36 Burst results for "Phoenix Arizona"

What Has Changed Since George Floyd

Morning Edition

03:47 min | 6 d ago

What Has Changed Since George Floyd

"Protests against racial injustice are motivating some political candidates to take on challenging races. In the suburbs of Phoenix, Arizona Democrats are targeting a predominantly white district that has been held by Republicans for nearly a decade. Steve Goldstein from member station Cage's reports. That ethics violations committed by the incumbent could make the race more competitive. Arizona six Congressional district is centered in Scottsdale. Its residents are highly educated, affluent and early 75% white Congressman David Schweikert was reelected by double digits here in 2018. But Schweickart had been under investigation by the House Ethics Committee, and on Thursday he admitted to 11 violations and agreed to pay $50,000 fine Schweickart perspective. Opponents immediately pounced on the news. Here's Democrat Anita Malik. There's a part of me that's glad that we finally have closure to this investigation, but it is so infuriating to see him simply get off with a slap on the wrist. Even before acknowledging the ethics violations, Schweiker was already expected to face an intense general election campaign, in part because of an electorate that wants more action on combating racial injustice. One of the Democrats. Looking to challenge him is African American businessman Carl Gentles. While he believes many here are worried about education and jobs, he says, the killing of George Floyd has led to more direct conversations about racial injustice in the district has seen before. While George, Florida's African American I am an African American, and certainly I can see myself my son, my father, my brother in the face of George Floyd beneath that. Officers NI. I think people can see their own family members, no matter what race they are in the face of tourist Floyd Tianna Chander is one of those people Gentles is describing. She moved into the district eight years ago. Rallies and protests illustrated for her the dramatic need to find solutions. Chandler is middle aged and white. It's not okay to just be silent anymore, and we've got to figure out what the heck got us to this point and how we can try and sort of turned the tide and get rid of some of that racism. Hate Willingness to look the other way when things that we know what an OK continue to happen. Schweickart has been silent on race related topics. But the changing political environment since the killing of George Floyd may force him to talk about them. Erica County, which accounts for 60% of arrows on his population, has seen a clear shift toward more progressive voting in 2018 that included pushing Kirsten cinema to US Senate victory, becoming the first Democrat to win in arrows in a Senate race in nearly 25 years. But it's not just that Phoenix is growing rapidly, more diverse as Quentin James He's the founder and president of collective Pack, which is focused on electing African Americans across the country. There are a ton of suburban white women who are seeing these videos and wondering If those votes for Donald Trump in 2016. If don't do that, again, Republican consultant stand Barnes understands why Democrats are generally optimistic about 2020 here but says it's misplaced in the Phoenix suburbs. I do not think the racially charged politics that we're living in that the moment plays favorably for the Democratic nominee. In that congressional district, in part that it's so overdone, and I think voters are numb to that kind of play. But Quentin James believes that voters now more than any other time in recent history, are looking to choose the best candidate. Whatever color they are part of what folks One also know is Do you hear me? And are you going to fight for me? And it doesn't take white voters to get white candidates just to do that, or Blackwater's only looking for black answer. I think that's the core question, James says. As candidates of color are becoming more common, voters are increasingly more comfortable with choosing them to bring about changes many in the public are calling for for NPR news. I'm Steve Goldstein in Phoenix.

George Floyd Phoenix Schweickart Carl Gentles Founder And President Steve Goldstein Arizona Anita Malik Floyd Tianna Chander Schweiker David Schweikert Senate NPR Donald Trump House Ethics Committee Scottsdale United States Congressman Cage
Fresh "Phoenix Arizona" from Programming

Programming

00:32 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "Phoenix Arizona" from Programming

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North Carolina Arizona Ricky Stenhouse Jr Garret Smith Lee Ligonier Martin Truex Jr Ty Dillon Austin Dillon James Davison Australia Pool Woodlands Nemecek Morsel Kevin Harvick Michael Dowd Ryan Newman California Jimmy Hill Peachtree City Alex Bowman Port Tobacco Brad Keselowski Rochester Hills
Diagnostic Differentials of Hot and Cold

The Plant Path

06:07 min | Last week

Diagnostic Differentials of Hot and Cold

"Hey. What's up everybody? Did you hear founder of the School of herbalism and one of the things that I talk a lot about on this channel is the importance of energetics constitutions in clinical herbalism. This is one of the attributes of traditional systems of medicine all across the world that we see really at their route and their way of understanding the uniqueness of a person and. The specific properties of medicinal plants and that's one of the attributes in I guess are more modern scientific era. So to speak that oftentimes gets overlooked right we overlook the constitution of a person and kind a tunnel in on the name of the disease or we forget the energetics of an herb and tunnel in on what kinds of diseases they're used for symptoms they're used for or. How, what kind of chemistry they have in them but really this integration of constitutions and energetics I believe is a critically important for the modern herbalists to understand and integrate into our scientific understanding of both people and plants, and so in this week's post. I answered a question from a student regarding some of the differentials between hot and cold. This is one of our primary elements of understanding of the energetics or constitution of persons temperature right whether someone runs really hot or runs really cold, but sometimes, it can be a little confusing for people in terms of like, how do you actually assess that like what are the core determining factors that you're looking at in a person to be able to tell whether they're hot or cold either constitutionally or in their current symptomatic picture. So that's what I cover in this post as super super important to understand this dynamic with every person that you work with, and so here it is, and I hope you'll learn something good from it. Thanks so much and take care. Our first question is coming from Janine who's in the vitals herbal practitioner program. And Geneva's asking. I've always thought of myself as cold and Dry, but listening to your explanation of cold and Hot from a more energetic standpoint. I'm actually thinking that I lean more toward hot these days and perhaps have along I'm wondering if you have any good resources for tests or quizzes or evaluations that one can complete to better identify whether they are cold or hot as it doesn't seem quite as. For my own constitution as it once was great questions in. So I'm going to kind of whittle that question down to basically what are some of the core evaluation criteria for how to assess and differentiate the temperature energetic pattern and term and the differences between hot and cold like what are some of the main ways that you see heat in cold? Manifest within a person and that could be either constitutionally speaking or that can be from more of. More of Pal g perspective like what are some signs and symptoms? Of Cold and heat. Excuse me so. So when you know this is really really important factor to consider whenever we're working with a person, a energetics of person tissue states and things like that. Really. Really important because it allows you to get more specific with your remedy selection. So you're not just choosing herbs based on. The condition or the symptom, but you're able to get a little more specific into the ecological state of the tissues that is giving rise to that symptom or that condition and temperature is really really important. So I think what I would like to do here is. Just, talk about cold and Hot and look at it from the orientation. We'll start off talking about Constitutional Amex and then dig into a little bit more detail on kind of main patterns or signs and symptoms that you might look for maybe some examples of some specific. Kinds of symptoms that you might see there. So let's talking about heat. And you know I think before actually jump into that I. think what's really important to understand about energetics is that this is how nature functions right everything in nature is based on energetics. I think and it's and it's very intuitive like these are things that we experience every single day. Right I actually think kind of joke around but it's Kinda true. I think. That's why people talk about the weather so much have you ever noticed that like when people don't really know Xavier like Oh it's pretty hot today or it's really cold today or for sure his dry out there. It's still raining. It's like we're and what does that? That's hot cold wet and dry right? That's the way we we always talk about that and so I always like to encourage my students to really. Remember that and to really pay attention to nature and. Come to an understanding of these energetic patterns, not just through what you read in the books. But also just paying attention to the season's paying attention to the weather paying attention to different ecosystems and then paying attention to how does. Different States of Nature Change your internal state, like how do you feel when you're in Phoenix Arizona? It's one hundred and ten degrees outside

Geneva School Of Herbalism Founder Constitutional Amex Janine Phoenix Arizona Xavier
Freight Train Derails and Bridge Partially Collapses in Arizona

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:29 sec | Last week

Freight Train Derails and Bridge Partially Collapses in Arizona

"Massive fire that took out a train bridge a witness going to get a scene from hell. Fire consumed the sky with thick black smoke. As many as 10 train cars derailed, causing the bridge over Tempe tone like to collapse the scene overhead, most of the bridge on fire. It's working his way back to the rest of the train. We have some tanker cars down there that fell off of the bridge. No major injuries reported around 90 firefighters showed to help fight the flames. Union Pacific says it is investigating Jennifer Brown. CBS NEWS PHOENIX, Arizona Chateau

Jennifer Brown Arizona Chateau Union Pacific Tempe CBS Phoenix
A Teacher's Aid

Kind World

05:00 min | 2 weeks ago

A Teacher's Aid

"Forty four year, old Jan Carson has an unusually good memory of childhood, but then again her childhood was unusual by any standard. It started off in a typical suburb in Phoenix Arizona Mom was a teacher dad. She says was a hippie stay at home. Father who occasionally dealt pot. And he was incredibly attentive. He brushed my hair and feed me breakfast every morning. He'd read to May. Take me to the petting zoo, but you know there were always signs of problems. Her Mother Link Carson knew something was wrong when her husband James. Carson began violently threatening. Anyone who upset Him. Including her the first few times. He said it. She didn't believe him the second few times he said it, and then he got a gun. In nineteen seventy nine, when five years old, her parents divorced after a decade of marriage. Shortly after James, Carson remarried and changed his name to Michael Barone Carson. And then the problems got worse. Jen's I her father and stepmother's house is etched in her memory. There was no furniture and lamps. It was dark and there were hundred potted plants. It looked like the haunted forest and Snow White. I remember actively trying to skip this house. General remembers a particularly terrifying moment. When her stepmother came into the room and started rubbing her back. She ended up scratching her and leaving five open wounds. She was saying things to me like I'll scratch this team and out of you it was. It was horrific. You remember when someone tries is threatening to kill you. You know unharmed. Show in this way so. After that visit I got home, my mom saw wounds and she said you're never going back there. Lynn took her daughter packed to personal car in the middle of the night and hit the road spending the next four years moving from city to city. They eventually settled in orange, county California. She told her young daughter that they needed to be away from her father because he was sick I, was incredibly angry so on top of my mom, having no one that's believing her for five years on top of that. She has a five six seven year old saying I hate you. I want my daddy. Jen's life at home was tough. Her mother struggled with depression. Her Life at school wasn't much better. She was behind academically and constantly got in trouble. I didn't really feel like I. was a bad student I felt like I was a bad person that my very makeup was bad at eight years old. Yeah, during this period, I had extreme depression. At School Jen's teacher didn't recognize her depression or cries for help. Instead. She constantly reprimanded her for acting out once, saying Jen was the worst students she'd ever had. That was like just throwing a match on my gasoline. So. My behavior then got worse throughout the rest of the year. She didn't feel safe anywhere. At Home Jen would often see police officers at her door. They ask about her father. She didn't know exactly why because her mother would always send her to room. Still she heard bits and pieces and knew it wasn't good. By Third Grade Jen was preparing herself for another difficult year I went into the class and I remember putting my hair in front of my eyes, and putting my head down, and just not wanting to interact with the new teacher. But then that teacher Mrs Sylvia case did something Jen didn't expect. I just remember her on day one day to day three Sane Jenny heard. You're such a great reader. Why don't you come? Help me hold the book? That was the beginning of something new Gen learned to love books, and over the year she caught up academically Mrs case was brought her Baratz as a prize for good grades on Her spelling test. They also kept the hair out of her is. She also helped John Apply for the girl scouts, and for reduced lunch when she suspected money was tight at home which it was. But what Gen remember most of all were misses cases, sincere and specific compliments. A lot of teachers will say good job. She would say you're cursive. Letter Ams look like art. And something I've tried to do the rest of my life because I think it is one of the kindest things you can do because you're saying to another human I, see you. And icy the goodness in you.

JEN Jan Carson Depression Michael Barone Carson Arizona James Snow White Lynn John Mrs Sylvia California Jenny
How To Navigate Stress

The LEADx Show

05:48 min | Last month

How To Navigate Stress

"Everyone? This is Patrick Baranov. I'm here to do a Webinar on how to effectively navigate stress and lead slash help others and the reason I have lead in there because to me as we go through this. I think you'll see that. This is not just a workshop on how to navigate stress internally, but to me this is about this is a leadership workshop where I spend most of. My time working with organizations so a little bit of background. Be Behind me. I run a podcast called lead like no other actions that inspire which will soon be changing to leadership reimagined, and that really is. Based on a lot of the work that I've been doing this podcast has been in existence for. Almost, two years now, but some of my background ice tablist, my business in two thousand eight, which, for those that remember that was our last financial crisis so I'm I'm familiar with the space for for what that's worth, and there are three areas that I focus. My work on one is on emotional intelligence. A model that I use is out of Australia. The group is called Genus, and it's a workplace model I also do a lot of work both disk in the five dysfunctions of a team. In combining those and then the last piece, it's like a three legged stool. Is Around Influence and bias research. And I was able to get certified and trained under a gentleman named Robert Dini down in Phoenix Arizona, the three of those for all of the work that I do and what we're GonNa talk about today in regards to leader stress, management and leading. Are All relevant and pieces. Those will come out throughout this. So. Here's some contact information for me as well. And I will start this out as I mentioned to me this leadership workshop. Even though we're talking about stress, management and I say that from this quote. John Quincy Adams said if your actions inspire someone. To Do to dream, more learn more do more and become more your leader. Nothing in here about a title and I think we really have an opportunity. It's our actions that will inspire others, and how we relate to stress and navigate stress, ourselves will have the ability to impact other people around us to, and that's why they're so important. So, the objectives here right explore the biological psychological and social aspects of the Human Stress Response, and it is a response and we're GONNA. Look at it really from a few different areas right the physical, emotional, spiritual and intellectual impact of stress, and it really does impact all of those. So then we'll look at understanding. What are some of the coping strategies that we can use to either increase, or what once damage our resilience? And this really is meant to be almost a buffet, even though you probably can't find buff as anymore because of the environment we're in. That this really will be an opportunity to take a look at what are some different strategies that I can use that fit in in my lifestyle. You don't need to choose them all. But there's something here for everybody in terms of how you can effectively navigate, stress yourself or help somebody else. And then from there, we'll look at a model that I put together and it's journal actually. Called the power. Journal, and there are a number of activities in that promote both wellbeing resilience. And this is based on a lot of research I will say foundationally. One of them is based on one that was done by gentleman named Sean Acre. WHO A HARVARD RESEARCHER! And he did what was called the twenty one day challenge, and he actually did this back in Glebe two thousand nine, so at that point of financial crisis before. And he actually did it with A. Group Company that was in the financial industry. And what they found when they when they did these activities that we'll talk about the end. That the the individuals that were able to follow through on this twenty one day challenge themselves to be in a happier place and to me if we can identify those things and find that and find a way to be happier, rebuild more resilient and well. Being I think all of us want that. Especially now. So a couple pieces of research talking about the origins of stress. If you weren't familiar before you probably are now in regards to the CDC their definition of stress, harmful, physical and psychological responses when job requirements don't match capabilities, skills, resources, or needs of the worker and I think in the environment that we're in now. Most of US probably feel stress in one of those areas. Now, what's important here is this. CDC's definition also goes on to say that this should not be confused with challenges and I've listed. You stress here. Because we need stress stresses important for us as well because it provides us an opportunity. To grow and improve. It's only when we lose control of it. That it becomes damaging to us and really that's what this workshop or webinars focused on. Undoing is providing ways that we can take the stress that we're dealing with the situations that we're dealing with and find ways to navigate those and I would say almost leverage these. So the next piece I'll talk about. Is this one that was done by the? American psychological, association. This was a survey. Twenty fourteen where they served. A little over three thousand individuals, and they ask them questions in four different areas, work money, family and health. I've only listed to here. Is it relates to both work in financial stress but I think if we were to take this today. We probably would all agree that? These would probably higher than sixty percent.

