35 Burst results for "Physicist"

What Do We Need to Do to Get Kids Into STEM Fields?

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:05 min | 6 d ago

What Do We Need to Do to Get Kids Into STEM Fields?

"Graduating fewer and fewer engineers. We're graduating for a few mathematicians. We're graduating fewer and fewer scientists. It's just we're seeing it in our R&D and the fact that we're having to get engineers, scientists, physicists, others from over a C's from Asia and other places just goes to the fact that this growth that was happening here in the United States that gave us the mental capacity if you would to get to the moon was not being captured anymore today. It's not being captured in the way that it was that about what do we need to do and I've seen this out as a challenge. What do we need to do if you're listening to this podcast? You know, is the question. If you have younger children, if you have or maybe you have kids in college or maybe you're looking at what the knowledge gap that we're experiencing right now in our college and universities instead of worrying so much about the social aspects and the social conditioning and the politically correct culture, maybe we ought to get back to actually encouraging young men and young women to go into the sciences to go into engineering to go into the math because these are the things that give us the creativity and the answers that we need to live in the society that we're in.

Asia United States
The Improbability of the Multiverse With Dr. Stephen Meyer

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:33 min | 3 weeks ago

The Improbability of the Multiverse With Dr. Stephen Meyer

"If you are bound or constrained by a materialistic world outlook, such that you think that everything came about by undirected materialistic processes, then something like the panspermia idea or the multiverse may be your best option. With the multiverse, we have the same kind of problem where the fine tuning is incredibly improbable. There's no way it would happen by undirected processes in our universe. So serious physicists have posited the existence of other universes and such a large multiplicity of other universes that eventually a universe like ours would, they say, have to arise. Right. But then as you dig deeper into this, you discover there's a problem. And that is that if these other universes were just causally all disconnected from one another, then something that happens Andromeda universe or universe X isn't going to affect anything in our universe, including whatever process it was that set the fine tuning. So in virtue of that, they propose universe generating mechanisms that underlie all the universes that could be spitting out universes here hither and yon, such that they could then portray our universe as a kind of lucky winner in a giant cosmic lottery. And that's where it all kind of falls apart because it turns out that even in theory, the universe generating mechanisms that have been proposed, some based on something called string theory and another one based on something called inflationary cosmology, these other universe generating mechanisms themselves depend on prior, unexplained, fine tuning,

'Science and the Mind of the Maker' Author Melissa Cain Travis on the 'Maker Thesis'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:32 min | 8 months ago

'Science and the Mind of the Maker' Author Melissa Cain Travis on the 'Maker Thesis'

"I am talking to the author of science and the mind of the maker with the conversation between faith and science reveals about God Melissa Cain Travis. We were just going to talk about something. You just mentioned it Melissa, tell us again. So the central thesis of my book science in the mind of the maker is something that I call them makers thesis. And this goes beyond the idea that science gives us evidence that points towards an intelligent creator. What I mean when I say the maker thesis is that when we look at diverse branches of the natural sciences, we actually see marks of rationality in all of these different areas of science. But in addition to that and corresponding to it quite beautifully, is the fact that we have inquisitive higher intelligent life on Planet Earth whose rationality is attuned in just the right way to be able to detect the rationality in. Okay, now I hate to break it to you, but that might make sense to you. And it might even make sense to me, but that's not easy what you just said, because I remember Hugh Ross, who introduced me to a lot of this stuff, when he was talking about this, I think it was on this program, like 5 years ago or something. I remember thinking like, that's a complex idea. So let's break this down. When you even talk about something that rationality, I think a lot of people go like, what do you mean exactly by rationality? I think it's a deep philosophical issue, isn't it? Like when you're saying that if I look at the world of science, the idea that it is somehow understandable is itself so taken for granted. It seems so innate to me that it's hard for me to step outside and marvel at it. Does that make sense to you? Yeah, it totally does. So back in the mid 20th century physicist by the name of Eugene wigner. Wrote an essay that has since become quite famous. Now, it's important to understand that wigner was not a theist in any sense of the word. We could probably best describe him as a happy agnostic. But he wrote this essay, it's freely available to read online. And the title of the essay is the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences. And what he did was he explored something that Albert Einstein had remarked about repeatedly, but just had not elaborated on. And that was the mathematical comprehensibility of the

Melissa Cain Travis Melissa Hugh Ross Eugene Wigner Wigner Albert Einstein
Man earns Ph.D., fulfills dream of being physicist — at 89

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 9 months ago

Man earns Ph.D., fulfills dream of being physicist — at 89

"In eighty nine year old Rhode Island man has finally achieved something he's dreamed up nearly his whole life Manfred Steiner had always been fascinated by physics but instead went into medicine after retiring in two thousand I really don't want to spend my life just sitting around so he enrolled at Brown University and after nearly two decades of classes I made it Steiner earned a PhD in physics this was the most gratifying point in my life his advice to others if there's something you want to do go ahead try it now that he has Steiner hopes to catch on as a research assistant I'm not looking for a paid job you know that's still I'm Sager made Connie

Manfred Steiner Rhode Island Steiner Brown University Sager Connie
Mathematics and Logic Are Founded on Faith

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:36 min | 10 months ago

Mathematics and Logic Are Founded on Faith

"Angels it folks I'm talking to doctor Michael gillan. The new book is believing is seeing a physicist, that's Michael. Explains how science shattered his atheism and revealed the necessity of faith. Michael it's brave of you in many ways to be talking about faith and science the way you do because so many people in the world of science are either openly and illogically hostile to discussions of faith or they are like many people simply afraid to open their mouths. And so they stay quiet and they contribute to the problem by being quiet. So thank you for all the books you've written and for what you do and say, and thanks for the new book believing is seeing. You mentioned mathematics in the book. Obviously, math is not a science, but they bear on one another. What do you say about math in the book? Math is the queen of the sciences and it is widely perceived to be solidly founded on logic and has nothing whatsoever to do with faith. So if of all the sciences, physics, biology, astronomy, mathematics is generally perceived, and it's a misperception, but it's generally perceived as being 100% faith free. And in this chapter that I call having faith in mathematics, I explained that even mathematics and even logic is founded on

Michael Gillan Michael
Author Michael Guillen: We're Able to Perceive Things Not Visible to the Eye

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:51 min | 10 months ago

Author Michael Guillen: We're Able to Perceive Things Not Visible to the Eye

"Folks I'm talking to Michael gillan, who's a scientist, who's written a book called believing is seeing a physicist explains how science shattered his atheism and revealed the necessity of faith. So you were just saying Michael gill really extraordinary experiment. They separate the connection between someone's left hemisphere and right hemisphere. And then they ask them, what do you see, cover up one eye? What do you see? Whatever. So the first time they cover up the right eye, and I'm sorry. The first time we cover up the left, which means you had it right. The first time they showed the picture of a frying pan to Joe, the split brain patient, they showed it to his right eye, which means that was being the image was being processed by the left hemisphere. And he had no problem identifying and naming it. He's a friend. Okay. Okay. Then sometime later, you know, they were jumping jumbling all these pictures. They showed that same frying pan image to his left eye, which means the image was being processed by the right hemisphere. And guess what? He said, well, I don't see anything. And the said, what do you mean? You don't see anything? No. And then they said, then they said to him, okay, close your eyes and draw the first thing that comes to your mind. So the guy closes his two eyes and draws, guess what? A frying pan. So what that indicates to us is that we're able to perceive things that are not visible. We're able to perceive things that are invisible to the eye. And that is where I start exploring the nature of faith because if you think about it, faith is all about seeing or perceiving truths that we can not see or prove in any or even imagine.

