18 Burst results for "Philbrick"

"philbrick" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

01:33 min | 5 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"How close you are with Ben, and then he laughed, but I did it in the accent. And then I said it's not your fault. It's not your fault. Any fucking hardcore hard, hard laugh. And it's got jumped in and started doing his routine about the DVDs of a volume 8 pirate something or whatever, which is really good. He kind of had practical because we knew what we wanted to do and how we wanted to practice it. But the point is this. There's a very good chance that would have bombed Damon was the reason it didn't. It had more to do with the guest than anything we were going to say. But most guests are going to claim up. Be like, oh, cool. You guys are going to try to do it's like when Will Ferrell comes on and you go, oh, you're going to try to be funnier than me. Okay, cool. Which I did try. But I had them. Check this out. But by the way, it worked. That one worked, and there's been a bunch of others that haven't worked that haven't worked. Have you shared the Krasinski story? Because that was when you actually didn't do it, right? I didn't do it. Yeah, yeah. Krasinski, I want to do the entire interview as if you were Jim still, but was blowing up as a movie star, being like, can you believe where you're at now and where you were like all those years? And then I told them after I was like, hey, I kind of want to do this. And he's like, oh, that would have been great. And I could tell it was like, I'm really glad you didn't do that actually, because it's fucking stupid. So his words did not match look on his face. He was like, oh, really, that's super original. Cool, that was great. All right, so there you go. I don't know what I don't know what lesson is in there..

Krasinski Ben Damon Ferrell Jim
"philbrick" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

01:52 min | 5 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"Illusion. And the one thing history is taught me is, you know, I can't say you honestly, you learn from the past, but it doesn't help you in the present because the present will always be impossible. You know, you're making it up as you go along, you're conflicted between self interest and altruism and a hundred years are going to laugh at us and say or say, what the hell were they thinking? Just as we look back on the pilgrims and George Washington and say, what the hell were they thinking? It's really hard. Living life. And the example of the past, I think, can only teach us humility. Because no one had it figured out. And we're all just making it up. Now it's beautifully set. I don't think I'm going to say anything beyond that because every time I go back and I read one of your books, I'll read somebody else's and I'll enter this world for 400 pages and you go, this isn't that different from the stuff we're arguing about now. We have technology. We have these advancements. We have medicine, we have all these things, but the mindset. The north shore south shore thing is so real today and then the reader may flower and you're like, oh, okay, this is exactly how it started. And it's we've been around a long time, but not so long that we're talking about that many generations removed if you really start thinking about the math of it, how many generations it would be from the first place in this country and where they're set up. And I always thought it was funny too, because you know as a kid, you're like, how come Boston wasn't the capital? How come New York became New York? Well, New York became New York geographically. It made more sense. But then Philadelphia has this run. And it would be like, oh, people were afraid if you made the capital in Boston, gave Massachusetts more power than it already had historically that there was a fear that the Massachusetts people.

north shore south shore George Washington New York Boston Philadelphia Massachusetts
"philbrick" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

03:05 min | 5 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"And yet Washington, who, you know, I came to recognize. He didn't win the American Revolution. He survived it. And I don't think there would be any other leader in the American military at that time who could have done it. And without Washington, the country, it would have just everything would have fallen apart. He just hung in there. That's a great way to say it because as I've gone through all the battles, you know, if he were people can look at LeBron James, right? And say, yeah, but look how many NBA Finals he's lost. And then go, you know, if you looked at George Washington, you go buy the battle. He probably have an under 500 record. 500. So, I mean, brandy wine. What was it about him getting people, whether it was deserters being afraid of being shot at the side of the road to rot in a snowy Woods, but every time you think there's no way this army can ride this out, guys are eating their own moccasins, boiling them. You know, they're eating dead cows in the side of the road. There was a guy that wasn't there a group, I remember one battle where they said screw it and they just went after some farmers chickens and then they killed the soldiers for even doing that. The fact that Washington can put this together, as you said, survive it, not win it with some help from the French. Let's not kid ourselves. That part of it is what I can't maybe what led him to even having the vision to be a president that could see the future before it happened. Right. Well, Washington was by nature very aggressive. He wanted desperately to have that one battle that he could win at all. But he realized that if he kept trying that, which he wanted to do, he'd lose it all. And so he had to go against his natural inclinations and play a rope a dope to not risk it all just to hang in there. And for a military guide, this was very frustrating, you know? You don't go in there and go at it, hammer and tongs. You hold back and you just hang in there. And that's how we won. Because when he would go against the British, for example, at brandywine, he would inevitably be out general by the opposition. He was not a great strategic thinker, and not a great tactician. But what he was was a great politician, and that's really the skill that enabled him to survive those 8 years because no one else could have handled the Continental Congress that had was very weak, unable to do anything. And yet second guess they were fearful that the military would take them over. You know, another a coup, that's how all other revolutions had gone in the past. But Washington was one of those people who realized that everything would be for nothing, if that happened. And so he hung in there under immense pressures and temptations. The patients of the man is remarkable. And ultimately was triumphant. Not because he was a great battlefield general, but because he was someone who.