CDC Patrick Baranov Australia Robert Dini John Quincy Adams Harvard Phoenix Arizona Sean Acre United States A. Group Company Researcher
Color-coded Runways

Uncontrolled Airspace: General Aviation Podcast

04:54 min | Last month

Color-coded Runways

"Let me tell you that this is borderline genius. If you ask me, this is just borderline genius all right? Let's color code the runways. I like that it's it's. KINDA UNIQUE DEER VALLEY Because they have a lot of rocks it wouldn't work a lot of other locales OKO although. Fake being what it is, we would probably discover that. Harrison Ford is colorblind but. That was Hodgson agent. Now is just an easy Joko. It's too easy. Sorry about that Harrison. I know he's a listener and It's kind of a clever idea. So this is we found this from a listener I think he's a listener, but a tweet twitter guy Ryan Ewing Nine high-ranking guy. What did I say? You Twitter Guy Twitter? Guy Yeah I. Don't know what the on twitter at twitter guy. We're all twitter guys in this day and age. He tweeted he tweeted. The Phoenix area is one of the most popular regions for flight training as such mistakes do happen. Runway landings have occurred Deer Valley airport. He writes owned by the city of Phoenix Arizona has a unique solution to prevent this different colored rocks surrounding each runway. So basically the what what I would think of as being the grass around the runway apparently is gravel. Zona 'cause grasping grow real quickly. You said wrong way. That's not correct. Wrong runway wrong runway landings. Oh! If I said runway. That was a mistake. You're absolutely right. That was Corrigan Corcoran. Different meaning different meaning. ANYWAYS so they've done apparently have done it with colored gravel. The terrain surrounding the runway and taxiways has a distinct color to it and but I want to know whether ATC, do they say you know land on Purple? Runway, purple instead of instead of landing on on the green dot at Oshkosh. Read read one roster. I can't say one way. Runway Yeah Right. Valley. QUIT GLENN! Wait. Never. Only one drawback or Weakness in it. Being told to land on the color runway doesn't tell you which way on the colored runway will now. That's true. True, but you they could say. Let's see what are. Let's just assume that these are two seven and nine there probably not exactly that. Zuma would picture. It should cut down on the confusion on. is at this piece. Is Strip payment or that? Oh! This is the one surrounded by green now which way on that runway? It's seventy five. Seventy five, so they'll say land on runway to five purple or I don't. Know they'll say land on runway to five left the purple one, which happens to be perfect. Yeah, that'd be an interesting question, Ryan, if you're a listener Give us anything in the in the in the follow up in the responses here, let's see. Someone else made my hair. Practice four joke, but there's a lot of colorblind jokes. CH-. Help for blind pilots. That's that's. This is also true. Well. That's yeah I know. Are Up sorry. From flight DECK IS HE THERE'S A. Problem, with death pilots, because they just don't listen. Higgin hi. Let's just discard this recording is. Really really know all right so. colorizing runways. I I hadn't thought of that I hadn't thought about the. Air! Venture colored dots, thing which apparently is wildly effective. I've haven't landed on those runways during those type. Jeb. You have obviously. Is it I. Don't know what's your reaction to that system as a pilot who's used operated on and off it? It works I mean. A IT works well I'll be seems to work well. I haven't landed on the dots that often. Over the years generally I will get in before the show opens, and although the dots are there, I'm I'm. ABC is not asking me to land on them. generally there's been a few years at that's been. Landed on the DOTS, but they're easy to spot and and. My only concern. In the past has been when landing on the first dot of the runway the one I come to. Its. Knowing, that there's a bunch of traffic and knowing that the runway is constantly in use. My only concern is getting run over from behind

Twitter Harrison Ford Ryan Ewing Deer Valley ABC Hodgson Oshkosh Phoenix Arizona Corrigan Corcoran Zona Zuma JEB Harrison
Nick Winkelman - Athletic Performance & Science Expert

The Functional Tennis Podcast

04:45 min | Last month

Nick Winkelman - Athletic Performance & Science Expert

"Welcome to episode fifty two of the functional tennis. PODCAST I'm your host Fabio, Molly, this week I've stepped outside the tennis world to speak to nick. Winkelmann Nick is highly regarded in the area of athletic performance and size, and is recently released a book which helps coaches communicate better without leads. It's a great chat and parts of the conversation. Bring me back to why start at funk's attends instagram account four years ago nearly two this very week. Nick has kindly agreed to offer discount for his book. The language coach which we share with you at the end of the show before we start a quick note to say, we launched a new tennis man that. Easily record tennis practice. Her matches which are phone don't always five hundred grams easily fits your racket by. And you can set up in seconds head of her website at functional tennis dot. com to get all the details. Finally shedded or podcast sponsors head who make amazing tennis rackets our favorite here at functional tennis. Okay, that's chat to nick. Hi Nick Welcome to the functional tennis podcast. Great to be here. It's great to have you on a I was asked by some friends of mine who work in the tennis street national coaches. I should get on the podcast so excited to have you on, and you're not our usual guest. You don't directly work in tennis but I. Think what you can offer can be really valuable to our. Our listeners who are mix of parents, young players coaches on so federation director, so it's going to be really great chat book before we get started. Can you tell our listeners a bit about yourself? Yeah, so I've been a string conditioning coach now for over fifteen years in, and maybe we'll kind of work from presidents to path, and so my my current role is as head of athletic. Science for the Irish rugby football you over here living in Dublin with my family, since two thousand fifteen, and just to give people insight into to what that long title actually needs. I have the fortunate opportunity to work across all national and our four provincial teams overseeing if you would in supporting the division, the execution and an application of all athletic performance and sport science. Let's say initiatives, which if I'm on very much so in lockstep with medical nutrition and rugby staff, but the really cool thing about. About Irish rugby is if you would we operate like team of teams, and we have the domain level weeds working for Irish rugby, then can support and connect all national and provincial teams, and obviously arm into supporting our domestic game as well and so my my role is probably seventy percent on the leadership, the vision coach, education side and thirty percent on the ground, but does background very much so in the trenches, helping people get bigger faster stronger for teams fourth primarily, but yet that interest prior. Prior to coming to Ireland, I worked for a company called xhosas orally athlete performance for the better part of the decade, and that was a Phillies high-performance company that is a multinational works across the United States in very country in private high performance, which is pretty big business in the United States in what I did. There was throughout the year. The string conditioning coach go primarily. My area was working with athletes transitioning into the NFL notably by the NFL. Combine and so I would help collegiate American. American football players physically prepare themselves to go to the NFL combine which happens at the end of February and the physical interview of sorts where they go run a forty vertical jump abroad job done so it's fairly big business in the united. Thanks to help. Let's say guide. These players transition to the combine to the draft, and then inevitably to the NFL and the other half of my job, so to speak was most certainly in coach education, and so it's always been a huge passion of. And when I started with excess, we were running these kind of weeklong coaching mentorship programs in Phoenix Arizona and by the time I left ten years later we at online certifications in running courses in over twenty five different countries, and so very much I see myself as one part coach and one part, a coach educator, and in kind of the reds thread throughout that really is just that it's my interest in coaching, interesting communication, or how he is moved it professionals whether you're a parent or a tennis coach. How? How we impact to others and their ability to learn to move through our language to our

Tennis Nick NFL Rugby Football Instagram Fabio United States Director Phoenix Arizona Molly Funk Phillies Dublin Football Ireland
3 Injured in Mall Shooting in Phoenix, Arizona

Hugh Hewitt

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

3 Injured in Mall Shooting in Phoenix, Arizona

"Three people injured a shooting last night she had an outdoor shopping complex in suburban Phoenix Glendale police officer Tiffany deluca we have one suspect in custody I don't know if there are any additional suspects but we do not believe that this time that there are one of the injured in critical condition the other two suffering non life threatening injuries no word on a motive

Officer Phoenix Glendale Tiffany Deluca
Operating in the Time of Coronavirus

Docs Dial Reps Podcast

06:20 min | 2 months ago

Operating in the Time of Coronavirus

"Dock style reps podcasts. We're here today with Dr Ken Hood a fantastic and reputable spine surgeon from Phoenix Arizona. Dr Hood it's great to have you on the show now. The novel Coronavirus Cova Nineteen has caused a sharp decline in elective spine surgeries as an esteem. Spine Surgeon Operating Multiple Times. A week during the middle of this global pandemic. We thought you would be uniquely qualified to talk about how the novel coronavirus has impacted your practice. But before we get started we'd like to learn a little bit more about your professional background. Hey thank you so much for having me on the PODCAST The first time that I'm doing this and I think what's exciting venue Be More than happy to answer some questions today. in regards to my background. I'm Orthopedic Spine surgeon up in private practice now for five and a half years Prior to becoming a spine surgeon night training in Orthopedic Surgery Residents in Riverside California there was during my residency program that I became interested in spine surgery itself as a sub specialty so after orthopedic residency which is five years then went on to do a complex in minimally invasive spine surgery fellowship at the University of California San Diego and that was a urine length and then thereafter A signed for my first job at the University of Arizona in Tucson. I was there for several years and then subsequently have moved to Phoenix Arizona where continued to practice today fantastic. Let's go back a little bit further though. When did you decide? That medicine was the career for you. What was what was the motivation for that. So my my interest in medicine actually dates back to well before attending medical school It was during my undergraduate years The University of Rochester where I was actually an economics major and during one summer break I had the opportunity to shadow a orthopedic surgeon I wasn't specifically interested in orthopedics at that time that I just on the back of my mind. Medicine was a potential possibility so It was able to shadow orthopedic surgeon during the summer months and see his day today and and see the the types of things that he was able to do in that really sparked my interest. My Mama's retired nurse. And so you know the medical field is always been a part of my life to in in that regard but UH specifically That that that summertime shadowing of the orthopedic surgeon so it really sparked my interest interesting that that's a that's a different sort of spark that I've heard from from other medical professionals. Now I understand that you're second child. The daughter was just boring. Congratulations thank you. Yes yes Just two weeks ago. Healthy baby girl so Everybody's doing well how. How was that process a during the pandemic how how is the whole process of having a birth and going to the hospital for for that specifically or did you yes? says the very interesting obviously with covid nineteen and restrictions in place. Most hospitals The process at least from my standpoint was much different. We have another daughter is one and a half years old and comparing the two experiences was Pretty interesting so With our newborn I wasn't presents at any of the the the the prenatal visits So just here for my wife thinks going because they wanted to minimize People in and out of the allocation offices When the pandemic broke out Luckily by the time that she was ready to deliver they did allow one visitor after the birth so I was actually not physically present during the birth itself but afterwards was able to visit which was great but definitely a different experience than with our previous child. Were able to be present for the entire process. Now how is it balancing your personal life and operating at a trauma one centers? Is it difficult or have you found your way into it? Pretty easily It definitely has its challenges. I would say that over time. I've been able to develop a routine and schedule. That helps me navigate the day today even with that though taking level one spine trauma call does throw curveballs into your into your plan. Schedule on a daily basis The the balance is key Between personal and Work Life. If you focus solely on either components the other will suffer significantly And it's tough because sacrificing time with your family friends it's hard And at the same time you know if you ignore your practice or your patients Bad things happen as well So what I tend to do is try to stick to it daily routine Monday through Friday. I usually get up between four thirty to five o'clock in the morning trying to get some exercise in before heading into work the day to day various between clinic and operating room as well as call stuff but most days. I'm done by somewhere between five and six. Pm and then once I get home. It's one hundred percents Family time occasionally. I'll get called in the middle of the night and have to go into operation. Fortunately most things can till the following warning but it is a challenge And I feel like There's no perfect answer. Perfect scenario you just have to try to find as much balancing your life account

Orthopedic Spine Surgeon Dr Ken Hood Coronavirus Cova Nineteen Orthopedic Surgery Residents Arizona Phoenix Arizona University Of Arizona Riverside California Tucson University Of California San D Private Practice The University Of Rochester
Students and teachers struggle with remote education

