaboration of different people in different kind of minds. And i have appreciated a scientist which are extremely technical. Or which have an extremely analytical. Mind that just going to details and split the the arguments over and over again find the little truck. I'm not particularly doing good and doing calculations or going into details. But i think that science also needs People who look the things from from a larger perspective and and see where the the two problems where the good directions and full. That's a nation which is not strictly scientific. I think it's it's it's so important to look into Into the great scientist of the past the many of them had an extraordinarily wide culture. So i think they were. The over specialization of modern education does all how help from the middle sized to go ahead. Let's just physics. Tolstoy in biology and medicine in In in other scientists. I believe that. I don't like science teaching completely focus on solving little problems. You know you have a ball. Rolling down a slope but the speed How long does he go and come on. This is so boring is interesting. What isn't is understanding. What is the structure. We're using for understanding the wall. What is a force. What does it mean to have an energy.

Ravelli Tesha Mitchell Canada Beethoven Mississippi Italy France Tolstoy
Why This Physicist is in the "Hope Business"

Here's Something Good

04:49 min | 3 months ago

Why This Physicist is in the "Hope Business"

"Dr shirley jackson is used to being a first and only she's a physicist and the president of the renown rensselaer polytechnic institute the first woman and first african american in that job and she's a leader pointing the way to a better future. Dr jackson believes that for our country to move forward to be competitive and prosperous. We absolutely must have women and people of color involved in tech and science. Her own life shows. How much change can happen in just a few decades when she was a girl growing up in washington. Dc public schools were still segregated. The nineteen fifty. Four supreme court decision known as brown versus the board of education allowed her to attend schools with better resources and broaden her horizons. She went on to become the first african american woman to get a phd from mit later. She served as an academic researcher and as chair of the us nuclear regulatory commission. We asked dr jackson about the challenges facing women of color in stem. How to meet those challenges and why she sees this as a moment of opportunity. Here's what she had to say. I think they're complexities. That african american women women of color face then that are rooted in the challenges that women face on the one hand and minorities race on the other now. We know that women get dissuaded. Many of them by the time they're in middle school from really thinking of themselves in these field and there are some fields that have been very a male dominated and that then will obviously breakdown to heaven affect on african american or minority women generally but then it's further exacerbated by sort of a kind of lack of confidence or belief in the talents of african americans in this country and and other minorities in terms of people seeing them seeing us in these fields and the net can become self inculcated so that the given individual dozen see ourselves as either being able to do these Do work in these fields or even if they believe they could do it and are excited The work they may feel the mountains of too high to climb and so people move into other things. All of us in higher education are by definition in the whole business because we educate the next generation of innovators and discovery discoverers and those who will be halsey makers etc but from the perspective of the kind of institution either lead. You know we really focus on those who will innovate will invent who will discover and join with those who come from other fields of endeavor to create what needs to be created to keep us moving forward and so i believe it is truly the most important work in the world and certainly here at rensselaer we. Educating many dynamic women leaders in science and technology we have women professors in computer science who have had great success in drawing young women into the field by proving to them that one does not have to grow up a gaming or programming as many of the young men in the class do in order to succeed in fact our young women do quite well here. They graduated very high rates and they go on to do amazing things. We have more challenge with a attracting and retaining minority students. But again those who come here they onion they do well and they go on to do important things. I'm one who believes times of upheaval can open up opportunities previously. Shut out of them. And i'm one who believes that one has to step through one window in time when it opened and to take advantage of whatever those opportunities there are offered and so we've now arrived at another moment when there is at least a more discussion about inequality of opportunity being recognized as something that in our democracy at least in most quarters is not something that we should have the finest tol

Dr Shirley Jackson Renown Rensselaer Polytechnic Dr Jackson Us Nuclear Regulatory Commissi Board Of Education MIT Supreme Court Washington Brown Rensselaer
Physicist Daniel Whiteson Explains: What Is a Neutrino?

Sean Hannity

04:39 min | 4 months ago

Physicist Daniel Whiteson Explains: What Is a Neutrino?

