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COVID-19 Threatens Indigenous People Of The Amazon

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:06 min | Last month

COVID-19 Threatens Indigenous People Of The Amazon

"Covert nineteen is devastating Brazil it's already killed more than twenty two thousand Brazilians and is NPR's Philip Reeves reports there's a particular concern about its impact in the Amazon rain forest there's a huge fish that swims the rivers of the rain forest it's called the cool this fish is more than two meters long which means it's handy for anyone explaining social distancing to people in the Amazon welcome one Jesus body ages if you're waiting on the line stay one or two cool apart advises the announcer is also visit the huge why did you call that a public service broadcasters on community radio in a place called some capital to cash whether it's a small river towns surrounded by forest he can play with so I could run the feeders that's the same message in one of some capitals sixteen local languages nine out of ten people in the area are indigenous which would have made of bush prizes for the job sage is were discovered in ninety six fabulous empire the municipal health section first the way to the next day six yes my master kilos also wish to keep this strictly scared municipal officials local people was scared too if it ended up costing somewhere but yeah there was a lot of panic dresses Anthony Bonilla did it from the bin he would try it out that's the source this virus doesn't fool around he says could nineteen has now killed at least seventeen people in some Gabrielle nearly six hundred or infected including villages in indigenous forest reserve it's in Brazil's far northwest by huge river no negative that's the same river the last time NPR traveled supplies are shipped in from the nearest big city that city is minnows five hundred and fifty miles away when covered nineteen hit me now is it caused havoc victims were buried in mass graves the health system collapsed people in some company L. suspect that's where the virus came from

Brazil NPR Philip Reeves Anthony Bonilla Gabrielle Amazon Bush
Bolivian lawmakers approve new elections, bar ex-president

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:54 sec | 7 months ago

Bolivian lawmakers approve new elections, bar ex-president

"To Bolivia now where lawmakers have passed a bill paving the way for new elections after weeks of violent unrest NPR's Philip reeve says the legislation means that former president ever moralis cannot run it's been two weeks since moralis fell from power amid mass protests of allegations that he rigged last month's election to win a fourth term since then his supporters have blockaded roads they've held big demonstrations against the interim president to replace but Alice thousands have been killed or injured in clashes with security forces who opened fire on crowds now the might be a breakthrough Bolivia's Congress is controlled by the Socialist Party of malice yet both houses unanimously agreed to a bill the denials the last election and lays the ground for a new vote it sets term limits preventing moralis from running the date will be set by a new electoral tribunal once that's

Bolivia Philip Reeve President Trump Interim President Congress Socialist Party Alice Two Weeks
Evo Morales begins Mexico exile as senator claims interim presidency

NPR's World Story of the Day

03:36 min | 8 months ago

Evo Morales begins Mexico exile as senator claims interim presidency

"Bolivia's former president. Evo Morales arrived in Mexico today to live in exile. He resigned Sunday amid protests that began after serious areas flaws were found. In last month's election now the senator next in the Bolivian Line of succession has announced. She will assume the presidency and peers. Philip Reeves is in the capital city the of Lopez and before we begin Phillip Here's what we know Morales resigned. His government collapsed anyone constitutionally designated to replace him step down. So what have you learned about this senator. WHO's announced her intention to lead the country? She's called Janina. She's fifty two. She's the second vice president. She's a lawyer with a media background and she's a fierce critic of Morales she had earlier announced that Bolivia's congress was going to convene this afternoon to formerly decide who would stand in as interim president. And here's the thing. Allies of Morales hold a majority in Congress and they don't necessarily want her a lot. All of them didn't show up today. So the problem forming a quorum yet despite this she went ahead and took control of the Senate and assumed the mantle of interim president saying she wants elections as soon as possible now members of Morales Party. The Movement for socialism were there when she made that announcement. It's not clear to me at this point whether her move will stick or whether Congress will accept this given the absence of a quorum. There's certainly been an angry reaction from morality supporters some some of whom tried to reach the Congress building after the announcement was made and they were met by police and soldiers firing tear gas at them. You've underscored the challenges that you'll have with all of the Morales support still in Bolivia's Congress. What do we know about Bolivians more? Generally well this is a very unstable volatile point in the history of this country. You just have to travel around this city to see that a lot of roads blocked off by makeshift barricades Arkadiusz. The city's pretty much shut down in the city today. The were very large numbers of police on the streets in full riot gear. The army's also on the streets it's those people who've been protesting for several weeks against morale is after the election. That was last month are celebrating. Because he's gum but but others are angry. Many of the people at the demonstration that was held today by supporters of Morales in the city are indigenous. Bolivians like Madonna's himself. They revere him because he did much to lift. Indigenous people out of poverty during his fourteen years nearly in power but one particularly disturbing. Something happened during that. Protest military jets flew very low and very fast over the crowd on multiple occasions while I was there and this was evidently meant as a show of force but it didn't seem to unsettle them one of their chance. Was You know we are not afraid. Given what you've described even with this interim turn presidency. Has the danger passed. No by no means I mean this is a very unstable situation. People here are worried about that. I spoke to one woman even today. Who didn't or doesn't align herself with Morales or with the opposition? She says she's no faith. That civilian politicians can resolve this situation. Adamantly and settler leader that can really manage a peaceful transition to new elections. She says she's worried. She says she's afraid and from the scenes gene today. I think she might be right to feel that way. That's NPR's Philip Rees reporting from La Paz Bolivia. Thank

Evo Morales Vice President Bolivia Congress Morales Party Interim President Senator La Paz Bolivia President Trump Lopez Mexico Philip Reeves Philip Rees Senate NPR Army Madonna
The Deadly Fight To Protect Brazil's Amazon

Environment: NPR

05:42 min | 9 months ago

The Deadly Fight To Protect Brazil's Amazon

"For Brazilians working to preserve the Amazon rainforest how far they'd go to combat climate change is a serious question deforestation is up sharply in part because of the surge in fires this year many of those fires are set by criminal groups stealing land as NPR's Philip Reeve's reports Brazil protecting the forest often falls too courageous individuals willing to risk their lives people of the rainforest holding a meeting in women and children and shorts and flip flops a sitting inside a wooden pavilion clearing among the trees they're here to talk about routine forest stuff jumbles about the timetable of the ferry on the nearby they discussed who's going to use the communal tractor the relaxed mood is deceptive. Shuo proposer as president of the residents association that called this meeting ethical when you get more details bother Barbosa people here actually deeply worried we're in the Amazon's western part in the Brazilian state of actually people around here are mostly subsistence farmers and rubber tappers who rely on the forest for their livelihoods words just reached them that their neighbors a few miles away are illegally setting fires to clear land for cattle a major issue for that's disturbing setback especially for activists who risked their lives defending forest but Boza is fifty five he's been an environmental activist here all his adult life years ago one of his fellow activists was shot dead by legal ranches now as forestation surges bubble believes people protecting the forest face a growing threat he's not alone I think it's become significantly more date interest. Daniel Wilkinson directs the Environmental Rights Program at Human Rights Watch Human Rights Watch has been investigating the deadly tactics the organizations in the Amazon News against those who stand in their way Brazil's far-right President Shaya boatswain auto wants to exploit the forests comic potential and is often accused of cheering on these criminal groups Wilkinson says the problem started long before Bolsonaro took office but ads what's new is that Brazil has a president who is openly hostile to the Brazilians who are trying to protect your forest including the government's own Inbar agencies killings in conflicts over Amazon Land and resources a common in Brazil Brazil's pastoral Van Commission which tracks these says the been more than three hundred in the last decade only fourteen cases went to trial says Wilkinson when people get killed in this part of the Amazon lers are almost never brought to justice the police blamed the fact that communities where killings happen often are remote but in fact even when killings happened in town they released any serious investigation these criminal groups often have connections in high places and plenty of weapons activists and also environment enforcement officials who dared to challenge them can expect their lives to be turned upside down the Soda Community How just ask Yoshiko logo ratty Saddam Lobos thirty seven and an indigenous Brazilian he lives deep in the rainforest inefficient community in the state of Para last logo launched a campaign to stop illegal loggers and miners invading his communities land he put handmade signs on trees pointing out their lands protected by law and telling landgrabbers to keep out it wasn't long before we started getting death threats his mind boss Katha Pinta Mata logos some loggers and miners decided to kill him and set up an ambush he escaped because he received a last minute tip off the Lobos now enrolled in a zillion government protection program for rights activists some the threat although he says it only provides limited security mostly in Kohl's and police escorts when he travels in the same program is this man never dodger decision running against I wouldn't wish this life on anyone there's a lot of suffering that's Danielle Pereira an environmental activists also he and his wife took on logos and a work one day to find to freshly dug graves outside that they spent the last six months at a secret address in Brazil's capital Acilia and have no idea when they return to the forest even in the big city they don't feel safe as a spur Sochi a residential some groups people who are against US belong to organized groups they are rich criminals who have the money to go wherever they like the emotional toll of living at constant risk is huge says Seo logo is squeaky he says he will it's public places and has stopped hanging out with Francis you're aware that you could be killed at any moment he says we don't know who to trust Lobos considered giving up his campaign to protect the forest on which is community depends question do I do. He's decided to carry on because he says in his heart he knows is sue you prefer to name. York was doing the right thing.

