19 Burst results for "Phyllis Schlafly"

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:23 min | 10 months ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Street. They don't know what to do, but they can't get loose. And I think that in the election next year this is going to badly hurt Republicans in Texas as a as a conservative. I realize you're in Bangor, Maine, but, uh you know, so you may not be all of that up on Texas politics, but you know, what are your thoughts on that? Well, my thoughts are that the, um the whole concept of whether abortion should exist or not exist is going to go on. For the indefinite future. And I think that this is this particular statute is going to cause some concern, particularly in terms of female vote, even even in Texas. But the fact is that The nation is going to have to it sometime, confront the notion that either we're going to amend the constitution and not have abortion or we're going to continue to have abortion and then try to figure out What are the accepted? Well, Michael, we've already had that We've already had that debate. And, you know? No. I think I agree by the way with Phyllis Schlafly and I make this case. In my book, The Hidden History of the Supreme Court of the Betrayal of America that had the Supreme Court not ruled in 73 in Row V. Wade. At that point in time there were abortion was already legal in multiple states. Had they not ruled on in Roe v. Wade. And this is the height of the women's movement, right? This was because the birth control pill was legalized in 1961. And so you had the kind of free love of the sixties And then you had the women's movement there really kicked off in the late sixties and early seventies had they not ruled. Eventually, pretty much every state with legalized abortion, and we just never would have had all this polarization and these huge knockdown drag outs that the Supreme Court overstepped their power, Frankly, in my opinion, and Phyllis Schlafly's opinion And that that decision was a mistake. Now they disagree. But can I tell you? Why? What marriage is hanging Just second. Michael. Let me just finish this thought. And then you can tell me anything You want. Um, the opposite argument for that is that because of that road decision, probably hundreds, and maybe thousands.

Michael Phyllis Schlafly Bangor 1961 Texas Republicans thousands hundreds late sixties The Hidden History of the Supr next year early seventies second Supreme Court Row V. Wade sixties Street Maine 73 Roe v.
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Judge bear the exception and not the rule. It's an interesting tension because on the one hand I do think that any conybeare Barrett reflects a certain model of conservative professional advancement Conservative motherhood cultivation of community and marriage, which is very much in keeping with the kind of model of what good Christian woman had looked like. But there are also many women who are in conservative environments and conservative Christian environments. From pursuing high powered professional careers who were told that they need to a privilege, their husbands advancement over their owned. So certainly I do think there are conflicting cultural messages depending on what kind of community are end and the kinds of values that they hold. Robin. I'd love to dig into that point a little bit more in especially this idea that you could have a conservative feminism. If you will and I'm wondering if you're as we see more Republican women being described as models of female empowerment from judge buyer it to Sarah Huckabee, sanders to former US ambassador to the United Nations. Nikki Haley How do you see this playing out Robin among conservatives? Is there a conservative version of feminism or is it not are the pillars of modern feminism at odds with conservatism in US politics? Well it seems to me that one of them you know misguided ideas is the notion night feminism is something that is attached to gender whereas it's it's a it's a philosophy of life. It's a an understanding of gender being equal and so I think that some of the things that are raised by conservatives suggesting that somehow the culture has not allowed conservative Christian women to flourish seems bist bit misguided in the sense that it's not the culture that's allowing them to flourish. But rather it's their own life choices and it's their own community that has impose limits whether they are real or rather they are psychological. So it seems like to me it's a bit of. A misguided idea that. There needs to be this kind of conservative Christian feminism in order for you know women of faith to have both ambition and also have a home life and certainly previous justices. were. People of faith. So the idea that somehow Barrett is this rarity I also think is a bit of a stretch. 'EM? I'm wondering too. There are some may recall Phyllis Schlafly who was the conservative anti feminist activists who essentially played a key role in defeating the equal rights amendment decades ago and some are drawing parallels to phyllis and just Barrett our seeing some of that. Will. Certainly leave. That's part of the chatter and the great irony Phyllis Schlafly is that she was a high powered extremely professional, extremely savvy woman with a huge platform, a huge career that allowed her to intern at that women remain in their domestic roles and lean into motherhood and wife hood above and beyond having a career I don't necessarily think that's what's going. On with Amy Barrett I think it's a little bit of a next Gen Phyllis schlafly if you will because she has said self-consciously that both her and her husband have worked hard to have successful careers she said that her father taught her messages like anything a boy can do a girl can do better. It never occurred to her in college that men and. Women would be treated differently. She clearly doesn't see the same kind of tension between having a really successful career and having a whole life. In fact, she's to present them as two sides of a rich life. She said that not fulfilling that kind of home life and family life is shallow and unfulfilled. She's trying to offer this model of both rather than one. Over the other I'm wondering if there's been an emphasis on judge Barrett's motherhood and being a mother, and if that's a somehow a way to sort of position her as somebody who shouldn't be questioned you know with the hard questions or not to be perceived as someone who should be attacked if you will wondering Emma, what do you think about that? I think Democrats walked into this hearing with a big optics challenge, which is this woman who has a lot of support from her community at Notre. Dame who has seven children one of whom has down syndrome who she reportedly carries down the stairs every morning in piggyback style and two children who she adopted from Haiti. It's really difficult to look at her and big family in the lakes that she's chosen and really go on offense to try to attack her personally make her seem evil or out to be someone who's scary and so the way the Democrats have taken that challenge is by really complimenting her family trying to be very warm and. Accepting an open, the kind of personal life that used presented, and then use that to dovetail into these empathic exchanges especially about the affordable care act. So it's a real thread that they're trying to to follow here of not going too far to be aggressive on the offense and seemed to be maybe churlish or uncouth while at the same time trying to get their points across that, they think that her jurisprudence could potentially be a huge danger to a lot of Americans especially those who have coverage under the affordable. Care Act. Robin I'm wondering just in terms of to piggyback off of what Emma was saying they're just in terms of how we view motherhood in this country and the sort of myth of motherhood or the mythical. Motherhood. tropes that we tend to fall into. Judge Barrett is a white mother and a white professional married mother How do you view that as sort of playing out here in terms of how she's being positioned? Well I think it raises a lot of questions about the different ways in which we treat mother's depending on You know the the the race of those mothers There is a long tradition of placing white mothers on a pedestal a sort of saintly pedestal and in watching and listening to the hearings on E. I felt that really was a point that would overwhelming you know especially as they talked about the two children. That she and her husband have a did from Haiti and the constant a singling out of them as being these you know sort of separate other different children. I was really struck by that because in most conversations I've had with parents of adopted children. One of the points that they make is that they are their children you know full stop, there's not this sort of qualifying adjective. And at one point eight. One of the Republican senators. Sort of leaned in and was asking Judge Barrett. If she could talk about what it Manse to what she had learned being white mother of black children and she kind of pushed back on that and said that you know her her personal life choices would not be entering into the way that she decided cases. So it seems that even she felt in that moment that the Republicans were really overstepping and pushing too.

conybeare Barrett Phyllis Schlafly Robin US Haiti Emma conservatives Nikki Haley United Nations Sarah Huckabee Notre intern sanders
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"The Democratic Party. Then you had wonderful. Conservative activists like Phyllis Schlafly have called for a choice, not an echo. You had the conservative movement which clarified things a little bit, And now you have this newer stage of the conservative movement with President Trump, which I think is clarified things a lot. So I do like it. I'm not shilling for the Republican Party, and I'm not saying the Democratic Party. Well, I I guess I am saying the Democratic Party's terrible but I'm not saying the Republican Party is perfect. It's merely that you do have some clarity on hugely important issues on abortion, For instance, you've got one party says We should protect life, One party says We should be able to snuff it out up until the very last minute. That's very clear. You've got of division on patriotism. One party's waving the American flag. The other party is supporting people who are burning the American flag. And protest ng against the American flag all the way up to that question. You've got clarity on foreign policy. Finally, you've got clarity on trade policy. You've got clarity on immigration policy. So I have a real choice and the fact that the GOP doesn't always live up to its promises. I don't I don't care for that. But I do at least like that. I have an option here, and I don't see how a third party could function any way other than As a spoiler. So many more great questions, But we've got to take a quick break in the meantime. Right now. Subscribe to the Michael. No Show podcast unless you're driving. I don't want you to crash your car. But assuming you maybe pull over we've got we've got a little bit of time. Here. Go over subscribed on Apple Podcast Google player wherever you find me on Twitter at Michael J. Knowles..

Democratic Party Republican Party Phyllis Schlafly Michael J. Knowles President Trump Twitter Apple Google
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Decorating Pages

Decorating Pages

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Decorating Pages

"I thought that the Indian was pretty powerful and that whole moment where she. Reveals how she feels about her kid one of her daughter's yeah it's awful. It is awful and. And I also think the nineties is not easy to come down there. Now that I know I hate add the night. It's been very hard to sort of capture as period I thought they did such a good job. They did really well thought the design of it was great and I think the I. Mean I. Yeah. I think you're spot on and saying they captured the nineties specifically watched it unlike what did they do because I'm going to be in that world so I think the designer everything was tapping. The white painted Brown Car Coffee Table and the curtains into pattern pattern. So I don't think. I maybe you've seen her Iran's Lisa Clark decorated that I think. So in Jessica Kinder- is the production designer and I don't I don't. Interview with her and I just thought you know what? This is I really. Thought could do this such a good job. I don't know. I guess I wish I read the book. But Yeah I did watch all of that. I mean I I loved Mrs America Oh hello. rentable. Science -solutely loved and I. Talk about design thought it was on on? Yeah. I really I I loved Kate. Blanchet is so good in that type of role pop emmy season. I'm surprised they. They weren't nominated to be honest. Can say that a yeah. Am I allowed because watching, which is so impressed with a look at the they're really surprised to. The one that took their spot. Behind the bar you know but. I think I is it when we were talking though I think it was. Keynote everyone puts out there for your considerations and everything and I think. I think that hurts some shows that they didn't have it. Right. Right. So I was one of them but. I saw feature for behind the scenes on the looking to show and I just I just anyway it was great. It was really well acted. Yeah I know I remember Phyllis Schlafly but I didn't really pay attention to always young and So it was nice to go back and live st it with adult is. Really..