"In the universe. That's there. There's a lot of them out there, but it just doesn't feel the same forces. It doesn't speak the same language that you and I and all the particles that make us speak or use right. That's right. Yeah, it's like, you know, it's like it's a It's death for something I can walk through the loudest bar. You know, with thump, thump, thump music right and not even hear anything. Don't even notice. It's there, right? It's not purposely ignoring you. It just does not hear it interesting. I was thinking a good analogy could also be you know how in the Internet today people communicate using Facebook or Twitter, or instagram or email. These are all different ways that people interact with each other on the Internet. But what if there was somebody who said you know what? I'm not going to use Twitter or Instagram or Facebook? I'm just gonna Respond to people if they write me a handwritten letter. That's right. Yeah, those people are social media knew. Trina. Yes. Yeah, that's kind of what it is. It's like everybody else is talking to each other in one way. But this one particle just says You know what? I'm gonna ignore those different ways to interact. I'm just gonna do my thing. Yeah. And given the toxicity of social media, that probably means the neutrino is the happiest particle And, Yeah, you know, maybe that's the key way should all learn from the treatise. Yeah, eh, So let's remind people, though, what the forces are so there's the strong nuclear force that ties the nucleus together. There's electromagnetism that's responsible for electricity and magnetism and light and all that kind of stuff. And then there's the weak nuclear force as the weakest of of these forces, And then there's gravity. Everything with mass feels gravity right. But in the case of particles, we don't really think about gravity very much because particles have hardly any mass at all. And so gravity doesn't really affect them to really those other three. So the corks the courts, they feel the strong nuclear force and electromagnetism and the weak force. Okay, so they feel everything electrons. They feel electromagnetism, and they feel the weak nuclear force. Neutrinos on Lee feel the weak nuclear force, which is called the weak nuclear force, because it's super duper week, not because it takes a week to act or something like that. So it doesn't just ignore some of the forces that everybody else fields but it only it like they wanted chose to interact with the rest of the universe. Is like the week is one. It's like the most inconsequential one, right? Exactly. It's like, you know, if you could only interact with somebody by sending him a letter to the South Pole, and the letters only go every six months or something. Right? And you know if the neutrino didn't feel any forces at all, then we would have no way to even know it existed. Oh, there could be a whole set of particles that Speak, even maybe a told different set of forces. Yeah, like people think about dark matter, right? Dark matter. We don't know if it feels any of these forces and that's what makes it so difficult to look for and to understand dark matter as far as we know, only speaks gravity, which is why you can only study it when there's like a galaxy sized blob of it. Neutrinos. You feel one of these forces, which is why we can talk about them and study them. Well, let's talk about some of these properties that I was reading about the neutrino. I read that it has a mass that maybe one lesson one million of the mass of the electron. That's right. Neutrinos are super duper duper low mass. And we don't understand why at all, you know, we look at the mass of these particles, the electron, the courts, the other ones. We have no idea why these particles of different masses. We did a whole episode on how they get their masses, which is by interacting with the Higgs Bos on some of them interact a lot where the Higgs goes on, and so they get a lot of mass, and some of them don't interact hardly at all. So they get almost no mass. We don't know why. Like why does this one interact with the Higgs a lot in this one. Almost None of it was like a bunch of parameters in the control panel. The universe and we don't know if there's a pattern to it or if they just set randomly the beginning of the universe. We have no clue, but it seems like an important hint. The neutrinos are so close to zero mass, but not actually zero. Yes. So they are kind of tiny, right? I mean, I know everything's appoint mask mathematically, but thieves things. I mean, they're not disappoint master there. Appointments that are really, really, really, really, really almost no Mass. That's right. But if again it doesn't affect their size, their physical size is a different thing from their mass, their masters like a quantum mechanical label, like electrical charge, right? Sound like something with more masses more stuff to it, But, yeah, you're right. Neutrinos are weird because they have almost no mass, but not zero like they're not the lightest thing in the universe. All right, photons have no mass exactly zero. They travel the speed of light neutrinos just less than the speed of light because have just more than zero mass these

Instagram Twitter Facebook Trina LEE
Magnets, The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