Brazil Amazon Daniel Wilkinson Philip Reeve President Trump Environmental Rights Program Boza NPR Barbosa York Six Months One Day
Fires in Brazil's Amazon blamed on deforestation

Environment: NPR

04:10 min | 11 months ago

Fires in Brazil's Amazon blamed on deforestation

"There's anger and dismay around the world about what's happening in the amazon right now. Tens of thousands of fires are burning in the rainforest dramatically more than last year environmentalists. I say many of these are caused by cattle ranchers and loggers clearing forest land. They blame brazil's president for encouraging them. N._p._r.'s philip brees has just returned from a trip to the amazon and i can you just give us a sense of scale. How serious is the situation. I know it's a cliche but the amazon rainforest really is the lungs of the world stores vast amounts of carbon. That's really crucial for slowing climate change. There are tens of thousands of fires in the forest every year but this year the number is far higher. Let me give you some of the figures according to brazil's institute of space that being more than seventy four thousand dollars this year and that's up more in eighty percent on last year and a lot of these are in the amazon the have been spikes before in two thousand and five for example but back then there was a drought and and environmentalists and climate change experts saying there's no drought this year and there are no doubt the people causing most of these in order to clear land often for cattle and they say that they have the data to prove it. When you visited the rainforest. How close were you able to get to see evidence of these fires always in the west of brazil in the state of actually which is mostly actually covered by rainforest and i drove into the forest and started to see smoke pretty early on and eventually came across a fire. There's actually burning there so i turned on my taper cola woah this area of land here well inside the amazon rainforest is burning. I can see charred tree stumps all around me smoke rising not just about this particular part of the fire but of over in the distance old around. I could see the forest but i could also see a large area. Maybe ten twelve football fields that has been unburned now. That's just one fire if you think that there are many thousands of these sense of the scale of this a scale so great that according to the world meteorological organization tation smoke from amazon fis is actually reaching the atlantic coast and also brazil's biggest city sao paulo way to the south of the amazon. Why are environmentalists blaming aiming brazil's president for this jabu scenario. The president argues that his government can exploit the amazon's mineral and agricultural wealth and preserve the forest but if you look at what he's actually done since taking office in january. It doesn't seem to have much to do with preservation. He's weakened government environmental enforcement osman agencies. He's alienated too key foreign sources of money for preservation projects norway and germany. He's also scoffed at satellite data compiled compiled by the government's monitoring agency and a lot of people say that by doing this does not always encouraging illegal loggers cattle ranches to cause more destruction of the kind. We're seeing now. Listen to the amer hamas. Who's from the socio environmental institute here in brazil. I think that it shows to people that the government's not interested stood in enforcing the legislation and strengthening all the strategies to combat deforestation like green sign for people to go into the ground rounding to the forest without any kind of control because they know that the president afterwards will say well that didn't happen. You know how is wilson are reacting getting to these kinds of accusations well. He's tried to counter-attack by suggesting without offering any evidence that non-governmental organizations are deliberately setting fires lies in the forest to make him look bad boston tried to row back from that remarks somewhat today by posting online video accusing the media of irresponsibly hyping those remarks but the allegations still out there and it's causing a lot of astonishment also outrage. There is generally a lot of anger here about what's happening in the rainforest brazil's environment minister at a taste of that during a u._n. Climate change meeting here in brazil this week where he was heckled and booed and in the coming days protests are planned around brazil to highlight the crisis in amazon. That's n._p._r.'s philip reeve's in rio de janeiro philip thank you you're welcome.

Amazon Brazil President Trump Philip Reeve Rio De Janeiro Philip Brees Socio Environmental Institute Wilson Amer Hamas Sao Paulo Institute Of Space N._P._R. Boston Norway Germany Seventy Four Thousand Dollars Eighty Percent
"philip reeve" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on KCRW