Michael Gillan Michael Gill JOE
Why It's Worth Exploring 'The Big Bang'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:34 min | 10 months ago

Why It's Worth Exploring 'The Big Bang'

"It's kind of funny, Steve. And I think we've talked about this privately, but in my book as atheism dead roughly have the same three things. And this was before I knew that you were putting it in this way. And the third one I put it differently, I kind of, you know, it's more about James tour and abiogenesis, but it's the same concept. And it's funny, though, that we're both logical or try to be. And these are three just astonishing arguments for God. There's just no way around it. And it's funny, I mean, I guess I'm glad to hear that you use these three because they struck me viscerally as the three arguments that I wanted to talk about. The Big Bang in some ways is a curious choice because I think a lot of people think, well, that's old hat. I don't think it is, at least, that's why I revisit it and I talk about it a little bit in that chapter. But why do you say the big why is it worth dealing with the Big Bang, something that presumably we've known about for a long time? Well, science and philosophy do intersect. And scientific discoveries can raise larger philosophical or worldview questions. In every world you have to answer the question, what is the thing or the entity or the process from which everything else came? And the default way of thinking about that from the late 19th century was that the universe is eternal and self existent that matter and energy play the role in a materialistic worldview that God plays in the theistic worldview. In other words, it's the thing from which everything else comes. And it's always been here, and therefore doesn't need an explanation. But one Princeton physicist Robert Dickey put it an infinitely old universe would relieve us of the need of explaining the origin of matter at any finite time in the past. But if the universe is finite, which is what all the evidence now points to. Then that raises a big question that materialism can't answer, which is where did the matter and the energy come from in the first place? At that beginning point. And this troubled Einstein, this troubled Arthur eddington, this troubled Fred hoyle, the great astrophysicist and physicist at the early part of the 20th century who were confronted with this evidence, all recognized that it posed a huge challenge to scientific materialism or scientific atheism or scientific naturalism, whatever you want to call it, the idea that matter and energy or the primary reality, not

Robert Dickey Steve James Arthur Eddington Princeton Fred Hoyle Einstein
Archaeologist Steven Collins on the Event That Took Civilization Offline for 7 Centuries

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:00 min | 11 months ago

Archaeologist Steven Collins on the Event That Took Civilization Offline for 7 Centuries

"Was talking to my wife about this yesterday. dot coms. I said you know it's a funny thing because you're just the archaeologist. You find this stuff and then you have to turn over your findings to every kind of scientists many hostile to the fundamental idea. Evidently they seem to think what you and. I seem to think which is maybe the biggest headline of all. Yeah early in the dig when we started discovering all this kind of anomalous melted material stuff that looks like it had been exposed to rather high heat index. What do i do with that. I'm an archaeologist. I know how to dig dirt. I know how to recognize strata. I'm an expert on ancient pottery. All of that stuff. That goes with archaeology. But i'm not a physicist. I'm not an astrophysicist. I'm not kim. Mr a geologist so all that stuff had to be turned over to scientists who know what they're doing with that sort of thing and it actually wind wound up in the hands of a team of scientists. Call the the comment. Research group r. g. who has their well published in all kinds of scientific journals including the proceedings of the national academy of sciences. And now of course. Nature scientific reports on this particular paper that they wrote but they've been involved six or seven years in this analytical phase of the destruction layer for the middle bronze age at tall hamam which associates with the time of abraham and this particular layer had all kinds of indicators that they call them proxies of what's called media riddick or cosmic bowling airburst event that exploded over. Just the the side of a mom but exploded over the entire plane of the jordan were the cities of the plain. The cities of the car in genesis are located and it absolutely took civilization off line in that area for about seven centuries

KIM National Academy Of Sciences MR Abraham Bowling Jordan
Physicist Michael Guillen on His Book 'Believing Is Seeing'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:07 min | 11 months ago

Physicist Michael Guillen on His Book 'Believing Is Seeing'

"Michael gillen welcomed the program. You're you've been a friend for a long time. You've been scientists for way longer He your new book is titled believing is seeing physicist. That's you explains. How science shattered his atheism and revealed the necessity of fate. So congratulations on the brand new book. What is the headline in this book. You've written other books. I love talking about faith and science. And how compatible. They are putting it mildly. What's the what's the news in this one. I think the news is that i. For the first time i tell the full story. Eric of my journey from atheism to christianity and i was dragged into christianity kicking and screaming and the headline is that For those people who believe standard is somehow anti science or is completely incompatible with science living breathing. Proof that's not true. Because i live quite comfortably in quite enlightened state being both a scientist and a christian so i guess that's the

Michael Gillen Eric
Mike Lindell: It's a Fact That Donald Trump Won the 2020 Election

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Mike Lindell: It's a Fact That Donald Trump Won the 2020 Election

"Where are we with what happened in the twenty twenty election in other words. What where do you think we are now from your perspective as you bring a all in the twenty twenty election. Donald trump one eighty one million to seventy four million. There was fraud in every single state every single state and and that's been proven by about four different different math matic. Scientists of one's physicists are one hundred percent proven plus. We have all the pack of captures everything from the election. So everything's the same and what we did. After the cyber symposium i have met with no five different states and we're getting the states onboard to bring it just like i said before to the supreme court or the states will be the plaintiffs. Were doing audits even in red states. Red states where people like place in missouri where they said oh there was never in any election fraud here met with twelve of them including their secretary of state and we're starting an audit there so all of these states had had can go on frank speech dot com the way and see what happened in your state exactly and because they were all set through the machines and and every every like the my home state of minnesota every curious about which states send donald trump won. He won all the swing states. Nevada nevada michigan nevada nevada michigan must kansin georgia pennsylvania in arizona. He also won new hampshire in minnesota. Those are facts eric. You can't get around. Well you know. I know that i i know you and i trust you and you don't blow smoke. You're very positive. But you're about reality. And so of course. The problem mike and this is the issue is that we can know what you just said but the question is how do we from today. Move it forward so that there's a

Donald Trump Nevada Supreme Court Missouri Minnesota Michigan Frank New Hampshire Pennsylvania Georgia Arizona Eric Mike
"physicist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"physicist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Physicist and a cartoonist and brought them together to discuss some simple but profound questions that people have been wondering about for thousands of years, but no one understood. Daniel and Jorge. Answer them in a fun jargon freeway. This is Daniel and Jorge, explain the universe. Hey, Daniel, Let's talk about life. Yeah, One of the most interesting mysteries about life is how did he get started? I mean, how do you go from like a pile of rocks and water and all sorts of energy to things that actually live in, turn into you know, people in hamsters? Even more interesting is the question. Where did life get? Yeah, We don't even know whether life started on earth. Life could have started somewhere else in the universe and then landed here on Earth because all the aliens that's right. This is the science fiction novel where the twist is that we are all the aliens. But it's a deep question. Not just how did life began? Where did it begin first, and is not guaranteed that just because his life on Earth now that it means that life started on Earth. Hi. I'm Jorge and I'm Daniel. And this is our podcast. Daniel and Jorge. Explain the universe in which we take the whole universe. Find one interesting little nugget and try to explain it to you in a way that you could actually understand. No jargon, no hand waving because it's a podcast. Just actual.