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:57 min | 3 months ago

Students and teachers struggle with remote education

"That's Jimmy Fallon on the tonight show earlier this week. I think voicing the thoughts of so many families. The song was a nod to national teacher appreciation. Week which ends today. But you'd probably go on all year long like schools across the country. The week looked very different compared to years past instead of apples on their desks or gift cards from parents teachers might have received an Apple Emoji or some on then mo. You know why. It's because forty seven states and the district of Columbia have ordered or recommended school closures for the rest of the school year. Teachers across the country have taken their lessons online to try and weather this pandemic so today will some of these teachers struggles and successes in navigating remote learning. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. We had really try to make everything work in the virtual world and that's challenging to do because most teachers like myself we don't sign up for that. We sign up for the interaction. We sign up for the collaboration and we sign up for those human moments that you can't really replicate online. That's Chris deer. Two Thousand Twenty Louisiana teacher of the year and a finalist for the two thousand twenty national teacher of the year. I teach at Shawmut High School in Louisiana right outside of New Orleans. Dear teaches world history to seniors and AP human geography to Freshman. I didn't know what that was. He said it's sort of like anthropology inspired to teach partly because of a formative personal experience. I was in high school when Hurricane Katrina hit. I was a senior. It was our second week. It disrupted the entire region down here. I was forced to Texas. I stayed in hotels in shelters in bounced around different schools. And I missed out on a lot of big events that a lot of people look forward to their senior year sound. Familiar deer has a pretty good idea of what is current students. Probably feel. It's a time when you're supposed to be celebrating all of your hard work your dedication. Your accomplishments When your family supposed to watch you walk across that stage cheer? So it's it's a time that you'll never get to Redo and you'll never get back and it's not just a loss for dear students. Some of them will be the first in their families to graduate from high school and the ceremony would have been meaningful to the relatives as well. Dear has students who are also dreamers undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children Andy has students. They're working essential jobs while they also balance online classes. Learning Online. Might seem easy enough if you're a student with the computer or the Internet but deer also has students who didn't have the luxury of these tools so a lot of students that originally didn't have Internet when this happened. We were Distributed work in packets in just literally papers out when we were distributing food but my district personally has been a given chromebooks out to students who need them and trying to collaborate with local organizations to get hot spots to get kids connected so I think teachers all across the country are doing everything they can to get kids online and to keep that that learning going as Peron's a community school in Phoenix Arizona has also handed out chromebooks in Wi fi to some of its students. But that's not all the school is providing. I think a lot of US forget how schools are to our communities. Even if you're not a student there Hannah Wysong teaches science and English at Esperanza mostly to low income students. She has helped distribute food boxes and gift. Cards to grocery stores. But as this pandemic drags on why song in her colleagues are looking ahead. To long-term challenges families might face food is available and a lot of schools in food. Banks is. This has gone on for a couple of months and parents are not working or working less The next set that working right now is to build a fund for rental assistance. And that's just the creative problem solving. Why Song has been a part of outside the classroom after students have been set up with food and Wi fi is when her real job and the real connection begins and these teachers have come up with all kinds of new ways to do that as well something that we normally at our school? This House monthly family nights with movies are dinner or games or whatever it may be and we were really mourning the loss of family nights and we decided to do it. Virtual dance parties so we got a local Dj from a radio station. And then we invited all of the families to get on zoom there. Were I think between forty five and fifty people on between families and staff and pretty cute to see a bunch of little squares of third graders? Dancing Chris Wyckoff who teaches American history to eleventh graders? North Carolina has taken advantage of our reliance on the Internet to send his students. Some encouragement been sending out digital cards. To let them know that I still see you. I still see your work. I still see you're working hard. Wyckoff has been proud of how well his students at the Johnston County career and technical leadership academy have taken online classes after all they could easily just turned the video off and go do something else online learning you know it has its it has its good and its bad. Even depending on the type of learner you are in a lot of our students are capable of making the adjustment at home all of those the social and emotional atmosphere of home versus the social emotional atmosphere at school all of those things combined to either create atmosphere for success or failure for for the students. Chris dineen this is another. Chris said there were hiccups using video-conferencing at first we had zoom bomb the first or second date but his middle school students at Albuquerque Academy in New Mexico. Have come around. The students themselves had to adapt to a totally different style of teaching and they've actually had to become somewhat more accountable for their own behavior. Because of course we can't see them and monitor them in the ways that we normally do. Laurie Abrahams finds this challenging to. She's a special education teacher on Long Island and works with three to five year olds. Who have special needs during normal times? Work incredibly physical and requires personalized interactions with each student. These days she struggles to get her students to sit still in front of the camera. All kids do well with schedule. Especially the kids with special needs listening issues and attending issues. They really need that. They need that routine. And the you know it's very hard. It's very hard for them but like everyone else. Abrahams has come up with ways to make it work. In fact she borrowed one method of calming her students. Down from children's Yoga certification course. What I'm doing with my fingers touching my thumb to forefinger middle finger rain finger and pinkie and so you have them do that. So it's four touches and then you just say peace begins with me and they understand that peace means quiet and then we keep doing it at any time. You feel anxious or that. You need to calm down you can just you can. Just move your fingers like that. It's thoughtful it's innovative. It's what's necessary the teachers we spoke to said they've mostly worked out the kinks of remote learning and they feel optimistic about finishing the year apart from their students but in the long run. They're still not so sure. I think these kids are young enough. That if it's just four months in the scheme of along is this is not gonNa make the biggest difference because they didn't have four months of preschool. I think that in the fall if kids can't go back to school if they have to learn online. I think that's going to you know really impact this whole generation. This won't surprise you but Chris Dear Louisiana teacher whose own senior year was interrupted by Hurricane Katrina this pandemic once again highlights the need for more investment in education. I know a lot of times when the economy starts to Tank a bit. The first thing that gets cut is education and people might say well. Why do we need as much you know money for education budgets when they do things virtually and whatnot but at this time? I feel like we need more because we need more counselors. We need more. Social workers we need more therapists need smaller classes. And that's how we're going to get through this. These five teachers said the feedback. They've gotten from students and parents has mostly been positive but during the strange difficult national teacher appreciation. Week it's nice for them to hear that their efforts haven't gone unnoticed so since they can't hug their teachers in person this year we got some amazing shouts from students all over. Who want their teachers to know that their students are grateful? My Name is Dalton Davis. I am seven years old from flawless. Oregon. I want to say hi to my first grade teacher. Mrs and Mr Hello. My name is MIRA sing and I am in seventh grade. I would like to thank all of my amazing teachers. Hi My name is Leah. And I'm a fourth grader. I want to give a shot at to my awesome teacher Mr Festival. He is there every day with a smile. Hi My name is Cassie from Whittier California. And thank you to all the teachers especially my Fourth Grade Teacher Mrs Cutler and I'm Kassy's MOM Krista I also WanNa say on behalf of my fourteen year old David who has autism. We appreciate the Special Ed teachers like Mrs Gain. Thanks hi I'M AMELIA. Ham seven years old. I'm in second grade. I have the best teachers and I can't wait the virus to beautiful so I could go back to school.

Laurie Abrahams Hurricane Katrina Louisiana WI Chris Wyckoff Dr Sanjay Gupta Jimmy Fallon CNN Columbia Shawmut High School First Grade Teacher Chris Deer Thousand Twenty Louisiana Apple United States Long Island Texas Leah
Whole Family Wellness

All My Relations Podcast

08:13 min | 3 months ago

Whole Family Wellness

"Let's start by having you introduce yourselves the way you would to a large group of people So I was born and raised in the area. That is now known as North Dakota. I'm from the Turtle Mountain Band of my Mom's side of the family. So I'm initial Bay and I'm Papa Lakota from the Standing Rock on my Dad's side of the family I lived on the East Coast for a number of years where I went to college at Dartmouth and I went to Grad School at Columbia University for Journalism and I am now the mom to a one year old and the partner to fashion. We live together in Phoenix Arizona where we run our our initiative called while for Culture. So wellness is my passion. I'm also a writer and a journalist but pretty much everything I do. Now is like health and family related Well softball scoop dodged everyone to the both of you and for those. That had a chance to me on. Yep Suga cash on knock to damage over jude are Choon. I'm from the Salt River. People around this area right here and Just happy to be here sup without the ATHOL AENA. Happy to be sitting here to be speaking with both of you. And it's awesome and you guys are one of our favorite podcasts and so we are just honored to be here and wanted to say thank you to the for the awesome work that you're doing with this in just around native country and the individual work you know we worked together. Matija in the past and I worked a little bit with us well at college horizon. So it's awesome to be here in this space to be able to be discussing more of these so very happy with that also work with the native Wellness Institute. I'm a board member there and I've been working with them now for about ten years now and Chelsea said one of the CO founders in our initiative that we call wealth for culture and and as Chelsea had said as well. Wellness is something. That's definitely my passion and the wellness that's rooted within our people and sexual ways. Yeah something that. I'm very passionate about and Just very Excited to try to share what little we know in this area of health and wellness as it pertains to family as you said and we know that that's a big part of of our communities you know it's it's the strong communities are built by our strong families and that's really the root of healing in the root of preserving and maintaining evolving. Our indigene are families and I think that's one of the most beautiful things we can put our energy and effort to especially in Mike this. You know when it's just we have so much going on and on world you know so my heart is full and I'm happy I you know I think the other thing. That's really cool. Is that you know you're a photographer. And you danced for years right with your work with Rohan long on the street. Dance B boy crews and stuff Yeah I didn't think about that what I think about this work. You do too because it's kind of like you know this evolution of becoming these. These people like Chelsea talks about you know going to Dartmouth and Columbia and becoming a journalist and and then you yourself. It's like being a photographer and working in industry and it takes so many different skills to put out content on a regular basis. And you know you to have been developing those skills for a really long time so maybe we could start just having you talk a little about the origins of welfare culture. And and your purpose and what that means to you individually. Well we founded in twenty fourteen shortly after I met. Actually we both were on our own individual healing and wellness journeys And we came together as friends and we did this cool photo. Shoot Auch Photograph me as it was at the time we were calling it like an urban warrior kind of thing but it was just this really cool fitness that we did in your city but meanwhile we were having all these conversations talking about how you know healthy. Lifestyles really are congruent. With our ancestral ways. Both of us were raised in ceremony. But both of us also kind of went the wayside with that a little bit You know during our teens and twenties and you know moving away both both of us moving away from our reservoirs and into cities and kind of just exploring the world and but eventually coming full circle back to that and so it was really cool because I connected as friends through that shared passion for connecting wellness with with our culture. At the time. We realized that there wasn't a lot of imagery of healthy active strong native people and we wanted to change that and so we co founded while for culture and it started as a website and an instagram and facebook page and then it quickly grew into basically this consulting business in Marietta. Other things that we do as well. Yeah we got together because like Jesse had said she was doing journalism. And as you'd mentioned I was doing photography and I after a while. I really wanted to start to kind of help. Help help with the movement that that you're contributing to your work is just to help to portray this our image. You know what I mean that we do have in our communities that often doesn't portrayed in so we started really like she said delve into that and we started really looking at it. And you know I was coming from a perspective of coming. From my community where diabetes obesity cardiovascular heart disease is really super high high in comparison to the non native people that are live on the border. Just a couple miles away you know. The life expectancy is just the gap between is is insane and so I was coming from from that perspective. That how we need to we need to really reclaim our health. And we need to put our health for first and foremost in our diginity to continue on and for me it was it was it was moved my body exercising and training and Alice really trying to draw those connections between that in and being a part of the community and We share a lot. Two of my personal observation is that I watched the the the the the community. I guess involvement and ceremonial things that bring wellness and love and happiness declined because of poor health. People can't show up so I just got really driven on this. This thing like you know we need to. We need to reclaim our health. In whatever way that is for people you know for me was exercising and know trend to really strengthen my relationship to food and so we got together and we start man this is. There's so much more than just you know putting out an image of somebody working out and trying to encourage and motivate people. That's a big part of it. You know but there's certainly a lot more to it so you know. We delved into it to try to create more of a wellness model. That was kind of rooted in in a lot of our cultural values and just kind of going around native country with my work. With Native Wellness Institute the Focus was always on on for sure was pinpointing historic trauma was healing but we didn't see the inclusion a lot of bringing a healthy lifestyle once again. It's as far as physical health. Bring our foods right back into the conversation healing or bringing movement and into the conversation. We're really seeing that so much too and I think that that's sort of like our generations contribution like it's what we're doing this all of us living here now so we really kind of just tried to go forward with that and develop it over the years and later on we became a family and and we realized that everything we were we were coming up with in creating and learning about and putting into practice and sharing about and doing workshops and trainings on was. We're things that we have this opportunity now to live that into model that and to to show that and I think that that's one of the most powerful things we can do is just model that you know model that that that wellness of that. Good life for all of our families to see you know. We're we're strengthening that spirit of wellness step brings families together increase healing once again to you know when when anyone participates in that and so and so you know. That's that's how we got to where we are with it today and as you said now we are really you know as a young family moving forward with that

Native Wellness Institute Chelsea Dartmouth North Dakota Turtle Mountain Phoenix Arizona Salt River Papa Lakota Athol Aena Writer Jude East Coast Partner Rohan Columbia University For Journa Grad School Columbia Mike Instagram Jesse
President Trump tours Arizona plant making N-95 masks

America in the Morning

01:28 min | 3 months ago

President Trump tours Arizona plant making N-95 masks

"Trump is making himself exhibit a in his determination to move past the coronavirus crisis correspondent Bob Costantini reports from Phoenix Arizona where he traveled with the president to visit a plant to making respirator masks and president trump is flying to Phoenix word leaked out of the White House that the coronavirus task force was going to scale back its meetings and so he was peppered with questions upon arrival say if you get the invoices to me yeah we have great advice we have great people with great people yeah we have great doctors we have great medical people laboratory people you still Sakshi dot records released the results oh sure yeah they will be and and so will other doctors and so other experts in the field Berkson found people much higher in believability regarding covert nineteen than the president but they have been excluded from a number of events related to the pandemic for more than a week the president's desire to get out of Washington which aides say will have him traveling more to highlight manufacturing conversions such as the Honeywell plant here this churning out surgical masks is matched by his zeal to get the country back into business with states relaxing restrictions president trump tells ABC news there will be a balance between economic gain increased lives lost it's possible there will be some because you won't be locked into an apartment or a house or whatever it is but at the same time we're going to practice social distancing we're going to be washing hands we're

Donald Trump Bob Costantini Phoenix Arizona President Trump White House Washington Phoenix Honeywell ABC
As Trump resumes travel, staff takes risks to prepare trip

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

As Trump resumes travel, staff takes risks to prepare trip

"President trump will visit Phoenix Arizona today where he toured the facility re purposed to manufacture and ninety five masks to fight the corona virus pandemic in what he suggests will mark the return to a more regular travel for much of the last two months president trump has rarely left the White House to limit exposure today's trip to the Honeywell plant revs up his re opening push for the country the state is nearly nine thousand coronavirus cases most of them were covered at three hundred and sixty to death before anyone comes near the president they're required to take a rapid point of care test to see if they have the virus trump says he'll also travel soon to Ohio New York in June for the military academy graduation South Dakota in July for fireworks and trump says he's eager to get back on the campaign trail I'm Julie Walker

Donald Trump Phoenix Arizona White House President Trump New York South Dakota Julie Walker Honeywell Ohio
The Grand Canyon

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

06:00 min | 4 months ago

The Grand Canyon

"Have you ever heard of the Grand Canyon. The Grand Canyon is the Whitest Canyon in the world and located in Arizona which also happens to be my home state. It's also considered one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The Grand Canyon is two hundred seventy seven miles long up to eighteen miles wide in over six thousand feet deep in places. It's very colorful a combination of reds browns whites and many other colors because each of the different layers or strata were formed at different times during the Earth's history. The Earth is very very old so the Grand Canyon is made up of different rocks from its two billion year old history early on the Grand Canyon was actually a mountain which overtime sunk down until it was flat. Then is the earth shifted. It became a canyon and over a very long period was even underwater. Eventually a river started flowing through the Canyon which is now known as the Colorado River. The water in the river was full of rocks. So over. Millions of years the river acted like sandpaper. Shaving down the canyon this is called erosion today. When you look at the Grand Canyon you can see the different layers in it similar to a layered cake. Some of the layers are white. Limestone other layers are filled with shells from was underwater and the upper layers are dark and reformed by a volcano after the Grand Canyon was formed into what it looks like today around three thousand years ago native people who now call the ancestral publians live near the Grand Canyon. They built homes out of stone and farmed corn squash and beans. They made carvings and paintings on Canyon walls which is one way we know they live there. Another group who lived there were called the co Nina for the ancestors of the modern Yuma Havasu Pie and who a lot by people who still live around the Grand Canyon. The native people call the Grand Canyon. Cab which means mountain on its side. The ancient people believed the Grand Canyon was a holy place and often visited for miles around to experience. It's wonder after Europeans discovered the new World Francisco Vasquez Coronado and a group of Spanish explorers were in the area. Searching for the fabled seven cities of Cipolla in fifteen forty Coronado ordered captain Garcia Lopez de Cardenas and. His soldiers to explore the area they and their Hopi native guides where the first European to see the wonders of the Grand Canyon. They were amazed at its size and fastness. Two hundred years passed until another European visited the canyon in seventeen seventy six to Spanish priests Francisco Dominguez and Sylvester de Escalate into explored southern Utah and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and the eighteen fifties. They were followed. By Jacob Hamlin a Mormon explorer sent by Brigham Young to find a way to cross the river. They made friends with the WHO a lot by tribe and found the crossing discovered by the Spanish priests which later became Lee's ferry. A theory is a place where a flat boat helps wagons and people cross the river then in eighteen sixty nine major John. Wesley Powell led the first expedition down into the Canyon. He had set out to explore the Colorado River and the Canyon. They wrote down the river on a boat and survived the dangerous rapids and finally ended up in what is now known as MOAB UTAH. John Wesley Powell later became famous for the founding of the Boy Scouts of America. In one thousand nine hundred three. President Theodore Roosevelt visited the Grand Canyon and marveled at its beauty. Teddy Roosevelt was known for his love of nature and spent much of his time outdoors in the Grand Canyon. He did everything he could to help. Preserve its natural. Wonder he worked to make it a national monument and believe places like the Grand Canyon should be preserved so people all over the world can enjoy it. All Roosevelt was president. He formed the National Parks Association to help. Save places like the Grand Canyon today. The Grand Canyon is one of the most famous places to visit in the world with about five million visitors every year. Who come from all over to see and explore it. Most people just come to look out over the vast canyon. I've been there a few times with my family. It's about a four hour. Drive from US where we live near Phoenix Arizona. The last time I went we brought our foreign kids who also looked out over it in awe. We had to hold them close to us because the canyon is a very steep drop below which made us very nervous. When I was in high school our family and a group of other families hiked down into the part of the canyon known as Havasu Pie. We drove there early in the morning and had all of our camping gear and food loaded onto the back of mules. Then we hiked about four hours down into the Canyon at the bottom of the trail. The huge picturesque Havasu falls. You can swim at the falls. Jump off cliffs and hike further into see and swim in the waterfalls. Our trip was very fun but took a turn for the worse when one of the days I slept on Iraq and twisted my ankle pretty bad the next day we were supposed to hike out so my close friend. I got up early and started hiking. I live most of the way. Even up the steep switch-backs. It was a rough hike out but the waterfalls and swimming holes made it worth it anyway along with hiking people take helicopter tours over the Grand Canyon love to raft the Wild Colorado River. They also take horseback tours down into the Canyon. And it's very popular. Hike it from Rim Durham. By sisters in their friends. Do this recently. Another main attraction is the Grand Canyon. Skywalk which lets you walk on a glass bottom path out over the canyon so you can look at the drop far