"I wish I could go. In fact, I may have to put in for that in October. We'll have to wait and see there you go five thirty five KCRW. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish Chang. Venezuelans took to the streets of the capital Caracas today demanding the ouster of leftist President Nicolas Maduro, but many stayed home one day after opposition leader one Guido tried to spark a military uprising instead of the millions. He called for thousands came out. Some banging pots and pans security forces fought pockets of protesters with tear gas and rubber bullets NPR's. Philip Reeves is in Caracas and joins us now. Hey, phil. So what's the mood in seemed in like on the streets in Caracas today? Well, I only recently arrived. So I haven't seen the whole city by any means when I got here, I went straight to a demonstration of the city's east side. This was one of those demonstrations that have been cold by one Guido for what he billed as the biggest of a demonstration in the history of Venezuela. The we're a lot of people that possibly in the tens of thousands. But I have seen much logic crowds, not quite though full. And so this was a small a small out. And I think the most noticeable thing about it is the mood has quite substantially changed. Whilst these demonstrations for the opposition Guido before very lively chanting singing. Now, there's a mood of wariness. I thought it was more subdued and not far away from where I was there were violent clashes. Underway between the security forces and smoke group of anti-government protesters in which you know, they were exchanging the security forces fired rubber bullets tear gas on the protesters will chucking rooks, and indeed a soul people breaking up rocks and putting them into plastic bags to give to the protesters now with beginning to see people with mental shields. Homemade shields gas masks, and so so this is this being a change in this this protest and the security forces. I think responding with with more violence, and of course, as a result of that we can expect more injuries and give us more detail about the change in the mood. I mean, have you been able to get a sense of the reaction to yesterday's extrordinary events when you're talking to people. What are they saying well, berries, I spoke to one person who woman who in the fifties who was hit by the bullet yesterday. Today. She came back again today. She's a peaceful protests, and she said she was disappointed, but she really thought yesterday might be the day when nNcholas Maduro finally was ousted from power in Venezuela. And a new dispensation installed that hasn't happened. She says she's coming back because she's going to continue the fight. I spoke to others who said, look, we we've grown used to the idea that this is a long road, and we can continue. Now, this of course, was just the one side of the equation. This is the support for Guido right other demonstrations also today, which I saw I drive into the city in support of the government. They were smaller significantly. So these the Chevy's does the supporters of the late Yugoslav is who come out with flags and red caps and hold rather demonstrations, and the the these took place in Caracas today. Okay. Now, president Maduro had called for his supporters to rush into the streets and rally. Did you see a lot of people chanting for Madero today? No. Mean? Saw was smooth protests. It's possible the other lodge ones in favor of doodo, but he's not wildly popular here. Under twenty percent his position in the ratings. So you wouldn't expect these protests to be that lodge guava, always launches? Okay. That's NPR's Philip briefs in Caracas Venezuela. Thanks, phil. We're now joined here in the studio by a political adviser to the Venezuelan opposition leader one Guido Francisco Marquez was imprisoned for four months by President Nicolas Maduro upon release he left the country now lives in the US Francisco. Marquez welcome to the program. Thank you for having me here. So help us understand you're in touch with one Guido. How have you seen the last forty eight hours? Was this a political gamble? So to speak that paid off. The last two hours president dole ordered security forces to restore constitutional order. That's what we saw. This was not a coup d'etat. This was all legitimate president recognized by the Venezuelans by over sixty countries. Asking security forces to go on the right side of the constitution. And at this point when you're talking about directing the security forces. Do you know what proportion is still loyal to nNcholas Maduro? This is a nationwide movement by the security forces and the majority of security forces are with the people. Remember, these military men Lauren high-ranking have families that don't have food on the table that they can't find medicine. So they're deeply impacted by the crisis. But if we look on screen and see a crackdown and see people going after protesters. How should we see that? They're definitely still a regime officials supporting regime, the regime of Madonna. That's that's a fact, but it's not the majority, and I would also point to that. In fact, even though there were millions. Venezuelan on the streets. There wasn't widespread repression read into what ought of the security forces. Don't do the orders that they don't follow. And that's also a big break in this situation, as you talked about there is this sense that there are members of the military who are defecting so to speak in support of one Guido, do you know, how much the military is actually in support of your movement right now, the transition is a process think about when the Berlin Wall fell wasn't a day. It was a process and since January twenty third when the constitutionally designated interim president started this process, he asked for security forces to support the constitutional president ever since then we've seen constant in a trickle effect of both high level and a middle and lower ranks of security forces what your communication like with the White House with the Trump administration. Well, I'm I'm here advising evacuate and investor. Evacuate myself have very fluid communication with members of congress with the State Department with the White House, and we've always rated have seen with very good is that this is a bipartisan issue. So what does it mean to you? When you hear someone like John Bolton, the national security adviser talking about all options being on the table when it comes to support for Venezuela. Do you have any fears about military intervention? Well, first of all we continue to ask for all options on the table. So you do you want that to be a potential we want all options on the table? We haven't asked specifically for military intervention. And the big difference is is that you have to be responsible about this think of this scenario think about one doodo continues to murder, more and more people. He has asked regime militia groups to repress peaceful protesters. So I think we have to be responsible about this approach. And that's precisely we always ask for a peaceful and constitutional solution in what other dictatorship, do you see a national assembly and interim president with the people asking for the regime to leave you were a political prisoner. What's this moment? Like for you. Personally. I've been fighting this fight since I was thirteen Chavez got into power a long time ago. Now, I'm thirty two. I'm married. I'm an exile. We will I will continue to fight this fight. And this fight is about this. Survival of the Venezuelan people. We're fighting to get back home. We're fighting for a home or fighting to rebuild our country..

Guido Francisco Marquez President Nicolas Maduro Caracas president Venezuela interim president NPR Philip Reeves phil nNcholas Maduro Audie Cornish Chang Chevy Madero Chavez Berlin Wall Francisco Lauren
"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you so much for being with us. Great to join you. No one in Venezuela dispute that if nNcholas Maduro losers the support of his top military commanders. He falls from power today. There seems to be a fracture. There's a video circulating on Twitter of an air force general saying that he now recognizes the opposition leader as legitimate. Interim head of state the Venezuelan air is disrespecting journal is a traitor and alleges he's done this because his father is under investigation for corruption. This is occurring on a highly charged with mass demonstrations planned by both sides NPR's Philip Reeve says the country's political crisis is presenting many officers in Venezuela's security forces with a dilemma. I think is. When I go has a message that's become his Mansur at every public meeting. Venezuela's police and military should abandoned doodo. He says did on the right side of history before it's too late yet switching sides for Venezuelan in uniform is easier said than done. We've come to a sidewalk cafe to meet a police officer NPR's withholding his name his request because he fears reprisals as Venezuela's political power struggle intensifies, this officers agonizing over what to do. It's hard for us because we're going through the same crisis as everyone else. This man's been a cop for a quarter of a century. He says when he signed up pay and conditions were good. He had health insurance and bonuses and could afford holidays abroad. Now his pace almost worthless. Because of hyperinflation Venezuela's government so broke he has to buy his own uniform, even his boots. Many cops are suffering from acute poverty says there's pretty widespread discontent because they go to work without eating for the whole day. They have no food at home. This officer says he's been shot three times in the line of duty that was part of the job of maintaining law and order as the current political crisis gathers momentum this officer worries about what else he'll be asked to do in the line of duty look poodle. They ask you to repress the people. These people are cells our families. This man says he knows many senior officers in the police force, including from elite units her against the dodo and the ruling socialist party. But he adds we can't speak out. If we do that the first thing they'll do is go after our families officers who disloyal a fired arrested and imprisoned. He says that makes turning against the Dudas government, very risky yet. He believes many government employees are on the verge of doing. So. We're getting close to that point the police civil servants fiber gate intelligence services. We're all going through the same crisis. He says he's thinking seriously about switching sides. He's. I would like to I wish I could. But I think about my family guy. What if this Madero government doesn't fall and nothing happens? That's certainly what Madonna is hoping for the donors loses the support of his security forces, especially in the military. He's out..

Venezuela officer NPR Interim head Dudas government Twitter Philip Reeve Mansur Madero Madonna socialist party
Venezuela opposition leader to police: Leave my family alone

1A

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Venezuela opposition leader to police: Leave my family alone

"Venezuela's opposition leader, one Guido is warning a state security unit to stay away from his family. He's declared himself Venezuela's interim president and is leading a campaign to oust nNcholas Maduro. NPR's Philip Reeve says that Guido claims his family is being threatened by DOE is accusing the doodo security forces of trying to intimidate him. He blames a special forces police unit with a reputation for atrocities that's widely feared by Venezuelans doses. Agents from that false visited his home when he was out. They asked for his wife hustle is who is at home with their baby daughter Guido said this during a speech at a university in Caracas outlining his plans for government. He then went home and appeared outside his apartment building with his wife daughter Venezuela's national police dismisses guidos account is totally false. The US says it was an egregious. Act of

Guido Venezuela Nncholas Maduro Interim President Philip Reeve Caracas DOE NPR Guidos United States
"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Venezuela today. NPR's Philip Reeves has more houses of people took to the streets to protest honoring a cold from position leader Guido. They chanted slogans calling for Nicolas Madura to leave office allowing a transitional government led by Guido, take PA the protests brought traffic to a halt in eastern parts of the city an opposition stronghold. But in the slums of the city's west the traditional stronghold of the doodo, the ruling socialist party there were plenty of police and national guard, but few protesters the actions part of a multi pronged drive to oust Budo in which the US is playing a dominant role a nationwide day of protest is planned for Saturday flip Reeves NPR news, Caracas, US, businesses added a solid two hundred and thirteen thousand jobs in January. That's based on information provided by payroll processor ADP, which says the strong private sector. Jobs numbers would seem to indicate companies are still hiring even with a month long partial government. Shutdown and ongoing U S China trade tensions ADP says while slightly below December strong pace, the January number still suggests companies are adding to their payrolls the government releases its more broad based jobs figures on Friday, Wall Street shot higher today, the Dow up four hundred and thirty four points, the NASDAQ rose one hundred fifty four points, this is NPR and this is WNYC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson arrests by immigration and customs enforcement continued to climb in the New York City area during the last fiscal year about thirty five hundred people were arrested. That's an increase of thirty five percent. According to federal data, analyzed by the mayor's office of immigrant affairs. Commissioner beat Steffi says she knew arrest went up in the first year after a president the President Trump took office. But I think we didn't quite know what to expect from the first year of Trump to the second year Trump, and the numbers are actually saying I continued increase in enforcement beyond what we saw the first year. She also said a bigger share of those arrested thirty. Eighty six percent did not have criminal records. The Trump administration arrests immigrants charged with crimes, even if they weren't convicted saying it's better for public safety immigration advocates disagree. Federal prosecutors in New York City officials are meeting tomorrow to come to an agreement about fixing the city's public housing authority WNYC's Merle alive says this court appointed deadline comes after a judge rejected an initial proposal that would have included two billion dollars from the city. William Polly said the remained didn't have enough enforcement in suggested a federal takeover should be considered mayor de Blasio has said he strongly opposes a federal takeover of the public housing system in eight announced on Twitter today that housing and urban development secretary Ben Carson will be visiting New York tomorrow to make an announcement about the deal, but did not give other.