Washington LeBron James George Washington NBA Continental Congress
"philbrick" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

03:38 min | 5 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"What would you say about what people think? I'm like, I knew what was coming out of his mouth. But all you had to say is, what do you think about what others think of you? And versus like, I don't give a shit. And like, I mean, that's how Bruce is. You didn't give a shit. And he'll tell you that. And I appreciate which I know you do too. Like brutal Odyssey. Don't sugarcoat things. And look, I think there's two ways you could look at that Antonio situation, right? You could look at it and go, okay. The tough decision is to stand up for what's right and cut this guy because you said you would cut him if he did anything wrong. And you said it. So I'm going to stick to what I said because I don't want to answer the questions like what I'm about to get. Or is it even tougher to be like, hey, I said it. I'm the one that's going to have to go up and answer the questions that I'm going against what I said. And that's what Bruce, I mean, that's not easy either, right? And he clearly just said, I think that decision was made before Chris Godwin went out, obviously. But we are not a better football team without him. I'm going to go up there and I'm going to have to take it and own it because I said that I would do something differently in a previous time, which was last year. And that's not easy, but I will give Bruce the credit of he doesn't care. He just doesn't care. He's going to do what he thinks is right in that moment. And what he thinks is right for the football team. And he's not really worried about answering questions to it. This might be stupid because I don't know exactly the full schedule here, but. When you're asking Aryans a question, is it a little different than when you're asking somebody else a question that you've used to covering? Because I know you've been on the local beat before you get to ESPN and everything. Do you have like, okay, I already know there's like this list of ten questions and 7 of them. I'm not going to ask them because I already know how he's going to handle it. Like, is he a different challenge in the way you'll ask him questions? No. He's awesome. But that's like, I love that though. I love that he doesn't, he doesn't play the game. He doesn't do the PR thing. He says things he shouldn't. And I think we talked about it last year when he would criticize haunt and people were like, oh my God, there's problems. And I'm like, no, man, like, Tom's not a robot. If Tom makes a bad throw, like he's not gonna cover for him and be like, well, I think, you know, maybe the Reed was maybe like this guy ran a bad route. Like, no, he's like, Tommy in a bad throw. And I think anybody that you cover, and I didn't even like the thing about when he was saying, I don't give a shit. Like, I don't even mean that in a bad way. Like I just knew that that's how he was going to answer it. But what's the quote that got used by everyone, right? It's like that quote, right? And he'll be and he'll come out and flat out say teams can't run it against that. And he said it in more forceful ways than that. But as a media member, you love it. You love a guy that doesn't be as you. You love a guy that kind of gives it to you straight. I sort of personally enjoy Bruce assaulting us and he's and he's not. He's like he's awesome. He's awesome in person. He I find his saltine is like endearing. He was, you know, on that laundry list of I'm not sure how if you're aware of this, but on that laundry list of the books that are hurt. He's in rough shape right now Bruce. He gets golf carted out on and off the field. Halftime a golf cart comes out to take him off. He's got like an Achilles injury. He's beat up. And he won't sit down for a second, but he's like, he's hurting. And I remember realizing how bad a shape he was in. Two was a two, three weeks ago. I was on the box game for Fox. They were playing in Atlanta. So I was on the broadcast. And I remember watching him walk out of the tunk, Bruce is like barely able to walk. And then in the third quarter, he's like losing his mind at a raft. Like losing his mind, this coach that's barely 69s barely able.