Phyllis Schlafly Jessica Kinder emmy Mrs America Lisa Clark Blanchet Iran Kate
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Problematic Premium Feed

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

"It's not going to be me. Because I, it probably retread a lot of ground. I'm sure you probably want to break in a different type of focus, you know one thing that they have in common that they have in common for sure is that it's not the cut and dried black conservatism that we have now this. This'll weirder more dumbed down version of that conservatism now where I think neither Clarence Thomas or Thomas so will could be a hero in. It looks like we're in this age of the diamond. Sill. What's what's her name I? Forgot her name. She's always a candidate Owen. On. The, yeah, this kind of like almost are buffoonish or the Kansas Owen kind of reminds me of Tommy Lauren in that. She's not very serious. She's more. Attractive, Face That, it should consider. A weathergirl something someone who's just kind of reading offer something you know both both kind of remind me of that whereas Thomas Seoul was. There's a kind of you. Talk about in your reactionary mine. It actually kind of going back and forth. But let me actually in mind when I teach you talk about how sometimes one things that people underestimate, but the right is the extent to which the right will use talking points or things from the left to get its a point across lake. How I'm I'm drawing a blank on his name, the guy who's always talking about campus conservatives, but but he'll he'll talk about how certain authors are underrepresented in the hand in that cultural studies. ARGUMENT TO OUT GET GET I. Think Irs in there. And yeah, I mean. Sorry go ahead! This GonNa, but it's it's a really important point. and I think oftentimes gets overlooked and I think there's there's two ways to think about this so again for you know the from listeners who don't know this book, the reactionary mind which I wrote almost ten years ago. looks at conservatism from the very beginning, which goes back. It's it arises in in during the during the French Revolution, and from the beginning, a conservative thinkers have always been deeply influenced by the very movement that they're opposing whether it be the French Revolution Abolition the new deal. The women's movement lack freedom struggle whatever it may be. One of the things that's interesting about conservatives is how how much they are imprinted by the very as I say the very movement that they oppose, and sometimes it happens in the way that you just described whether you know borrowing talking points, and it's very cynical, instrumental in strategic, and they're doing it very self consciously and I see throughout the book. How that I think the more interesting thing is, is that oftentimes conservatives are influenced by the left in spite of themselves and ended up mimicking its language, not self-consciously in strategically, but unconsciously and strategically, and that was your example Sega a Phillix Phillips shares. Phyllis Schlafly? Yeah, exactly remember example, yeah, and which you know, there's a there's a series on I. Think it's Hulu a called. Mrs America, which is about this, and it's actually quite good on this in an..

Owen Thomas Seoul Clarence Thomas Phyllis Schlafly Hulu Sega Irs Mrs America Kansas Tommy Lauren Phillix Phillips
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"So I'm going to recommend the show. Mrs America on Hulu It's an fx on Hulu show It's all about like second wave feminism. In the seventies like Gloria Steinem, And Betty for Dan, and but it's like mostly following Cate Blanchett as Phyllis Schlafly who's like conservative woman trying to stop the era from being passed. It's Kinda wild, but it's incredible. I really been enjoying it. It has a really nuance job of portraying second wave. Feminists Feminism highly recommend. Meanwhile I have been listening to a podcast that. Some here might be familiar with It's called. My Dad wrote a porno. It is an award winning comedy podcast. It is some of the most absurd. I ever listened to basically the concept. is that this gentleman and his friends They are reading aloud. The gentleman's father's romance novel and this this Older Gentleman is writing romance for the first time and It is some of the raunchiest most messed up, but like hilarious material. And just. Very amateur rating as well and I don't exactly know how this man and his father have like retained relationship, because they absolutely destroy this novel in their criticisms, and it's it's big got a huge following. They've got like three hundred thousand followers on instagram right now. I. Am only on listening. I've only just started the first book and I know that the. The father the DAD has written. I think five now so. There's a lot of material and for people who are maybe afraid of romance. Maybe this isn't going to be Your Cup of tea. Just because it is so bonkers, bananas but at the same time. Maybe it will make other romance more palatable. WHO's to say? Well, my Gosh I love that I, WanNa go listen my recommendation It's kind of silly, but it's what's been keeping me. Entertained and feeling so I didn't tell him tell. Like masters. On Hulu it's wonderful. My brothers were super into like when we were kids and I was always disappointed that I. make cool stuff like they did so now i. just watch like a masters. And it's beautiful, and after you left and I'm GonNa be a little sad when it's over so. You're up for season two, so you guys mentioned Like your graphic designer and the instagram accounts at the characters, but where can we find? Consensual and then any personal projects or sites that you guys WanNa plug. You can find US primarily on Instagram at consensual pod. We should have the teaser hopefully by the time this episode is, our teaser will be up on spotify. You can go give it a listen and follow. Follow ten. We turn about so when the first episode drops in June, it will pop up in your spotify feed. you can follow me personally at be Grizz on all things to hear me. Complain about animal crossing important content..

Hulu DAD Gloria Steinem spotify Cate Blanchett US Phyllis Schlafly Mrs America instagram Dan
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Home or you just want to use your brain to think about something other than you know coming up on the show today bestselling author speaker and now podcast host Pranay brown will be here her new podcast is called unlocking us and it is perfect for this moment plus we'll speak to the author of hidden valley road a fascinating account of a family plagued by schizophrenia and how their DNA has helped researchers and will take a minute to meditate together sixty seconds of mental space is on the plan for today we will get to all of it but first on March twenty second nineteen seventy two the equal rights amendment was passed by Congress from there it went on to the states for what seemed like could be a swift ratification process and then well Phyllis Schlafly happened a new series from FX Primera on Hulu called Mrs America is a fictionalized account of Schlafly's ability to mobilize conservative women in this country to fight the RA all while sort of ironically feeding her own ambition and acting a bit like a feminist except for that torpedoing an amendment to secure equal white rights thing the series Mrs America stars Cate Blanchett is Phyllis Schlafly as she lunges and parries with the leaders of the women's liberation movement Gloria Steinem played by rose Byrne Shirley Chisholm played by it was overdue by Betty free downplayed by Tracey Ullman and Bella Abzug played by Margot Martindale the nine part series doesn't take the binary hero villain arc it's more nuanced than that showrunner and writer W. Waller does not shy away from tackling the issues and divisions within the feminist movement is unafraid to explore the motivations of the women involved in stock E. R. A. it's a story of political maneuvering a history lesson and a reminder that the experiences and opinions of women never have and never will be monolithic Mrs America premieres on Hulu on April fifteenth and here's a little preview featuring Cate Blanchett as Phyllis Schlafly I am not against women I am not against women working outside the whole but what I am against is the women's liberation movement we need to get the word out quickly we want the right to be a mother the right to be a white delivers one to create a sex neutral to tell me you know what you're saying our movement is about fighting the oppression of all women we do not want housewives thinking that we are against them we are against the Aleutians how long are we supposed to wait how much time do we get people to adapt to change the other one is kind of waiting creator and showrunner Davi Waller.

Pranay brown Congress Phyllis Schlafly Hulu Mrs America Cate Blanchett Gloria Steinem Shirley Chisholm Tracey Ullman Bella Abzug Margot Martindale W. Waller Betty free writer Davi Waller
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Foundation dot org this is all of that and W. NYC I'm Alison Stewart thank you for joining me today we have a lot to get to this hour the first is a preview or working on for this week bestselling author speaker and podcast host Bernay brown will join us to talk about anxiety common courage also actor Cate Blanchett will be here to talk about her portrayal of Phyllis Schlafly the new FX Hulu series Mrs America so we've been told to expect another really rough week this week maybe the roughest yet and we're all searching for ways to stay emotionally as well as physically balanced so we thought we'd try something new today you're out there listening to me here in my home studio we're going to take a minute to meditate to breeze if we can bring our stress levels down a bit joining me now is W. N. Y. C.'s Lorraine Maddox who leads a regular meditation session for staffers of the station these days she's conducting the sessions on zoom it naturally so the rain thank you for doing this we are in your hands for the next sixty seconds great thank you Alan until let's go ahead and close our online take a deep breath and filling up the valley the long the child to the crown here hang on hello hello hello hello shop in your belly.

Alison Stewart Bernay brown Cate Blanchett Phyllis Schlafly Mrs America W. N. Y. C. Lorraine Maddox Alan
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

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Brown Navy. Brown facebook Phyllis Schlafly Dot Kim Cups instructor Allison. Oliver
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