New York Trump NPR Guido WNYC US Philip Reeves Nicolas Madura Venezuela de Blasio ADP Sean Carlson socialist party Caracas Ben Carson president Steffi China Twitter
"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the street. There is a feeling of anxiety because Venezuelans dead to hug the change before and been disappointed. And I think they know that this drama is not yet over by any means NPR's Philip Reeve's reporting on a fast moving situation there in Caracas Venezuela. Thank you fell. You welcome in Nicaragua. To prominent journalists who ran a popular cable, news outlet are facing charges of terrorism. The government accuses them of stirring up anti-government anger as NPR's Carrie Kahn reports their case is the latest attack on the press in Nicaragua. Since a crackdown by President Daniel Ortega began nearly a year ago, the news program on cable outlet one hundred percent of PCS has long been a daily staple for Nicaraguans. That's until December twenty first all the sudden, the nightly news roundtable is abruptly interrupted seconds later viewers here news director Lucia Pineda's. Breathless please. Martina getting into that idea. Not this just in the latest news. There are riot. Police here at the station trying to enter she says in the background. You can hear loud crashes than the cable outlets signal is cut completely the native the station's owners Miguel Maura and his wife, Veronica Chavez were hauled off to prison. More than five hundred fifty people have been jailed since protests broke out last April against President Daniel Ortega and his wife now, the country's vice president more than three hundred people have been killed Moran. Pineda remain in Nicaragua's infamous japodlay prison, charged with fomenting hate spreading fake news and terrorism charges that face a possible. Twenty year prison sentence Chavez was released. Don, not the asset. Leon. No,.

President Daniel Ortega Nicaraguans Lucia Pineda Veronica Chavez NPR Martina Miguel Maura Philip Reeve vice president Caracas Carrie Kahn Don Venezuela director Moran one hundred percent Twenty year
"philip reeve" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on KCRW

"As from member station. K U E R for the second year in a row. Chicago is reporting a reduction in crime police chief Eddie Johnson says crime fell in several categories twenty eighteen represented another consecutive year where Sukagaw experienced fewer murders shootings robberies burglaries and thefts says the same time last year, he said police sees more than ninety six hundred illegal guns in Chicago in two thousand eighteen will increasing arrests for gun crimes. This is NPR. Rescue workers in Russia pulled a baby boy from the rubble of the collapsed apartment building today. The ten story building fell down yesterday after an explosion. That officials say may have been caused by a natural gas leak at least seven people died. Dozens are still missing searchers heard the baby cry and we're able to pull them out alive. It's not clear that he will recover. A new president takes over in Brazil today. Zaire Bolsonaro will be sworn into office at a ceremony in the capital Brasilia. NPR's Philip Reeve's reports officials expect a huge New Year's day crowd in the city to celebrate the inauguration of a populace president from the far, right? A retired army captain who served seven terms in congress, but has no experience of high office. Both sonata was elected in October by wide margin. And polls show he's become still more popular since then many Brazilians hope he'll turn the country around off to the worst recession on record and amid a crime and corruption epidemic. Both Sinato isn't that Myra of Brazil's possibility dictatorship about a third of his cabinet comprises, retired military personnel. His critics consider him a threat to people's rights. But.

NPR Brazil president Eddie Johnson Chicago Sinato Zaire Bolsonaro Philip Reeve Brasilia Russia Sukagaw army congress
"philip reeve" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on Double Toasted

"Too late with thank y'all. We don't have any social. Oh, should I was really into? No, go to governor. Subscribe keep us going in many ways to subscribe, very easy for you. And when you do you can get there. What that what's that? Rhonda get that toast to goodness all over your body. She got it to a little wiggle. And she drunk to she came in a new she was drunk. Do you? Remember you kid, and you had hedge you come by the house are a one your mom's friends. You could always tell they would drug. That's what she was like when I let. On what's going on? You. Drunk off. All the time. I was. I hid in the backseat. The mother had friend you smoke the London. Mouth was going bad and lips always wet and this came by his son. Only doing it. She came into the collaborative. I hit. She even knew I was from the like playing now you try to have them really hashtag. Or now. Oh, she did. Tagger and spirit. Damn her to hell, right. More. Go ahead and get into it. Now. About these engines of Martin, mortal, engines, native American man, see these inches got some horse power to them because is based on the book this whole. Teenage people lie aid Topi and thing been going on for while Martin everybody thought to start with the hunger games. No, no, go back to the eighties and go back all the way to the eighties. Even though we not going that far back with this. Don't go back to two thousand and one little book came out called the mortal engines from Philip Reeve, you can see Martin it was on his fifteenth anniversary anniversary edition. It was it was a hit. Because not only was it a. Not only was it a at that time, you know, even before all these other things that it was one those movies. I was our books that was Mitha young people, but they didn't shy from the darkness of the world. In fact, this wasn't wasn't even Topi downright apocalyptic in a way mankind has destroyed himself with the weapons that he's created. Finally, did it and. The people at that point. They even take the movie the the week died the strong lived on and as they begin to form society, again, a reform society. Everybody started dressing up like they were trying to for the movie Allison wonderland. They brought the top hats back. Brought the corsets. Yeah. Yeah. Within the collapse of society, London, decide to go back to the Victorian age. Yeah. Yeah. You know, it does when you tell it the way I'm telling sound silly. But one man saw and say, you know, what I love this is going to be my next thing. I'm on Peter Jackson. He wanted to depth this into a movie, but then he was working on the Hudson and. Nom busy. But I still got a little time to help out with script. And when the movie start he said, you can even come in. I'm not going direct this. But why my man is busy? 'cause there's this movie's epoch is huge. He says, you know, let me take some weight off a man we'll be here. Let me do a little second unit directing, and we're talking about a man who brought some people say it was it impossible feat. He brought the Lord of the rings to life and made it as as it was people saying, okay at this man did catering on this movie. You know, the the Jackson touch shouldn't have to make this movie a hit right here. I'll tell you. It is a fascinating world that they've created. Let's go ahead and take a look at the mortal engines, the trailer for this. And then we'll be back with our review. I was.

Martin Peter Jackson Rhonda Philip Reeve London Mitha Topi Allison wonderland
Brazil Elects Far-Right Candidate Jair Bolsonaro As Next President

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Brazil Elects Far-Right Candidate Jair Bolsonaro As Next President