Bruce Chris Godwin football Antonio Tom ESPN Reed Tommy golf Fox Atlanta
"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:11 min | 7 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Philbrick. Do you say Nathaniel? How many books you've written? I can't even imagine, because you've been doing this for a little while. How many books officially? This is my 13th. 13 book book. Yeah, your books are I mean, I think the reason you're popular author is because you don't only write about interesting things, but you write interestingly. You write well. And I'm not just gonna butter you up. I think it's important. People are they don't like to trudge through pros. And this actually seems just like a fun thing to write about. What else do we need to know? I mean, actually, let's go back. You made the trip yourself with your wife and you said with your dog as well, what kind of a dog do you have? We have a taller. A Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever look a lot like a fox and high energy. So, you know, we obviously had to stay in dog friendly hotels, but I have to say, Mount Vernon is dog friendly. So for us, it really sort of to follow George this way, gave you a sense of just how hard he worked. You know, we all laugh about Washington slept here. We began after a year and a half of following Washington, we really began to understand the personal sacrifice of physical sacrifice that was involved. I was going to say this is amazing that you did this. How long was his journey? Was it a year and a half on his side? It was he broke them up into four different legs, but it was he did them during the first two years of his first term. And so we spent about that much time following him. And, you know, one of the things that was, we were traveling in a car, obviously. But there are parts of the south, particularly between Charleston and Savannah, where the roads he traveled are still there. And since the I 95 was taken away the traffic, you can drive down very much the way George did back in 1790. And you have the sense of channeling the past in a way that I've never experienced researching other books. It just sounds wonderful. It sounds like a miniseries or a reality show or something. Really, I mean, what a great idea. But what a great idea for a book. But it's just fascinating to me to think that he actually did this and that you figured it out. How did you do that? Did he write about it in such a way that it was fairly easy to piece together? Where did you find, was it his diary? Where did you find this kind of information to know that the details? But he kept a diary and those papers had been published. And edited wonderfully. And so, you know, you can really see the towns he went to. And one of the things I did with this, before we even left, I made a list of all the towns and more than a hundred of them. And reached out to all the libraries and historical societies of each town and I mean, which was a big job, obviously. But an asset. You know, what memories do people have in your community of Washington's travels, soon I was getting articles, newspaper articles, along with journals, diaries, local history, that were written in the 19th century. And so even before we got hit the road, I had this whole archive formed and also contact because many of the librarians and archivists volunteered to get in our car when we drove into town and show us around. So it was just a great way to experience history in this country. It just sounds delightful, great idea, great idea for a book. Thank you, Nathaniel philbrick. For all you right. And in this case, for all you're traveling, the book is travels with George. Thanks for being with us. I'm great to be with you..

Philbrick Nathaniel Washington George Mount Vernon Savannah Charleston Nathaniel philbrick
"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