Short Wave

04:45 min | 4 months ago

Magnets, The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

"Okay jeff brumfield. Where does our journey into the world of magnetism begin. It begins with a call to carlos. And a guy named tim murphy. They both work at the national high magnetic field laboratory in tallahassee florida. Normally you know. I do research and i learn about things but this time i just i just brought some bar magnets thought i would let you. That's all we do here so they just you know they're bigger and they give us money for it so expensive too. Yeah and they're painted. We paint them. They're so ready for this interview. They were born ready for this interview. These folks work with magnets all day long. Carlos heads the k. Twelve education programs for the lab. Tim is a physicist there. And like carlos was saying earlier they really feel like magnets need respect. I guarantee you that whatever direction you're looking right now unless you're in the wilderness. Right now there's probably a magnet in your line of sight and you just don't know it well and if you're you're in the wilderness you're standing on the biggest magnet that we have which is the earth the earth is a giant magnet with a pole and the south pole and where that magnetism comes from kind of complicated so for today. We're just going to stick to smaller baghdad's like the ones we use in our daily lives. Jeff i'll be honest. I don't really know what makes a magnetic field magnetic field. So how would you describe that which is kind of fascinating. Because you've turned yourself. Into the shortwave fisk there's gaps in my knowledge the only god what is a magnetic field exactly well so magnetic fields like i just said you know based on the field. Actually they're often said to north and the south pole and right opposite poles attract and light poles repel. So magnets can pull each other together. Push each other part in actually magnetism itself is half of fundamental force a called electromagnetism which also includes electric fields. But what i think is really fascinating is aside from gravity. Magnets are really the only fundamental force that we can just experience an encounter on a regular basis right and we can kind of see this magnetism action when we're playing around with magnets and they stick to certain metals right. Yeah yeah i mean the whole metal magnet thing is kinda complicated carlos. Tell you that everybody comes up. I see on. Tv shows all the time even the education tv shows. They say magnets metal. And i'm like no you got it wrong again. There's only three medals of her naturally magnetic iron nickel and cobalt. And what carlos means there is that there are only three medals that be permanent magnets that hold their magnetism forever and never other metals can stick to magnets but then there are a lot of medals. They can't so we just moved to. A new house has a stainless steel fridge. And guess what like all our fridge. Magnets don't work on this fridge anymore. so what makes them materials magnetic and others not so much well it actually all has to do with electrons. Oh our friends the electrons. Of course these are. The negatively charged particles in adams and when they flow they create electricity. That's right and whenever electrons move in in particular when they spin around something they generate a magnetic field as well as an electric field so magnetic fields have to do with spinning electrons exactly so the electrons are spinning around the atom and that makes like a little magnetic field but then in a permanent magnet. What happens is all. The atoms are facing the same direction. Imagine all these atoms lined up in a row and they kinda wanna do what their next neighbor is doing. So if their neighbor is pointed up right there magnetic moment is up than the one next to him says. Hey up is the the direction so they go up as well. So now you end up with a macroscopic magnetic field because all of these atoms are kind of lined up with their magnetic moments so all of these atoms facing the same direction is what creates one. Big magnet exactly. That's how permanent magnets work like the magnet. Cystic to your fridge. All the atoms in that baghdad are lined up in the same way and they make this big magnetic field that polls the magnet against your fridge and keeps it there. But then there's another kind of magnet and tim the guy you just heard there he actually works with this one. It's called an electromagnet for electro magnets. We actually don't care about the spin of the electron what we care about is the

Carlos Jeff Brumfield National High Magnetic Field L Tim Murphy Tallahassee Baghdad TIM Florida Jeff Adams
"physicist" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"physicist" Discussed on The Science Show