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything now to Brazil which yesterday elected a new president who is from the far, right? Messages of congratulations from world leaders are pouring into Zhou your Bolsonaro, including one from President Trump. There are concerns though about what Bolsonaro will do once he assumes office and beers Philip Reeve's reports from Rio de Janeiro. As his supporters. Celebrate a stunning victory giant Bolsonaro appears before the cameras. Enormity zeus. Thirst for prayers led by an evangelist pastor and then for promise that's intended to allay the fears of his opponents in Brazil and his critics abroad, fath- Mia royals decay ethical new witness both out hotels the audience. Mike government will defend the constitution and democracy and liberty Bolsonaro a retired army captain and congressman we'll take over as priscilla's president on the first of January his admiration for his nation's past military dictatorship has led to concerns of whether democracy is safe in his hands. Both outta supporters celebrating outside his beachside house in Rio have no such worries. Cloudy. Miranda is a lawyer. I'm not afraid about that. I agree that sometimes the doesn't have the right word to use. But I don't think that's a he said they take her. But under hoops, Bolsonaro will end the massive corruption. Embroiled many Brazilian politicians his record for misogynist racist. And homophobic remarks doesn't bother her. She thinks they taken out of context there is a completely different. Meaning so I don't I don't I'm not afraid about that. Other precisions are worrying on many fronts will bowl Sinatra's plans to loosen the environmental laws threaten the Amazon rainforest all their civil rights secure. This is Christina Rio's largest Favila, a low income. Mostly afro Brazilian neighborhood. Sprawled across the hillside, it's a battleground in the war between security forces and criminal organizations in the narcotics trade residents caught in the middle sometimes injured or killed both Sinato wants to get the police even more leeway to use lethal force to the alarm of Luis Fernando powler who was born here. They will be trouble seriously terrible. So it's not good for people prepo live here. Opinions. Among political analysts are divided about what the future holds Brazilian their country that has institutional maturity even stronger than many people believe specially many people side overs. John Jonah gone, a political consultant doesn't think both out as a threat to democracy. He says Brazil's judiciaries proved how strong it is by convicting some of the country's most powerful people in a massive anti corruption investigation Bolsonaro has strong support in Brazil's new congress yet he must still negotiate to get plans approved. He also has close ties to the military. His cabinet is expected to include several retired generals. Jetta gowns also not worried by that. I have absolutely no doubts that the revision armed forces flute. Always choose the constitution over eighty president. And even if it's predators. Both. On our political scientists Modise, oh Santoro also doesn't think Brazil's at risk of a dictatorship. But he is concerned about the rights of Brazilians every country where estimates were elected the problem or face it on it ocean of democracy facing problems, regarding minority rights hate-crimes violence against social activists that don't seem to be one area of consensus among those puzzling of a what president bulletin outta will be like if he's to unite Brazil, he must knock off the divisive political rhetoric shadow gun, again, marriages can empower individuals in the country to believe that they have a green rights to act in grassy for violence manner. Aginst minorities to the breeze NPR news, reddish NATO support for NPR. And the following message. Come from Cirque du Soleil, crystal a frozen playground of world class ice skating and stunning acrobatics. See it live at Capital One arena from December. Fifths and ninth tickets available now at Cirque du so Soleil dot com.

Brazil Bolsonaro President Trump Miranda Rio De Janeiro Cirque Du Soleil Comcast John Jonah NPR Santoro Christina Rio Capital One Philip Reeve Fath- Mia Luis Fernando Powler Amazon Mike Government
Brazil Set To Vote In Presidential Run-Off Election That Has Polarized The Nation

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:24 min | 1 year ago

Brazil Set To Vote In Presidential Run-Off Election That Has Polarized The Nation

"This podcast. And the following message is brought to you by jet dot com. Your one stop shopping destination. The jet experience provides a unique and relevant Dortmund with no membership fees. Start shopping conveniently at jet dot com or on the jet app today on Sunday, the people of Brazil will choose their next president the favourite to win is a retired army captain from the far right Zaire Bill scenario, and he openly admires that country's pass military dictatorship. This elections a second round run-off between Bolsonaro and a candidate from the leftist Workers Party racist, bitterly, polarized, Latin America's largest democracy. We're joined now by NPR's Philip Reeves, he's envio deja narrow. Hey there Philip. So is this election essentially a done deal as he that far ahead. Will it certainly look that way of the last couple of weeks giant Bolsonaro has had an eighteen point lead in the polls. Thanks to his ability to capitalize on deep public, contempt and anger in Brazil's towards establishment politicians. He's done that despite being a congressman himself for many years, and he's channeled that anger at his rival from the Workers Party blaming that party for the recent recession, which was the worst in Brazil's history and for a huge corruption scandal because that party was in power win. Those two crisis began to play out. However, the latest poll from yesterday shows the Workers Party candidate phenomena Adagi has narrowed has made some ground and that the lead of Bolsonaro has narrowed to twelve points. A why are we seeing this late swing away from Boston are what's driving it? Eight hundred be certain. The a couple of incidents this week that might have been factors. Boston outta made a speech in which he talked about his leftist opponents as red bandits and said he wanted to drive them off the map and amount of never before seen in the history of Brazil and also a video emerged from July in which one of his sons who's also congressman is heard talking about how easy would be to shut down the supreme court. That's Tim rebuke from the chief Justice of Brazil and analysts here think that this has set alarm bells ringing about whether both now does a threat to democracy because although this country seems to be swinging fought to the right poll show that Brazilians strongly favor keeping their democracy and don't want to return to the dark years of the nineteen sixty four ninety ninety five military dictatorship. So given that polling or these worries of both are well-founded. Well, Bolsonaro says that he's going to respect the constitution. He wants government. He says. Authority, but not an authoritarian government. And that he says he he doesn't want a military takeover annoys as does the army, and he has distanced himself from his son's comments about the supreme court characterizing those really as a mistake. We've been talking about political divisions here in the US. But I understand that campaign has been fairly nasty. Can you talk about what that looks like it started out being nasty, right? From the beginning. I mean Bolsonaro himself was stabbed and severely injured a newly September. And since then we have seen a brawl on what's up, which has been awash with fake, news and abuse. Of course, people have been recalling Boston does pass record of making the Sajjan est and racist and homophobic remarks and that has been out there. And people have been reminded of all that that's been a big scandal about a report that emerge showing that businesses have been Bank rolling. Mass message. Ages are what's up targeting both hours opponent, financial dashiki? And also the have been attacks on the street, which are related to the election and attacks and threats against journalists. So it has been a pretty nasty campaign. That's NPR's Philip Reeve's Philip. Thank you. You're welcome. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class

Brazil Workers Party Bolsonaro Philip Boston Philip Reeves Leftist Workers Party Supreme Court NPR Congressman Dortmund Philip Reeve Comcast President Trump United States Latin America Adagi TIM
UN climate change report warns of 'irreversible' damage by 2030

Morning Edition

03:21 min | 1 year ago

UN climate change report warns of 'irreversible' damage by 2030

"The GOP base, Shannon. Vincent, NPR news, Washington. A politician from the far right one a commanding lead in Brazil's presidential election yesterday. NPR's Philip Reeve's reports veteran congressman and retired. Army captain Jacinto needed both and fifty percent of the valid votes to win the presidency of Latin America's largest democracy outright. He came close with just under forty seven percents after almost all votes counted in Rio

Captain Jacinto NPR Philip Reeve GOP Congressman Latin America Shannon Vincent Brazil RIO Army Washington Fifty Percent
"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Officially hit it we officially made history today, apple did apple just hit a, trillion dollars in market value for the first time in history a company is worth one trillion dollars so big deal super meaningful right kind of unimportant, Kim forest portfolio manager at fort. Pitt capital and she says. The numbers largely symbolic apple. Doesn't unlock any new, catalysts. Superpowers. Now that it's crossed the threshold it just sounds cool if anything it means the company can borrow more money if it wants forced, likens it to well being rich the bigger your house the more you can borrow against it because the lender thinks at your house. Is going to be worth more tomorrow. Than it is today some investors think this is actually a Bad thing assigned that apple. Stock is overvalued, for says, maybe? But she adds, apples got revenue on the books to back. Up its high valuation unlike some of. Its fancy tech sector peers some of those peers are likely to join. Apple in the four comic club, Amazon's close but in the history books you rarely learn who came in second for NPR news I'm, Ryan Kyle off Brazil, will elect a new president in October and a far-right candidate has emerged as a front runner in that race among his biggest supporters are. Young resilience as NPR's Philip Reeve's reports This crowd has come to meet the man they want to. Be president Cheyenne Is about to land Seven thousand people waiting in the. Airport to. Welcome,.

apple NPR Pitt president Kim forest Philip Reeve portfolio manager fort Ryan Kyle Amazon Brazil one trillion dollars trillion dollars
Apple, NPR and Pitt discussed on Dale & Keefe