Earth earth Daniel thousands of years One Jorge one first
The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

Short Wave

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

"Science concepts. We're going to unpack. Today is states of matter. You know some of those other states of matter. You didn't learn about in science class right. So the physicist. I called up to explain. This is martin's veer line at mit. And what. i find hilarious pout. Martin is he said when it comes to his own kid. He actually prefers to keep this particular science lesson. Pretty simple to my son. I'm like oh yeah you the gas liquid solid bam. Leave it at that you know. He's seven and states of matter is really just a way to describe how a group of particles think atoms or molecules etc move which is sort of beautiful and collective and different from what you would guess by looking just at a single particle and changes in temperature and pressure can cause those particles to move differently and change their behavior right. We see the super easily with water. That's right in the liquid phase water molecules slip and slide past each other but we humans quickly learned that if you lower the temperature the particles slowdown bam. We see is appear and we build bridges. And we're very excited about that. Actually that was a huge deal hundred years ago to make ice and if we go in the opposite direction heat water up. The particles move faster and farther apart and eventually the h. Two molecules breakaway and dissipate into the air as water vapor aka humidity. That's right it is already a miracle in itself like that. Water exists in these three different states. And that we can see those states at temperatures that we can reach as humans in the kitchen. But here's the thing. We can only do so much in our kitchen speakers there. But there's a limited range of temperature and pressure that even you can achieve in your kitchen mattie and there are states of matter beyond

MIT Martin Mattie
The History of the Electric Car

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:55 min | 1 year ago

The History of the Electric Car

"It or not. The electric automobile is almost two hundred years old in eighteen. Twenty eight hungarian priest by the name of unused djedovic created a simple electric motor and may have created a device that converted it into motion in eighteen. Thirty two scottish inventor robert anderson created a very simple vehicle which is basically a carriage a non rechargeable electric battery into crude electric motor. It didn't go very far and it didn't go very fast. But it was a self-propelled electric vehicle. Electric vehicles were mostly novelties. And weren't something that could find practical use. There was no centralized electrical generation at the time. And there were. No wires transmitting electricity. And moreover every time you use the car you had to get a brand new battery. It isn't believed that any of these very early vehicles actually ever carried a passenger. Many people in the mid nineteenth century created electric devices which moved including prototype electric trains however the fundamental problem that electric vehicles run into for poor batteries and very inefficient motors. The first big development came in eighteen fifty nine by french physicist guest on plenty who invented the acid lead battery. This was a breakthrough in that. The battery can be recharged over and over. Even though there had been improvements over the years this is still basically the same type of battery found in most cars today in eighteen. Eighty one french inventor gustav trevi created the first thing that we would probably recognize as an automobile. It was an electrically driven vehicle. That could carry a pasture down a public street trevi. Interestingly enough also applied electric motor to a boat thus creating the world's first outboard motor in eighteen eighty two englishman. Thomas parker produced a commercial electric vehicle. It wasn't until eighteen. Five that german engineer karl benz invented the first internal combustion engine automobile and the name benz should ring a bell to anyone who's remotely familiar with cars.

Djedovic Robert Anderson Gustav Trevi Thomas Parker Karl Benz Benz
What Was Stephen Hawking's Final Project?

BrainStuff

02:31 min | 1 year ago

What Was Stephen Hawking's Final Project?

"Days before his death on march fourteenth two thousand eighteen famed theoretical physicists. And cosmologists stephen hawking completed what would be his final research paper it since passed peer review and was published online in the journal of high energy. Physics on april twenty-seventh written with co author. Thomas herzog a theoretical physicist at the university of louisville belgium. The paper adds another facet to our understanding of this universe that we live in and needless to say it's complicated titled a smooth exit from eternal inflation. Be publication discusses an enigmatic problem facing cosmologists but before we delve into the crux of the study. Let's go back to win. Our universe was a baby. Some thirteen point eight billion years ago. A lot of evidence suggests that our universe originated from a singularity an infinitely dense point from which all the universe as we know it was born. We call that event the big bang but how the singularity came to be and why the big bang happened isn't of concern right now. We're interested in what happened immediately. After our universe was spawned a period known as inflation cosmologists predict that inflation occurred over a vanishingly small period. Right after the big bang during our universes very first ten to thirty two seconds during inflation the universe expanded exponentially and much faster than the speed of light after only his second. The energy from this inconceivably gargantuan explosion condensed to form subatomic particles that over millions of years created the stars galaxies planets and after another few billion years life. As we know it once this inflationary period ended the universes rate of expansion slowed but it continues to expand to this day because inflation powered a faster than light speed expansion. The observable universe that we see today is not the entire universe rather we exist inside a region of the cosmos. That light has had time to reach. It's like dropping a pebble into a calm swimming pool. The first circular ripple to propagate from the splash travels a fixed speed across the surface of the pool. If we imagine that the limit of our observable universe is that ripple traveling across the pool at the speed of light it's not that nothing exists beyond that ripple there's more pool or universe beyond it. We just can't see it yet. So the consequence of inflation is that there should be a lot more universe beyond what we can see even with our most powerful

Journal Of High Energy Thomas Herzog Stephen Hawking University Of Louisville Belgium Swimming
Branson, Bezos, Musk: The Billionaire Space Race

Sky News Daily

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Branson, Bezos, Musk: The Billionaire Space Race

"Richard branson's being outed longer than the others. Seventeen years or so since richard branson. I announced his ambitions. Two thousand four. When virgin galactic was started. I think back then the intention walls within three or four years. They be doing what they've only just done now of of taking passengers into space but for him dates back and he. He talks about this a lot. Doesn't it back to nineteen sixty nine and watching the moon landing a teenager. We choose to go to the moon and and do the other thing not because they are easy being taken outside by his dad and the pointing up at the moon and realizing there were two men up there east folks at one of those men buzz aldrin in the nineties and and talked about the idea of using plane rather than a traditional rocket as so. The idea is been fermenting for a long time lot of setbacks on the way of course. I think a lot of us wonder whether this would ever happen. He's proved he can do it. And i think that for him is why this is so emotionally significant but also practically significant in a business sense as well. Let's go through the others then we go elon. Musk of tesla. Fame with space. X.'s dragon capsule and he's the best known for his space ambitions around the world. Think just because of his global profile that he has and has had a lot of success with the commercial side of this deals with nasa of taking things up into orbital space which of course is much further than branson or some of the tourism operations are going and has talked in perhaps much greater ambition. About what could be done. He's talked about colonizing mars. Easy said he wants to go to mars. he's also said people might die. Going to mars but ambitions seemed to be much bigger and grander than just space tourism. And someone who through his life has solve the big problems as he's seen them around the world and this is one he sees that needs to be solved by the private sector. Then making up the triumvirate. Jeff bezos of amazon fame. What of his ambitions. what's his rocket. Program is interesting isn't because he there's far less publicity with with. Jeff bezos a blue origin. The company that will take him into space has been around for twenty years so longer than branson's virgin galactic but his plans all rooted much further back than that he he talks of colonizing space of building these holds where trillions of people can live something. It's thought he took from a professor. He had at princeton physicist. Who came up with his idea in the seventies so he has these grand ambitions that pass. He doesn't talk about as much as richard branson alone. Musk but which are very rooted in in history and clearly having left amazon this is now his focus on taking humans where they where they've not come

Richard Branson Musk Of Tesla Virgin Galactic Aldrin Elon Branson Jeff Bezos Nasa Amazon Princeton Musk
MicroPython and CircuitPython

Talk Python To Me

01:46 min | 1 year ago

MicroPython and CircuitPython

"Welcome to talk by damian. Welcome back scott. Great to have you. Have you really good to have you both here. And normally ask people how they got programming. David you've already told you story. And maybe i think we'll mix it up just a little bit. Let's maybe just have you both do a quick introduction about you know you fit into the python world and what you're up to these days damien. gophers show. I'm the creator of micro python. It's been a long journey in the pasta. Nine years nine years or so. Before that i was theoretical physicists and i studied mobile university australia and the theoretical physics. My phd was extra dimensions and kind of string. Theory related stuff. That's super cool seeking couldn't be like a astrophysics type thing. It's gotta be something small if you work in micro python right like well. The thing with particle physics is all about the tiny tiny things. The aquatics is sort of a small area but also linking to cosmetology which is the really really huge thing than the idea of cosmology is to link the tiny with the lodge. That's all i guess. Very different from. Meyer controls impaired gumming software and hardware and real tangible things. How'd you get from physics to the program side of things. I always liked computers and programming and I always had that as a side hobby. And i actually studied computer engineering and mathematics. Physics wasn't thing i kept. It professionally say that and always had on the side microcontrollers and my desk and cnc machines and sort of how phil