"You can't see them. And he goes on. Surely nothing is every bit as physical is something. Especially, if it is to be defined as the absence of something. Now. Is this really solid? Otherwise understood nothing to the absence of everything. And now, Lawrence Krauss assures us that nothing is actually the presence of an absence of something. And that he has physical properties. But, it can't really be like that either. For a best nothing can only be the virtual presence of an absence of something. This no objective reality remember. So we may well ask how virtual particles poppy in and out of virtual existence have physical properties. On this formulation, what can physical possibly main? Then in the fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene Columbia University I read that reality. The stuff of the universe is composed of six dimensional vibrations in tiny loops of virtual stream. In other words, the universe is like a ten dimensional pot of boiling. Bubbling Virtual Spaghetti made a virtual pastor in a virtual pot. But white shouldn't that also be virtual reality and don't the vibrations have to be virtual to? And if not, how does virtual spaghetti produce real vibrations. This time Max Take Mark Professor of physics at Mit has the answer. In his book, a Mathematical Universe he writes. Physical world not only is described by mathematics, but it is mathematics. Not Real, mathematics, not real objective mathematics, course, but virtual mathematics virtual mathematicians like Max mark. And Max take mark is not alone. Vlatko Vedra professor of quantum information science at Oxford. Writes something very similar. Information and not matter or energy or love is the building block on which everything is constructed? Moreover in apparent support of Stephen Hawkins claimed that the universe created itself. The drawl adds information in contrast matter energy is the only concept that we currently have the can explain its own origin. Anton Zeilinger professor of physics at the University of Vienna. Also thinks that reality is made of information. In fact, he thinks reality and information are indistinguishable. We have learned in the history of physics that it is important not to make distinctions that have no basis such as the pre Newtonian distinction between the laws on earth, and those that govern the motions of the heavenly bodies. I suggest that in a similar way the distinction between reality and knowledge of. Between Reality and information cannot be made. Max Plank, the father of quantum mechanics and recipient of the nineteen eighteen prize ventured even further. In an interview with science writer, John Sullivan keep proposed that everything is made of consciousness. I regard consciousnesses fundamental. Regard matter as derivative from consciousness. Everything that we regard is existing postulates concerts nece. Sullivan's interview with plank was published in the London Observer on the twenty fifth of January nineteen thirty one. Planks hid it again in Florence in nineteen, forty four. There is no matter as such or matter. Originating exists only by virtue of the existence of a conscious and intelligent spirit. This spirit is the Matrix of Olmeta. Now. If plank is right then, I suppose we should expect the large Hadron collider soon to turn up another new elementary particle, the fundamental interaction of the spirit or consciousness field. A plank bozon perhaps. In the ensuing years, planks view gained support from Fred Allen Wolf One time professor of physics at San Diego. State University. WHO IN A book entitled? Parallel? universes combined it with a wheeler feinman absorb theory. And concluded that the world we see out there appears physical form because information from the past, and from the future joins for a momentary flash of consciousness. Throw out either and nothing would exist as a solid object. So.

Max Plank Professor of physics Max mark Stephen Hawkins Lawrence Krauss John Sullivan Fred Allen Wolf Anton Zeilinger Brian Greene Columbia Universi Vlatko Vedra University of Vienna professor London Observer State University white Olmeta Florence San Diego writer
"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I'm coming from a place. Which I don't fully understand. But it's cold awareness. Among key. Doesn't have the kind of awareness. We have is a place within us. Where is that within? Well, let me just just be a little physics with you. In the beginning. Was the void. And this was on the face of the deep. Now. What's that mean? If you're a physicist summit attack you now if you're a physicist how did the universe begin with the big bang? What would that come from? Where did it come from? No in the mini gaining scripture says in the beginning, avoid it's credit. And then he says over said let there be light. Beginning where heat flows through the cold receiving cold and temendous speed always perfectly. Tufik speed the speed of light so to speak, but more than the speed of light because light is being carried and producers of resistance, a small resistance, but it flows with gravity if flows where won't go into that right now while I'm trying to say go back to it. I'm trying to say. Is it? Everything came from. So if I use the word place, I can't find another word. It's not an aside. It's not an in this side where we are. Is out there. Just beyond. Outside the universe. You is outside the universe is not inside the universe because you have to have something absolutely still to make relatively relativity of motion possible..

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Hi, Maury cartoonist, and I'm Daniel particle physicist. And this is our podcast Daniel and Horry explained the universe in which a cartoonist and physicist try to figure out how to make the universe understandable to anybody. Yeah. And to the on the podcast, we are examining a very heavy topic. Gravity, and specifically why is gravity so weak and strange gravity as we said earlier is something which controls the structure of the universe. I mean, the reason the solar system looks the way it does is because of gravity the reason the earth is round is because of gravity. The reason we have galaxies is because of gravity. The reason we waste so much is because of gravity, right? No. No, that's because of late night. But it's such a fundamental force of nature, right leg. It's present in our everyday live. We spent a lot of time thinking about gravity, right? How not to fall down droppings? How to go up buildings go down buildings, right? These seems like one of the most important forces. I mean, if you ask people to name a force or what kind of forces the experience in their life gravity's, the one that's present in their lives. Right. You're climate upstairs. You're fighting gravity trip. You fall down. You're feeling gravity. You look around you the shape of things is controlled by gravity. And that's why it's particularly strange that gravity is the weakest force of all the forces. We've discovered it's by far the weakest yet into release strange to hear you say that really how can gravity be week. Like, you know, like, it's it's keeping the whole earth together. It's making the entire planet. Swing going Thurgau basically right without gravity. We would just shoot off into space. Right. It's a really strange. Situation. And there's other things about gravity. We don't understand as well. It's really strange. It doesn't play well with the other forces. It's very very weak. It's a total mystery signs, except that we have a theory which works beautifully, right? We can calculate. Exactly how mercury orbits a sun. We can send things in outer space and no with two millimeter precision, exactly where they're gonna land. We have a working theory that we can use. Right. But we don't understand it on a conceptual level. We have these basic deep questions about about what gravity is and how the universe works because of it. So it's a weird question. And maybe one that people had thought about before. So Daniel went out as usual and ask people on the street. Why do you think gravity so week? Here's what of random selection of folks who are willing to talk to me on a Tuesday morning had to say about gravity. I should. I was I was those are pretty strong. I I don't know. Because. It depends on this, and it's long range one. So that's why we feel it very weak. Most of the time. No, I have. No, I'm sorry..