Dale & Keefe

01:31 min | 2 years ago

Apple, NPR and Pitt discussed on Dale & Keefe

"Officially hit it we officially made history today, apple did apple just hit a, trillion dollars in market value for the first time in history a company is worth one trillion dollars so big deal super meaningful right kind of unimportant, Kim forest portfolio manager at fort. Pitt capital and she says. The numbers largely symbolic apple. Doesn't unlock any new, catalysts. Superpowers. Now that it's crossed the threshold it just sounds cool if anything it means the company can borrow more money if it wants forced, likens it to well being rich the bigger your house the more you can borrow against it because the lender thinks at your house. Is going to be worth more tomorrow. Than it is today some investors think this is actually a Bad thing assigned that apple. Stock is overvalued, for says, maybe? But she adds, apples got revenue on the books to back. Up its high valuation unlike some of. Its fancy tech sector peers some of those peers are likely to join. Apple in the four comic club, Amazon's close but in the history books you rarely learn who came in second for NPR news I'm, Ryan Kyle off Brazil, will elect a new president in October and a far-right candidate has emerged as a front runner in that race among his biggest supporters are. Young resilience as NPR's Philip Reeve's reports This crowd has come to meet the man they want to. Be president Cheyenne Is about to land Seven thousand people waiting in the. Airport to. Welcome,.

Apple NPR Pitt President Trump Kim Forest Philip Reeve Portfolio Manager Fort Ryan Kyle Amazon Brazil One Trillion Dollars Trillion Dollars
 Venezuela Election Won by Maduro Amid Widespread Disillusionment

All Things Considered

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Venezuela Election Won by Maduro Amid Widespread Disillusionment

"Summit scheduled for june twelfth in singapore may not happen at that time but pompeo says his office will continue with preparations for the meeting between trump north korean leader kim jong hoon german kim asked for this meeting president trump agreed to undertake it we work to find the date and location we got those set and since then we're driving on it is clear we are we're working to make sure that there's a common understanding about the contents of what will be discussed but i i'm optimistic pompeo's comments came after the president sat down earlier today with his south korean counterpart is continue depress the two sides to meet trump today question north korea's commitment to denuclearization and as well as president says he is expelling the top us diplomat and his deputy from his country nncholas maduro accusing the two of being involved in a conspiracy alligators npr's philip reeve says his rejected as false by the state department medeiros given us shasha defend todd robinson and his deputy forty eight hours to leave venezuela the announcement came as madero celebrated his landslide victory in an election the us calls a sham here the empire does not dominate us madero said in a televised speech we've had enough of conspiracy the us state department says venezuela hasn't actually officially notified it the two diplomats episode on on gratae and warns that the us may respond with what it calls appropriate reciprocal action the white house imposed a fresh round of sanctions in the aftermath of maderas reelection sunday in a vote that's rejected by latin america's largest nations and the european union but it breathes npr news caracas the us house of representatives has passed a bill.

Pompeo Donald Trump President Trump North Korea Philip Reeve Todd Robinson Madero United States Venezuela America European Union Singapore Kim Jong NPR Caracas Forty Eight Hours
"philip reeve" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington i'm janine herbst president trump is calling for an investigation into the probe looking into his presidential campaign as npr's miles parks reports the president seems to want answers about a confidential source who met with members of his campaign in two thousand sixteen the president said on twitter that on monday he would officially demand the department of justice investigates own surveillance techniques he said he wanted to know whether the fbi or the doj quote infiltrated or surveilled the trump campaign for political purposes the tweet seemed to be referencing reports this week that say a professor who met with trump officials in two thousand sixteen was an f b i source it's unclear what action will actually come from trump's demands the justice department inspector general's already investigating the fbi surveillance techniques with regard of the russia investigation that began after publican lawmakers question the agency's targeting of trump campaign advisor carter page miles parks npr news washington then as well as president nncholas maduro is seeking a second term in a controversial election today amid an economic meltdown and here's philip reeve's reports the turn out so far seems low venezuelans are used to spending many hours every day standing in line for food or cash from banks but there are no lines to stand in for many casting their ballots in caracas voting centers around the capital appear to be receiving only a trickle of people although venezuela's information minister says two and a half million people voted nationwide by ten opposition parties are boycotting this vote saying it's fraudulent and tailored to deliver another term to nncholas maduro his main challenger henri paul says he's receiving hundreds of complaints about socalled red points tents set up by the government close to voting centres to persuade venezuelans devote that breathes npr news connects incoming national rifle association president oliver north says kids shouldn't be afraid to go to school but he also tells fox.

caracas oliver north venezuela nncholas maduro carter advisor russia department of justice janine herbst fox henri paul washington philip reeve professor fbi twitter president npr
"philip reeve" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on NPR News Now

"For her body to arrive in pakistan that's expected monday or tuesday chef was in santa fe under state department study abroad program venezuelans are voting in a presidential election today incumbent president nicolas maduro expected to win a second term despite the country's deepening economic crisis npr's phil reeves reports in the east of the capital caracas which is a stronghold of the opposition the streets are extremely quiet the opposition's boycotting this election in the west of the capital which is strong hold of the ruling socialist party there is more life at this polling station a small crowd vote is awaiting to enter president with doodo and his wife have already voted of it allegations that this election is not free and fair and that despite his unpopularity and the economic crisis here he is certain to win philip reeve's npr news could acas this is npr hawaii's kill aware volcanoes becoming more dangerous molten rock is flowing across a key highway and into the ocean which could create lays a mixture of hydrochloric acid and fine glass particles in the air earlier today thirties reported the first serious injury from the eruptions splashing lava hit a man sitting on his balcony and wounded his leg authorities in democratic republic of congo say another person has died amid an outbreak of ebola bringing the death toll to twenty six npr's ava peralta reports four new infections are also confirmed the world health organization says this outbreak in congo can be contained with a vigorous response they say the situation poses a high risk to the region but it is not yet of international concern beginning monday congolese authorities say the will begin deploying an experimental vaccine in band.

pakistan santa fe caracas socialist party president doodo philip reeve congo ebola ava peralta nicolas maduro phil reeves
"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

"High school in santa fe xs ten people were killed a seventeen year old student is in custody facing murder charges nncholas poll represents the suspect he says the family of dimitrios pa gorgias is shocked and confused by the attack they did not see this coming they had no idea when the incident started they were as worried about their kid is everybody else was all schools in the santa fe district remain closed through tuesday the us and china ended their latest round of trade talks in washington yesterday they issued a joint statement that they would substantially reduce the us trade deficit with china with beijing increasing its purchases of us goods and services but it would not commit to a specific number the agreement was also silent on whether either side will impose tariffs then as whelan's are voting in a presidential election today incumbent president nicolas maduro is expected to win a second sixyear term despite the country's deepening economic crisis food is scarce and inflation is soaring npr's philip breeze is at a polling station in the capital in the east of the capital caracas which is a stronghold of the opposition the streets are extremely quiet the opposition's boycotting this election in the west of the capsule which is a stronghold of the ruling socialist party there is more life at this polling station a small crowd and voters are waiting to enter president but doodo and his wife have already voted amid allegations that this election is not free and fair and that despite his unpopularity and the economic crisis here he is certain to win philip reeve's npr news the president of turkey is campaigning today in the bosnian capital sarajevo register tie of oregon is seeking the votes of turks living abroad in next month's parliamentary and presidential elections is earned wines only campaign stop in europe you're listening to npr news health officials say workers in democratic republic of congo will begin vaccination program this week designed to contain an outbreak of the deadly ebola virus more than five thousand doses have been shipped the diseases spread through contact with bodily fluids of those infected.