Grand Canyon Whitest Canyon Colorado River Arizona Utah President Theodore Roosevelt Wild Colorado River Wesley Powell John Wesley Powell Francisco Vasquez Coronado Rim Durham Havasu Falls Cipolla Brigham Young Boy Scouts Of America Jacob Hamlin Garcia Lopez De Cardenas Iraq Nina United States
Democratic Debate In Washington D.C. to be held with no audience

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 5 months ago

Democratic Debate In Washington D.C. to be held with no audience

"There will be no audience at tonight's presidential debate I'm Jim crystal with the debate having been moved from Phoenix Arizona to Washington DC because of coronavirus it will be the smallest of stage since primary debates began last June the event will feature democratic presidential front runners Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders five candidates who were on the stage in the last obeyed in South Carolina February twenty fifth have

Jim Crystal Phoenix Arizona Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Washington South Carolina
How the Sunday Democratic debate is different than all the other debates

Texas Home Improvement Show

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

How the Sunday Democratic debate is different than all the other debates

"Also on Washington tonight a democratic debate I'm Jim chrysalis with the debate having been moved from Phoenix Arizona to Washington DC because of coronavirus it will be the smallest stage since primary debates began last June the event will feature democratic presidential front runners Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders five candidates who were on the stage in the last debate in South Carolina February twenty fifth have dropped out this will be the first one on one debate between Biden and Sanders ahead of several states holding primaries on

Washington Jim Chrysalis Phoenix Arizona Joe Biden Bernie Sanders South Carolina
Biden, Sanders battle for the Latinx vote

In The Thick

07:56 min | 5 months ago

Biden, Sanders battle for the Latinx vote

"Let's get to our first topic. Which is going to be a two thousand twenty election update who would have thought that the election the United States would be like a secondary story but it kind of is even though it's also a huge story weekly because you know two weeks ago we couldn't be saying this. I certainly didn't imagine this right that Joe Biden would now be in the lead basically in terms of delegates that he won Michigan Idaho Mississippi and Missouri all went for Joe Biden right now sanders. One North Dakota and Washington is still too close to call. I mean this is truly Julio like an extraordinary unfolding of events I still say yes. It was the coalescing. Is it so much the love for Biden or was it simply at the choice has got reduced none? The less Democratic Party has got some challenges yet and if people are following the delegate count and again you know Biden as of this recording. He has eight hundred eighty one delegates Sanders has seven hundred twenty five. We're seeing the same pattern as we saw. Super Tuesday Biden is doing really well with older voters. Sanders is sweeping the youth. Vote Biden again doing really well in the south with black voters. Sanders getting the Latino. Vote and the main thing about all this money is that older. Democratic voters are just showing up and coming out more. It's very simple. Older voters are coming out younger. Voters are not and one of the things you know. It was a weird night to cover politics because it was the early news of the corona virus. Starting to happen. The big Tuesday election coverage became secondary very quickly. It was almost very subdued. What happened on Tuesday but what was interesting as I went on instagram. GotTa notification that Alexandria. Oh Cossio Cortez was going live on instagram. And I watched her basically address. What happened in these primaries? One of the things that we're seeing that there's a very strong generational divide and this is something that I've encountered something that I have noticed across many different issues. There's a generational divide in the Democratic Party on healthcare on climate change on foreign policy on pretty much every policy imaginable and as a younger person in this movement. I take a lot of that as information for how we navigate the next decade. So there's like the electoral perspective and there's the movement perspective and I think this is something that's really important that we talk about. Because electoral politics can be movement based but movements aren't necessarily electoral in nature. Either and the interplay in the relationship between these two things is something to pay attention to something. That's important so media you just heard. Afc She was in the thick Back in the day. What do you think about what you'll see? Said I think is coming out a winner in all of this because of her authenticity which is what people are dying to see in their politicians. And so I just think that she. She's keeping her feet on the ground. I think we understand. We've talked about it. That her power in the endorsement of Sanders was huge. A am very concerned about the the lack of turnout among young people. I I'm trying to understand. Is it just because they do want to do it? But then they like they actually never remembered to register or the day of the election. Just you know weren't in the right state or in the right time like what? What is that about? Because let dino's Latina's were turning out but it's like the younger vote just didn't carry it and I'm still fascinated by what you call the motivation of older voters to come out for Joe Biden. You know one of the things that is clear to me with all this because looking at Michigan which Sanders won over Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen a lot of those same voters chose Biden bright working class white non educated or even white suburban voters like college educated and Bernie's platform really hasn't changed since two thousand and sixteen so I think in twenty twenty. The big difference is that he wasn't up against the woman and so I feel like part of that. Michigan vote was Anti Hillary Clinton interesting. Yeah in two thousand sixteen over Pro Bernie and you know this whole notion of misogyny in electoral politics. I think once we get out of what we're in now. I feel like that has to be something that we need to continue to explore right. And you're convinced that all the male run American mainstream media is GONNA do thoughtful work. No but that's why I roll with you. We're GONNA do it here because I wanNA roll with you in some bad ass women and doing it in the thick down the road about all this because I feel like it is a big takeaway of this electoral seasonable. Listen what's going to happen next because I feel like this is where I think we can start looking at the pandemic and electoral politics but talking a little bit about that you know a lot of Biden supporters were urging Sanderson. Drop after you underperform on Tuesday and I think a lot of this has also with you know the pandemic th people are. Kinda like electoral politics. I got other things to worry about. There's a case to be said and on Friday Louisiana date of Louisiana became the first day to announce that it's postponing its primary until the summer that primary was scheduled to be on April fourth but at the same time sanders. Supporters are still reminding people that you know Biden is not even close to getting the delegates. He needs to get the nomination. They're still twenty nine more states that have yet to vote including Puerto Rico as a territory so there you go so on Wednesday Sanders Address. The press and he said that he would stay in the race. I cannot tell you how many people our campaign has spoken to. Who have said quote. I like what your campaign stands for. I agree with what your campaign stands for. But I'm GonNa vote for Joe Biden because I think Joe is the best candidate to defeat. Donald trump end of quote. We have heard that statement all over this country. Needless to say I strongly disagree without assertion but that is what millions of Democrats and independents today believe Donald Trump must be defeated. And I will do everything in my power to make that happen on Sunday night. In the first one on one debate of this campaign the American people will have the opportunity to see which candidate is best positioned to accomplish that goal so a couple of things. Sunday debate is going to be audience free. It was going to be in Phoenix Arizona and then it got moved to DC because of the corona virus crisis also known as Covy nineteen audience. Three no spin room. Cnn univision are hosting the debate. Here's the thing money. Yeah this is the part for me where I'm kind of like our people just going to lose interest in this race because of the crisis. There's so much that shifting beneath our feet right now yeah. I think that actually could spur people because you know the clear evidence of administration lying in the middle of public health crisis pandemic. I don't know though because I worry about people who are so far into the Donald trump sphere that they. I have heard in this past week. People who I know saying things like it's just a hoax. Wow Yes A. I'm sorry I don't know. Yeah so so. I don't

Joe Biden Sanders Donald Trump Democratic Party Michigan United States North Dakota Washington Hillary Clinton Cossio Cortez Puerto Rico Missouri CNN Alexandria Mississippi Idaho Dino Univision
Nick Winkelman on The Language of Coaching and Skill Acquisition

Just Fly Performance Podcast

07:02 min | 5 months ago

Nick Winkelman on The Language of Coaching and Skill Acquisition

"Nick. What got you into? The Art of coaching cues Or the language of coaching initially. What what brought your interest to that area of the coaching wrong. Because I think we don't pay as much attention to that as we do every everything else in the field. Yeah I mean. It's it's one of those things that just happened to me more or less by chance. I mean I possibly have some affinity towards the area. My mom did always telling me that I talked too much so maybe I had some interest in language. Were very young age but the way it happened was like this. It was my first year running the NFL combine program at Exocet. He must have been two thousand nine or two thousand ten. And I had the program given to me from my predecessors and so these were some of the best drink Co. just still to this day that I know so insofar as the eight week plan off from when we got the players out of college to them actually going to Indianapolis to run their forties and go through the rest of the combine that was all mapped out so I had already been part of. Three combines priors. I knew how to run the program. Good idea but I was going to be so to speak the captain of the ship and in that first year I coached the heck out of it dotted the i's cross the t's and I made sure every player sweat the details you know. We had the film out for every session. We were getting everything done. I felt the entire program was executed perfectly. And when I got Indianapolis guys started to show up to get him. Prepped and I watched the first day of running with the big guys in the second and third day and the fourth thing am watching my guys run on national television. I remember gold and tate was a very specific one that I can recall. I was looking at their numbers there. Pr's from when I had them in Phoenix Arizona at our training facility and obviously I was referencing our training video so how good the guys looked running so and so forth and then I was comparing that obviously to what they were doing at the NFL. Combine and something really interesting occurred and that is sure all the guy is performed better than when they entered the training facility in early January but very few. Let's say we're running as fast as I knew they could based on our training data and so I was looking at. I'm like well. Gosh what's going on well. They added a second layer to that. And when I started looking at let's say the sprint technique. The coordination the skill of running I realized that the vast majority of them had reverted back to type so to speak and they were using a lot of the bad habits that I thought we had rid them up. During the training process now rightly or wrongly. I connected part of their. Let's say reduction in times to that shift back to poor technique so even though they had improved fantastic. I knew and I had felt we'd left something on the table so as I deep in my look at that something dawned on me and that was we had put them through an eight week program. That had quite a bit of stimulus. They were sprinting. Almost every day they were doing strengthen power multiple times a week they were on the high level nutrition plans to optimize their body cop for their personal goals like everything was locked in so insofar as the training stimulus is concerned. There was no questions it helped all these guys perform and then I realized that that is exactly what I observed that it was nothing more than their physical exposure to the training program that had upgraded their engine their capabilities physically allowing them to get more out of their body independent of their coordination in their technique. I thought to myself what's the number one variable. What's The number one coaching strategy that I am using to manipulate how they run? I e the coordination and quality of their movement. And it hit me. My Voice by Queuing by coaching and I was like in that moment. I realized I had failed. These guys. Sure I'd facilitated the program that was going to make them better no matter what but insofar as my contribution that was unique to me helping them move better to get even more performance advantage. I definitely not optimized that something to change between them leaving Phoenix and then running enjoy. You know the number one thing that changed. I wasn't standing next to them. Whispering sweet cues into their ears when they went out there and did it live on. Nfl Network and it was from that moment on that I started to study and scratch each around the coaches variable in ultimately get into motor learning. And I think my intuition around the gap was correct ultimately as I started to shift how I coached across what I said when I said it and even the learning environment I started to see those results that I didn't see here one actually brought to the table and guys not only ran faster physically but also because we made changes that stick. Yeah that's that's really what it's all about is getting it to stick because I think that's what all your coach you you. We've all been there where we communicate something in just like you had said we. We see the athlete than they're competing in. There's there's different motor patterns or they're or they're going back to their old motor patterns and I think a lot about the idea of the subconscious. Mind being the most powerful driver or it is and how do we get through to that because I feel like a lot of cues and and things we say are only. It's almost like they only reached like that consciously and so how how do you. I know the obviously written a whole book on this. There's a lot to cover. So can we just start by the idea of you talked about this before? But but internal versus external cues and what's going on there and and and then if there's anything that goes beyond even that but if we could just start with the internal and external cue. I thought idea. Yeah so when you start to study the kind of things that coaches say and for the listeners. When I say coach I'm really talking about movement professionals in general so if you teach movement for a living I'm calling you a coach because just a quick little footnote. My definition of a coach is anyone that helps to move others to the place they want to be and I believe in that regard. Many of us in this field can adopt the word

NFL Indianapolis Nick. What Phoenix Arizona Drink Co. Exocet Tate Phoenix
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

06:30 min | 8 months ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Mike permit in Phoenix Arizona looking at local and national economy the American economy is going as good as it's gone in my lifetime for sure and if you look at statistics that who is helping in who is who is gaining ground this is working for all Americans this is a reason for us to celebrate going back to twenty sixteen there was a story economists saying that a trump when would tank the stock markets there was one expert economist in twenty sixteen or white after the election before the inauguration and he was asked how long will it take for us to recover from a trump economy and he replied will never recover that was the doomsday prediction that what he was going to do was destroyed the American economy well the exact opposite is happened let me just run down some statistics perspective I I I you have a very close friends and I mean this sincerely have very close friends that are very liberal I have a friend that I grew up with that I love like a brother one of my first friends when I real I grew up in southwest Florida in a town called fort Myers I moved there when I was young I was eleven years old and one of my first friends and we grew up in the same neighborhood road the same school bus we were inseparable as a group for years and years and years and how we breathe the same air and became sole polar opposites politically I don't know but we still we argue like crazy but we love each other like brothers and his view of the economy being dismal and he's a business guy he's a guy that runs a business it is impossible for me to wrap my arms around outside of the disdain for Donald Trump you can have a different opinion on feelings but the facts are still the fax we know that here in the month of December the Dow Jones has added over ten thousand points since trump was inaugurated ten thousand points since inauguration day the Dow the nasdaq and the S. and P. the three big indicators have all touched endorsed set records this month all that is absolutely true the lowest unemployment rate in fifty four fifty five years that also was true highest number of Americans employed but when you look at the demographics it's the lowest black unemployment in America since they've been keeping the statistic same with Hispanic unemployment over sixty percent of the jobs created during this administration notice I didn't say by this administration during this administration over sixty percent of those jobs have gone to women you got unemployment low employment rate hi you also have growth you have people's incomes growing faster now than they have in decades and very low inflation which means you are not just keeping up with your way of life with your raises your actually living better the bottom of the economic ladder the lowest earners in America have seen the greatest grow there were two indicators they say it's been years and years and years since both have been a positive answer one is are you better this year than you were last year the answer for the majority of Americans is yes do you believe you will be better off next year than you are this year again the overwhelming answer from the American people is yes working class Americans are earning more and keeping more of their own money the tax cuts helped everyone and this is my problem with what we're seeing in America that instead of us being overjoyed it's what I live in a desert I live in Phoenix Arizona there was a time of year we call monsoon season where the rains come people dance in the streets when it rains here because of the long spans without rain when it rains it's a joyous experience we should be overjoyed with the rain right now we had so much of an economic drought and climbing out of a recession business is scraping by and not thriving and now businesses big and small are thriving in individuals are thriving as well as a nation we should be overjoyed and as a party the Democrats should be overjoyed the Democrats should be thrilled with what's going on the working class Americans the working poor as they call them in America that they claim to be the champions for our living better now than they have in decades wage increase job growth you have the democratic candidates that are still selling about would bill of goods that say we needed Connie that works for everyone what demographic is the economy not working for every American that wants a job right now has a job and we also know wages are going up they can't say they're not good jobs they absolutely are good jobs we have now shown that when the government gets out of the way the lives of people improve they do it themselves all this president did was on leash the job creators and look what it's done I will say one thing that I mindset shift that all of us could learn from when you hear the Democrats talk about give backs to corporations I want you to change the way they think in the way you think a tax cut is not giving anyone anything a tax cut is taking less from them the government doesn't give you anything they take less from you our taxes them confiscating some of your earnings if they take less they take less that's not giving you anything and I'll tell you that shift in mindset would have people go a long way when looking at how this economy is improved not done with this by a long shot there's still so much more to talk about the economy statistically proven for both local and the federal level what this president has done with policies that is on leave the American people and how it's going to bode for him in the next election cycle all of these things impeachment all of the inter twined in the economy is one of the key pieces of it we're gonna get to more this coming up here just a moment again my name is.