18:55 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Early seventies even though the equal rights amendment had been around for about fifty years She really claims she wasn't aware of it. She didn't was not aware of any massive movement behind it and it wasn't until she says a friend says. Hey you should check out this whole. Era Thing you might be interested in it that she reads it and like all of the light bulb go off above her head and she says a Ha- here is the enemy and for those of you not familiar with the era. As I really wasn't until doing research kristoff mom never told you. It was first introduced in Nineteen twenty-three by Alice Paul at the Seneca Falls Convention and the era which would have been the twenty seven th amendment if it had gone through it's very simple and its language it just states equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. So essentially it would render gender-based discrimination illegal on a federal or state level across the board and people today say that if the IRA had been passed and had been ratified. I should say that. H- cobbling together. That women have to do today between title nine and other state laws and stuff like that it. There would not be any of this. Maneuvering around that we would have to do in light of gender-based or a sexual discrimination. Because era would've just in very simple language accounted for all of that but not gonNa let that happen even though. The era was widely supported like across the Aisle by Democrats and Republicans alike. Yeah women men ever like. Yeah sure. Of course even George Wallace from Alabama. Who was about as racist as they come was chill with the IRA. Yeah I know because I think a lot of people saw it as like well. We already have language in these other. Various laws and amendments. That you know. We shouldn't discriminate against women like sure. Why not throw this on the pile? Yeah I think it was seen as as kind of not toothless but just like acceptable this to the lady. Yeah let them have. Let them have it not having it was all SHLEF and in Nineteen seventy-two. She writes about it in the Schlafly. Report dedicates a whole issue to it and this is what starts the anti feminist campaign against the era and boy did she have some ideas about what that simple sentence really meant. Oh God oh God yes. She said that the era was going to eliminate sex segregated public restrooms. We still hear that panicked today. The way it's going to force women into the draft D were. Wasn't that just in the news. It's going to dissolve sex crime laws. I got nothing. It's going to remove men's financial responsibilities to be breadwinners Or the pairs of child support. Oh more women are becoming breadwinners these days and she basically considered women as we as we touched on earlier in the episode. She basically considered women to be this privileged protected class who would lose those privileges and protections if the era went through and that's why my brain was just collapsing last night as I was researching this stuff. Because it's like but if we if we're protected under the law through the ER A in the way that the spells out we won't have to worry about these so-called privileges and protections and what. I would call benevolent sexism. Oh Yeah but if you aren't stoking worry and fear. How are you going to start this movement? Pece LAUGH GOING TO GALVANIZE. Her Gal and galvanized the Gal. She does because the subscriptions to her newsletter. Shoot up from about three thousand to thirty five thousand. Thanks to all of this fierce joking that she does not only among women like herself. You know good Catholic housewives but also among the Evangelical Christian Housewives Ladies Ladies Ladies. We have a lot to worry about in terms of losing those cushy lives that we know and this is something that I read all the time in stuff. I'm never told you. Youtube comments from men's rights activist. -I trolls who claim feminists are just victimizing themselves because in piche laughs terms. Like you're a privileged class people. Take you out for dinner. You get discounts. Happy hours and you know you have affirmative action. You'll get whatever you want if you paid me equally. Then maybe I wouldn't need a discount exactly for your happy hour man and this the thing is though she's starting this she kind of asserting it out of her garage. She's writing her newsletter. She sending it out. It's very grass roots and that becomes really the source of her political influence. And it's her brand. Yeah Oh yeah. It's only your brand. The piece left brand is all about the grassroots. She has this newsletter base largely comprised of fellow conservative housewives and once she stirs them up they start fundraising they start sending out mailers they start hosting anti era press conferences and importantly lobbying their state legislatures. They would go carrying loaves of homemade banana. Bread and Appolos and things like that little goodies and deliver them to all of the politicians who were going to vote on the era that day and say Oh we don't we don't need that. Good Sir. Have a little apricot. What was in the bread? Did they put something? In drugging their legislators and then Phyllis teams up with North Carolina Democratic. Senator Sam Ervin. No relation in the past couple generations at least Who OPPOSED THE R? A. And this allows her whole stop Yar a movement to cross party lines. Yeah And keep in mind too that in one thousand nine hundred ninety three just a year after Schlafly starts going after the Era Roe. V Wade happens and so this is of course during up even more angst among conservatives so then in nineteen seventy five we see her take her success with developing this stop. Era Group and transitioning it into the Eagle Forum and this is essentially the women's auxiliary of the conservative right wing Contingent of the Republican Party at the time And the Eagle Forum which was twenty thousand strong. In nineteen seventy five lobbied politically lobbied four conservatism alongside sister groups like how happiness of women and a wear which stood for. American women are richly endowed. Phyllis is beside herself. Although I don't know if you could describe someone who is as cool calm and collected as Phyllis ever beside herself because she's very calculating she knows what she's doing. Yeah Oh for sure. And so her major beef though with the growing contingent of feminists in the US. It is all about how they are messing with the natural order of things that goes back to her assertion that feminists are trying to destroy the family. Yeah so in one thousand nine hundred four Shiro one of many columns in which she says. Feminism is incompatible with human nature. The premise of the feminists is that God goofed in making us two. Different sexes and that our laws should remedy his misset mistake. And I guess okay. I'm GonNa make this a little personal for a second like I guess. That's why so many of her arguments and similar arguments. Don't make sense to me because I am not a person who is religious or Has God as a former very inappropriate boss of mine said To me one time so like things like that. Don't make sense to me saying that. There is a natural order in the way that the biological sexes half to be or the genders have to be. Yeah and I'm sitting here across from you not surprised at all because a large part of my childhood was spent in Evangelical Churches and while the passers weren't railing against feminism. Every Sunday there was definitely concern particularly the homosexual agenda because that definitely violated in quotes nature. And so that's like a whole other aspect of right wing activism and pushes behind their politics that that I simply as a person on the left do not have because I just. It's not part of my world view but it was it so shaped hers. Oh definitely I mean. And and part of that too is attached to her a familiar distaste for east coast elitists and Liberals and one thing that she really goes on and on about in a choice on an echo is how Barry Goldwater is the person you should vote for because he has simple ideas simple solutions whereas LBJ and all these Liberal Democrats they just have these convoluted theories and bureaucratic structures and they just want to muck everything up whereas you know it's just it's just nature. It's just man and wife. It's this and that you know it's a very black and white worldview and that's a it's a similar thing that we see today where there is this distaste among right wing right wing conservatives for non simplistic answers because that challenges their worldview in a terrifying way and I mean I also say this from the perspective of being very cognizant even at a young age of how a lot of the rhetoric political rhetoric that I heard in conservative churches that my parents attended was just so fierce stoking. You could feel it in the room you know and it was powerful enough to get schlafly where she wanted to go and in addition to her argument about feminism being incompatible with human nature she also kind of suggested that feminism was out to replace husbands with government. Big Brother Right. So look at you dumb feminist. You're just trying to get rid of the home. Get rid of the family structure. Get rid of the husband who can provide for you. They can be the breadwinners if you just let them but instead you want to get rid of all that and have the government give to you. Have the government be your breadwinner and your husband. Accept Welfare and public assistance and things like that and it doesn't sound like a frustrated just out of college phyllis who can't get a a job in the government because big brother has saved all the other jobs for other brothers essentially And in the way she puts it though in one column it might have been the same Same column from Nineteen ninety-four She She she uses sarcasm in rhetorical questions a lot so she sneers needed job. Big Brother will get you an affirmative action quota position. You don't meet the physical requirements. Big Brother will gender norm the test results and give you a high score not satisfied with your salary. The comparable Worth Commission will order your employer to give you a raise and if you WANNA promotion the Glass Ceiling Commission will force your employer to give it to you. So it's just this idea that we are making up these problems and through this group of kingmakers. We you know the government. Then establishes these committees that just You know give magically give women raises. Well I mean all of her rhetorical questions. There go back to her. Emphatic assertion that there is no such thing is this patriarchy. That oppresses women. That women are not oppressed and then her assertions are directly tied to today's conversations around women are making themselves victims. Well and this next quote about how she describes the relationship between feminism and the federal government is still reminiscent of what you here today among women against feminism and or anti-feminist. Whichever way you want to put it where she says. Our societal policy should be to let women make their own decisions about marriage and career without the interference of taxpayer funded Gender Equity Federal busybodies. Well so she's trying to have both at the same time you know. She's trying to to say that. We don't need feminism. But not because we don't want the best for women but just because we don't think that anyone should be telling women what to do. So isn't feminism telling women what to do and so that's why you know women's shouldn't be for feminism and yes it does make you and I do mean you care and myself want to slowly bang our heads against the desk and Ditto Betty for Dan and many other. You know second wave feminist of the day all Betty Yeah Teflon Phyllis managed to infuriate frequent debate. Opponent Betty for Dan to the point where Betty told her that she should burn at the stake. Yeah and lists the troll loved? It loved it. Oh yeah because she was like Oh. I'm so glad you said that because it just goes to show how nasty you feminists are. And of course. Schlafly had her opinions about Betty for Dan as well. She said I reject all her ideology. She said I reject all her ideology most of it based on the absurd notion that the home is a comfortable concentration camp and the suburban housewife is oppressed by her husband and by society and she loved calling feminist fat ugly and unlikable. Which again. I'm telling you like reading about laugh is just kind of like reading about Donald Trump and a lot of ways isolated. Tv shows. Yeah it goes back to my college geology class in which we were talking about feminism and a fellow student of Mine and I've told her on the Pike House before but a fellow classmate Raised her hand and basically said but if we like men and want to get married. Shouldn't we not agree with any of this stuff? And it's like washing sound is point completely going over your head 'cause yeah like the worst thing to some people is to be considered or just called fat or ugly or unlikable. Oh indefinitely talking about the seventies our society is still I would not say woke but it was certainly less woke in the seventies but as much as I really hate to keep quoting Phyllis schlafly. Because it's never a pleasant thing that you will have to say I do think it's worth highlighting a few of her positions on feminist issues. Yes she didn't think that marital rape was thing nope she said by getting married. The woman has consented to sex. And I don't think you can call it rape on sexual harassment. No big surprise. She needed Anita Hill and she just thought that that woman was just raking that honorable. Clarence Thomas over the coals unnecessarily because she's a feminist and was just sad that he wouldn't take her out on a date so on sexual harassment. Schlafly said quote non-criminal sexual harassment on the job is not a problem for the virtuous woman except in the rarest of cases. Yes so insert victim blaming here. Well if you're a virtuous woman you should have nothing to worry about. What were you wearing exactly and domestic violence. She said that when marriages are broken by false allegations of domestic violence. Us taxpayers four up an estimated twenty billion a year to support the resulting single-parent welfare dependent families. And I'm like that's your concern.

Phyllis schlafly United States Alice Paul Betty George Wallace Alabama Era Group Senator Sam Ervin Youtube federal government Anita Hill harassment Barry Goldwater piche Clarence Thomas rape Pike House Republican Party
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