Daniel physicist Horry
"physicist" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Move harriers. And so they called up. Theoretical physicists in the science that they were studying was quantum mechanics? It was actually quantum mechanics that made me want to become a theoretical physicist. So it's interesting because in a sense relativity, you might say was a means to an end for me, and it's a beautiful theory. But it was a means to an end whereas quantum mechanics was just as mysterious beautiful thing that I needed to understand. And so it was fortunate for me that it turned out that I was a physicist. So I knew I could get both six I could understand relativity to see how time machine would be built at the same time. You know, I could understand what it was like to be a theoretical physicist. Use these equations to understand how the universe works in a strange thing quantum mechanics. So that was really the people are surprised at that was actually my love for quantum mechanics is real interesting question, which actually. To become a theoretical physicist. Well, they're building some incredible things. The large Hadron collider at certain Switzerland. In French borders amazing now who knows how close they can come to building an actual time machine. In terms of the things you've done to try to construct one. Are you still at it? Or are you letting other people work on? No you have to remember member. I sit down with your medical physicists, right? That what I did was to Einstein had developed a set of equations. They're called Einstein's gravitational field equations, they're part of what's known as general theory of relativity. And essentially what that series says is Einstein's theory says that what we call the gravitational force really isn't a force at all. It's actually the structure of space, and what he meant by that in the simple analogy that I give to people is the fact that think of empty spaces being like, let's say like a rubber sheet like a trampoline and think of..

physicist Einstein Switzerland
"physicist" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"It chuck sivertsen abc news cosmos space and time travel science and technology brought to you by fear radical physicist futurist popularizer of science and world renowned.

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Conversation what condition conversation wbz here for years dick summer for example still here still doing it six one seven five four ten thirty there's the toll free triple eight nine two nine ten thirty and a super excited about the newest episode of the jay talking podcast astronomy astronomy is not the dry astronomy and physics i accidentally took astronomy in college and it turned out to be my favorite course took it the very last course in the summer and i was just astonished by it and i was really astonished i guess the other night doug the astronomer and physicist who actually makes his own telescopes he actually grinds the glass for his own telescopes how's that for for a hobby beer making winemaking can bucci making any bringing up a notch telescope making something you probably could do if you're into it i wonder how he does it i think he does it at his house i'm not sure you invited me to go up there because i go up to new hampshire all the time i wanna religion to the puck i'm gonna listen to the podcast and i urge you to do the same thing mark just posted it it's galactic sized podcast as you as you will read jay talking podcast you can just do a one off on the computer just google it and play it you can subscribe get them all automatically on itunes or what have you got on your phone also and it's just occurs to me recently i i have one hundred eight travel videos one hundred and eight the yours to watch for free anytime.

jay doug physicist google
"physicist" Discussed on The Bible Project

The Bible Project

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on The Bible Project

"This in the notes but i'll just relate because it was really interesting this was about the development of the concept of force fields oh science right okay so and really it's the use of the word field okay right so you mentioned this was a physicist faraday michael faraday daniel fair day really important i know the last name faraday says michael faraday okay michael faraday there's whole institute you know physics dedicated to carrying on his legacy mid eighteen hundreds he's like pioneering physicist so he developed the concept of the magnetic field so what we're talking about is when a magnet the effect that a magnet has yeah like a you know the classic thing throw a magnum table with little pieces of iron around it yeah it exerts a force yeah or a force in attraction brings certain of those little pieces of iron business stick to it and there's a real estate around it in which it works there is a space around it where the attraction is strong enough to actually move it yeah so the whole point was about would we call that yeah what do we call that case so he developed the metaphor of field which was used according to oxford english dictionary at the time to use this an actual plot of land plot of land where everything in it is the same thing it's a cornfield wheatfield so to feel dedicated to a certain thing and everything in it's the same and then you can have field as a metaphor of like of study a field research field of whatever quantum mechanics so yeah so it wasn't that that was always a metaphor at some point fair day was like man something we need to talk about we don't have language for you so he adapted english word field and it actually changed its meaning because of magnetic field is not like a wheatfield because a wheat field doesn't have more wheat in the middle and less we on the outer rings what i love is that almost all languages that way correct that's right and that's that's always fascinat.