Mike Phoenix Arizona
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:33 min | 8 months ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on WTVN

"Mike permit in Phoenix Arizona looking at local and national economy the American economy is going as good as it's gone in my lifetime for sure and if you look at statistics that who is helping in who is who is gaining ground this is working for all Americans this is a reason for us to celebrate going back to twenty sixteen there was a story economists saying that a trump when would tank the stock markets there was one expert economist in twenty sixteen white after the election before the inauguration and he was asked how long will it take for us to recover from a trump economy and he replied will never recover that was the doomsday prediction for that what he was going to do was destroyed the American economy well the exact opposite it's happened let me just run down some statistics perspective I I I you have a very close friends that I mean this sincerely have very close friends that are very liberal I have a friend that I grew up with that I love like a brother one of my first friends when I real I grew up in southwest Florida in a town called fort Myers I moved there when I was young I was eleven years old and one of my first friends and we grew up in the same neighborhood road the same school bus we were inseparable as a group for years and years and years and how we breathe the same air and became sole polar opposites politically I don't know but we still we argue like crazy but we love each other like brothers and his view of the economy being dismal and he's a business guy he's a guy that runs a business it is impossible for me to wrap my arms around outside of the disdain for Donald Trump you can have a different opinion on feelings but the facts are still the fax we know that here in the month of December the Dow Jones has added over ten thousand points since trump was inaugurated ten thousand points since inauguration day the Dow the nasdaq and the S. and P. the three big indicators have all touched endorsed set records this month all that is absolutely true the lowest unemployment rate in fifty four fifty five years that also was true highest number of Americans employed but when you look at the demographics it's the lowest black unemployment in America since they've been keeping the statistic same with Hispanic unemployment over sixty percent of the jobs created during this administration notice I didn't say by this administration during this administration over sixty percent of those jobs have gone to women you got unemployment low employment rate hi you also have growth you have people's incomes growing faster now than they have in decades and very low inflation which means you are not just keeping up with your way of life with your raises your actually living better the bottom of the economic ladder the lowest earners in America had seen the greatest grow there were two indicators they say it's been years and years and years since both have been a positive answer one is are you better this year than you were last year the answer for the majority of Americans is yes do you believe you will be better off next year than you are this year again the overwhelming answer from the American people is yes working class Americans are earning more and keeping more of their own money the tax cuts helped everyone and this is my problem with what we're seeing in America that instead of us being overjoyed it's what I live in a desert I live in Phoenix Arizona there was a time of year we call monsoon season where the rains come people dance in the streets when it rains here because of the long spans without rain when it rains it's a joyous experience we should be overjoyed with the rain right now we had so much of an economic drought and climbing out of a recession business is scraping by and not thriving and now businesses big and small are thriving in individuals are thriving as well as a nation we should be overjoyed and as a party the Democrats should be overjoyed the Democrats should be thrilled with what's going on the working class Americans the working poor as they call them in America that they claim to be the champions for our living better now than they have in decades wage increase job growth you have the democratic candidates that are still selling about would bill of goods that say we needed Connie that works for everyone what demographic is the economy not working for every American that wants a job right now has a job and we also know wages are going up they can't say they're not good jobs they absolutely are good jobs we have now shown that when the government gets out of the way the lives of people improve they do it themselves all this president did was on leash the job creators and look what it's done I will say one thing that I mindset shift that all of us could learn from when you hear the Democrats talk about give backs to corporations I want you to change the way they think and the way you think a tax cut is not giving anyone anything a tax cut is taking less from them the government doesn't give you anything they take less from you a tax is them confiscating some of your earnings if they take less they take less that's not giving you anything and I'll tell you that shift in mindset would have people go a long way when looking at how this economy is improved not done with this by a long shot there's still so much more to talk about the economy statistically proven for both local and the federal level what this president has done with policies that is on leave the American people and how it's going to vote for him in the next election cycle all of these things impeachment all of the inter twined in the economy is one of the key pieces of it or to get some more this coming up here just a moment again my name is Mike broom that I'm in Phoenix Arizona and this is the Glenn Beck.

Mike Phoenix Arizona
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

06:33 min | 8 months ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Mike permit in Phoenix Arizona looking at local and national economy the American economy is going as good as it's gone in my lifetime for sure and if you look at statistics that who is helping in who is who is gaining ground this is working for all Americans this is a reason for us to celebrate going back to twenty sixteen there was a story economists saying that a trump when would tank the stock markets there was one expert economist in twenty sixteen white after the election before the inauguration and he was asked how long will it take for us to recover from a trump economy and he replied will never recover that was the doomsday prediction that what he was going to do was destroyed the American economy well the exact opposite is happened let me just run down some statistics perspective I I I you have a very close friends that I mean this sincerely have very close friends that are very liberal I have a friend that I grew up with that I love like a brother one of my first friends when I real I grew up in southwest Florida in a town called fort Myers I moved there when I was young I was eleven years old and one of my first friends and we grew up in the same neighborhood road the same school bus we were inseparable as a group for years and years and years and how we breathe the same air and became sole polar opposites politically I don't know but we still we argue like crazy but we love each other like brothers and his view of the economy being dismal and he's a business guy he's a guy that runs a business it is impossible for me to wrap my arms around outside of the disdain for Donald Trump you can have a different opinion on feelings but the facts are still the fax we know that here in the month of December the Dow Jones has added over ten thousand points since trump was inaugurated ten thousand points since inauguration day the Dow the nasdaq and the S. and P. the three big indicators have all touched endorsed set records this month all that is absolutely true the lowest unemployment rate in fifty four fifty five years that also was true highest number of Americans employed but when you look at the demographics it's the lowest black unemployment in America since they've been keeping the statistic same with Hispanic unemployment over sixty percent of the jobs created during this administration notice I didn't say by this administration during this administration over sixty percent of those jobs have gone to women you've got unemployment low employment rate hi you also have growth you have people's incomes growing faster now than they have in decades and very low inflation which means you are not just keeping up with your way of life with your raises your actually living better the bottom of the economic ladder the lowest earners in America has seen the greatest growth there were two indicators they say it's been years and years and years since both have been a positive answer one is are you better this year than you were last year the answer for the majority of Americans is yes do you believe you will be better off next year than you are this year again the overwhelming answer from the American people is yes working class Americans are earning more and keeping more of their own money the tax cuts helped everyone and this is my problem with what we're seeing in America that instead of us being overjoyed it's up I live in a desert I live in Phoenix Arizona there is a time of year we call monsoon season where the rains come people dance in the streets when it rains here because of the long spans without rain when it rains it's a joyous experience we should be overjoyed with the rain right now we had so much of an economic drought and climbing out of a recession business is scraping by and not thriving and now businesses big and small are thriving in individuals are thriving as well as a nation we should be overjoyed and as a party the Democrats should be overjoyed the Democrats should be thrilled with what's going on the working class Americans the working poor as they call them in America that they claim to be the champions for our living better now than they have in decades wage increase job growth you have the democratic candidates that are still selling a ballad bill of goods that say we needed Connie that works for everyone what demographic is the economy not working for every American that wants a job right now has a job and we also know wages are going up they can't say they're not good jobs they absolutely are good jobs we have now shown that when the government gets out of the way the lives of people improve they do it themselves all this president did was on leash the job creators and look what it's done I will say one thing that I mindset shift that all of us could learn from when you hear the Democrats talk about give backs to corporations I want you to change the way they think and the way you think a tax cut is not giving anyone anything a tax cut is taking less from them the government doesn't give you anything they take less from you a tax is them confiscating some of your earnings if they take less they take less that's not giving you anything and I'll tell you that shift in mindset would have people go a long way when looking at how this economy is improved not done with this by a long shot there's still so much more to talk about the economy statistically proven for both local and the federal level what this president has done with policies that is on leave the American people and how it's going to both for him in the next election cycle all of these things impeachment all of the inter twined in the economy is one of the key pieces of it or to get some more this coming up here just a moment it again my name is Mike broom that I'm in Phoenix Arizona and this is the Glenn Beck program.

Mike Phoenix Arizona
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

06:33 min | 8 months ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Mike permit in Phoenix Arizona looking at local and national economy the American economy is going as good as it's gone in my lifetime for sure and if you look at statistics that who is helping in who is who is gaining ground this is working for all Americans this is a reason for us to celebrate going back to twenty sixteen there was a story economists saying that a trump when would tank the stock markets there was one expert economist in twenty sixteen white after the election before the inauguration and he was asked how long will it take for us to recover from a trump economy and he replied will never recover that was the doomsday prediction for that what he was going to do was destroyed the American economy well the exact opposite is happened let me just run down some statistics perspective I I've I you have a very close friends that I mean this sincerely have very close friends that are very liberal I have a friend that I grew up with that I love like a brother one of my first friends when I real I grew up in southwest Florida in a town called fort Myers I moved there when I was young I was eleven years old and one of my first friends and we grew up in the same neighborhood road the same school bus we were inseparable as a group for years and years and years and how we breathe the same air and became sole polar opposites politically I don't know but we still we argue like crazy but we love each other like brothers and his view of the economy being dismal and he's a business guy he's a guy that runs a business it is impossible for me to wrap my arms around outside of the disdain for Donald Trump you can have a different opinion on feelings but the facts are still the fax we know that here in the month of December the Dow Jones has added over ten thousand points since trump was inaugurated ten thousand points since inauguration day the Dow the nasdaq and the S. and P. the three big indicators have all touched endorsed set records this month all that is absolutely true the lowest unemployment rate in fifty four fifty five years that also was true highest number of Americans employed but when you look at the demographics it's the lowest black unemployment in America since they've been keeping the statistic same with Hispanic unemployment over sixty percent of the jobs created during this administration notice I didn't say by this administration during this administration over sixty percent of those jobs have gone to women you've got unemployment low employment rate hi you also have growth you have people's incomes growing faster now than they have in decades and very low inflation which means you are not just keeping up with your way of life with your raises your actually living better the bottom of the economic ladder the lowest earners in America had seen the greatest growth there were two indicators they say it's been years and years and years since both have been a positive answer one is are you better this year than you were last year the answer for the majority of Americans is yes do you believe you will be better off next year then you are this year again the overwhelming answer from the American people is yes working class Americans are earning more and keeping more of their own money the tax cuts helped everyone and this is my problem with what we're seeing in America that instead of us being overjoyed it's up I live in a desert I live in Phoenix Arizona there was a time of year we call monsoon season where the rains come people dance in the streets when it rains here because of the long spans without rain when it rains it's a joyous experience we should be overjoyed with the rain right now we had so much of an economic drought and climbing out of a recession business is scraping by and not thriving and now businesses big and small are thriving in individuals are thriving as well as a nation we should be overjoyed and as a party the Democrats should be overjoyed the Democrats should be thrilled with what's going on the working class Americans the working poor as they call them in America that they claim to be the champions for our living better now than they have in decades wage increase job growth you have the democratic candidates that are still selling about would bill of goods that say we needed Connie that works for everyone what demographic is the economy not working for every American that wants a job right now has a job and we also know wages are going up they can't say they're not good jobs they absolutely are good jobs we have now shown that when the government gets out of the way the lives of people improve they do it themselves all this president did was on leash the job creators and look what it's done I will say one thing that I mindset shift that all of us could learn from when you hear the Democrats talk about give backs to corporations I want you to change the way they think and the way you think a tax cut is not giving anyone anything a tax cut is taking less from them the government doesn't give you anything they take less from you a tax is them confiscating some of your earnings if they take less they take less that's not giving you anything and I'll tell you that shift in mindset would have people go a long way when looking at how this economy is improved not done with this by a long shot there's still so much more to talk about the economy statistically proven for both local and the federal level what this president has done with policies that is on leave the American people and how it's going to both for him in the next election cycle all of these things impeachment all of the inter twined in the economy is one of the key pieces of it or to get some more this coming up here just a moment it again my name is Mike broom that I'm in Phoenix Arizona and this is the Glenn Beck program.