13:57 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"And she and Fred were hyper focused on. International Communism less so on the threat of reds in America like McCarthy was in a lot of that stems from the fact that she'd been so heavily focused on foreign policy and foreign politics in college and soon after that she gets a platform in one thousand nine hundred sixty two. She hosted a fifteen minute. Radio Show on national security called America wake up and it was carried by twenty-five Illinois station so she was like a lady Bill O'Reilly in the radio days almost and the same year her religious conservatism really ignites further following the Supreme Court decision prohibiting state-sponsored sponsored prayer in public schools which is still a massive lightning rod for religious conservatives. Obviously yeah I mean. It's almost like she's just kinda gathering up all of her platforms. You know in the in the fifties and sixties and then in nineteen sixty four star takes off yeah. She referred would refer to this later as her most productive year of her life period. And that's saying a lot considering you know like we said by the age of twenty seven. She was already hyper political. So so what more could phyllis be doing well? She was talking to the New York. Times is Gina Belafonte about how in nineteen sixty four? She was as we mentioned President of the Illinois Federation of Republican Women She went to the Republican convention and she was also stumping on behalf of a Republican candidate for presidential nomination buried gold water and Goldwater made His name really by voting against the Civil Rights Act because it was desegregation at the time. That was freaking. All the conservative white people out and finally here comes Barry Goldwater. Who's like you know what folks I'll take a stand against this and Phyllis was like big old you might dude and she wrote this book more of a pamphlet really. She read this book though called a choice not an echo about how Barry Goldwater is. Do you put all of your Republican support behind. And also how? He's the only person who can effectively combat that international communist threat. She self publishes this book and she will brag for the rest of her life. She always says that she sold three million copies out of her garage. And whether or not that number is accurate it. Is it definitely galvanize? This group of similarly white religious conservative Republicans and particularly Republican women. Yes and it helped launch Barry Goldwater into the presidential race. He got the Republican nomination to run unsuccessfully against Democrat LBJ and You know I was curious about what was in. The book is a biography of him. Is it some sort of inspirational tract of literature? Talking about Barry Goldwater background. Well according to Elizabeth Colbert's Not a fan characterization from two thousand five. She wrote that A choice not an echo was a mixture of fact sensational accusations. Commonsensical truth and elaborate conspiracy theories that is brought together in a compelling but evidently bogus narrative. But it's a narrative that still a still remains today because it poses these very conspiratorial questions that still stoke a lot of angst among a lot of people you know on either side of the political spectrum really At the beginning of the book choice on an echo she bullets out questions for readers to think about of who really picks the president because according to beach laugh it's a secret cabal of powerful white dudes. She also asks. How political conventions stolen? Who are the secret kingmakers? And how do hidden persuaders and propaganda gimmicks influence politics? I mean if you think that. The whole lame stream media Fox News Hatred of the New York. Times etc is a new thing. No no pece laugh in a choice. Not An echo was calling out all of those Newspapers including the Atlanta Journal Constitution Elliott. Yeah as being in on this group of kingmakers okay and they would selectively report on the party knowing full. Well I guess that you know who was really pulling the strings and that's kind of at the core of this right wing populism of saying you know what they're these there these secret meetings going on and they just they're going to turn our country into assessable pool of of secular welfare nonsense already because of the new deal you know they're already terrified him about the new deal and I take the podcast on tour anytime soon. It should just be called. What what did you say? Nonsense heckler Cesspool of nonsense But I mean in this. In in this election cycle we've heard similar refrains from the left. Select their plenty of people who are as fed up as as pece laugh about kingmakers in the establishment. A right as fed up and also as borderline can and slash full-blown conspiratorial But something else that jumped out to me in a choice. Not An ECHO is how schlafly describes herself how she kind of lays out her author credibility at the beginning of the book and she says that she's devoted thousands of hours to the Republican Party which is probably true and she talks about how she did this at a great sacrifice to her family because she has six kids and are although she's still at the point is I don't think she has six yet. She's still having babies but she's on her way to six and this is in direct contrast to what she'll be saying in the seventies where there is no sacrifice all of a sudden. It's just what she did just as a hobby. It's just easy for me. I don't worry. I still managed to be a fabulous housewife and mother. Did we employ A FULL-TIME HOUSEKEEPER? Yes but she always brag that they did not employ a nanny right and that she home schooled each of her six children until they were seven and that she breastfed all of them. Which I'm surprised she even said the word breast didn't maybe she just pointed to her boobs and winked when editor kids. Like These. Yeah it is. That was something else that comes up in pretty much every profile of her and she breastfed her six children. Like okay. Okay. What you know. But that's part of her whole perfect housewife image as she cultivated. Yeah but even though a choice on an echo was very successful in getting Barry Goldwater to be that year's Donald Trump essentially And it was very successful for spotlighting. The potential influence of Phyllis schlafly because Goldwater lost so starkly to LBJ the GOP establishment Hashtag dudes. We're like you know what you're white right. Wing Ultra Conservative Movement. Stuff like stay in the corner. Obviously you're not going to help. The Republican Party is a whole. So we're gonNA steer things back more moderate and peace laugh like we're not going to give you like a position or anything because you're a woman so just keep doing your your woman thing so she did really get like the sexist shaft from the GOP not surprisingly. So you're saying that schlafly shaft yes schlafly the shaft but then schlafly turn around and shaft us. Oh Yeah in the seventy S. But we're not even they're not even there yet. Because that's the thing most people's recollection Phyllis Schlafly just starts with the era. You gotTa know all this stuff leading up to it to make it all make sense. So what's happened? What has happened? So Pece Laugh has gotten snubbed. Essentially she ran for presidency of the National Federation of Republican women because she had been running a state level organization. She went for the national position and they were like Nog girl. You wrote that book in your garage. Good for you but Your candidate loss. Oh no and that was a huge burn for her. Yo Yeah that was a huge burn and she manages though to pull a lot of the women in the National Federation of Republican women a way to support her because she starts publishing in nineteen sixty seven this weekly newsletter. The schlafly report And it started out with just about three thousand subscribers and a lot of those were women that she had met in this National Federation of Republican Women As well as Women from her other organization that she'd been leading But as we'll talk about in the second half of the PODCAST. She does pull some amazing political and religious based maneuvering to massively raised the number of subscribers. Yeah and just in the background politically. We got to mention that in nineteen sixty six even though just two years earlier hyper conservative. Racist Barry Goldwater lost so famously to Lbj but that year you start to see conservative. Republicans winning some significant congressional and gubernatorial races including one Ronald Reagan becoming governor of California so schlafly launching her newsletter. The next year is really banking on the rise of this conservative movement which up until then had had been this kind of niche pocket of people But she starting to see it mainstream because really just because like white people were getting really scared about black people and feminists and three years. After PECE LAUGH LAUNCHES THE SCHLAFLY REPORT. She runs for Congress again and fails again but despite her faltering start Phyllis about to bust out and never looked back. That's right and we're gonNA talk about that.

Barry Goldwater Phyllis schlafly Republican Party National Federation of Republi National Federation of Republi New York Illinois Federation of Republi President America Pece Laugh Fred Supreme Court Atlanta Journal Gina Belafonte Ronald Reagan McCarthy Bill O'Reilly Illinois Congress
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

15:22 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Her mother wanted to stay home with the kids in the house and do the cooking and all about that stuff and be the traditional housewife. And so she's being raised with these ideas about traditional family and traditional politics and because of their financial situation at home. Phyllis realized that she was going to have to make her own way. It's not like Her parents could just pay for her to go to college and so she worked really hard. She was always at the top of her class. And in nineteen forty four. She received her bachelor's degree from Washington University. And in a makers interview. She talks about how she paid her way through college by working. She says forty eight hours a week as nightshift. Gunnar testing thirty and fifty caliber ammunition at a Saint Louis Munitions Plant and that is absolutely true. I mean she not only tested These guns she would also like document their trajectories and do all of this stuff which seems like again very appropriate resume item for someone who ended up leading right wing Republicans but also one thing we skipped over is that she graduated at nineteen right. She finished college in three years and graduated at nineteen like some people. Don't even enter college until nineteen like she was. I mean this woman was so driven and was from the outset not going to let anything stand in her way but at this point she doesn't necessarily want to go into politics. She ends up in nineteen forty five receiving her master's degree in political science from Radcliffe. Which was the sister university to Harvard at the time because while Harvard had started leading Some women from Radcliffe take colleges with Hoffman They wouldn't fully allow women into the school and apparently she ended up in Pali Sigh because it was one of the only things that she could study and do it at Harvard so she could do it in those mixed gender classrooms because it meant a lot to her to go to Harvard and Radcliffe. And if you listen to any interviews with her whenever she talks about her masters degree she loves talking about you know her bootstrapping of her education and she always says she went to Harvard but in fact her degrees from Radcliffe and I realized that that's kind of a minor detail but I think it's still says a lot about how she sort of adjusts her reality to fit this concept of a sexism free world that needs no feminism because as she would tell audiences usually of Filled with women. Well when I went to school there was no sexism. I had no trouble getting into college. I was able to study alongside. The boys know what these feminists. We're talking about one thousand nine hundred eighty five my blood pressure and yeah and and just as she didn't necessarily set out to be a poly SCI major she also did not set out to be a hyper conservative right wing Republican either. She was pretty moderate but she quickly shifted more conservative after she did face barriers and she would not admit necessarily that they were barriers. Used it more to illustrate that she was able to sort of shift course as needed and find her niche that allowed her to gain power to really become phyllis. Oh yeah definitely gain power for sure and Her Post College career path also hints as to why she has so much animosity toward big government because after she graduates from matriculated from Radcliffe. You know the war is ending and a lot of jobs are being reserved specifically for veterans most of whom are men so phyllis wants to get a job in the federal government. She's like I wanNA work on policy. This is my thing I got really into this police. Cy classwork and I'm good at it. She graduated at the top of her class but she couldn't find a job in the federal government because they were like no. We gotTA save these veterans. So big brother didn't allow Phyllis to fulfill her dream so she ends up at the far more conservative think-tank private think tank of the American Enterprise Institute. So I mean it's it's incredible to see all of these sign posts along the way. Yeah but like here's me you know ghost caroline who's not alive yet like no but Phyllis look at what you can fight. You can fight sexism that prevents women from going to the schools and getting the jobs they want but she wouldn't blame not getting that federal government job on sexism because they weren't telling her you couldn't get because you're a woman you couldn't get it because you're not a veteran so her I R- would be pointed toward the government. Okay well in nineteen forty nine. She Marries Fred. Fred Schlafly who is a devoutly Catholic and politically active lawyer. And what I what made me stop in? My tracks is a line about her wedding vows and this is a line that would be very much at home in an article about some. You know devout feminist getting married. Perhaps in the New York Times they write in the New York Times at the ceremony. Mrs Schlafly said she did not promise to obey only to cherish and that does not sound much like what she would say in her nineteen seventies anti our a campaign right. It was all about obeying Fred. Yeah because she was a housewife. Yeah and so this this this little bone that we keep picking up is the same bone that feminists have picked for decades because they say Phyllis Philly Schlafly schlafly laugh. Oh girl light peach laughs you. You are so active and driven on behalf of yourself basically and making sure that you get the opportunities that you want but what about all of the other women who does that sound like though who has similarly intense hair donald trump does a very as a very similar approach to this? Where your your D- reality is moves with the wind. Whatever you know best serves you at that time and we'll most elevate you then. Then that's truth that's your fact whether it is actually fact or not and she though Pece Laugh is essentially coated in Teflon. Yeah and it's kind of incredible to see how she does just constantly deflect any criticism and it seems like she. She enjoys receiving this criticism. Just I mean she's a total troll like run off of her she wants said she told The New York Times actually in two thousand six in the scale of liberal sins. Hypocrisy is the greatest. And they've always considered me a hypocrite and go on to say how she defends herself by saying you know. I never told women that they shouldn't or couldn't work outside the home quote. I simply didn't believe we need a constitutional amendment to protect women's rights. But did did she not advocate for housewives? Spe- that being the reality will. She certainly advocated for housewives but she would continually say well. I'm not telling you you have to be a housewife. I'm just saying that. We don't need to devalue housewives and that feminists are trying to undercut in destroy the role of housewives even though and this is a whole other podcast unto itself Caroline even though right before ole fill a sunkar claws into the equal rights amendment a woman. And I'm forgetting her name right now. Because I'm really worked up. A woman from the National Organization for Women started this relatively successful outreach feminist outreach to housewives and divorced women who suddenly found themselves you know not really knowing how to support themselves or not really know how to how to grapple with their personal politics and their domestic situation. So it's like so. That's another myth. Makes this mythology as she goes mythology. That still repeated definitely. Yeah that feminists want to destroy the home and destroy the family. Hi No many a feminist. Who has her own family and children even washes the dishes. I mean like the idea and you know. Of course. That's a silly thing to say. But my point being but like the idea that feminists are as like a Monolithic. Army are trying to destroy The family and the home I mean. It's it's insane but it's clearly ineffective tactic. It's clearly effective rhetoric. Oh yeah because it's all about stoking. Fear that is that's really the name of the game with all of this and one thousand nine hundred eighty two. She's just twenty seven years old when her political aspirations get a kick in the pants because a group of Republicans local Republicans come over to her and Fred's house. They come over to the shafts and they encourage Fred to run for Congress. Say there's an open seat in there like Fred. You're the guy you should do it in Fred's like listen. I'm not really interested and as the story goes at one point. One of these gentlemen jokingly says hey villas you should run and fills is like okay damn straight. I should run. And she's off from there. I mean she really seizes this opportunity and she runs and wins the primary which was huge but of course she loses in the general election. Yeah she was in a really democratic area way more liberal and I think she was against an incumbent to yes. She's yeah she was and we read that by the end of that race her opponent her democratic opponent was so livid with the rhetoric she used about him being this liberal monster that he would not even shake her hand. He was so mad at the stuff that she had stirred up about him and she wasn't even yet thirty already stirring that political pot and one thing. That's really interesting that was. We were reading about how her rhetoric and the way that she positioned herself as a woman in politics. Really sort of echoed The selfridge's and women in the progressive era who were in women's clubs part of the Women's Club Movement. Because you know remember back then women didn't have the vote so if they wanted to agitate and be activists for any causes and help women in any way each other they had to join these clubs and and band together for things like daycare Or other other causes that could potentially help families and their communities and so One thing that she had in common with those early women who were being political even if they could not be in politics was that she positioned herself as a woman who would clean up the dirty mess of politics and it needed cleaning up because it was run by men and so here she is positioning herself as I'm a woman and therefore with my natural womanly abilities I'll be a better candidate for you right. Because that was a suffragette argument of why we should have voting rights and political involvement because of the domesticity Victorian era idea of woman as the moral center of the hall right so let let the moral compasses and their vaginas. Come into the political process fellow so we can clean up after you. We also have to remember too that she was fiercely anti-communist and extremely hawkish on foreign policy to the point that she was like Joe McCarthy level and maybe even more so anticommunist and that's really where her focus resided for a long time well before she sets her sights on the era and even after that defeat though in one thousand nine hundred eighty two she gets up and keeps going. You can tell that this kind of lit a fire for her because she starts stumping around Illinois on behalf of the daughters of the American revolution that she remains super active and from nineteen fifty six to nineteen sixty four. She was President of the Illinois Federation of Republican Women. So you can see her. Starting to gradually rise through these organizational ranks. But now we're also seeing her diverted off sort of to the women's auxiliary side of things and in the meantime in nineteen fifty eight. She and Fred started the Cardinal Minds N. T. Foundation which was named for the Roman Catholic leader who had been tortured and imprisoned by Hungarian Communists in an effort to educate Catholics on the dangers of communism..