michael faraday physicist
"physicist" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Science Friday

"Well i did fight very hard i think it's important yeah jodi jodi you're absolutely right yeah i'm not fighting i think we have over the last decade and we have ruled out a tremendous number of ideas about what a wimp could be but i think to say that it's completely dead is not a fair statement let me move on from the wimp to new thinking about physics and flip do we need new ideas are you're young you're young astronomer physicist theoretical physicist do you bring new ideas to the table that you're perhaps your your your forefathers i might say not been accepting of oh gosh i hope my advisers and listening yes so what's really interesting i think that me and probably the a lot of my colleagues we see ourselves as refugees from the large hadron collider so we are a group of of theoretical physicists who kind of cut our teeth in our phd's of building new theories for the higgs bose on and all of the promises of the nineties theories on ninety super symmetry extra dimensions all these weird ideas that we've kind of sold ourselves drinking the kool aid that when the large hadron collider turns on we're gonna find all these new particles and explain everything about the higgs and come twenty thirteen when we're all writing up our dissertations the discovers the higgs and it turns out to be the most boring possible thing from the point of view of new physics and i think a lot of the theorists on of my generation kind of had a bit of an identity crisis where we had to reevaluate what is the most pressing question in particle physics and not only what is the most pressing question but what is the most pressing question that we actually have a shot at answering experimentally in our lifetimes and so i think we've all brought a kind of tool kit for how do we approach models of particle physics to this new arena of dark matter.

jodi jodi physicist higgs
"physicist" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Yep so then let's start with who are you rob so my my background i mean in my core scientist physicist mathematician but then i actually left the hard sciences in expanded into like nba to get a little bit management experience in military officer for leadership experience event i went back from a phd actually financial economics is i thought that having the kind of the hard science than the econ background would just be a really nice combo to build especially to do what we're doing here i think it's a perfect combo so why i got into bitcoin i could say i came from just a heritage of libertarian cypher punks where bitcoin came from i just got lucky i guess being part of that community and you know getting into bitcoin early on and then from there i started getting involved in the community actually started doing active research for my phd in on bitcoin pricing and then that led me to actually be getting a little bit more entrepreneurial involved in the space then the more i got into it the more i just it just kind of sucked me in and then i was on a project called z classic working court team there and talking to a few of the other guys on the team we realize just kind of a big gap in the industry particularly in the governor inside in applying economics i think a little bit more thoroughly to different stakeholder groups in expanding the particular technology in a direction we thought just made a lot of sense so that that's where we we launched zan from that motivation right on so you're in the military you have your mba and you have a phd you're not a slender i can say i'm actually my my mom will tell you i'm still abd on the doctor which is all but dissertation so i teach and actually teach bitcoin to boxing courts but i still eat to defend my dissertation later this stall hopefully not would reynaud.

nba officer zan scientist physicist
"physicist" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"That this is our inert objects they don't they're not open systems they're really closed systems the way physicist look at it the thing that's unusual about physics is that it's a level microphysics level we can't see really what's going on in the levels we can see what's going on we see that systems are organized is open systems they require it's throughput this flocks now the ancients did that i believe they they inferred like i did that even though we can't really see what's going on at a micro physical level wouldn't it be normal that nature operates in a similar fashion in that matter and energy are example of open systems that the ether is really a never ending flux that's going on and as long as that flex continues the physical world is maintained you see that concept in hindu myths for example the idea of this new dreaming idea of dreaming as concept of process and as the dream continues the mayor is generated the physical universe and then when he awakens may dissolves now that it's not that there's nothing at that point it's just the physical universe those waves and either dissipate and the you realize all along you're vishnu dreaming so when you refer to ancients well this goes to i believe back to the ice age the source of this knowledge i believe that it was lost due to a major cataclysm that happened to the planet and there was a appears a major effort to encode this science of creation in myths particularly creation myths you find it in ancient egyptian myth of out tomb also in the story of us iras you find it in the crash the greek creation myth of house zeus and his brothers sisters created the world the universe you find it a mess up to tame ian creation myth babylonian creation epic it's in the east ching hitching metaphysics you find it in the tyrol also in astrology the first thing that killed me into this this ancient science was the taro i was explaining my theory of physics which is based on this idea of a reaction kinetics either either that's engaged in process and in certain way you know you can actually describe the processes that.