Mike Phoenix Arizona
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

06:34 min | 8 months ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KNSS

"Mike permit in Phoenix Arizona looking at local and national economy the American economy is going as good as it's gone in my lifetime for sure and if you look at statistics that who is helping in who is who is gaining ground this is working for all Americans this is a reason for us to celebrate going back to twenty sixteen there was a story economists saying that a trump win would tank the stock markets there was one expert economist in twenty sixteen white after the election before the inauguration and he was asked how long will it take for us to recover from a trump economy and he replied will never recover that was the doomsday prediction for that what he was going to do was destroyed the American economy well the exact opposite is happened let me just run down some statistics perspective I I've I you have a very close friends that I mean this sincerely have very close friends that are very liberal I have a friend that I grew up with that I love like a brother one of my first friends when I real I grew up in southwest Florida in a town called fort Myers I moved there when I was young I was eleven years old and one of my first friends and we grew up in the same neighborhood road the same school bus we were inseparable as a group for years and years and years and how we breathe the same air and became sole polar opposites politically I don't know but we still we argue like crazy but we love each other like brothers and his view of the economy being dismal and he's a business guy he's a guy that runs a business it is impossible for me to wrap my arms around outside of the disdain for Donald Trump you can have a different opinion on feelings but the facts are still the fax we know that here in the month of December the Dow Jones has added over ten thousand points since trump was inaugurated ten thousand points since inauguration day the Dow the nasdaq and the S. and P. the three big indicators have all touched endorsed set records this month all that is absolutely true the lowest unemployment rate in fifty four fifty five years that also was true highest number of Americans employed but when you look at the demographics it's the lowest black unemployment in America since they've been keeping the statistic same with Hispanic unemployment over sixty percent of the jobs created during this administration notice I didn't say by this administration during this administration over sixty percent of those jobs have gone to women you got unemployment low employment rate hi you also have growth you have people's incomes growing faster now than they have in decades and very low inflation which means you are not just keeping up with your way of life with your raises your actually living better the bottom of the economic ladder the lowest earners in America had seen the greatest growth there were two indicators they say it's been years and years and years since both have been a positive answer one is are you better this year than you were last year the answer for the majority of Americans is yes do you believe you will be better off next year then you are this year again the overwhelming answer from the American people is yes working class Americans are earning more and keeping more of their own money the tax cuts helped everyone and this is my problem with what we're seeing in America that instead of us being overjoyed it's what I live in a desert I live in Phoenix Arizona there was a time of year we call monsoon season where the rains come people dance in the streets when it rains here because of the long spans without rain when it rains it's a joyous experience we should be overjoyed with the rain right now we had so much of an economic drought and climbing out of a recession business is scraping by and not thriving and now businesses big and small are thriving in individuals are thriving as well as a nation we should be overjoyed and as a party the Democrats should be overjoyed the Democrats should be thrilled with what's going on the working class Americans the working poor as they call them in America that they claim to be the champions for our living better now than they have in decades wage increase job growth you have the democratic candidates that are still selling about would bill of goods that say we needed Connie that works for everyone what demographic is the economy not working for every American that wants a job right now has a job and we also know wages are going up they can't say they're not good jobs they absolutely are good jobs we have now shown that when the government gets out of the way the lives of people improve they do it themselves all this president did was on leash the job creators and look what it's done I will say one thing that I mindset shift that all of us could learn from when you hear the Democrats talk about give backs to corporations I want you to change the way they think in the way you think a tax cut is not giving anyone anything a tax cut is taking less from them the government doesn't give you anything they take less from you our taxes them confiscating some of your earnings if they take less they take less that's not giving you anything and I'll tell you that shift in mindset would have people go a long way when looking at how this economy is improved not done with this by a long shot there's still so much more to talk about the economy statistically proven for both local and the federal level what this president has done with policies that is on leave the American people and how it's going to vote for him in the next election cycle all of these things impeachment all of the inter twined in the economy is one of the key pieces of it we're gonna get to more this coming up here just a moment again my name is Mike broom that I'm in Phoenix Arizona and this is the Glenn Beck program.

Mike Phoenix Arizona
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"Can work for a company based in Phoenix Arizona. So what I'm saying here is Jessica, you have a lot of options. So now it's the research that you enjoy doing for work, you need to. Focused on research research research right now, and you're looking for part time roles where you can write develop curriculum some type of content, and that's all over the place. But as you start to search you will find what you're looking for one last little tip that you should add into your search think about who you most like to help, if you were going to write some curriculum or research. Who would you wanna be doing the research on behalf of that's going to give you a little bit more pinpointed direction as you start. But you are really really close at you don't have any financial pressure. So have fun with this research process to find the right role. It could be it could be some that comes through very quickly or could take six weeks. But I think it can be really fun. And I think that's the direction need to be going good stuff. They're eight four four seven four seven two five seven seven. Hey, folks, I've been talking about this a lot on the show this job economy, is crazy hot. There are more jobs available than there are people who are unemployed, which means for you. The person who wants a better job, it's time to move, because the times never been better, in now, it starts by having a strategy and getting connected with my friends at ZipRecruiter is a good strategic decision. That's right. Ziprecruiter dot com slash kin. That's where you need to go to check them out. Here's why ZipRecruiter is so affective that.

ZipRecruiter Phoenix Arizona Jessica six weeks
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"And when they were sixty five they were the most likely to be a millionaire, and I'll never forget in Phoenix Arizona with that. A Keaton went bankrupt. And my my gosh, I'd I had made one hundred million dollars a year half his life and didn't have a nickel saved and busy at helicopter. Ters and mansions and owned islands. And it was just just runaway debt. My. Josh we went well over an hour. Is there anything we didn't talk about that? You wish we did that were you're planning on. Well, you know, it's interesting in this tobacco. Me backtrack. Just one important point that we didn't touch on you, you kind of tangentially mentioned it was one other little bit of advice for the young doctor is have a financial plan. Have a financial planner stick to it. Start saving from day one because the teachers and the firefighters the public servants who have union positions, you know, they're kind of into force savings. That's how they end up being relatively secure in their retirement. As dentists we don't have anybody kind of doing that for us. We have to be self motivated, and I can't quote statistics on the number of dentists who have nothing saved or haven't you know, maximize their pension plans. But you don't wanna be in that group. You don't wanna be, you know, sixty years old where I'm at and. Have nothing saved and then or not enough saved and have to keep practicing because that's a really dreary existence where you have to go back or you have to reinvent yourself at a certain age and try to do it again. So, you know, one of those other little tidbits is, you know, when you're twenty five and you graduate from dental school. You're never gonna get old. You're never gonna hit. You know, you never gonna be short up here, or, you know, belting in the middle or those kinds of things, but you know, it happens in the flash of an instance, and you know, what to do today is you tomorrow, and one of those pieces of preparation is certainly the financial preparation and one of the little tiny observation I can.

Keaton Josh Phoenix Arizona one hundred million dollars sixty years
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"For both adults and for children in the area. You're talking about here is an era where they want to pending on how you how you look at this. They're the one side would say they wanted to include the native Americans in American culture, and therefore they wanted to inculturated them. And the other side would say that they wanted them to lose their identity as native Americans and inculturated them. But it was definitely at a very intentional move to bring them in to have the move away from their families to go to these boarding schools and two tournament white people would be the crude way of saying that. Yeah, it's very complicated history, and it's very painful history. And although it's mixed for some people that experience as much as it was it had some negative sides. Also, brought good things to them others found it just devastating. And they try to deal with all that in a really meaningful, and I think respectful way at the herd. The herd has it's mostly native curator's in. So they do a really nice job at dealing with those complicated issues. The other thing the heard is is a arts museum contemporary or more historic pieces of art, usually all native arts. The most recent show featured Yupik masks from Alaska combined with works by Matisse because he had used some of these masses inspiration in his work. Generally, though, the shows are focused on native arts native artists, the shows are always splendid really high high quality works. If you're at all interested in native art and the contemporary native art seeing the heard will have something spectacular. They have the finest collection. Definitely in the west and probably some of their collection is probably equal to some of the pieces the collection at the national museum of the American Indian. They really do a nice job with their show. Does depending how long you heard you have a couple other options for the day. You are right downtown at the heard you're in an old historic neighborhood. You're just north of the Phoenix art museum. The phoenix. Art museum has a lovely collection. They are pretty much the standard big city museum. They have a lovely collection. But it's it's not Phoenix specific for the most part, the exception to that is their photo exhibit draws from the Zona state university collection, and usually has some really interesting things in it. And they do spectacular spectacular special exhibits. So if you're an art person, you might just want to walk down the street and spend the rest of the day at Pam. I did forget to mention that at the heard have lunch before you leave the herd. They have a fabulous cafeteria then head onto whatever else. The Pam would be one of them the Phoenix art museum the other action. If you kind of had enough art for the day, or what a little smaller museum is to get in. Your car and head over to the smaller museum at the state capitals. The state capitalism. It's the old capitol building. They've preserved a few rooms in the building. But they have some really interesting exhibits in there. It's not very big. But they have a exhibit on the Zona the worship which was sunk in Pearl Harbor and some memorabilia from some of the survivors as well as this was news to me that all these ships have find China and silver and fancy settings like you get some Victorian dinner party, and they have all that unto splayed there as well. They also have some very interesting displays on the beginnings of AirAsia as a state in the establishment of the of the state, including the fact that Arizona kind of played a trick to get into the US as a state. They were required to change something in their provision for how they will how the handled their judges and resulted didn't like with the federal government wanted them to. Do. So they went ahead and did it to become a state. And then as soon as they were state, they went and undid it and did it the way they want it to. And the whole section on it. It's really quite interesting. So those are my day to number one my action number two is to go back up. If you haven't been discussed to go to Scottsdale and do western spirit. I don't know. Have you been to western spirit in Scottsdale? Chris I do not know where you speak of with western. Still. But well, this isn't relatively new museum. It's maybe five years old at the most they're trying to capture the full extent of the the life and population changes in the west, and it has several components that it's a fine art museum more than a history museum. Although it does have historic pieces. One piece of the museum is a cowboy collection or western collection that has things like Spurs and saddles and all the things you'd expect in like a cowboy museum or an old west museum except most of the pieces were collected because of their artistic value more so than as artifacts of the old west that's a fun place for kids. But it's it's kind of cool for everybody because they have all this stuff. And you start looking at it. And you're like, wow, I never knew Spurs could be that interesting. But they can be part of museums fine. Art, mostly they've been expanding what they've been showing. They usually always have a big section by a prominent bronze artists who does away art in features native Americans, although he's not native American himself. They've added now a western movie poster collection that they acquired so there's usually some sort of western movie themed exhibit. They've also added a collection of Hopi classic historic and contemporary, but mostly historic Hopi pottery that they always have some of undisposed, and then they have some other traveling exhibits they've had western cartoons. They've had the towels painters different things very much art based most of the first floor is very much art based except for the movie posters in the western cowboy things the second floor has to Perm semi permanent exhibits one of which saved Alaska's. It's kind of. Zossen? It's a fine. It's interesting. He's laughing. It's a fine art exhibit. That tells the story of the settlement of the west and meeting of the natives and the Anglos as they started settling the west, it's a big Zabit. And it's interesting, but more interesting as the other half, which has mostly has some fine art, but it mostly has more what we would consider artifacts and objects. So it has some artifacts and things from the Lewis and Clark exhibition. It has collection of spectacular chief's blankets. It has a bunch of Curtis. And they've changed this since I was there. The first time of Curtis original Curtis images of native Americans and showing all the different printing presses he used which was something. I had never seen the goal tones in some of that before. And so that was really interesting. It's got a fabulous mix of items and again, very large exhibit. So this is a museum that if you wanna see everything will take most of the day to take a break here and here from a sponsor with all the recent news of online security breaches is hard not to worry about where your data goes making it online purchase or simply accessing your Email could put your private information at risk. I hope he knew the danger of connecting to the WI fi in the airport or in a local coffee shop. But did you just see AT and T has been selling your data and other companies have been as well your browser history? So that they can target you. You can protect your data and your privacy by using VPN. I have installed express VPN. They have an easy to use app. That runs seamlessly in the background on your computer, your phone, or your tablet. You could turn on protection with one click. It's secure as an anonymous as your internet browsing by encrypting your data, it costs less than seven dollars a month. And it's the number one rated VPN service by tech radar. Protect your online activity today and find out. How you can get three months free at express VPN dot com slash travel. That's E X P R E S S VP and dot com slash travel for three months free with a one year package and thanks to

Phoenix art museum Art museum Alaska phoenix Scottsdale Curtis Pearl Harbor Zona state university VP Pam Yupik China AT Spurs US Arizona Matisse AirAsia Chris
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"That. Yeah, it's a very complicated history. And it's a very painful history. And although it's mixed for some people that experience as much as it was it had some negative sides. It also brought good things to them others found it just devastating. And they try to deal with all that in a really meaningful, and I think respectful way at the herd. The herd has it's mostly native curator's in. So they do a really nice job at dealing with those complicated issues. The other thing the heard is is a arts museum contemporary or more historic pieces of art, usually all native arts. The most recent show featured Yupik masks from Alaska combined with works by Matisse because he had used some of these masses and Spiratou in his work, generally, though, the shows are focused on native arts native artists, those shows are always splendid really high high quality works. If you're at all interested in native art and the contemporary native art seeing the heard will have something spectacular. They have the finest collection. Definitely in the west and probably some of their collection is probably will to some of the pieces the collection at the national museum of the American Indian. They really do a nice job with their show. Depending on how long you heard you have a couple other options for the day. You are right downtown at the heard you're in an old historic neighborhood. You're just north of the Phoenix art museum. The phoenix. Art museum has a lovely collection. They are pretty much the standard big city museum. They have a lovely collection. But it's it's not Phoenix specific for the most part, the exception to that is their photo exhibit draws from the Zona state university collection. Unusually has some really interesting things in it. And they do spectacular spectacular special exhibits. So if you're an art person, you might just want to walk down the street and spend the rest of the day at Pam. I did forget to mention that at the heard have lunch before you leave the herd. They have a fabulous cafeteria than head onto whatever else. The Pam would be one of them the Phoenix art museum the option if you kind of had enough art for the day, or what little smaller museum is to get in. A car and head over to the smaller museum with the a state capitals the state capitalism. It's the old capitol building. They've preserved a few rooms in the building. But they have some really interesting exhibits in there. It's not very big. But they have a exhibit on the Zona the worship which was sunk in Pearl Harbor and some memorabilia from some of the survivors as well as this was news to me that all these ships have find China and silver and fancy settings like you get some Victorian dinner party, and they have all that on display there as well. They also have some very interesting displays on the beginnings of AirAsia as a state in the establishment of the of the state, including the fact that Arizona kind of played a dirty trick to get into the US as a state. They were required to change something in their provision for how they will how the handled their judges and didn't like with the federal government wanted them to. Do. So they went ahead and did it to become a state. And then as soon as they were state, they went and undid it and did it the way they want it to. Whole section on it. It's really quite interesting. So those are my day to option number one my action number two is to go back up. If you haven't been discussed to go to Scottsdale and do western spirit. I don't know. Have you been to western spirit in Scottsdale? Chris I do not know where you speak of with westerns. Still, but this is relatively new museum. It's maybe five years old at the most trying to capture the full extent of the the life and population changes in the west, and it has several components that it's a fine art museum more than a history museum. Although it does have historic pieces. One piece of the museum is a cowboy collection or western collection that has things like Spurs and saddles and all the things you'd expect in like a cowboy museum or an old west museum except most of the pieces were collected because of their artistic value more so than as artifacts of the old west that's a fun place for kids. But it's it's kind of cool for everybody because they have all this stuff. And you start looking at it. And you're like, wow, I never knew Spurs could be that interesting. But they can be part of museums fine. Art, mostly they've been expanding what they've been showing. They usually always have a big section by a prominent bronze artist who does away art in features native Americans, although he's not native American himself. They've added now a western movie poster collection that they acquired so there's usually some sort of western movie themed exhibit. They've also added a collection of Hopi classic historic and contemporary, but mostly historic Hopi pottery that they always have some of undisposed, and then they have some other traveling exhibits they've had western cartoons. They've had the towel Spain tres different things, but very much art based most of the first floor is very much art based except for the movie posters in the western cowboy things the second floor has to Perm semi permanent exhibits one of which saved Alaska. It's kind of. Exhausting. It's a fine. It's interesting. He's laughing. It's a fine art exhibit. That tells the story of the settlement of the west and meeting of the natives and the Anglos as they started settling the west, it's a big Zabit. And it's interesting, but more interesting is the other half, which has mostly has some fine art, but it mostly has more what we would consider artifacts and objects. So it has some artifacts and things from the Lewis and Clark exhibition. It has collection of spectacular chief's blankets. It has a bunch of Curtis. And they've changed this since I was there. The first time of Curtis original Curtis images of native Americans and showing all the different printing presses he used which was something. I had never seen the goal tones in some of that before. And so that was really interesting. It's got a fabulous mix of items and again, very large exhibit. So this is a museum that if you wanna see everything it will take most of the day to take a break here. And here from sponsor with all the recent news of online security breaches is hard not to worry about where your data goes making it online purchase or simply accessing your Email could put your private information at risk. I hope he knew the danger of connecting to the WI fi in the airport or in a local coffee shop. But did you just see AT and T has been selling your data and other companies have been as well your browser history? So that they can target you. You can protect your data and your privacy by using a VPN. I have installed express VPN. They have an easy to use app. That runs seamlessly in the background on your computer, your phone, or your tablet. You could turn on protection with one click. It's occurs. An anonymous as your internet, browsing encrypting your data it cost less than seven dollars a month. And it's the number one rated VPN service by tech radar. Protect your online today and find out. How you can get three months free at express VPN dot com slash travel. That's E X P R E S S VP dot com slash travel for three months free with a one year package and thanks to