Fred Schlafly Phyllis Philly Schlafly Radcliffe Harvard The New York Times National Organization for Wome Washington University Illinois Federation of Republi Saint Louis Munitions Plant Gunnar donald trump American Enterprise Institute Illinois Pali Sigh
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

16:58 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Pepperidge Farm Milano believes you should make some time for yourself once in a while. Sometimes you just can't have that bath that you really need so maybe cookie instead cookies. Make most things better. Miami time is hiking and there's nothing like getting to the top of the summit and then having a Milano Cookie Milano. Cookies are the perfect. Treat to savor during me time. They have just the right amount of cookie and luxurious rich chocolate. They're the type of treats you won't want to share so remember to save something for yourself with Pepperidge Farm Milano. I'm Hugh Jackson. I'm a chef restaurant tour a traveler. And now I'm the host of the passenger people. Ask me all the time. What's that list of places to go in this city in that city and this show is dedicated to that idea mercer yourself in that culture and finding out what's intriguing? What resound and what we think about the future of that place as a visitor as a passenger subscribe. Now on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you podcast. Hey this is Anne and Samantha and welcome to stuff on never told you production of Iheartradio for today's classic. We are talking about them. That's come up a lot in the news lately and a couple of our recent podcast and that is Phyllis Schlafly schlafly. Somebody always struggle pronunciation of her name right. I feel like every time we talk about her. We do you think. I don't think those women he does how yes. Yeah I think her name is sir. No offense to any schlafly is out there. That are not like her but yeah because of the movement and continued debate around the equal rights amendments. She has been coming up a lot and in this month of International Women's Day or National Women's month thought that it was appropriate to bring her back in this very appropriately titled Episode Christening Carolina did pass host the ghost of Phyllis Schlafly. Because it feels like we're still dealing right. Her work is still haunting us. It very much is so yes I loved it. I loved it. Yeah please enjoy learn in this in this classic episode. Welcome to stuff. Mom Never told you from house. Works DOT COM Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Kristen and I'm caroline and today we are talking about Phyllis Schlafly. This episode has been a long time coming but ever since she died on September fifth twenty. Sixteen we'VE BEEN TALKING AMONGST OURSELVES CAROLINA. I about how we should do episode on Phyllis. We've heard from a number of listeners asking whether we're going to deal with. Phyllis schlafly episode. And how could we not? How could we not especially? After my twitter. Response to her passing Brought men out of the woodwork. To tell me that I was a monster. So what did you tweet? I tweeted as India Gif whereas Diaa was just going by and That was it and conservative. Gentlemen did not appreciate that and called me fat feminist Monster Ono. They called you fat. Isn't that the worst thing? A woman can be called totally. Did you even survive it? I don't know I don't know eating even more. Feminism EATING EATING. All the feminists yeah. Well it's also apropos. Talk about Schlafly. Because in a lot of ways she paved the way for Donald Trump being the republican nominee for president this year and I would argue that her star was definitely rising at the same time that the Republican Party was veering more toward the Reagan affiliation. You know Aligning with the religious right Then It previously had been. Yeah I mean that's how she made her name was definitely by essentially ushering helping usher. What was this fringe right? Wing Group of Republicans. Sort of like we think of the tea party today in to the mainstream because for a long time they were just sort of off in the corner and not really taken all that seriously but then as will talk about more. Phyllis schlafly showed America that these right wing conservatives could win in the polls but I don't WanNa get too ahead of ourselves. Let's talk a little bit more about who this woman is. Because for I I feel like you either absolutely know who she is. Because she's the arch nemesis of second wave. Feminism or. You probably never heard of her. So let's give a quick primer of who the Schlafly who's Schlafly lady is. Who's this dame? Well I mean you're right. She's absolutely considered one of the most polarizing figures in American public political life. And she's basically I don't know what would you. She's an author. She's a politician to a degree And she is best known for her war against the equal rights amendment in the Nineteen Seventies. Yeah I mean she's a grassroots conservative political organizer who is now considered an icon among ultra right-wing Republicans Donald Trump included and. We read her obituary in both the New York Times. Obviously more liberal some might call it the lame stream media if they're schlafly fans and then we read her in the National Review which is ultra conservative of course and the New York Times described her as quote a self-described housewife who displayed a moral ferocity reminiscent of the axe wielding prohibitionist. Carrie nation says he's a tough cookie. Real stuff cookie And then the national review described her meanwhile as one of the original Happy Warriors Funny Gracious and Grittier. Than One might expect. And it's astonishing to trace back our political climate today and everything that we are now witnessing in terms of Donald Trump's supporters and the types of white dudes who came after you on twitter for instance and trace at all way back to this woman in the Mid West who in a lot of ways started out almost like Hillary Clinton. She was from a relatively like working class background. Although Hillary Clinton came from a slightly wealthier middle class family but schlafly you know it was scrappy and she was and she was ambitious and then any similarity she might have to. Hillary Clinton just ends right there. Well yeah and I mean. They both initially supported. Barry Goldwater to ultra before before a hills went the other direction. But yeah and I mean you can look at the the fact that Nowadays Catholics and Evangelical Christians worked together when they are on the right You can trace that back to Phyllis Schlafly as well. She was Catholic. devoutly Catholic. But through. And we'll get to this more in a second. But like through all of her grassroots efforts she brought more women of different faiths and different denominations into the political fold to try to combat this sort of what she viewed as liberalisation the downfall of American society and in a lot of ways. She is a difficult woman. She summarize because she's kind of a basket of contradictions because she is this very ambitious self sufficient woman and a lot of ways who said that from the get go and she was growing up. She knew that she would need to take care of herself. And in her political career she was extremely Visible she wrote twenty books. I mean the woman never stopped and yet publicly. She always said that she was a housewife. I and politics was just a hobby because she has six children home and her husband. Fred Schlafly is king essentially and she does whatever he allows her to do even though like in the same breath. You'll also say you know but I can do whatever I want And she relished starting this organization called stop. Era which was intended to stop the equal rights amendment. Well Yeah and stop was actually an acronym for stop taking our privileges. Which is what I learned about that. Acronym was also my brain exploded a little bit about just how. How blatant the intention is right. There of privileges stop taking our privileges. Because I mean Phyllis Schlafly we'd be like yeah I mean I love. White privilege is terrific. Yeah I When I was researching her life and activism and politics my brain just kept collapsing on itself because to me as a liberal feminist and one who cares about having equal rights for people of all backgrounds. None of it made sense. Because I'm like why would you want to stop the era a when? Oh wait no but you only one the privileges for you and yours. Well okay so I was. I take back what I say that she would. She would be all about her white privilege because what Phyllis Schlafly did and Donald Trump does. She deny that privilege even exist. Oh well sure in the same way that she denies that denied that sexism even exists. Well privilege in the way that we talk about it now and on our podcast but I mean she actively talked about the privileges afforded to women right in the sense of chivalry almost right yes so her latest book a conservative case for trump came out just after her death and she describes in it trump as a quote old fashioned man grounded in his two great priorities hard work and family and a man who in other respects has led a remarkably clean life. Okay so I mean this is. This is the the viewpoint that we're dealing with. This is the kind of it. Choose your own reality that Phyllis Schlafly was able to mold into a startlingly powerful career for herself and it makes sense that right before her death. At Ninety two years old she came out stumping for trump. Because she was all about populism. She was all about demagoguery and she was all about. You know galvanizing this hyper conservative. Evangelical religious right that has similarly flocked to trump well and Regardless of weather you as the politician she was stumping for were hyper Republican or whatever. She just hated the establishment right. That's like some of the same rhetoric you hear a lot right now. And and she saw trump as an answer to those establishment politics and she was really. She harped for decades on kingmakers. The idea of like a secret group of rich liberal elite kingmakers who sat around a pointing politicians around the world. Yeah I mean 'cause that right. There is a core tenet of populism where their belief is that almost conspiratorially that it's just a group of powerful people who are making all the decisions so power to the people let's overthrow them and she told Breitbart in January of this year twenty sixteen that quote trump is the only hope to defeat the kingmakers because everybody else will fall in line so I mean she really believed in this kingmaker business to her death and I mean that's that's all also something to keep in mind as we talk about Phyllis Schlafly and something that was impressed upon me reading about her time. Line is how she has not changed in her political viewpoints. At all. She's still tells the same anecdotes that she did. You know in the sixties. So how did Phyllis happen? well let's give a little bit of biographical background real quick. She was born in August. Nineteen twenty four as Phyllis McAlpine Stewart in Saint Louis I did have a moment of concern because a lot of people are from Saint Louis and I did wonder like Oh. She came up in St Louis around the same time as my grandmother wonder if they were friends. She was the oldest of two daughters to odeal dodge. Who was her mother? And John Bruce Stewart. And what's really interesting is that I mean by all accounts. Her mother was also a very hard worker. She worked outside the home. She was a teacher with two college degrees. And that's not too shabby at all for a woman who was born at the end of the nineteenth century. Her mother not phyllis right I mean and odeal ended up being the breadwinner because her dad John Bruce Stewart was a westinghouse machinist and an industrial equipment salesman and after he lost his job in the Great Depression. Odeal had to become the breadwinner and she hustled. She was a department store saleswoman. She was an elementary school teacher. And a librarian at Saint Louis Art Museum and in her spare time how she had spare time. I'm not sure. She wrote a book on the history of Saint. Louis Yeah so like the constantly. Busy Work Work Work Ethic. Phyllis schlafly could absolutely be seen in her mother as well but and also her politics though. Come Straight from her dad. Her Dad was seventeen years older than odeal. Which is going to be a similar age gap that will see and Phyllis schlafly his own marriage and her. Dad was a staunch Republican. Who even though? They fell in such hard times during the Great Depression he hated FDR and hated the new deal and wanted nothing to do with that and so from a very young age. Phyllis was groomed to be a very conservative Republican. Yeah and I think that there's also the emotional aspect of yes. She had a really smart really hardworking really busy mother but she also grew up in addition to hearing her father. Rail against the new deal heard her mother being filled with regret at having to work those jobs..