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"You know he was he was just an awfully nice man and fun to be with i never to tell you the truth every time i went into talk with him i took in the list of questions mainly to do with what i was writing about him but at the end of the lists would be questions i really wanted to know myself the more the deeper more personal questions maybe well he had very slow communicating with them all never got down to those questions and i am sorry about that i wish that it happened i don't know we don't have any time there's one other anecdote i wanted to mention but i think we don't have time to we if you could get it in in thirty seconds comment that has com his colleague gary gibbons made about him last summer at a conference who may gary was a graduate student with him at cambridge way back when and gary gary came to cambridge thinking he was a brilliant physicist thesis i thought it was a brilliant physicist and i met stephen hawking and it was like salary meeting moats via for analogy vigil basu vermont and we have just a minute to go here i your last thought and and how do we encourage more scientists sort of pushing the directions at hawking win well you know so he was human like all other humans and had his pluses and minuses he was also lonely man sometimes to the later years of his life because it was very slow talking to him so my sense was not as many people talk to him as should have could have would have because it was just hard to do so but i think the thing that we can do to remember him in the positive light and what we can learn from is courage right he had courage and thaddeus the way in which people if people have courage they can do like him on the chief similar greatness i would say well as hawking himself once said he believes he was lucky in his condition that had ails had progress more slowly than is often the case it shows that one not need not lose hope.

gary gibbons graduate student gary gary physicist stephen hawking moats basu vermont cambridge thirty seconds
"physicist" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Scholar is to convey the fruits of knowledge to the broader public because in fact the broader public cares and is interested so you know yeah i've had the experience of being in cabs all around the world and the cabdriver when he finds out that i'm a physicist will turn around and start asking me questions about quantum mechanics or about 'cause molly or something and steven was really was passionate about conveying these ideas now now i have to say that if you read the brief history of time it's not always necessarily fully comprehensible to the lay public you know i gave that book as a present to my parents and the comment was it's really beautiful but we didn't really understand but sometimes it doesn't matter you know sometimes you read poetry and you don't really understand it but it's beautiful inspiring anyway well an nba to to the point that kid he was making that it was really really important for to hawking to make things as comprehensible as he could he came back and wrote a briefer history of time right and took out a lot of the technical details right and juno partly through that role by doing that in the heat i think i think part of the reason he so beloved is he became a metaphor for the human condition you know we're all tied hand and foot by being said animals on the earth you have to eat you've got to find housing does the daily life but you get sick you die but we all yearn for deeper and higher truths right now stephen hawking was even more challenged physically than most of us but he really exemplified they're dea that there are these higher truths and that you should try to learn them and then try to communicate them and he was deeply influential that way you absolutely hit the nail on the head that's kind of what more my mind was this morning when i had heard that he had died because i mean i just feel like his influence i'll tell you on me personally really had less to do with.

physicist nba stephen hawking molly steven
"physicist" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Think Again

"Thinking in is brought to you by the national association of realtors every business faces challenges whether you need more space a better location or a little more curb appeal a realtor a member of the national association of realtors can help you find the right place to grow so get what your business needs get realtor hi there i'm jason godsend you're listening to think again a big thing podcast mm back in the old days if your species was faced with the next essential threat you were stuck hoping for some advantageous mutation maybe an extra finn or a slightly more sophisticated eyeball outwitting fate was pretty much out of the question and as much as we might prefer to disco bingewatch something and forget about it there are several plausible scenarios whereby humanity could face extinction in the too close for comfort future happily thanks to our very large brains and thinkers like my guest today theoretical physicist michio kaku we have some options dr kaku his latest book is the future of humanity tara forming mars interstellar travel immortality and our destiny beyond earth welcome to think again dr kaku that v on so it seems to me that kind of related to see peace snows old idea of the two cultures rate that the humanity is in the sciences were separating off that we may be facing something similar with respect to technology knowledge e and the future i read a lot of philosophy and literature and so on and those people are terrified many of them of many of the things that you study and talk about and then there are many people on the other side of the spectrum who are extremely extremely excited about the future about what's emerging and technology about where we're headed well i think that we are evolutionary really uh hardwired to be terrified of the future and the unknown because our ancestors were timid monkeys every time they saw a tiger in the forests or the rustling of leaves in the forests they ran that's why we're here today precisely because our ancestors were terrified of the unknown and the future those that weren't if i eat enough because once in awhile there was a tiger lurking in the forest however how do we deal with things that aren't terrifying we deal with them in three stages okay stage one is we say resolves all my.