Phoenix art museum Art museum Alaska phoenix Curtis Scottsdale Zona state university Pearl Harbor Yupik Matisse Spiratou Pam VP Spurs China Spain AT US Arizona
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

10:21 min | 1 year ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"The bags back on the road. There and read it's go real good pass board. Hamma traveler pursued six hundred forty seven today. The amateur traveler talks about art, museums and western culture, hikes petroglyphs and Naro cactus. As we go to Phoenix, Arizona. The metre traveler, I'm your host, Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Phoenix. I'd like to welcome back to the show Cindy Carlson from exploration vacation dot net. Who has come to talk to us about Phoenix cine? Welcome to the show. I Chris thanks for having me or welcome back to the show said he was here about one hundred episodes ago. I was surprised it was that long ago talking about northern Vietnam. And if you haven't heard that episode I like that episode, obviously because otherwise she would be back. So Cindy, we're talking about a much more domestic destination this time in what's your connection with Phoenix? My now there's been down there about thirty years now. And so I've been going down there pre regularly since about nineteen ninety five bending sometimes just a few days and sometimes spending even a couple of weeks down there exploring the area. Excellent. So she is a snowbird in the language of the area. Yes. My parents are snowbirds I'd snowbird if I could convince my husband to spend more time down there but likes books. Gets a tad warm in the summer for me and Phoenix. And just so we know we usually don't talk about whether for a while. But one of the reasons a lot of people come down in the wintertime, lovely lovely weather summertime. They'll get one hundred days in a row that will go of one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. So that just baby something you think about we have a friend who moved to Phoenix because the summer's here in San Jose that only got two ninety were not hot enough for her. So if you like hot weather, that's definitely good time to go lot more people there in the winter. And there's a lot to do. Actually, I haven't been there in the summer, but there's a lot to do in the summer inside. And there's actually water in rivers and floats and things I have a lot of friends that live there year round. And they actually say summers aren't always that bad. Right. Well, it depends. Again, what you like. And I do know that the friends who go out hiking tend to do it early in the morning in the summertime or or later in the evening usually early in the morning when it's the coolest time of day, but what kind of itinerary do. Recommend for us for Phoenix. So I tried to put together, and I tend to worry that's really aimed at first time. Visitors to Phoenix it gives them an idea of what Phoenix is about where it came from what the landscapes like and what the people who've lived their past and present are like and it's geared. It's five days because five days seems to be to me a good amount of time to get a real feeling for Phoenix. It's still leaves you enough time that if you want to spend time golfing or laying by the pool or you wanna make a trip up to Grand Canyon, which I know you've covered on one a year. Previous shows you can add that on then it's a week's vacation and still do all the stuff that I'm recommending will you we won't took quite as much about site trips. But there are a number different things if you had north or south either down to Tucson, we've done it episode on that or up to flagstaff area up to Grand Canyon or even up to the north east corner of the state, we've got different shows about northern Phoenix. So we won't be talking about them now. But what should we do in Phoenix? Well, actually, let me back up a bit here. I should start with. Why should we go to Phoenix of all the places we should go to sell? I think Phoenix gets the bad rap as as a snowboard destination. Oh, it's just where the retirees go because warm it's hot in the summer. Why would you ever go to Phoenix? And Phoenix, particularly in the last fifteen years twenty years, maybe now has really become a arts and culture hub. It's got a a thriving lively downtown great art scene. It has spectacular scenery all around the city with the snoring desert there. It's become a real interesting place to go. There's something there. I think for everyone, and it's really a worthwhile destination. There's a lot to see in Phoenix that you probably won't see and other places. The only part of that that I would show is that that has happened over the last ten or fifteen years because I've been going there at longer than that. And I think it's getting better known for that over the last ten fifteen years, I think that's been there for. A while in terms of the arts and culture. I think part of it is as light rail's come in. It's maybe it's more that it's expanded places like downtown Mesa that used to be really dead are now little art tub's. Okay. And so maybe that's it because it's been building. It's I've always liked Phoenix. But I think it's really become something that a lot of people don't expect excellent. And we're should we start? So I'm gonna suggest that people start by learning about the Sonoran desert by actually going out to the desert botanical garden, which is in northeast. It's a beautiful place as botanical garden it, of course, has landscaped areas and non native plants, but it also has large areas of native plants. It's a great place to soak in the beauty of the desert and to learn about the desert, so that when you go hiking on your own, you know, that even those those Challah cactuses might look really friendly fuzzy that to get near them. So it gives you both that introduction to the desert as well as beautiful place to wander. You can easily spend a few hours or half day there. They have a fabulous cafes. What's a nice place to spend some time in the garden, and then wandered to the cafe will want to make sure that we're talking about the same place because the desert botanical garden that I know is not in north Phoenix. It's on almost in Scottsdale. So it would be east of Phoenix. It's right on the border of Scottsdale. And Phoenix you that's not north Phoenix east, east Phoenix. Okay. And that's another thing. I should mention that. I have geographic dyslexia when it comes to Unix. So keen on is because I miss a west when I really mean east it's over by Scottsdale, and it's beautiful. It's right at the foot of the mountains beautiful place to walk in wander. I happen to see it. The first time when there was a truly exhibit. So my experience there is quite different because there was all sorts of glass being shown at the same time. But what if a place especially for kids to recommend our kids love the butterfly exhibit, for instance, there as well as some of the other. And they've actually redone the gardens since you've been there since the league's of it. And there are still still Hulas and some other sculptures in the garden. They do special events visitors coming into Phoenix should check the schedule and see they sometimes do big fun parties out in the garden at night and different things can be hard to get tickets to those. But there are blast. If you can get them. Excellent. So because that's not necessarily a full day. If you want to do a little more that day, I would continue on towards the west to the Pueblo grandee museum, which it's a museum in an archaeological park, it's fairly small museum. But they do really nice job of talking about the hokum people who live in the Phoenix area more than thousand years ago. They actually were the original ones building canals in the salt. River valley canals bring all Phoenix's water in today. But that actually goes back to ancient culture that lived there more than a thousand years ago. It's a nice little museum the archaeological site itself, isn't terribly into. There's not a lot left. But the museum dozen nice job of introducing you to what this area was like in the people who live there a long time ago. The other alternative end out your first day would be if it's on a Thursday had over to Scottsdale and do evening art walk and have dinner down on the in the arts district in historic Scottsdale, which is a really fun place. And I'll talk about that a little more in the next day. We should say we haven't really even gone very far from the Phoenix harbor airport here for the first two stops does botanical gardens. The public grid museum are practically stone's throw from the airport. So we haven't ranged very far afield yet. This is all fairly easy to a stone. So for Phoenix anyway, which is a gigantic Norma's area. Geographically is a very large area. Geographically. That's right. I forget to actually put together two different options, depending on visitors interest level of interest in native cultures or cowboy culture, I've got two different options. One the one would. Be two more about the people who live in the southwest today. And that would be a trip to the heard museum in downtown Phoenix even closer to sky harbor airport. We haven't left really Phoenix at all for these. The today's the herd is both a cultural history and art museum about half the museum or more is devoted to exhibits on the peoples of the southwest with separate areas on each different culture, and both modern and historic pieces of art in basket tree in different daily aims of daily life. The other part of the museum includes an exhibit which for in my part of the country is something people don't know as much about as the Indian boarding school era. They've just redone the exhibit. I haven't seen the new one. But the old one was both fascinating and really heartbreaking. But really really interesting again mostly history. But combining modern perspectives and information as well. And presenting it in a way. It's very very acceptable like the exempts really geared for both adults and for children in the area. You're talking about here is an era where they want to pending on how you how you look at this. The one side would say they wanted to include the native Americans in American culture, and therefore they wanted to inculturated them. And the other side would say that they wanted them to lose their identity as native Americans and inculturated them. But it was definitely a very intentional move to bring them in to have the move away from their families to go to these boarding schools and two tournament white people would be the crude way of saying that.

Phoenix Phoenix cine Phoenix harbor Cindy Carlson Scottsdale Chris Christensen Arizona Naro cactus Vietnam art museum Hamma Sonoran desert Pueblo grandee museum Indian boarding school era public grid museum Grand Canyon summers
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"The. The bag on a roll. Anna read it's go in real good pass board. Hammet traveler pursuit six hundred forty seven today. BMI traveler talks about art, museums and western culture, hikes petroglyphs and Sua cactus. As we go to Phoenix, Arizona. Walk. The amateur traveler your host, Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Phoenix. I'd like to welcome back to the show Cindy Carlson from exploration vacation dot net. Who has come to talk to us about Phoenix cine? Welcome to the show. I Chris thanks for having me or welcome back to the show said he was here about one hundred episodes ago. I was surprised it was that long ago talking about northern Vietnam. And if you haven't heard that episode I like that episode, obviously because otherwise she would be back. So Cindy, we're talking about a much more domestic destination this time in what's your connection with Phoenix? My now there's been down there about thirty years now. And so I've been going down there pretty regularly since about nineteen ninety five bending sometimes just a few days and sometimes spending even a couple of weeks down there exploring the area. Excellent. So she is a snowbird in the language of the area. Yes. My parents are snowbirds I'd snowbird if I could convince my husband to spend more time down there, but likes us books. Gets tad warm in the summer for me and Phoenix. And just so we know we usually don't talk about whether for a while. But one of the reasons lot of people come down in the wintertime, lovely lovely weather summertime. They'll get one hundred days in a row that will go of one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. So that just maybe something you think about we have a friend who moved to Phoenix because the summer's here in San Jose that only got two ninety were not hot enough for her. So if you like hot weather, that's definitely a good time to go lot more people there in the winter. And there's a lot to do. Actually, I haven't been there in the summer, but there's a lot to do in the summer inside. And there's actually water in rivers in floats and things I have a lot of friends that live there year round. And they actually say summers aren't always that bad. Right. Well, it depends. Again, what you like. And I do know that the friends who go out hiking tend to do it early in the morning in the summertime or or later in the evening usually early in the morning when it's the coolest time of day. But what kind of itenerary do? Recommend for us for Phoenix. So I tried to put together, and I worry that's really aimed at first time. Visitors to Phoenix it gives them an idea of what Phoenix is about where it came from what the landscapes like and what the people who've lived their past and present are like and it's geared. It's five days because five days seems to be to me a good amount of time to get a real feeling for Phoenix. Still leaves you enough time that if you want to spend time golfing or laying by the pool or you want to make a trip up to Grand Canyon, which I know you've covered on one a year previous shows, you can add that on and then it's a week's vacation and still do all the stuff that I'm recommending will you we won't talk quite as much about side trips. But there are a number different things if you head north or south either down to Tucson, we've done it episode on that or up to flagstaff area up to Grand Canyon or even to the north east corner of the state, we've got different shows about northern Phoenix. So we won't be talking about them now. But what should we do in Phoenix? Well, actually, let me back up a bit here. I should start with. Why should we go to Phoenix of all the places we should go to sell? I think Phoenix gets the bad rap as as a snowboard destination. Oh, it's just where the retirees because warm it's hot in the summer. Why would you ever go to Phoenix? And Phoenix, particularly in the last fifteen years twenty years, maybe now as really become a arts and culture hub. It's got a a thriving lively downtown great art scene. It has spectacular scenery all around the city with the Sonoran desert there. It's become a real interesting place to go. There's something there. I think for everyone, and it's really a worthwhile destination. There's a lot to see in Phoenix that you probably won't see and other places. The only part of that that I would show is that that has happened over the last ten or fifteen years because I've been going there at longer than that. And I think it's getting better known for that over the last ten fifteen years, I think that's been there for. In terms of the arts and culture. I think part of it is as light rail's come in. It's maybe it's more that expanded places like downtown Mesa that used to be really dead are now little art. Okay. And so maybe that's it because it's been building. It's I've always liked Phoenix. But I think it's really become something that a lot of people don't expect excellent. And we're should we start? So I'm going to suggest that people start by learning about the Sonoran desert by actually going out to the desert botanical garden, which is in northeast. It's a beautiful place as mechanical garden it, of course, has landscaped areas and non native plants, but it also has large areas of native plants. It's a great place to soak in the beauty of the desert and to learn about the desert, so that when you go hiking on your own, you know, that even those those Challah cactuses might look really friendly in fuzzy that to get near them. So it gives you both that introduction to the desert as well as beautiful place to wander. You can easily spend a few hours or half day there. They have a fabulous cafe. So it's a nice place to spend some time in the garden. And then wander to the cafe will want to make sure that we're talking about the same place because the desert botanical garden that I know is not in north Phoenix. It's on almost in Scottsdale. So it would be east of Phoenix. It's right on the border of Scottsdale and Phoenix that's not north Phoenix east, east Phoenix. Okay. And that's another thing. I should mention that. I have geographic dyslexia when it comes to Unix. So keen is because I miss a west when I really mean east it's over by Scottsdale, and it's beautiful. It's right at the foot of the mountains beautiful place to walk in wander. I happen to see it. The first time when there was a truly exhibit. So my experience there is quite different because there was all sorts of glass being shown at the same time. But what if place especially for kids to recommend our kids love the butterfly exhibit, for instance, there as well as some of the other. And they've actually redone the gardens since you've been there since the CIA Julia exhibit, and there are still still chew Hulas and some other sculptures in the garden. They do special events visitors coming into Phoenix should check the schedule and see they sometimes do big fun parties out in the garden at night and different things can be hard to get tickets to those. But there blast if you can get them. Excellent. So because that's not necessarily a full day. If you want to do a little more that day, I would continue on towards the west to the grandee museum, which it's a museum in an archaeological park, it's fairly small museum. But they do have really nice job of talking about the hokum people who live in the Phoenix area more than thousand years ago. They actually were the original ones building canals in the salt. River valley canals bring all Phoenix's water in today. But that actually goes back to ancient culture that lived there more than a thousand years ago. It's a nice little museum the archaeological site itself, isn't terribly into. Interesting. There's not a lot left, but the museum dozen nice job of introducing you to what this area was like in the people who live there a long time ago. The other alternative end out your first day would be if it's on a Thursday head over to Scottsdale and do evening art walk and have dinner down on the in the arts district in historic Scottsdale, which is a really fun place. And I'll talk about that a little more and went in the next day. We should say we haven't really even gone very far from the Phoenix harbor airport here for the first who stops does botanical gardens. The public grid museum are practically stone's throw from the airport. So we haven't ranged very far afield yet. This is all fairly easy to stone. So for Phoenix anyway, which is a gigantic Norma situ area. Geographically is a very large area geographically that's right for day to actually put together to different options, depending on visitors inter level of interest in native cultures or cowboy culture. I've got two different options won the won would. Be two and more about the people who live in the southwest today. And that would be a trip to the heard museum in downtown Phoenix even closer sky harbor airport. We haven't left really Phoenix at all for these. The today's the herd is both a cultural history and art museum about half the museum or more is devoted to exhibits on the peoples of the southwest with separate areas on each different culture, and both modern and historic pieces of art in basket tree in different daily aims daily life. The other part of the museum includes an exhibit which for in my part of the country is something people don't know as much about as the Indian boarding school era. They've just redone the exhibit. I haven't seen the new one. But the old one was both fascinating and really heartbreaking. But really really interesting again mostly history. But combining modern perspectives and information as well. And presenting it in a way. That's very very acceptable like the exempts really geared for