Phyllis Schlafly Donald Trump Phyllis Fred Schlafly Hillary Clinton Schlafly Milano Cookie Milano twitter Phyllis McAlpine Stewart Pepperidge Farm Milano Iheartradio Saint Louis Art Museum Hugh Jackson John Bruce Stewart apple Miami National Review Republican Party New York Times
Virginia Lawmakers Renew National Debate Over ERA

Morning Edition

03:48 min | 2 years ago

Virginia Lawmakers Renew National Debate Over ERA

"Martin in Virginia this week state lawmakers are set to take a series of important votes on the equal rights amendment thirty eight states are needed to ratify it and Virginia with these folks would be the thirty eighth that's likely to spark legal battles over whether the ERA is still viable and a renewed national debate over the proposed constitutional amendment which would forbid discrimination based on sex it's a fight that stretches back decades and a generation of women who long ago battled on either side of the issue are watching and fighting again and pure Serra McCammon spoke with several of them Andrea Miller first heard about the equal rights amendment from her mother it basically went I'm very interested and the equal rights amendment I disagree with it a little I think women are superior to men but we'll settle for being a call that would be what what my mother told me there was an eighth grader in the Chicago suburbs in the late nineteen sixties her mom owned a business delivering mail door to door and they used to drum up support for the ERA so what we did was we took our little ERA wires and stuck them in the bag of junk mail a few years later and Schlafly Cory was also learning about the issue from her mom the weight Phyllis Schlafly the ERA's most prominent opponent the telephone rang day and evening with calls and questions from supporters and from reporters on ERA with Shaq constant in my childhood now sixty five and living in Saint Louis Schlafly Corey has continued her mother's work promoting conservative causes she fears the ERA would make it harder to restrict abortion even if the US Supreme Court eventually overturns the nineteen seventy three roe V. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide I think there are a lot of concerns about ERA have not changed in the nineteen seventies to today because the the end result ERA is to make men and women and interchangeable in every situation that's a problem Schlafly Cory says because there are biological differences between men and women that sometimes require differences in the law at least folk of stop ERA Illinois it warns of an end to separate prison facilities for female inmates or that women could be forced into a military draft book says she's oppose the equal rights amendment since she was a teenager in the nineteen seventies she believes many women who support it don't understand it it's very emotional for them they're very attached to it from the seventies they believe that going to be the cure all for all their problems and what they don't understand is it's really not going to add any benefit to them it's only going to add harm for Donna grant ski a seventy three year old activist and retired teacher from Midlothian Virginia the upcoming vote in the state legislature is a historic moment she remembers coming to the Virginia can capital in the nineteen seventies lining a walkway holding candles to show support for the ERA and yes she says it is an emotional moment I may get teary eyed now it means that my country looks at else the same way it looks at mail it means that my granddaughters can pick up a copy of the United States constitution and see that they are in trying to even assuming that Virginia ratifies the equal rights amendment this week it faces an uncertain future the justice department has issued an opinion saying that the deadline for the E. R. A. to be added to the constitution has expired if that stands it could mean another round of debate over the amendment in state houses nationwide there macam and NPR news Virginia

Martin Virginia
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

08:51 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"The states again. It's the system that we have of the federal government participating with the state governments and so three fourths Earth's of US states have to ratify any amendment in order for it to actually get into the constitution. And so what happened with the equal rights amendment is right away many states aids ratified it was on the platform of both political parties until Nineteen seventy-two wildly popular Picked up a lot of steam it was immediately ratified by many states and it got up to thirty five states unfortunately the number that's needed thirty. Eight not thirty five And so the deadline which was imposed used by Congress. They put a deadline seven-year deadline so the nineteen Seventy nine was set for the deadline. That deadline was extended by. Congress wants to nineteen eighty to and The equal rights amendment still fell three states short in one thousand nine hundred. I'm looking at the timeline. Now and like you said three fourths of the states have to ratify it. So that's thirty. Eight total and up until nineteen. So there was kind of a snowball effect until the late nineteen seventies and then in Indiana in nineteen seventy seventy just kind of stopped right and just curious that you know like what the cultural climate was that. I'm just thinking out loud. Like what the cultural. Hey it's kind of a wild moment in time. Because the women's rights movement was in full bloom in the early seventies You had marches for the Equal Rights Amendment Amendment In order to extend the deadline there were marches. Hundreds of thousands of people marched on Washington was a huge nationwide issue And there was wide support for changing the amendment. What changed how did it go from? You know rapidly getting thirty states to right away. Ratify it to slowing down while two things happened. One of the culture wars really picked up And a woman named Phyllis Schlafly who is One of the most powerful figures ears in American political life If not in those decades certainly even perhaps in the century she started a movement called stop. Era so she. She started organizing women to advocate against the IRA and the reason that was successful as they use a lot of scare tactics so they would say things like housewives. Swabs are going to be forced onto the front lines at the military dragged. Out of their homes You know they would. They would use the bathrooms argument. which was is even putting today but also at the time they use gay marriage so they was marriage equality? This is GonNa Cause Gay people to be able to get married so they use a lot of scare tactics in order to fight the equal rights amendment but also towards the end it was coming down to the state. The unratified state and a lot of the unratified states are places where women's rights are constantly under attack. Where where women are really falling behind? So you know there were fifteen states. That didn't ratify in twenty seventeen of this this incredible woman. Her name is Pat Spearman and she is a senator. She's a black preacher. A black preacher in Nevada and she essentially resurrected directed the rights amendment. She got the equal rights amendment ratified first time in thirty years anywhere that it had been ratified and she got it ratified in Nevada in twenty seventeen eighteen. And so this reignited the Movement for the Equal Rights Amendment people thought OK well states can still ratify today and then Illinois followed suit so Illinois Loyd ratified it in two thousand eighteen And then we had just one more state At this point we're almost to the thirty eight threshold required by the Constitution. And and that's really where we are today. The next most likely to state to ratify Virginia being currently brought up in the Virginia Senate and the Virginia House of delegates gets it almost passed in Virginia last year in two thousand nineteen so we are just a hair's breath away from getting that final thirty eighth state that is fascinating fascinating. I didn't know the history about Nevada. I didn't I didn't know that in two thousand seventeen. I knew the twin in Nevada. The I keep saying Nevada Nevada. I'm not really sure added in Nevada so a Tina Vada I knew that it was ratified in two thousand seventeen but I did not know the history and now that I'm looking at it. That is pretty remarkable from nineteen. Seventy seven Indiana being the last state to ratify to two thousand seventeen so that that was. That was huge. I'm I'm assuming that if she had not done this people would probably forgotten you know our immune some people who never forgot there were people fought for the equal rights amendment all that time who were advocating in the states who never really gave up on the dream of having an amendment for in the Constitution to protect women But it was largely forgotten and efforts in the women's movement sort of went to other other causes and other issues but there were some women who never forgot and and constantly advocated. What really one of the things that kind of brought the equal rights amendment back onto the table is the twenty seven th amendment so the most recent amendment to the constitution is called the Madison Amendment It was proposed by James Madison has to do with congressional pay. It was proposed by James Madison. But it wasn't ratified edified until the early nineteen nineties. So two hundred and three years later a particularly agitated gentlemen in Texas decided that he was going to create a movement to ratify the the Madison Amendment and it did get ratified so people who are in the Ra movement. Were looking around and thinking way. Okay okay it. Two Hundred Years can pass. An amendment can still make it into the constitution. Additional states than thirty years is not too much then we can still bill agitate and we can still get this amendment that we've always wanted so the equal rights amendment would be the twenty eighth amendment to the Constitution. You know and and again I am endlessly fascinated by women who uphold harmful patriarchal norms. Like this Phyllis Shave with. I just can't I can't wrap my brain around around super interesting character. She's very talented. If you watch debates with her it's fascinating because she debated waited some of the most prominent people in the women's movement at the time and she really honestly wipes the floor with them like she is always more prepared. She's very very intelligent. She's always on point. She is a very very fascinating and talented woman The problem is of course she always gets blamed with the defeat of the equal rights amendment. But for me. I think it's important to remember. That sure. She was the face of it but she she ran for Congress twice and she lost both time. I'm so she never actually voted against the equal rights amendment. The people who voted against the equal rights amendment were meant. They needed cover. They needed to say that that it was just a fight women against women but it was not the people who kept it out of Congress where men the people in the state legislatures to this day. In some of the states where the amendment have not been ratified have eighty percent men in their legislatures. Even the Federal Conver- Congress today The vast majority are men so the actual the people who are truly keeping us from constitutional equality are not women She she really put a face to it and she organized and she helped defeat feet the equal rights amendment but the end of the day the decision makers the people who had power the elected officials were met. I'm glad you said that that. That's that's a really excellent point because representation matters and it seems like that that repeats itself throughout history that you know women often. I see that a lot happening with Nancy Pelosi in a lot of other examples we can think go where you know. The name is wrapped around women. When we love our favorite exactly I I mean the things she did are very very sad the way that she changed the conversation at first it seemed like it was women against men in power but she inserted herself into the conversation in a way that made it seem like it was just a difference of opinion among women and that is not true Also she is not the one who would benefit from keeping the equal rights amendment out of the Constitution that is men who directly benefit from not having us on equal. WHOA stature so I I I always hesitate to blame things like this on women She's a fascinating figure and an important person in the movement but it is it is not her fault she never won election show. She never actually got to vote against the cement right not to mention that men can't alone pick up this fight right right and it is the right thing to do regardless of what your gender at scores.