turkey npr europe sarajevo nicolas maduro beijing murder santa fe congo oregon us philip reeve doodo president socialist party caracas
"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In back in the fruit lockett lisa lopez is worried by that she says no one knows what will happen after the election as venezuela's economic disaster further unfolds dot com hinted she says i'm scared everyone scared philip reeve's npr news the johnstown flood is one of history's great tragedies more than twenty two hundred people died in may of eighteen eighty nine when twenty tons of turgid waters teeming with debris of houses trees and drowned animals unleashed a biblical flood in the middle of pennsylvania al roker the man who tells millions of americans what the weather will be an nbc's today show was written a book about what is still the deadliest flood in american history his book ruthless tied the tragic epic of the johnstown flood al roker joins us in our studios here in new york l good to be back with you is good to see you again scott you mentioned words in this book you say this was a tragedy of human making this was during the gilded age and this the original one percenters in this country they wanted especially western pennsylvania i mean this steel move this country still help build this country in the industrial age and the steel was in western pennsylvania and throughout pennsylvania and the titans of steel and of cold and railroad and they wanted a club their compatriots had out west and so they created the south fork hunt and fish club and they wanted to be able to go out boating and fishing and so there in the kama valley they dammed up a river created an earthen dam but it was not well prepared and the people are concerned about it and they said this this dam could fail and if this dam fails it would be catastrophic there there was a lot of rain wasn't i mean we talk about rain of biblical proportions i mean it was more than a foot of rain but the problem was in the engineering of the damn there was no way to on a methodical basis to be able to release water the water just kept coming over the spillway and eroding the face of the dam which was holding in the all the rock and stone and that gave way within forty minutes twenty million tons of water was emptied and heading down the.

lisa lopez venezuela dot philip reeve pennsylvania nbc al roker south fork hunt kama valley johnstown new york scott twenty million tons forty minutes twenty tons
Joshua Holt of Utah begs for help from inside Venezuela prison

NPR News Now

01:43 min | 2 years ago

Joshua Holt of Utah begs for help from inside Venezuela prison

"Of reforming government instead the election commission says it's missing votes from one hundred eighty six polling stations most of them were from kirkuk where era ban turkman leaders have accused kurdish parties of fraud in fact the election chief said his workers there were being surrounded by gunmen and held hostage that turned out not be true but it's a sign that after elections which took place peacefully tensions in some places are dangerously high amid the vote counting jane arraf npr news baghdad the world health organization says a new case of ebola virus has been discovered in a major city in democratic republic of congo who officials are concerned that now the deadly illness has appeared in a heavily populated area it may spread quickly the world health organization says forty four suspected and confirmed cases of ebola have been reported indie rc in the past five weeks you're listening to npr news from washington there's been a riot inside a jail in venezuela where joshua hold an american missionary from utah is imprisoned npr's philip reeve's reports the us embassy is worried and is calling for holds release holtz twentysixyearold mobile missionary who went to venezuela to marry a fuel say he met on a religious website he so far spent two years imprisoned without trial of two police claim they found weapons in the couple's apartment he and his supporters say he was framed holtz in detention center run by venezuela's intelligence agency in caracas where prisoners led a riot wednesday holt posted facebook video saying his life was in danger and appealing for help from the us.

Kirkuk Fraud Ebola Washington Venezuela Utah Philip Reeve Holtz Caracas Holt United States Baghdad NPR Five Weeks Two Years
"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Attacks we don't really know yet exactly what happened but in his tweets trump also blamed the bomb administration and this is a favorite subject for him but in this case he talked about the obama administration not acting forcefully enough with syria when it had the chance to do so what's the message he's trying to send with that i think it's a political message he tweeted if president obama had crossed his stated red line in the sand the syrian disaster would've ended long ago animal assad would have been history so i think politically he's doing what a lot of presidents do which is blamed their predecessor saying it wasn't my fault the problem is that when you're in your second year in office it's one thing if you've just been in office a couple of months but at some point it becomes your responsibility and blaming your predecessor makes you look whiny and weak president obama did the same thing he used to blame george w bush for leaving him a mess in iraq but now president trump is doing the same thing president obama was criticized for this and i think president trump will be criticized for not taking responsibility himself if we see a an action by the president how quickly could that happen a man who was once one of the superstars of latin american politics for his leftist policies has spent his first night in custody after turning himself into the police the departure from the political stage of the former brazilian president luis inacio lula silver was dramatic for more than a day lula as he's known defied a judge's order to hand himself in to begin serving a twelve year prison sentence for corruption and he was cheered on by his supporters outside a union building in sao paulo where he'd hold up we're joined now by npr's philip reeve's who's in south bowel for the latest good morning.

obama administration syria obama assad george w bush iraq trump president sao paulo npr philip reeve luis inacio lula silver twelve year
"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Has at spent l o his c first dot night gov in custody slash after n turning l himself s into the read police the departure and from the the political listeners stage of of the former cake brazilian president luis inacio lula da silva was dramatic for more than a day lula as he's known defied judge's order to hand himself in to begin serving a twelve year prison sentence for corruption and he was cheered on by his supporters outside a union building in sao paulo where he'd hold up which owned now by npr's philip reeve's who's in south for the latest good morning good morning so for those of us who've covered brazil which i have and you are this is extraordinarily it looked for a while as though we could be in for prolonged standoff between lula and the authorities so walk us through what happened yeah oh he's supposed to hand himself in on friday afternoon but he holed up in the building where his career began a crowd of supporters thousands of them many of them from his party the workers party gathered outside but also friends and sympathizes the deadline passed he stayed inside it became tense because it was very hard for the police to go in and get him with the crowd surrounding the building and yesterday he finally came out climbed onto the stage amongst the crowd held a mass celebrating the birthday of his late wife the songs charting he was tearful the crowd was in tears he made a long speech declaring his innocence but said he would hand himself in because ultimately he respected the rule of law and he left born aloft on the shoulders of the crowd it was a remarkable finale for the most charismatic of popular politicians and finally walked out talk nece fell amid much mayhem and was taken by police escort to the airport to fly south to the city of tiba where he was originally convicted and he's now in a small cell in federal police station with a bath from tv table and bed remind us how he got to this point i mean it has been a very long road he was convicted of corruption last year and money laundering he appealed and.

president sao paulo npr philip reeve tiba luis inacio lula da silva brazil twelve year
"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of whom there are thousands clad in the red of the workers party that he heads and thousands who've come to catch this moment in history and so the expectation is that he will do that and then it'll happen sooner rather than later possibly today we think possibly quite soon today but it's been very difficult to establish any concrete facts in this situation npr's philip reeve's covering a developing situation in sao paulo thank you so much russia has been making new inroads into africa mostly through arms deals and some say washington needs to stay vigilant russia is second only to the united states in the arms trade worldwide npr's michelle kellerman reports a un sanctions committee recently allowed russia to sell weapons to the government in central african republic which is struggling to contain an ethnic and religious conflict with that arm sale came a small group of russian military trainers now in the capital bangui the us has taken notice cair's president is quoted as saying he wants more cooperation with russia now including an infrastructure and education but so far this is mostly about business says a former un sanctions inspector alex vines who's now with the british based think tank chatham house vulnerable fragile states like the central african republic but have intense security demands and requirements of the of places if the russians are looking to improve their market share question military equipment is well suited for countries in the region vine says inexpensive and easy to maintain russian and ukrainian helicopters are also often used in un peacekeeping missions the russians have even opened up maintenance locations in.

npr philip reeve sao paulo russia washington united states michelle kellerman cair president alex vines chatham house africa un
"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on KQED Radio