Phoenix Phoenix cine Phoenix harbor Sonoran desert Cindy Carlson Scottsdale Chris Christensen Arizona Vietnam Hammet art museum Anna BMI Sua cactus grandee museum public grid museum Tucson Grand Canyon summers
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"We start in Phoenix Arizona this morning. That's where police have charged a nurse at a long-term healthcare facility with raping the incapacitated woman. He was supposed to be caring for thirty six year old Nathan Sutherland appeared in court Wednesday, this after police issued court ordered DNA tests on male employees at hacienda healthcare. Here is a Phoenix police sergeant Tommy Thompson. Through the course of their investigations detectives authored and served search warrants to obtain records to identify individuals who may have had access to the victim in this case. In addition. Detectives authored orders to obtain DNA evidence from numerous individuals that evidence was sent to the Phoenix police department crime lab and those individuals worked tirelessly tirelessly to compare those DNA samples with DNA obtain from the baby now one of the samples obtained through a court. Order was from thirty six year old Faneuil Sutherland Sutherland was a licensed practical nurse or an LPN who was responsible for providing care to the victim during the time the sexual assault occurred on Tuesday January twenty second was yesterday. The scientists and the Phoenix police crime crime laboratory determined the sampled at the pain from southern. Matched the baby shortly after that determination Sutherland was taken into custody by officers from the Phoenix police department fugitive apprehension investigations detail and taken to Phoenix police headquarters for processing. Based upon probable cause that they developed through this investigation. Nathan Sutherland is being booked into the miracle county jail today as we speak charged with one count of sexual assault and one count of vulnerable adult abuse. Investigators think Sutherland raped the patient sometime between February and April. The twenty nine year old victim had been in long term care since the age of three and gave birth at the facility December twenty nine th employee said they had no idea she was pregnant police say it was a former prison guard trainee who killed five people during a standoff at a small town Florida Bank before surrendering to a swat team. Investigators said Zaphon Xaver called police from inside the SunTrust Bank branch Wednesday to report that he had opened fire Florida governor, Rhonda scientists and police chief Carl Hoglund people Florida stand with the community here..

Nathan Sutherland Phoenix Faneuil Sutherland Sutherland Phoenix police department Phoenix Arizona assault Zaphon Xaver Florida SunTrust Bank hacienda healthcare Carl Hoglund Florida Bank trainee Tommy Thompson thirty six year twenty nine year twenty second
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"The story out of Phoenix Arizona. Investigators are possible taking a closer look at possible. Sexual assault are for a woman. There was an vegetative state for fourteen years gave birth. Oh, but that set in for a minute to do some math there. But that set in for medicine woman patient of the hacienda health care skilled nursing facility for fourteen years. And they didn't know she was pregnant until she went into labor unconscious at a nurse that happened to be there gas or an attendance help deliver that baby right there. It's very possible. Somebody's going to have to go to jail. I don't think we need any further explanation. I think we can all figure out what happened, and it's not pretty I think there's a special place in hell for people that rape those were disabled unconscious. Do what you have to do sad sick and twisted immediately. Wow. Yeah. Now, I wa this unnamed woman has been in the patient there for at least fourteen years after a near drowning left her in a vegetative state. A source familiar with what happened who asked to remain anonymous told the Arizona family that staffers at the city had no idea the woman was pregnant until she went into labor this past Saturday. Wow. Now, the source said the nurse at the facility delivered the baby who's alive and healthy. The baby's fine law enforcement immediately got involved to determine how this pregnancy could have happened. I think we know how. Yeah, we just got to find out who. Now, the source said the patient required around the clock care that many people would have access to her room since the birth of acidity has instituted a new rule requiring Mel staffers to be escorted by a female staffer whatever they go into a room with a female patient this according to the zone family now inside are found at the nursing facility have been previously citing for the state of health authorities for another complaint of inappropriate behavior. A nursing assistant a resin complained into the inspectors that the nurse would enter shower rooms while residents were bathing naked, and so they got a complaint for that several years ago lovely I'm curious why would you leave somebody in a vegetative state for fourteen years? Are they hoping that this person is gonna come out of it? I know you don't have the answer to that. But it sounds like you do. Tell us now. I sure that family do I don't I just saying that what I what would you do all your family members are listening? What would you do? Thanks todd. I don't know you're the one. So what would you do in this situation? That's a tough call. It's a tough call. I just doesn't sound like it's a tough call. I think you would probably unplug that relative. Well, I just think there. You come to the point. You know, if it's been a few years. Golly. Obviously nothing is going to change. But it's a top call. But. Doesn't sound like it's a tough call for you. Sounds like you might accidentally unplugged that machine. B b b. I think you've really gone to the dark side, you're the one that went to the north side. Talking about unplugging. Explain explain tell me how you're going to tell this family to unplug grandma. You brought it up this. This would rather not this the side of the ankle you brought I just unfortunately what I did was. I shared a thought that I probably shouldn't have shared and now you're putting me on the spot. Don't give me all the credit. You're the one that said what the hell is she doing in a vegetative state years? What the hell? But you said what is she doing in a vegetative state for fourteen years? I just think that that probably the writings on the wall that this is probably as good as it's gonna get. But I guess that's for this family must be a hard call to make. That's all I can say it must be hard for them to make that call must be in your world. It would be an easy. I have no idea. I have no idea. Todd. I know it sounds like you do it sounds like we have a pretty good idea. It sounds like there's going to be an interesting conversation over the dinner table tonight after she Moseley yard and cooked your food. Yeah. That's the topic. I'm going to bring let's talk about what happens if you're in a vegetative state. I know if it was me, I'd say, hey, unplug me, don't waste all that money time and resource stand over my bad crying. Right. Let me go. Well, I kind of hope give me a good healthy sponge bath. Yeah. And let me go. That's right. That's right. Simple as that Boone. Feed me my last meal, and it sounds like it sounds like she was she I don't know her age. We should we should find that out Elissa her age because she apparently was in some sort of near drowning incident. And that's why she's in the vegetative state. And maybe maybe maybe a young person. Yeah. Well, rough deal all the way round. And what's what's the charge? Is it aggravated rape? Oh, that's right. That is rape. Obviously this was sex without any kind of consent whatsoever. Yeah. Unless it's some kind of immaculate conception. And I just don't think that's the case. I don't think that happens. I don't think that is the case it is eight forty two here on the Totta Don show, you could jump in here at five one two eight three six zero five ninety toll free eight seven seven five nine zero five five to five hundred to a dark place, man. Yeah. Well, it's I think it's a valid question. It is why what was your question. My question was why would you keep somebody on life support? Who's in a vegetative state has been for fourteen years? I are they holding out hope maybe more for some kind of looker finger moved or she's she spoke. I I don't know. I can understand holding out. Hope I can. But it just seems like thank you most. I think most doctors listening what say that. She's never coming back, right? The way she was I to say or are there any cases of anybody being in a coma for that long a vegetative state? I don't think so I can't I can't think of any made for TV movie. No, I can't either. It sounds to me like we have. I it sounds me. Like, we have a nursing facility that not not only likes to impregnate those who are unconscious, but maybe lex that revenue. I bet that's what forty fifty thousand a year. Maybe more more hundred thousand dollars a year. I don't know what that cost to have that kind of constant care. I don't know. But it sure is a cash cow. Yeah. For the doctors and the nurses at that retirement center. And apparently, it was a place where somebody would get his rocks off too. You would think that if you wanted to she's twenty two years old. Oh my God. Twenty two years old. She's been in a vegetative state for fourteen years. I don't get it at all. And it seems like there would also be some kind of surveillance camera on this person is well here caught the child in that situation. Somebody's there with their every day. Right. Yeah. Is she in my other question is, and I guess the case was she must not have been showing at all. Or nobody was paying attention. Is it possible? I'm very visit impossible to be in a vegetative state. And not on life support. Maybe.

rape todd Phoenix Arizona assault Arizona Mel Moseley Boone fourteen years hundred thousand dollars Twenty two years twenty two years
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Phoenix. Arizona's news station. KTAR news ninety two three. From ABC news. I'm Daria Albinger. President Trump and leaders from Canada and Mexico are celebrating a new trade agree bunch of NAFTA remains intact. But the new deal does have changes coming to the auto industry and agriculture it will require automakers to use more North American parts and require higher wages. It will also give American dairy farmers more access to Canadian markets, but it's language discussing currency manipulation. And barring free trade deals with non market economies that may signal a template for the Trump administration's negotiations with Asian Pacific countries. Mark Remillard, ABC news. The White House has eased limitations on the F B I background investigation into supreme court nominee Brett cavenaugh. President Trump now says the FBI doesn't fact operate at his direction in this case. But said alternately, quote, my White House will do whatever the senators want. The president was also asked if the FBI should interview all three women accusing judge capital of sexual assault. It wouldn't bother me at all. I mean, I've been heard that the third one. Has I have no idea if this is true has very little credibility. The FBI has been given a deadline of October fifth to complete its investigation and report the findings to the White House. Stephanie Ramos, ABC news, the White House. A lawyer for Mark judge tells ABC news that judge has been interviewed by the FBI. But the interview isn't done judge was named by Christine Blasi Ford the other person in the room when she was allegedly assaulted by Cavanaugh remembrances anima Morial underway in Las Vegas marking the one year anniversary of the nation's deadliest massacre gunman opened fire on a music festival killing nearly sixty people including Mindy Smith sister of lives changed forever when they had to live through that terrifying night. And now they struggle with all they have to endure. None of us will ever be the same after that night. And the days that follow FBI's never found a motive for the shooting. You're listening to ABC news. Arizona's news.

FBI ABC White House President Trump Mark Remillard Trump administration Phoenix. Arizona Daria Albinger president American dairy farmers Arizona Christine Blasi Ford supreme court Stephanie Ramos Brett cavenaugh Mindy Smith
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on Amanpour

"In phoenix arizona in the desert and he you know basically he swapped to wide screen television and a second hand call community and family and so we left community and family for that second hand co i'm wide screen television yeah i'm buying that he just didn't think that was a good deal so interesting i wonder what the people coming across into arizona and new mexico and texas and all these frontier states right now from from central america what they know about what they going to whether they think they're going to find the american dream or is it going to be a bit of a letdown i think i think what happens in cuba is is roy land marianas brother hit made twenty previous attempts he arrived there on the twenty first ten i think to get on the phone back to the family in cuba and say after twenty one the tens that is actually know what putting out is a very difficult thing to do i think pride gets in the way and i think they tell the cubans us din in cuba things better than it really is and that kind of myth just kinds of spreads around the country it just perpetuates the american dream what do you want people to take away from this when they've through the film maybe a slightly unfashionable thing to say but i think that sometimes for some economic migrants in certain circumstances is maybe not always the best thing to do and i guess that's kind of another choice that people should think about that is so important that you just say that because right now the politicians are saying economic migrants you go back if you're in legitimate fear of posts acution a war all the other terrible things that could get you refugee or asylum status it is it's hard to say what you said it is but they're going to have to be making those decisions if not the governments will is an unfashionable thing to say about as what i witnessed and he's told it beautifully that is the most spectacular visuals certainly in that in your film and a really really interesting relationships to kim hopkins thank you very much indeed thank you so much and that's it for our program tonight thanks for watching and goodbye from london

phoenix arizona new mexico america cuba texas kim hopkins london
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on KOIL

"Nice person in phoenix arizona listening on the radio there patti i talked to patti she's very nice patti and her sister listener sisters in tucson and and petty says you know everybody calls her folk on us i got a better name for really she should be called lie a wafa lyle wafa it's another she lives she lies other chee lies about all this stuff because she's a big liar wire liar buckskin pants on fire let's go to let's go to the phones let's go to john in washington d c john you're on the chris plante show hey credit howery smart i'm great thank you could get one thanks for taking my call uh you you alert alluded to it a moment ago about how uh uh you know worn stole a college education john a native american child i think that's just arbel thing you know people don't really realize that there was a limited number of seats in that classroom back year in that college and they should have gone to actual native american and there's a there's a native american out there somewhere who did who was robbed of a college education by this woman who knew what she was doing and you know if if trump is done this or so on the on the you know republican it on the democrats would have a million attorneys out there right that be jumping out of airplanes you know um to go find native american and they would parade that native american around on all the networks just like they did as the muslim family you know it the dnc at a at the other gold serve family you're absolutely right usm an abuse them until they throw them away white kleenex it was cultural appropriation you're listening to the.

arizona patti tucson chee dnc phoenix patti i washington chris plante
"phoenix arizona" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"phoenix arizona" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Some of the nine basic but basic meeting it important some of the most important things that you need to understand with regard to social security has to do with spousal benefits has to do with your own retirement benefits it has to do with full retirement age it has to do with the the increases or the decrease that you get depending on when you happen to take your own benefits and how some of them might be denied to you for various reasons and by the way i think you also get into the taxation of social security if not fully then at least briefly in some strategies surrounding that so watch it go there now if you like wealth dot com the nine vital steps at navigating social security we get so many russia's on social security that we thought an important to at least have that up there it's quick through it's about fifteen minutes you can watch the whole thing be done with it and be a whole lot smarter after this fifteen minutes right there at wellfed dot com and speaking of which and other social security email or two this is from sally in phoenix arizona hello i have a question i don't quite understand it was written is wali sorry it was in taipo gunnar sheet there lawfully italy i don't see sally no it was sally i have a question i don't quite understand the whole thing was social security and all and it was wondering about something i've been married to times and each of the marriages were over ten years both of my ex husband's are deceased they both past after we had already divorced i've been working for years myself and wondering when i come up on retirement age add like to retire at age sixty two in nine years when it comes to retirement age or could i.

social security russia arizona wali sally fifteen minutes nine years ten years