Damian Gophers Damien Scott David Australia Meyer Phil
The Missing 96 Percent of the Universe

TED Talks Daily

01:54 min | 1 year ago

The Missing 96 Percent of the Universe

"Have you ever taken us three d. glasses of the cinema. The picture looks blurry and it can be difficult to see exactly what is happening. This is because three d. Glasses treat our brain into forming three d. image by controlling the color of the light that each high-seas using different filter. In each lens. You could say sometimes seeing things from a different perspective can make them look clearer and easier to understand. This is exactly the approach that has helped me with my research looking to answer some of the most fundamental questions. We have about al universe to put this in a different context. I could see some people finding my voice difficult to understand due to my cerebral palsy as an insurmountable barrier to giving a tedtalk even if i saw that there are alternative ways for people who have difficulties with communication to speak to an audience. I could be put off from using them thinking that this dry computerized voice has no life in it and would put you all to sleep. Within five minutes alternatively i could see the dodgy female british synthesized voice as something to be embraced pepper. This talk with jokes and gags sometimes at the poll communication aids expense and hopefully make you laugh and keep you engaged with what i want to tell you about. Luckily for you. I have chosen the second option. And what do i want to tell you about. I'm here to tell you that we have completely misplaced ninety six percent of the entire universe. Everything in existence dotson awful lot of missing socks. I am a particle physicist analyzing data. From the large hadron collider at sir in switzerland to on the most fundamental questions about al universe

Aids Dotson Switzerland Al Universe
Matt Damon and the Two Americas Between Hollywood and Real America

The Dan Bongino Show

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Matt Damon and the Two Americas Between Hollywood and Real America

"In Real America, the two Americas between the Media and Real America, the two Americas between politicians and Real America. I'm going to give you stories That happened over the weekend and one specific piece of audio from actor Matt Damon. That sums this whole thing up. How folks There are legitimately two separate America's right Now there's the America. You and I go to work in every day. Get dirt under our fingernails. Whatever we're doing right, the America We love kids soccer games on the weekend barbecues. Flawed, However, it is doing our best to fix it that America and then there's the America. All these other people live in Hollywood, the media people politicians, and it's not to say it's there's no overlap at all. It's like they live in like bizarro Superman land. It's like they live in. I mean, are you physicists out? There's that M theory String theory thing real where there's multiple different universe that exists in the same mass or whatever, like they live in a different spot, like in M Theory, String theory universe we don't live in and you're like, What the hell And then when they come into contact with real America, like Matt Damon did not play the audio for you in a bed there like Holy Moses. These Deplorable smell ease the Trump voters. These these redneck Hey, see, losers. Really? Aren't that bad? Yeah, yeah, Like kind of we've been telling you for the whole time. And he's like shocked Matt Damon, like, Oh, my gosh, like they're not racist, xenophobic phobia phobic. It's to phobic phobia. Phobia like this is just crazy. Like I met these people and they love God and their families, and they work really hard. And they're like, Oh, my gosh, Shaggy there like stunned

Real America America Media And Real America Matt Damon Soccer Hollywood Holy Moses Phobia
The Second Kind of Impossible

Science Friction

02:06 min | 1 year ago

The Second Kind of Impossible

"Heard the beginnings of a saga and we met the maverick mind behind it. Paul steinhardt theoretical physicist and albert einstein professor of science at princeton university. Great job title. Well today he gets another title indiana jones. You know irish Sort of learning science type is here and as theoretical physicist. I never had to go out on an expedition before except to sign a piece of chop. Hell you'd never lights up a pair of hiking boots little build a campfire. No but you were the mission later. Did people think you're mad. Well anyone who had volunteered for this trip. I guess accepted that we were going to go on this mad trip with very little likelihood of success because they hunting for the equivalent of a needle in a haystack. A tiny speck of crystal with a very big story. It's invisible to the human eye. But had his mission crew will have to cross miles of remote wilderness in far east russia in search of it but the whole story is a series of long long long shots. And so by this time long past the point where you would hesitate. Poll is no hesitate. And if you missed it you definitely want to start with the podcast of last week's episode or catch it over on the science fiction website right now. Paul is about to become an unlikely expedition later. In search of a forbidden idea. One that violates would have been the accepted laws of nature where you just knew it was history in the making so we heard that thirty years of detective work had thai. Can paul from a wacky idea to a box with a mysterious labeling contents in florence museum to chasing down a suspected kgb. associate in israel. A romanian mineral smuggle like cold team a dutch widow with not one but two secret diaries and then finally to an incredible discovery. Something that we had thought was first of all is

Paul Steinhardt Albert Einstein Princeton University Indiana Jones Russia Florence Museum Paul Israel
"physicist" Discussed on Here's Something Good

Here's Something Good

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"physicist" Discussed on Here's Something Good

"Hi this is malayan version. And this kim as a rally and where co hosts of seneca's conversations on power and purpose brought to you by the seneca women podcast network and iheartradio. We're launching a brand new season of this podcast. Which brings you fascinating. Conversations with leaders like two time gold medalist author and activist abby wambach and actor producer entrepreneur justin balboni among many others. Listen to senegas conversations on power and purpose on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast look into this episode of. Here's something production of the seneca women. Podcast work an iheartradio each day. We aspire to bring you the good news. The silver lining the glass half full because there is good happening in the world everywhere every day. We just need to look for in share it. Here's something good for today. Dr shirley jackson is used to being a first and only she's a physicist and the president of the renown rensselaer polytechnic institute the first woman and first african american in that job and she's a leader pointing the way to a better future. Dr jackson believes that for our country to move forward to be competitive and prosperous. We absolutely must have women and people of color involved in tech and science. Her own life shows. How much change can happen in just a few decades when she was a girl growing up in washington. Dc public schools were still segregated. The nineteen fifty. Four supreme court decision known as brown versus the board of education allowed her to attend schools with better resources and broaden her horizons. She went on to become the first african american woman to get a phd from mit later. She served as an academic researcher and as chair of the us nuclear regulatory commission. We asked dr jackson about the challenges facing women of color in stem. How to meet those challenges and why she sees this as a moment of opportunity. Here's what she had to say. I think they're complexities. That african american women women of color face then that are rooted in the challenges that women face on the one hand and minorities race on the other now. We know that women get dissuaded. Many of them by the time they're in middle school from really thinking of themselves in these field and there are some fields that have been very a male dominated and that then will obviously breakdown to heaven affect on african american or minority women generally but then it's further exacerbated by sort of a kind of lack of confidence or belief in the talents of african americans in this country and and other minorities in terms of people seeing them seeing us in these fields and the net can become self inculcated so that the given individual dozen see ourselves as either being able to do these Do work in these fields or even if they believe they could do it and are excited The work they may feel the mountains of too high to climb and so people move into other things. All of us in higher education are by definition in the whole business because we educate the next generation of innovators and discovery discoverers and those who will be halsey makers etc but from the perspective of the kind of institution either lead. You know we really focus on those who will innovate will invent who will discover and join with those who come from other fields of endeavor to create what needs to be created to keep us moving forward and so i believe it is truly the most important work in the world and certainly here at rensselaer we. Educating many dynamic women leaders in science and technology we have women professors in computer science who have had great success in drawing young women into the field by proving to them that one does not have to grow up a gaming or programming as many of the young men in the class do in order to succeed in fact our young women do quite well here. They graduated very high rates and they go on to do amazing things. We have more challenge with a attracting and retaining minority students. But again those who come here they onion they do well and they go on to do important things. I'm one who believes times of upheaval can open up opportunities previously. Shut out of them. And i'm one who believes that one has to step through one window in time when it opened and to take advantage of whatever those opportunities there are offered and so we've now arrived at another moment when there is at least a more discussion about inequality of opportunity being recognized as something that in our democracy at least in most quarters is not something that we should have the finest tol and so i suspect on the one hand that this current moment will inspire a new generation of women leaders and a new generation of leaders of color including african americans is evidenced at more of them. Want to go into medicine. Because of what has happened to minority communities in this pandemic and so people will continue to aspire and strive and then the society has to respond and and had those windows open those stores open those ceilings shattered and then with that we will be an even raider country and global leader than ever and i do believe that and as i said on the business. I love that the hope business. That's the business. We should all be an so. Here's something good for today. Science and tech benefit when all people from all backgrounds have a seat at the table. But as dr jackson says we have to have confidence in that vision to know that we can all do it and do it well today. We're at a moment. When roles are being. Reassessed and assumptions are being challenged. And that says dr jackson presents an opportunity for windows and doors to open for ceilings to shatter and for a new generation to lead us into a better future to hear more insights from our conversation with dr shirley jackson. Listen to today's episode of our podcast. Senecas one hundred women to hear if you'd like to join the seneca women network goethe's seneca women dot com there. You'll get access to exclusive events and workshops plus updates on new podcasts and other opportunities to get involved..