"D it's six twenty now this is weekend edition from npr news i'm scott detro we turned to brazil where extrordinary scenes are underway the country's former president lula da silva is defying a judge's order to turn himself in and start serving a prison sentence for corruption npr's philip reeve's reports from sao paulo where a standoff is underway it's just before five in the afternoon the sun is sliding towards the rooftops of the city of sao paulo on the outskirts thousands of people gathered in the streets brandishing flags and bans some of them slept here overnight the here to support their former president lula da silva once the most popular leader in brazil's history many wearing red the color of his leftist workers party some flourish big placards that say lula is innocent of this have t shirts saying no to prison for luna louis holdup somewhere in the building in front of them it's the headquarters of the metalworkers trade union where his political career began decades ago louis under orders from a judge to surrender to the police by five o'clock and age seventy two to start serving a twelve year prison sentence the graft and money laundering yet he's still here inside his old lab several hundred miles from the place where he's been told to surrender the crowd counts down the seconds to the deadline celebrates its passing an unprecedented political drama is underway in brazil the charismatic lula as he's universally known is a huge figure in latin american politics when he left the presidency in two thousand and ten after two terms his popularity ratings were over eighty percent a booming economy had helped him lift millions from poverty even now he leads the popularity polls ahead of brazil's presidential elections in october although his chances are being allowed to run a very slim the judge ordering lula to prison is socio moro moros also a celebrity thanks to his leading role in a.

scott detro lula da silva philip reeve sao paulo brazil metalworkers trade union npr president eighty percent twelve year
"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is weekend edition from npr news i'm scott detro we turned to brazil where extrordinary scenes are underway the country's former president lula da silva is defying a judge's order to turn himself in and start serving a prison sentence for corruption npr's philip reeve's reports from sao paulo where a standoff is underway it's just before five in the afternoon the sun is sliding towards the rooftops of the city of sao paulo on the outskirts thousands of people gathered in the streets brandishing flags and bans some of them slept here overnight the here to support their former president lula da silva once the most popular leader in brazil's history many wearing red the color of his leftist workers party some flourish big placards that say lula is innocent of this have t shirts saying no to prison for luna louis holdup somewhere in the building in front of them it's the headquarters of the metalworkers trade union where his political career began decades ago louis under orders from a judge to surrender to the police by five o'clock and age seventy two to start serving a twelve year prison sentence for graft and money laundering yet he's still here inside his old black several hundred miles from the place where he's been told to surrender the crowd counts down the seconds to the deadline an unprecedented political drama is underway in brazil the charismatic lula as he's university known is a huge figure in latin american politics when he left the presidency in two thousand and ten after two terms his popularity ratings were over eighty percent a booming economy had helped him lift millions from poverty even now he leads the popularity polls ahead of brazil's presidential elections in october although his chances are being allowed to run a very slim the judge ordering lula to prison is socio moro mottos also celebrity thanks to his leading role in a massive anticorruption operation targeting some of latin america's most powerful politicians and executives many brazilians at cherry motto on seeing the imprisonment of lula as a sign.

scott detro lula da silva philip reeve sao paulo brazil metalworkers trade union latin america npr president eighty percent twelve year
Brazil's ex-President 'Lula' defies court, hunkers down

Fresh Air

02:30 min | 2 years ago

Brazil's ex-President 'Lula' defies court, hunkers down

"Fluential russian businessmen known as oligarchs to a sanctions list trump administration officials say this is the latest response to russia's attempts to subvert western democracies npr's michelle kellerman has the latest the trump administration says it's taking aim at a group of russian to have close ties to vladimir putin's government and play a key role in advancing the kremlin's destabilizing activities that includes russia's military incursions in ukraine its support for the syrian government and its quote militias cyber activities one of the well no names on the blacklist is elliott derek pasta and aluminum magnet and influential figure and energy arlit guard victor vex oberg is also being added to the sanctions list as is career shamala whose fortunes rose after he married putin's daughter officials say this brings the total of russian individuals and entities targeted by the trump administration to one hundred eighty nine michelle kellerman npr news washington burdensome office is rejecting a visa application for the niece of a russian former spy was poisoning nerve agent attack last month in england the government says victoria scruples application was denied on grounds it did not comply with the immigration rules it did not elaborate british ambassador to the us kim derek tells npr's here now the uk's one hundred percent certain the nerve agent used the poisons scruple and his daughter julia came from russia and he defended the uk's decision to expel russian diplomats as the us and other allies have also done russia is behaving outside all the accepted standards all international behavior whether in what is doing in ukraine whether in his takeover of crimea whether it's what was doing in syria orders done in seoul spree england again russia denies any involvement in the nerve agent attack in suggest britain may have actually been behind it to feel anti russian sentiment protests are underway in brazil after a judge ordered former president lula da silva turn himself into the police today and start a prison sentence npr's philip reeve says the silva's supporters are congregating at his headquarters in some paolo time is running out for the former president a judge has given lula as he's known until five o'clock local time to surrender himself to the police and start a twelve year sentence for graft and money laundering convictions that judge is sergio moto who's anticorruption campaign has made him a celebrity in brazil and beyond moro sits in a court in the.

President Lula Da Silva Paolo Seoul Syria Kim Derek Washington Derek Pasta Ukraine Vladimir Putin Sergio Moto President Trump Philip Reeve Russia Brazil Britain England Crimea Julia Nerve Agent
Brazil's ex-President 'Lula' poised to defy arrest warrant

02:19 min | 2 years ago

Brazil's ex-President 'Lula' poised to defy arrest warrant

"West and russia for npr news mainland zillow in new york indians are planning another day of big protests along the border wall with israel is after palestinians say israeli troops killed at least twenty people near the border during protests there last week and peers daniel estrin has more from jerusalem palestinians say this is a peaceful protests we see food trucks and families picnicking at the border but then a few hundred meters away from the border fence they're mostly young palestinian men protesting there i saw people today rolling in big tires to burn at the border and israel accuses hamas of trying to use these protests away to create a combat zone at the border and carry out attacks npr's daniel estrin and the billowing smoke from those burning tyres has israeli troops firing back sporadically israeli military also renewed its warning that it wouldn't allow the fence to be breached the government releases its monthly jobs report for march this morning economists say the report is expected to show another solid month of hiring but at a slower pace than the very strong february job report us futures contracts are trading lower at this hour the dow futures contract down just over one percent you're listening to npr news from washington in south korea disgraced former president park hey has been sentenced to twenty four years in prison over a corruption scandal mark was convicted of bribery of use of power extortion and other charges and has been in custody since her arrest in march of last year she was removed from office last year after months of massive protests calling for her ouster a judge in brazil has issued a warrant for the arrest of former president lula da silva and fears philip reeve's reports silva's under orders to turn himself into the police by friday and start serving a twelve year prison sentence brazil's judiciaries moving swiftly against a man who was once one of the world's most popular leaders a judge who's spearheading a massive cleanup of corruption in high places gave the former president until five pm friday local time to turn himself into the police judge says yo motos order comes less than a day after brazil's supreme court ruled that lula as he's known cannot remain that liberty to pursue more appeals against a graph conviction imposed by the judge last year many brazilians a.

Extortion Philip Reeve NPR DOW New York President Trump Lula Da Silva Brazil West Bribery Mark South Korea Washington Daniel Estrin Hamas Israel Zillow Russia
"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"philip reeve" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brand is toxic and anyone who buys it probably should change the name i think that's already being discussed um but it does have assets i'm it's got a valuable library of movies unlike oscar winners the king's speech and the artist i'd also has the quentin tarantino movies janko unchained ominous television assets like project runway but the weinstein company is also heavily in debt so it now looks like it may be facing bankruptcy and peres elizabeth blair thank you very much thank you ricki you're listening to all things considered from npr news it's carnival time in brazil land and pierce philip reeve says there's more to it than the annual parades and costumes phil says if you want to really understand what it's about you have to hit the streets brazilians say khannabal is about dropping your inhibitions and letting your emotions out they have a phrase for this salta langa to release the a chicken you know this chicken it's the chicken inside you that makes you munwar could a wedding party when you don't know how that gene she didn't certainly coming out here we are in rio in a but he me of neighborhood called lap up this is one of the city's hundreds of street parties broncos held during carnival season their kings and clerics pirates and nitz dancing rabbits and emperor's with almost no club's every to god someone selling ice cold cans of beer to help lure out this chickens cushioning stand to see khannabal as the limit the marks the end of one yet and the stock another last year was tough here thanks to a stubborn recession a massive corruption scandal and a surge in.

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