Nevada Congress James Madison Indiana Nevada Nevada US Phyllis Schlafly Virginia Federal Conver- Congress Nancy Pelosi Illinois Virginia House Washington Virginia Senate Pat Spearman Texas Era Phyllis Shave
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

08:51 min | 2 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"The states again. It's the system that we have of the federal government participating with the state governments and so three fourths Earth's of US states have to ratify any amendment in order for it to actually get into the constitution. And so what happened with the equal rights amendment is right away many states aids ratified it was on the platform of both political parties until Nineteen seventy-two wildly popular Picked up a lot of steam it was immediately ratified by many states and it got up to thirty five states unfortunately the number that's needed thirty. Eight not thirty five And so the deadline which was imposed used by Congress. They put a deadline seven-year deadline so the nineteen Seventy nine was set for the deadline. That deadline was extended by. Congress wants to nineteen eighty to and The equal rights amendment still fell three states short in one thousand nine hundred. I'm looking at the timeline. Now and like you said three fourths of the states have to ratify it. So that's thirty. Eight total and up until nineteen. So there was kind of a snowball effect until the late nineteen seventies and then in Indiana in nineteen seventy seventy just kind of stopped right and just curious that you know like what the cultural climate was that. I'm just thinking out loud. Like what the cultural. Hey it's kind of a wild moment in time. Because the women's rights movement was in full bloom in the early seventies You had marches for the Equal Rights Amendment Amendment In order to extend the deadline there were marches. Hundreds of thousands of people marched on Washington was a huge nationwide issue And there was wide support for changing the amendment. What changed how did it go from? You know rapidly getting thirty states to right away. Ratify it to slowing down while two things happened. One of the culture wars really picked up And a woman named Phyllis Schlafly who is One of the most powerful figures ears in American political life If not in those decades certainly even perhaps in the century she started a movement called stop. Era so she. She started organizing women to advocate against the IRA and the reason that was successful as they use a lot of scare tactics so they would say things like housewives. Swabs are going to be forced onto the front lines at the military dragged. Out of their homes You know they would. They would use the bathrooms argument. which was is even putting today but also at the time they use gay marriage so they was marriage equality? This is GonNa Cause Gay people to be able to get married so they use a lot of scare tactics in order to fight the equal rights amendment but also towards the end it was coming down to the state. The unratified state and a lot of the unratified states are places where women's rights are constantly under attack. Where where women are really falling behind? So you know there were fifteen states. That didn't ratify in twenty seventeen of this this incredible woman. Her name is Pat Spearman and she is a senator. She's a black preacher. A black preacher in Nevada and she essentially resurrected directed the rights amendment. She got the equal rights amendment ratified first time in thirty years anywhere that it had been ratified and she got it ratified in Nevada in twenty seventeen eighteen. And so this reignited the Movement for the Equal Rights Amendment people thought OK well states can still ratify today and then Illinois followed suit so Illinois Loyd ratified it in two thousand eighteen And then we had just one more state At this point we're almost to the thirty eight threshold required by the Constitution. And and that's really where we are today. The next most likely to state to ratify Virginia being currently brought up in the Virginia Senate and the Virginia House of delegates gets it almost passed in Virginia last year in two thousand nineteen so we are just a hair's breath away from getting that final thirty eighth state that is fascinating fascinating. I didn't know the history about Nevada. I didn't I didn't know that in two thousand seventeen. I knew the twin in Nevada. The I keep saying Nevada Nevada. I'm not really sure added in Nevada so a Tina Vada I knew that it was ratified in two thousand seventeen but I did not know the history and now that I'm looking at it. That is pretty remarkable from nineteen. Seventy seven Indiana being the last state to ratify to two thousand seventeen so that that was. That was huge. I'm I'm assuming that if she had not done this people would probably forgotten you know our immune some people who never forgot there were people fought for the equal rights amendment all that time who were advocating in the states who never really gave up on the dream of having an amendment for in the Constitution to protect women But it was largely forgotten and efforts in the women's movement sort of went to other other causes and other issues but there were some women who never forgot and and constantly advocated. What really one of the things that kind of brought the equal rights amendment back onto the table is the twenty seven th amendment so the most recent amendment to the constitution is called the Madison Amendment It was proposed by James Madison has to do with congressional pay. It was proposed by James Madison. But it wasn't ratified edified until the early nineteen nineties. So two hundred and three years later a particularly agitated gentlemen in Texas decided that he was going to create a movement to ratify the the Madison Amendment and it did get ratified so people who are in the Ra movement. Were looking around and thinking way. Okay okay it. Two Hundred Years can pass. An amendment can still make it into the constitution. Additional states than thirty years is not too much then we can still bill agitate and we can still get this amendment that we've always wanted so the equal rights amendment would be the twenty eighth amendment to the Constitution. You know and and again I am endlessly fascinated by women who uphold harmful patriarchal norms. Like this Phyllis Shave with. I just can't I can't wrap my brain around around super interesting character. She's very talented. If you watch debates with her it's fascinating because she debated waited some of the most prominent people in the women's movement at the time and she really honestly wipes the floor with them like she is always more prepared. She's very very intelligent. She's always on point. She is a very very fascinating and talented woman The problem is of course she always gets blamed with the defeat of the equal rights amendment. But for me. I think it's important to remember. That sure. She was the face of it but she she ran for Congress twice and she lost both time. I'm so she never actually voted against the equal rights amendment. The people who voted against the equal rights amendment were meant. They needed cover. They needed to say that that it was just a fight women against women but it was not the people who kept it out of Congress where men the people in the state legislatures to this day. In some of the states where the amendment have not been ratified have eighty percent men in their legislatures. Even the Federal Conver- Congress today The vast majority are men so the actual the people who are truly keeping us from constitutional equality are not women She she really put a face to it and she organized and she helped defeat feet the equal rights amendment but the end of the day the decision makers the people who had power the elected officials were met. I'm glad you said that that. That's that's a really excellent point because representation matters and it seems like that that repeats itself throughout history that you know women often. I see that a lot happening with Nancy Pelosi in a lot of other examples we can think go where you know. The name is wrapped around women. When we love our favorite exactly I I mean the things she did are very very sad the way that she changed the conversation at first it seemed like it was women against men in power but she inserted herself into the conversation in a way that made it seem like it was just a difference of opinion among women and that is not true Also she is not the one who would benefit from keeping the equal rights amendment out of the Constitution that is men who directly benefit from not having us on equal. WHOA stature so I I I always hesitate to blame things like this on women She's a fascinating figure and an important person in the movement but it is it is not her fault she never won election show. She never actually got to vote against the cement right not to mention that men can't alone pick up this fight right right and it is the right thing to do regardless of what your gender at scores.