justin balboni abby wambach washington shirley jackson jackson two time dr shirley jackson iheartradio Senecas today first woman nineteen fifty dr each day one window rensselaer polytechnic institu one hundred women dr jackson Four supreme court decision nuclear regulatory commission
"physicist" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"physicist" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guests. Today's dope josh mccown. Who is a physicist and as roma at princeton university switch goals have to explode the properties of planets around other stars understand how planets form and evolve and may. Nba pufus on the age. Old question of that are other planets capable of supporting life. His group uses optical telescopes to study exponentially systems especially those star and planet eclipse one. Another belco josh. Hello having sure. Yeah so i went to a used one of your papers. Do of the context for our conversation. And it's entitled the oakland's architecture of excellently systems in which you say the basic geometry of the solar system the shave spacings orientations of the plant. We orbits kessle long been a subject of fascination as long as Well as inspiration for planet formation theories for excellent systems those same properties have only recently come to come into focus. So you know this paper in twenty fifteen And i think there has been a lot of exoplanet discoveries right so what. What does count now. How many exoplanets have you flown. So far the closest thing would official count we have has about four thousand five hundred extra planets. Four thousand five hundred and it's all over the place And in general that would imagine that some limitations beyond which we cannot really find them. So could you could you sort of set the Set the context for that. Are that three different methods by which we find them Could you describe those at webster. Sort of the maximum distance we can target fight it exoplanet. Yeah you're right to begin with the technology because this is a very technology driven field yet there have been speculations since the ancient greeks about whether the other are like the sun and whether those stars have planets and at seemed increasingly plausible as the centuries went on and we learn. More and more strongly would really wasn't until the mid nineties that this field of x plant science scott going and that's entirely because of limitations in our ability to measurements yet answer. The measurements are well. The first thing you might think of doing if you wanna find a planet coming around another star is to use some big telescope and make image of the art and then look for the little dots going around start at the very direct method. Fortunately it's also extremely difficult and it has worked but only barely in a few cases. You actually see the planet has a little dot of its own. Watch the Blocks distance approximately bear. We can actually actually image planet the distance from from us from our scale so we reckon distances we one way to measure distances in light years. Yes That light travels in a year and the nearest stars are few. Let's say or tan light years away. And most of the exoplanets we know about our within a few thousand light years and with with with the more being on closer to us that far away and that's again for practical reasons. It's much easier to perform the necessary measurements if you have a star and then it a nearby star so we clearly quickly lose the ability to detect planets. If they're all the way across the galaxy we were really exploring our tiny little neighborhood of the galaxy but even Even thousand light years so you can actually a planet at that. I think the ones that have been emerged are are closer than that. Mitt me maybe fifty two hundred years ago. I would have to look it up to be sure. Maybe maybe several hundred that sounds like a lot or a little too you to to most ordinary non-scientists. It's distance louis mentioned bodily distant. Yeah stronger that is really next door. There are astronomers who study things that are name many times yes so so. I was just sort of looking at the finding an image at that distance from an earth based oath based Is now the biggest issue as su- is the stalled itself like star so bright anything around said Becomes difficult. So i know that there are some techniques that allows you do actually actually fee doubt the light coming from the star to to actually see the planet's Is that possible. Yes so the basic problem is that we cannot focus oranges as tightly as we might want and some of his make into the to the laws of optics that is this phenomenon called. Diffraction that whenever you interrupt a lightwave with a telescope then lightwave develops curvature of that is boring of the image in your camera and so that's kind of an irreducible problem. And it means that if there is a tiny little dog right next the star than the blur of the star will overlap the dot from the planet. We won't be able to see it so one approach is to just make tighter entire images in one way to do that is to have larger and larger telescopes because the blurring factor in principle those down with large telescopes. Another way is to put your telescoping space where is possible to Make sharper images on the ground. Because on the ground in addition to the problems with optics and fraction the atmosphere salih messing up. The path of libraries and causing additional blurring are images. But then when you alluded to there are special cameras you can build that manage to zero out. The light from a very specific point in the image which star and thereby allow the surrounding area to be searched without the severe problems of the glare from the star. Those instruments are are very advanced and finicky and high tech they go Most of them go by the name of corona graph because these same kinds of instruments were originally used to image the corona the outer layers look blocking the sun's glare and they basically work by putty carefully designed obstruction to obstruction of different shapes with immolate. So as to block the light and direct flight from star to to other areas of the and prevented from reaching the detector right yummy the beauty of seeing an exit planet actively walls around the star itself as a is a magnificent day But we have a couple of other other techniques. Do not to see them but at least to Sort of Speculate the excess. Do say exists. They did this before we leave. The topic of i want to direct your your listeners to particular video that i think every human being should watch you need to look up. The name of the star. It's age are eight seven. Nine nine does very glamorous name. I use a new tune elsewhere. You will find a movie of four planets as tiny little dots circling around of a small portion of their orbits around this nearby star. So that is greatest success of this tanking method so far and how flawed As.

josh mccown Nba princeton university oakland physicist Mitt official su louis
"physicist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"WeII founded physicist and a cartoonist and brought them together to discuss some simple but profound questions that people have been wondering about for thousands of years. But no one understood. Daniela Jorge answered them in a fun jargon. Freeway. This is Daniel Jorge, explain the universe. Hey, Daniel, Let's talk about life. Yeah, One of the most interesting mysteries about life is how did he get started? I mean, how do you go from like a pile of rocks and water and all sorts of energy to things that actually live turn into you know, people in hamsters and more interesting is the question Where did like Yeah, We don't even know whether life started on earth. Life could have started somewhere else in the universe and then landed here on Earth. Wait, could all be aliens. Right? This is the science fiction novel where the twist is that we are all aliens. But it's a deep question. Not just how did life begin? But where did it begin? First, And it's not guaranteed that just because this life on Earth now that it means that life started on Earth. And I'm Daniel and this is our podcast. Daniel and Jorge explain the universe in which we take the.

Daniel Jorge Daniela Jorge Jorge physicist WeII
"physicist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fine, brilliant Physicist on theoretical mathematician, a scientific giant, he said that masses equivalent energy e equals M C squared, which led to the atomic bomb, all shattering devastation in which was born. The atomic also said time and space could both bend, which led to the discovery of black holes. And like a million other things, he enabled man to embark it last I'm a total adventure, and it didn't take long before Einstein just became a symbol. Do you think you're smarter than Einstein for intelligence? For energy and old shot, genius. I'm not a genius. I'm not Einstein. I don't have to be an Einstein. So that was Steve's assignment. Find the brain of the guy whose name basically means genius. How do you even begin looking for the brain of a guy that died decades ago? Yeah, there. There was this thing called the library. And so Steve knew that Einstein lived in Princeton and died in Princeton. April 1955, So he headed over to the local public library holds up the newspaper archive. Look, a microfilm. And he finds this article written a couple days after Einstein died, and it's that Einstein's brain to be preserved for study..