michio kaku physicist
"physicist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The academic ladder as a physicist what happened to your interest in time travel during those years the thing is is that even when i was a kid i knew that people were concerned about me because i was in this depressed state and so i was astute enough to realise not the tell him that i was wanted to build a time machine we could implement relay us exactly and of course when i was growing up the academic ladder you know i thought i tell my colleagues interested in building a time machine right not yet thank you were still thinking about our whole young progress so far in physics you put the idea of time travel no no no no see the thing is is that what i did was i developed the cover plan you have to the physics physics is a strange strange peace this what people call legitimate crazy ideas and then there's what people call crazy crazy black holes were legitimate crazy and other words in black holes it turns out that black holes or connected with on size work and black holes are connected with taught ron malott is theoretical physicist and author of time traveller the scientists personal mission to make time travel a reality coming out bull revisit one of the greatest time travel comedy movies of all time groundhog day and will even rethink time itself i man strain champs adds to the best of our knowledge from wisconsin public radio and p r axe.

physicist ron malott wisconsin
"physicist" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Question uh your physicist aama physicists we have of course objective statements to make to the public however in your heart of hearts any heart of hearts what do you think is out there i first of all do intelligent beings exists in outer space be can they reach us and if they do reach us are they going to be peaceful what are your thoughts like late at night when you think about this if at night i i really think of much of anything but i i will say that the idea that you give in the movies that there somewhat like slowly don't look the same but there is some like i i you know that's what that's a little bit naive if you consider what we're doing in this century we're doing a lot of interesting thing from this country are you finally under any biology and so forth and so on but also we're developing machine that have cognitive abilities comparable to our our our own artificial intelligence and not yet artificial intelligence it can play go or our poker are kiss or anything but artificial intelligence that can do anything that human brain can do and in that sant uh what we're really inventing our successors the aliens the once were likely to hear from if they're even thousand years beyond us are 100 years beyond us they will have those machines to so i think if the majority of the intelligence from because most likely to be synthetic intelligent not soft squishy biological intelligence and consequently yet i i suppose we should be looking for signals coming from not being on some sort of planet with oceans anambra here's but from you know artificial intelligence machine and that makes our experimental very much more difficult one because i know quite know what to do about that mmhmm now let me ask you the final question japan's i'll well you probably get a lot of phone calls from people that say by humbug they're already here how do i know they're here well i visited a flying saucer the other day myself it went to venus so what do you say to people who are very sincere very honest but claim that they've already met the aliens what are your thoughts well.

artificial intelligence japan physicist thousand years 100 years
"physicist" Discussed on The Weekly Substandard

The Weekly Substandard

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on The Weekly Substandard

"Well yes will english the doctor was she lee physicist the nuclear physicist who discovered cold fusion yes that that nuclear physicist right i don't know as always wanted to she was no christmas joe i was ways you actually second mention of movies which actually pairs that two of those characters has just like yeah nuclear physicists off in the world doing awesome research and if the two of them with their characters and i think they'll be awesome that also movie that would be a great movie did you can make it funny though you get you it is comedy oz hysterical like legally blond but with physicists and yeah do tiger cheek so speak uh speaking of deathwish it sounds like i hang up death speaking of test speaking of death come on its head honestly right you're transitions for it sounds like i backs as a deathwish for three d that's why said at healthy you go now this is a story that you picked up or which of you gentlemen that i saw the sunny eusought first so what's happening is that world so everyone who is a decent person hates three d the movies this is just the fact this is in fact of science everyone hates three d nobody likes it the only reason we tolerated as filmgoers is because the studios have decided that this is an easy way to soak money from us and they they jam all of the good screening times into three d slot so if you're just like showing up at the theater and you and you and i was amazed by this this is how a not insignificant portion of the population decides what movie they wanna see on any given night they go to the theater and they pick what showing next.

physicist filmgoers