Nevada Congress James Madison Indiana Nevada Nevada US Phyllis Schlafly Virginia Federal Conver- Congress Nancy Pelosi Illinois Virginia House Washington Virginia Senate Pat Spearman Texas Era Phyllis Shave
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

12:48 min | 3 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The great American women's perspective on things about equal rights amendment earrings about women serving in the military and more. Joining me now from the independent women's forum is the honorable Julie gun. Lock Jolie gun. Lock welcome again to the Bill Cunningham show. Julie how are you? I'm doing great. Thanks. I want to get your reaction first of all to well. Let's deal with women in the military because right now or a federal judge has ruled that the draft was doesn't exist. But men have got to register for it. But I think between the ages of eighteen and thirty four that somehow. And I certainly agree with it on paper. But I don't agree to it in principle. I know what my granddaughter, I don't want my wife or sister serving but the equal rights amendment is surfacing again. Which ostensibly we'll give women equal rights to men one St. short. So give me a woman conservative woman's perspective on not just the ERA women serving in the military. Well, look on the ER a it sounds really good, right? It it sorta taps into this grievance culture that we have out there. That tells women that were unequal we're treated on equal reconstitute victimized. There's mass hysterical levels of misogyny and sexism out there were paid less. We're not appreciated we do everything. So of course, the sort of taps into the equal rights amendment. But what people need to understand is that women are already guaranteed equal rights by the fourteenth amendment, which states that the government may not. Deny. It says quote deny any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws, and we have a number of federal and state and local laws that say it is illegal to discriminate based on sex. We have these laws in place, we have these protections in place, and you know, what I find so insulting is the idea that we literally need to amend the constitution to protest a little me the weaker sex. Thing it's insulting it's patronizing. And frankly, I find those who are pushing the IRA to be the true sexist. I don't need their protections under the under under the constitution. I don't need changes to the constitution. I already have those protections. And if anyone would just sit down and read the constitution, they would understand that. The point is political not substantive at the point is is to continue to make women cower in fear that Sex's men are about to assault them beat them hurt them assault on college campuses that somehow government's got to help a woman what their paycheck, and what's going to happen. And so we're only one state short of the thirty eight required under the you're too young to remember it but in the seventies and eighties. This was a big deal, and it was finally stopped. Because feminists said wait a minute number one priority protected by the fourteenth amendment. But number two, we have certain advantages over man. And so we're going to give men we're going to increase the rights that they have to equal women and women said, we don't want this. Well, God bless Phyllis schlafly who was learnt of and the mainstream press is largely last at, but she did a lot for women in this country. She alone thought the which for a while, thanks to sort of second way feminism we had a lot of support for it. But ultimately it fell flat. When people started to realize realize. Is that women do benefit from not having served not being drafted? You know, there's a lot of things that FEMA pass we wouldn't have as much legal rights. We wouldn't have certain protections. So women really started to realize that and again, it's because Phyllis schlafly. She's a hero to women in this country against she's she's largely made fun of by you know, sort of the elites in the mainstream out there. But but she really accomplished a great deal. The thing with one of the things that the ear. I would do was it would make women eligible for the draft. And this is also I think in our sort of modern area, they are very attractive. You look at the sports situation, you have transgenders Dow competing against women you had this idea that there's no differences between men and women. Actually, I w I just had a a really fabulous about New York City about who's afraid of sex difference. And we talked about how biologically neuro biologically and just physically men and women are very different. Why are we so afraid to talk about this? And so what the draft would do would it would it would play it a women possibly on the front lines facing enemies that are physically stronger than them. This is something that people should know about certainly women should know about that sort of glossed over by the feminists, and those are pushing the RA the issue that issue to me is used because men and women are equal. But dammit were different men have more lung space. We got bigger we're stronger, our hands our shoulders. So I'm watching in Connecticut. These high school boys who aren't doing well running against boys. So now, they're winning the state title for girls because they haven't gone through surgery or hormonal stuff they identify as female and as a consequence that means they can run in these events. What happens when a twenty five year? Old former college male golfer identifies as a female and show of shows up in the LPGA tour hitting the ball three hundred twenty five yards. What happens then, well, we're starting to see some out against transgenders competing and women's sports. And she she said, you know, look at anybody knows Martina. I'm just going to stick with Martina Martinez is a as a champion of LGBT writes way, back in the eighties shoot one of the leading champions of aids research and a champion of aids of of of the cause of aids and in terms of research and human rights, and and and and she is a leader on on on fighting for the rights of the LGBT community, and she came out. So this is this is a woman who who who is is sort of new to these issues. So she came out with a really compelling piece talking about how she she really research. She went and she looked at the biology. She looked at the science of these issues, and she came out and said, look, we should not have transgenders transgender women. These are formerly men who have transitions to to to a female best. They can and and and competing in these these sports, and man, she has been dropped by the LGBT community some sort of sponsors. She has been blasted by this community. And she said I went away I researched it, and I came to these conclusions. And so it is really it is it's extremely politically dicey for people to really take up these issues, but this apply the reason I'm talking about this is to me this applies to women in the draft being on the front lines in combat. We can pretend there's no difference between men and women. But there clearly is whether it comes from, you know, the. You know, the tennis courts to other sports venues to military passing the ER a would would allow women to go into the draft and to be put in these frontline combat positions. That is dangerous. Why that's considered good for women progress for women. I will never understand Joni god-like independent women's forum several months ago, it might have been an August September at the US open. John McEnroe one of the top five or six tennis players of all time was asked what about Serena Williams playing on the men's tour, and he made the comment that would be impossible. That that the one thousand ranked male in the world would regularly beat Serena Williams and one as said when he said that hey, got nothing. But hell John Lloyd was married to Chris Evert, Lloyd, and John Lloyd was on the ATP tour, but he was like one hundred and fifty in the world, and they would practice together, and John Lloyd B Chris Evert all the time when they when she was number one ranked in the world house is good for women to have men identifies a women and takeover women's sports. You would think feminists would say hell, no, we're not gonna do that. But they don't do that. Do they? Well, we really are starting to. We're seeing most of this in high school sports, right? We're seeing this in the Connecticut case of the two. Transgender female identifying young men who who if you look at them. They have the body build of men they have the lung capacity of men, they have the widened shoulders. They have the longer legs and they are winning every single race because they are only now going through transition. So they have been through most of humanity and most of developing as boys, and so they they have an advantage. But you're saying this in high school sports, and this is what have we seen it in other sports? I at a lower level bicycling, for instance, recently, there was a world sort of a world championship and a transgender woman. So that's a man who to then I am. It's very hard to keep track from. Then changed to a woman. You know, she she one and one of the the woman who came in second or third sort of objected, man. She was hammered hammered. You also have seen it a little bit and some weightlifting now the weightlifting and bike racing. Are thing are sports that are not. So popular the minute. We start to see this and women's tennis the minute we start to see this and women's basketball the minute we start to see in the slightly more popular, women's sports arenas. You're going to see more prominent blowback. I mean, what Martinez natural natural Turlough by dead, very brave the very rare. And I think as some of the the sort of more higher visibility sports involving women women's sports more popular women's sports as as transgender start to start to come into those sports, you'll see more vocal opposition. But right now, what's so sad is. In high school sports and everybody is so terrified to speak up that we're we're not seeing it. But I think as these as transgender sort of start to get into more prominent sports, we will see more objections. Another issue is the sexual rape and assault of so many young girls as young as seven or eight years old. But but women according to the president, according to ice win interviewed about one third or more of women who travel across Mexico when you go into very so-called counties. You have to pay a toll either pay money your pay with your body. And so one of the arguments Trump made the other day in his speech to to CPAC is, wait a minute. Now that there are literally hundreds of thousands of young girls and women and some boys that are sexually assaulted. So one of the reasons to shut down the southern border is too distant courage, the rape of sexual assault of girls and women and young boys and men on the perilous dirty, and you would think if you're a feminist what you wanna do is. Protect the chastity of these women that are forced to take birth control pills along because their teenage girls getting rape. But but the feminist don't react like that. Do they know where's the metoo movement for the women coming across the southern border? I'd like to know that right? I mean, where is the where's rose McGowan? Okay. Where are the seminaries who, you know, are so agitated about like the rapist in Hollywood. But they don't give a crap about the women who are trying to cross the southern border and again or having to give their young daughters, birth control. So that they don't get pregnant by their rapists. It isn't academic. It is I mean, the us government considers a whole bunch of epidemics Hollywood. So do all these activists, okay, female, feminist activist? But when it comes to the poor women crossing the southern border. They don't seem to give a crap sorry for my language, but they don't and it is irritating and the era of of metoo. So we're also woke we're all supposed to be. So we're also supposed to be so concerned about the about. Women in general who are victims of sexual assault. And yet you have these horrifying horrifying stories about women young women older women, and yeah, even young boys being raped on the southern border, and nobody cares..

assault Phyllis schlafly Martina Martinez Connecticut US John Lloyd Julie gun rape Serena Williams Bill Cunningham Jolie ERA Hollywood LPGA New York City John McEnroe FEMA
"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"phyllis schlafly" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Berry. Welcome to the Jesus Christ show. I. A question about the conservative bible project run by Phyllis schlafly, son on our I only heard about this talked about a secular lead roles in people weren't Christians. But they when I got on the website said that the, you know, the your name the years, we are corrupted not because of lack of translational stuff. But because they have socialist influences in them, and it to me seems to be pretty outrageous. Even though I don't read those translations. What would you have to say about it? Well, as far as the conservative bible project goes. I'm always leery of any group that looks is looking at scripture from a particular bent. Liberal conservative black white any group that looks at the bible from a particular. Bent can be a problem when it comes to translation. The thing that I find interesting about the conservative bible project is that it's not the truth bible project. It's not about saying we want the best translation possible, and those do exist. The ISV is a new translation that you can find out. I think it's v dot org, but you can see the the processes they are not so necessary at this point. But the beginning processes of scripture being translated and the desire was to to get the the the best translation possible, not the most conservative translation or the most liberal translation. So I'm I'm bothered by that because it should be the most godly accurate translation and for for years. You've heard the arguments against liberal bias in scripture and people saying, oh, you're you're emasculating it by having the unisex terms or anything that's gender inclusive and all these things really. It's about the content is the content still there are you hearing the importance of it. It can be bothersome that people say, oh, well, it says mankind here, and that's a fence. You know, the you understand the context of what's being said. So to try in a mutate or forced into scripture, something you feel more comfortable with is not the way to go. What to scripture actually, say? Now, there's a better scholars and people that are more efficient and translating now than ever before. And that should be utilized in new translations should come out. And what a lot of people don't tell you what Lund people don't know about scriptures. They're often like, you know software and they have newer versions. But like the for instance, will say it's the, but you don't know this two point, oh or three point zero or four point zero because when they change it. They don't necessarily let you know this happens with a lot of translations there's changes or modifications as they get better or they correct things and. This the attitude though, that it's got to be a conservative bent or liberal bent is missing completely missing the point. Are there? Those that read into it liberally. Yes, are those that read into it conservatively? Yes. And it's always gonna be that case. But look for the truth of the scripture in the best translation, I don't look for the political version. I that seems backwards. The Jesus Christ show will return in a moment to.

Bent Phyllis schlafly Berry. Lund
Cate Blanchett Takes First American TV Role in FX’s Phyllis Schlafly Drama ‘Mrs. America’

Donna and Steve

00:32 sec | 3 years ago

Cate Blanchett Takes First American TV Role in FX’s Phyllis Schlafly Drama ‘Mrs. America’