Einstein Steve Physicist Princeton
"physicist" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on WTVN

"A particle physicist, and I'll admit to gritting my teeth while reading popular science are kind of excitement. You just read it and you're so excited. Clench your jaw? No, not always out of excitement. Sometimes I see a headline and I think Oh, my gosh. How could they even write that? What is that? Something you don't know, are not familiar with. Well, then, you know, I have to extrapolate. I say, Well, if I know that it bunkers half the time. There's a good chance that this is a bonkers article and started to write to a friend of mine. Who's an expert in that area and say how bonkers is this? E. It's bonkers until proven otherwise. That's my general philosophy on that's, uh, General Park. As welcome to Daniel and Jorge. Explain the universe in which we explore the bonkers nature of the universe. Some true some of it click bait and we break it down for you. We want you to understand the truth about our crazy, amazing, wonderful, beautiful universe. Without resorting to silly science journalism. Well, I guess it's tricky because, you know, sometimes the universe is kind of bonkers. Right? So I guess the question is more about, you know, telling the difference between things that are maybe overblown. And what scientists actually discovered. Yeah, and as a lay person, how can you tell the difference? Because there really are things that science has discovered that are hard to understand that are hard to take. Seriously. I mean, the universe is billions of years old and began with a huge explosion. I mean, it's ridiculous. There are pockets of space out there. That like cannot even escape and can eat any kind of matter. I mean, it sounds absurd and made him but some of it is true. Yeah, sometimes. We pay people to sit around and drink coffee and smash particles together. That's just bonkers as well. Now you're being ridiculous. Come on. Heard it happens in Geneva. That's not a job. Come on. I guess it's like podcasting to miss. You know, I feel very fortunate to be able to smash particles together to try to reveal the secrets of the universe. And we take our responsibility very seriously on this podcast to explain the science to you in a way that actually makes sense and doesn't overhype already amazing discoveries of science Eso today on the program will be discussing a recent article in the popular press that has some apparently pretty bonkers results from none other than NASA. That's right, And this is an article that went all around the Internet. Readers from all over the world asked us What is this really made a lot of noise on Twitter and on the rest of the Internet. And so we thought it'd be useful to break it down for you to tell you what actually happened. Why really is fascinating, scientifically. But why the Clickbait headlines may have gone a step too far from what is a lot of noise and twitter sound like Like, Like, Like, Like Like, Like. Turk Turk Turk Turk Turk Turk, Unlike unlike like, like Retweet, usually there's not a hate button. Is there on Twitter? Think there's enough hate on Twitter already? I don't think you need the extra Buttons there, But yes do they will be talking about an article that came out and several outlets. For example, in New Scientist magazine. There was a headline. We may have spotted a parallel universe going backwards in time. Boom. Wow, that's a lot of it's a lot of words in one sense and said, Make you think What? Yeah. Yeah, I know. Wow. Apparel universe could exist. What It goes. Doctors in town backwards What you spotted. Oh, my gosh. There's so much there right is incredible. Yeah, on the Daily star, the newspaper says a parallel universe right next to ours were all the rules of physics seem to be operating in reverse. And now it's nice to us, apparently right next to ours. That could be like in your pocket or You know, sitting at the next table in the cafe or something, it's adjacent. It's nearby its image right right beyond your reach, and I don't know what happened on the Internet that day. But this just really took off zillions of life That was retweeted by everybody and then newspaper after newspaper reported this claim, And so it's right everywhere. A lot of people heard about it and and a lot of readers asked us to break this down, and so today. On the podcast, booby asking the question..

Turk Turk Turk Turk Turk Turk Twitter physicist NASA General Park New Scientist magazine Geneva Daily star Daniel Clickbait Jorge
"physicist" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Short Wave

"So okay Serafina to really understand dark energy we have to go back to Einstein right yes. So Einstein came up with this theory of general relativity which is basically his version of gravity and the early nineteen hundreds and the only way to make his equations work and satisfy what he thought was a static universe. He introduced this fudge in his words called the cosmological constant so Einstein actually thought that the universe was static. Not Not that it was expanding. That's right and over the next ten years people sort of manipulated these equations and tried to find solutions and started hinting at. Perhaps the universe wasn't static. Well it's nice to see that Einstein could get things wrong that's cool so the funny thing is this Cosmological constant he called it his biggest blunder. Honestly it's just nice to hear. Einstein say I messed up you can all fact the fun fact is that he ended up actually being right bring it so it turns out that that cosmological constant is exactly what we think. Dark energy is necessary to actually describe our universe I feel like that's classic Einstein him being wrong being more right than I've ever been in my entire life exactly yes okay so after Einstein. Introduces this idea that that the universe is static. We figure out actually that the universe is expanding right. Yeah so in. Nineteen twenty nine. Hubble Edwin Hubble showed that the universe is not static. It's actually expanding on. What HE DID. Is He measured basically galaxies? How Far Away. They are and he found that galaxies are actually moving away from us so that means that the universe is not static. It's infact expanding at this point. We think that the universe is expanding that that expansion is slowing down. Is that correct exactly? So we think that the expansion comes from the Big Bang and it comes from inflation which was right after the Big Bang. Which is this rapid expansion of space? But because there's gravity in the universe and there's mass in universe we would think that gravity starts to take over and the expansion decelerating because gravity starts to pull things back in and then in in the late nineties. We get turned on her head again. Right there's another discovery and we're like Oh wait. Maybe she's not slowing down. That's right so in one thousand ninety eight and in one thousand nine hundred nine thousand two teams that were studying a specific type of Supernova and they found that these supernova that were super far away from us were fainter than what we would have expected if the universe was in fact expanding but decelerating dot expansion and the only way to explain away thought faintness is if the universe was instead accelerating its expansion wild so we went from the University of static. Okay it's not static it's expanding but it's slowing down that expansion two way way way. Not only is it expanding but it's expanding faster than we thought it. Was it speeding up in in in the explanation for that is dark energy? You killed it. That's right nailed it so yes we have finally gotten to the point where I can ask you SARAFINA. What is dark energy so I think the only answer to that question is we don't know oh come on Sarafina. You brought me all the way here. You told me Einstein Story and we don't know I know it's it's really uncomfortable to sit with. We can see dark energy through its effects on the expansion of the universe. But we don't actually know what it is. Wow I don't even know I don't even know what to say about that. That's so wild. We don't know what dark energy is but we know it exists. Yes in you was. What are you doing over there? Astronomers this about five percent. Not that I mean. That's that's wild. Any amount of dark energy is staying the same right. So that's that's an interesting question. So I like to kind of describe dark energy and the expansion of the universe in The way that I think about it is sort of picture a loaf of bread and picture a bunch of reasons and the bread and the reasons are like the galaxies and the bread itself is like Space Time. Okay and so as you bake the bread. The bread rises and the raisins get farther and farther apart. They're sort of carried along the fabric of space time. Which means that the distance between galaxies increases with time. Okay I'm with you I'm with you. And the introduction of dark energy is like imagine you have this special type of yeast that you can put into a bread and the breads starts to rise with the and then all of a sudden it starts to rise a lot and it gets bigger and bigger and bigger over time and

Kelly Safai NPR madeleine Sarafina UC Berkeley Einstein Nance
"physicist" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KOMO

"A nuclear engineer physicist who worked on a power plant on the east coast of England back in the seventies worked there for a number of years since their retirement they've lived in the area and there was a natural disaster which caused a nuclear mishap which has frozen the culture that the landscape around their area and caused a big cultural disasters well and they're both suffering to a certain extent from trauma resulting from this thing they're living in a little cottage road which is away from their home which was inundated with a tsunami they are visited by an old friend who also used to be one of the workers at the power plant the play is really you know not all preachy it's and it's actually very funny in many many ways it's brilliantly written by Lucy Kirkwood who is a young English player right in that the relationships between these three people on this sort of triangular long standing relationship that they've had and that is when which there are secrets of past behaviors that come out and put inside this server fabric of this personal story there is the story of personal responsibility cultural responsibility what might we do if we had a kind of Fukushima disaster on our hands in another place in another culture in Fukushima a lot of older engineers responded by going back in and relieving younger engineers who were still young and have to have young families they felt responsible and a lot of them went back to take over putting them in severe danger and I think Lucy Kirkwood's sort of jumping off point here was would that happen here or what would happen here here being in England and in her case but but we could we certainly extrapolate that when we watch the play here in the United States is that why it's called the children because this is the world we're leaving to our children Bob I think that's something of a you know it's question that we all had on that the audience often has about why is it called the children the chip children are referenced in a number of ways in the play hazel and robin I play robin Jean Paulson's brilliant wonderful actors plays hazel we have children and there's that sense of responsibility that we have with whatever we leverage actions like environmental actions for instance you know we we wanna leave the IDC planet toward children and get them the question is how much are we willing to sacrifice for them I mean truly on a very immediate level the sacrifices that these three people may end up making are pretty severe but it would be again in fact to try to allow the next generation who are not children but who are our children's ages since these people are in their sixties allow them to survive now I want to know what happens when a stranger shows up at the door and and how they are recruiter what what they do and the place is running through the fifteenth this month at the Leo K. theatre over the Seattle Rep thank you so much Bob right hopefully people will get over there and see it before the show is over I hope so too thanks so much thank you the children is the name of the show sounds great three fifteen your call will propel interest money game update from the Seattle business magazine and here's a redditor rob Smith several Seattle organizations have banded together to launch a covert nineteen response fund the Seattle foundation and United Way of king county will administer the fund which was created by the city of Seattle Alaska Airlines Amazon the Starbucks foundation and Microsoft the organizations made a combined one million dollar donation the fund will make initial grant soon to organizations working with residents who lacked health insurance stock markets around the world plummeted on corona virus fears the Dallas two thousand fourteen points or seven point eight percent in the biggest loss since October two thousand eight nasdaq lost six twenty five in the S..

physicist England engineer
"physicist" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"A yeah exactly this your vehicle back fifty years and they seem like different religions almost and and I think now metaphysics and science come together very it you know I've I've never met the physicist that didn't read ancient texts and want to understand cosmology I have never met physical well you know and and that this is a cool practitioner that didn't follow quantum physics read ancient text and want to understand cosmology and I've never met a physical well you know and and that this is a cool practitioner that didn't follow quantum physics so I think we've all come together and and I think this is in a magical time for that I think we I think we're on the threshold of of real knowledge let's good gusts in Los Angeles on here gosh go ahead Sir Hey how you doing George great thank you right right so I I've been hearing you for for a few years now so thanks for all the knowledge that you're giving me but I I have not studied might help on aegs actually how it might work and I've been bald guy in my life but not a lot of situations that could happen in any light and I noticed that when you're in a very very white pixelation and you can fall prey here with all the energy for some reason that it cycle so strong that it but not recently I thank the energy no you know what you're going through yeah and it makes it happen three so my thing is that I I'm I'm not truck drivers so I'm trying to I'm trying to change careers at the truck driver going on as an entrepreneur and I've been hearing you to video to change my mind because all the bad habits that have been going to act like a black box right so I feel like your energy that's holding you back and I don't know what it is that that the higher power or it's just make it energy but I've also known that hypnosis can trigger something I'm part of the brain nodded up it's procrastination or negative energy the people that are around my life but I I need to know if meditation or hypnosis will actually be something a lot stronger you know that would have been much more of an effect on the part of procrastination that would help me out you're kidding you know be a tour instead of like all you know like I'm going to do it and you put it off and for some reason you never end up doing it you know and so I need to know okay it just negativity or just keep on a minor you know it's just every like project deadlines or anything then my life into preparing me for you know what's gonna come or I I just I didn't know like you know if medication or even get both this would actually work what's holding them back driver well you are so you hold yourself back consolidated yeah there's a very thin veil between and hypnosis and meditation that I that that sort of on the same scale but a different different possible across the scale so okay so I know how you feel because I felt the same way before I start my says company and I was lucky enough to meet a guy called George Rothman he built Amgen which is the most successful by technology company in history people have been there to sixty billion dollars he was the most humble and gentle beautiful man I ever met in my life is in much even in the seventies when I met him when I was in my forties early forties and I was having dinner with him and I was waxing lyrical about my business plan and I thought I had this great idea you know and and but I have but I still haven't made the jump I was procrastinating I I was having all these things in my head saying why it wouldn't work but I wanted to test out on him and he held his hand up he said seven you don't know what business you're in until you get into the business just stop you'll figure it out from there and I didn't understand the process how profound that was until I did stop with this company and I thought I was starting a company in a particular nation a particular direction and within three months I was going in a completely different direction and it works for you Trevor we're out of time thank you.

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on SUE Speaks Podcast: Searching for Unity in Everything

SUE Speaks Podcast: Searching for Unity in Everything

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on SUE Speaks Podcast: Searching for Unity in Everything

"Tells you how to quiet your mind and discover who you are now this is in the eighteen hundreds and he says the who. You are is timeless awareness. Were that means that your mind. Your consciousness is out side of space and time. The major basic nature is not meat and potatoes but your basic nature is outside space and time so that your awareness is independent of time. That is you're you're not limited by causing effect so for a physicist to learn that something is not governed by causing effect is quite shocking. But he says because your awareness can move independent of space independent of time your consciousness. Your true nature of self is timeless awareness. It gives you a sense of freedom. Something to meditate on and says a spaciousness. The new picture of who you might be and so was that your intro to this was that what got you my intro to that. By the first thing. I read causo chan buddhism and hugh they early expository zo. Chen pod missed. Imbaba began teaching the problems. Imbaba was in the twelfth century or in the a century bought buddhism to tabet. He talked about naked awareness as well padras imbaba not to tell you more you wanna know padres imbaba was really the forerunner of he said who you are is naked awareness and so forth but he was still a hindu so padres zimbabwe's writing is still full of more armed creatures and gods and goddesses them from the deity mound religion..

first imbaba Imbaba Chen twelfth century eighteen hundreds causo chan hindu buddhism zimbabwe
"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I am coming from a place yeah which ship I don't fully understand but it's cold awareness a monkey doesn't have the kind of awareness we have is a place within us when it is that within well let me just just be a little physics with you in the beginning there was a void and thought this was on the face of the deep now what's that mean if you're a physicist some attack you now if you're a physicist how did the universe begin with a Big Bang what would that come from what what come from no in the many getting of the scripture says in the beginning there was a void if scratched and then he says all of a sudden let there be light beginning where heat flows through the cold receiving cold and in this species always perfectly a perfect speed the speed of light so to speak but more than the speed of light this light is being carried and produces of a resistance so small resistant but it flows with gravity if flows we won't go into that right now what I'm trying to say go back to what I'm trying to say is it good everything came from so if I use the word place I can't find a low would it is not in this site it's not in this site where we are there is out there just beyond outside the universe you can is outside the universe it's not inside the universe because you have to have something absolutely still to make relatively quick relativity of motion possible.

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I am coming from a place which I don't fully understand but his cold awareness a monkey doesn't have the kind of awareness we have is a place within us when it is that within well let me just just be of little physics with you in the beginning there was a void and thought this was on the face of the deep that was me if you're a physicist some attack you now if you're a physicist how did the universe begin with a Big Bang what would that come from what what come from no in the many getting of the scripture says in the beginning there was a void if scratched and then he says all of a sudden let there be light beginning where heat flows through the cold receiving cold and with a tremendous speed but always perfectly but perfect speed the speed of light so to speak but more than the speed of light this light is being carried and produces of resistance so small resistant but it flows with gravity if flows we won't go into that right now what I'm trying to say go back to what I'm trying to say is it everything came from so if I use the word place I can't find a low would it is not in this site it's not in this site where we are there is out there just be honest outside the universe you can is outside the universe it's not inside the universe because you have to have something absolutely still to make relatively relativity of motion possible three my way is that well I don't know but I can leave that be the cold on the the beginning in the beginning I was in a hot and flowing edited beginning of gravity but there could be no gravity without infinite.

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Daniel and the particle physicist and we are the authors of the book we have no idea let's talk about all the things we don't know about the universe and how we might hope to one day understand them yes I welcome to our podcast Daniel Jorge explain the universe in which we take everything and anything in the universe and try to explain it to you in a way that makes sense to hopefully make you laugh to be on the program we're going to talk about hello three that's right string theory and this is a question that we've been getting from listeners we ask people please send in your request for topics and maybe more than fifty percent of the requests were can you explain string theory what is drinker talk about string theory more than fifty percent yeah and it's fascinating because string theory really have is a part of the sort of cultural died guys like an idea that people know exist even if they don't understand it but the big part of that show the Big Bang theory right like the people in that show there they supposedly study string theory I don't know I don't want that I mean either but that's what I've been told your cultural advice expert has told you yeah this is a cultural thing well yeah it's it's something people have heard of it will have you heard about string theory before you started spending your time talking to business I know you had heard about it you know it's one of the things that you hear a lot about it sees like crazy theory about the universe but it's really and you know it you hear certain things about it like the everything is made of the strings but you don't really and I know what it is and what does it mean for things to be strings you're very visual person what image to getting your head if I tell you everything is made out of strings do you like the universe and idea of like a universe where everything's cruciate out of yarn how does it work in your head okay that's what are those strings made out of right right of course the you are if is it that hard right because every question this leads to the next question that's right yeah this is it hard supermodel on the outside new car but I thought it was an interesting question to tackle because it's something everybody's heard about but very few people actually understand I think that's why people wanted us to to talk about it yeah can you make this not just something we've heard this phrase was something where we can know what it means to get the insight into why people are spending their time doing it right yeah so as usual we went out into the street and ask do you know what string theory is yes the before you hear these answers think for a moment could you define string theory do you know what it is and why it's persisted for so long I asked had to say so I have no idea what that is now I do not.

Daniel physicist
"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"That universe came from god beyond it void where it said beyond the void in the beginning there was a void handout this is on the face of the deep and that is six and god said let there be light that is called a singularity in physics is exactly the same as god saying it but they caught the physicist cannot tell you how can this one thing spend energy for ever and ever and ever and ever to create a bigger and bigger universe all the programs there to to to have them margins sky and food in growth if if evolution evolution you can call if you like but the point is this is the realm inside you that if you can if you would be still no and the way you be still is look at your eyelids and if you can see your eyelids inside your eyelids if you listen you little pixels and see pictures coming and going but mostly if you do it right uses pixels what you're really seeing is but a light to another was the look when you come into the world this is gonna have to go over again with it when you come.

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"If you're a physicist, these guys, and you realize that energy is created or destroyed it can only state go from foreign back to energy back to form like, and we know that's true. Looking at the cycle of life all the way through a black hole that recycle. Matter about the energy setting. So from that standpoint, if you just believe that what that is a kind of afterlife belief system that they can say. So and I believe that's true. We only change form at that. We do go back through our manifested farm, which is with a lot of people call it your higher self. Well, the one that mortal a ball back the crater all now as far as free will does. I think we we do have free will the two. But the problem is our perception is so heavy that what we think is choice or so heavily influenced that are conditioned mind. But a lot of times if the choice made at a conscious level and those conscious levels can change though as your conscious of level reaches higher levels, you make different choices and some of those are to occupy your own energy and not allow external other energies to occupy occupy chocolate. That's what seems to be happening is if you don't own your energy, somebody else can occupy your body and use it. Gerald jubilee in in ghosts. Do I believe in go? Well, I think probably if what we're talking about energy. That's not paying form right to try. Dr pot for them or just have.

physicist Gerald jubilee Dr pot
"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I'm coming from a place. Which I don't fully understand. But it's cold awareness. Among key. Doesn't have the kind of awareness. We have is a place within us. Where is that within? Well, let me just just be a little physics with you. In the beginning. Was the void. And this was on the face of the deep. Now. What's that mean? If you're a physicist summit attack you now if you're a physicist how did the universe begin with the big bang? What would that come from? Where did it come from? No in the mini gaining scripture says in the beginning, avoid it's credit. And then he says over said let there be light. Beginning where heat flows through the cold receiving cold and temendous speed always perfectly. Tufik speed the speed of light so to speak, but more than the speed of light because light is being carried and producers of resistance, a small resistance, but it flows with gravity if flows where won't go into that right now while I'm trying to say go back to it. I'm trying to say. Is it? Everything came from. So if I use the word place, I can't find another word. It's not an aside. It's not an in this side where we are. Is out there. Just beyond. Outside the universe. You is outside the universe is not inside the universe because you have to have something absolutely still to make relatively relativity of motion possible..

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"Another question that was raised by your talk as you come from family of scientists. I also come from a family of sign cool. Do you think that coming from science or from scientists makes a person more immune to bullshit? Very good question. Bullshit of all types. Sure. Let's let's go bullshit about types. You know, our as opposed to bullshit that is within the realm of scientific immoral or. Yeah. Or like, what their parents specifically, did, you know, like, I I have my parents were biologists. Right. My my mom's a PHD name idea as marine biology. My sister became a nuclear physicist and now she's a science reporter for science news. Awesome publication. I developed an interest in evolution. And I have, you know, a pretty strong foundation in that field, and I can serve detect. I'm pretty good at like something out like evolutionary psychology bullshit. You don't you know, that kind of thing where it's like sipping? Yeah. Like, oh, humans were evolved to do this. Or that when that's you know, anytime you see someone on TV say humans evolved at this. It's probably bullshit, right? Pop. Pop psych stuff. Yeah. You know, I think I developed that. But I do think that I don't think scientists are immune from bullshit, right? I think that. We are all extremely fallible as reasoning creatures that we all have a fantasy that we are perfectly rational and know the truth in that we can always solve every puzzle that every question out. There is a math problem that we can figure out especially those of us who have a science background or identify skeptics know. And that we can really get it in the truth is we are all small limited minds that are subject to bias. That can never see the full picture. Right. And the thing about science is that in science all the small minds combined into a structure that works right called science, right? Where we publish and then other people evaluate and then we come to a consensus. And then even when science gets it wrong, we you know it evolves. And we learn more, you know, what? I mean, we overturn paradigm and etcetera. And so science moves forward, even though the individual scientists are flawed unreasoning, you know, messed up people who are subject to bullshit, right? Yeah. I do think scientists are. The greatest people in our scientists are very cool and are generally great critical thinkers, right, but at the same time, I mean, go look at the, you know, the various methodological crises that almost every field has having replication or in terms of, you know, systemic biases in their field, or it's all over the place. Right. And you realize that p hacking and whatnot, which that's an incredible one. Right. Where it's just like. Yeah..

physicist