08:10 min | 7 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"There folks, I'm talking to the author Nathaniel philbrick, the book is travels with George in search of Washington and his legacy. Nathaniel, you were just saying if it hadn't been Washington to be the first president who would it have been? And this is one of those things where it's almost impossible for us to reimagine it because he seems created to be that, you know, it's like a great a certain novel, a famous novel. You know, if ahab hadn't been the captain, who would be the captain, you think, well, I can't answer that question. The whole thing is all baked together. They can be no. That's how I feel about Washington. I mean, who was around at the time, you know this better than anyone who might have been president. Well, the second vote getter in that first presidential election was John Adams. And of course, he would be the second president after Washington finished out a second term. And he was Adams was a quintessential federalist, new englander. The opposite kind of personality from Washington. No interest in those grand theatrical moves. You know, as he admitted to friends, you know, a introvert, someone just, you know, if he wasn't in The White House, he was back home in Massachusetts. In fact, he was probably in Massachusetts as much as he was in The White House when he became president. On the other side is Thomas Jefferson. You know, who a better social, you know, social person, but also not anyone interested in getting out there and mingling with the people. And they came and Jefferson and Adams came from opposite sides of the political spectrum. What made Washington unique was that he was a southerner with the political views of big government. Taxation program of a northerner. And so he could, you know, before there was an aisle, he couldn't reach across because he embodied both sides. He also strikes me as that kind of a figure that he like being divisive repelled him. He wanted to be a unifying figure and of course what you're describing in the book he travels around the colony specifically to unite the country. It's almost a calling that he had. And it's one of the reasons we call him the father of the country. Absolutely. And, you know, one of the things there would be virtual warfare with is within his own cabinet as Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton went at it, you know, because they were also from the opposite ends. And there are these wonderful letters, Washington writes the tour, saying, as soon as you get this far from another person in your point of view, the thing you have to start wondering is maybe a middle course better. You know, he's not the opposite of a dogma of this. He's saying, let's try to make it work rather than prove we are a writer than you are. And that really is a unique kind of position to be in. He didn't have to be right all the time. He was just trying to make it work. Well, I mean, that's a different kind of dogma, I guess, in a way that unity meant he understood that if we don't hang together, we will hang separately, something along those lines except a few years later, but it's a similar idea that he understood that that's the priority for the country. I like the phrase he called the country in 1789. The infant woody country. What a great phrase. It's such an 18th century phrase too. But I love that idea. And it's hard for us to imagine when you mention road trip, what were the roads like? And how far did he go? I mean, to what extent did he travel? Yes. Well, yeah, it was the infant woody country. You know, if you traveled from Mount Vernon to Baltimore, it looked like prime eagle forest in 1789 as he made his way to New York. The roads were terrible. The roads were terrible everywhere, but the tav public taverns. In Washington insisted in saying only in public taverns, he wanted to prove, have no favorites on these tours. And these were like the roadside motels today, they were terrible beds, worst food, fleas throughout, but Washington felt that, you know, I am a leader of I am one of you. So he did this. And it was an arduous ordeal, particularly the longest tour of them all the south, where he traveled from what was now the temporary capital of Philadelphia, all the way down to Savannah, inland to Augusta, and then back at more than almost 2000 miles. It took him three months traveling by horse drawn carriage and it was while Congress was in recess. This is what Washington was doing while all the other politicians were on vacation trying to pull people together by actually going to a person's village or Hamlet. And did he get up to New Hampshire? How far north did he get? He got all the way to Portsmouth New Hampshire and then during a harbor tour. He stepped onto what's now kitty point main. It was then part of Massachusetts. And so that was as far north as he got. So, you know, look at him from Portsmouth down to Savannah. It's a huge distance traveling when he would average somewhere between 40 and 45 miles a day, stopping frequently to feed both the people and the horses and you know, so this was this was not getting an Air Force One and virtually parachuting into a community. This is a reality. It's fascinating to me that he stayed in public taverns. That's a big thing. I guess I'm a little surprised by that. I would have expected him to stay at the homes of the wealthy people in each town. This was a real, this was a real issue for him to do this to be a man of the people, so to speak. Yeah, and when he came to Boston, the governor then governor Boston, John, Hancock. Sort of expected Washington to stay at his beautiful house on Beacon hill. And Washington says, no, I've got a matter of policy. I'm not staying in private homes. And Hancock took such umbrage. He didn't show up when Washington rode into Boston. And boss at Washington's response to that was Hancock had invited Washington to dinner in Washington have accepted assuming Hancock would come. Come to the festivities, he said, no, I am not coming to your to dinner. I am the president, you see me first before I see you. And so Hancock, who was enormously popular in Massachusetts, has to suffer the indignity of apologizing going to Washington's quarter saying, yes, I made a mistake here. Please come to my house for dinner. And he would. I mean, that's the other thing you get about Washington. This formality and a real sense of these kinds of things of what is proper, propriety was a big thing for him, but I've never heard that story, and I'm sure I've never heard many of the stories in this book. I'm talking to Nathaniel philbrick the book is travels with George will be right back. From Boston to Denver. Hey folks, I'm talking to the author of travels with George, yes,.

Washington Nathaniel philbrick Massachusetts Adams Jefferson ahab Nathaniel John Adams Thomas Jefferson Alexander Hamilton White House George Hancock Savannah Portsmouth New Hampshire cabinet Mount Vernon
"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:43 min | 7 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"A terrific painting by NC Wyatt. You know, the illustrator treasure island just a wonderful painter of Washington writing on that great big white horse into Trenton New Jersey and it was there was an all female group greeting him and they're throwing rose petals in front of him. And it's just a wonder painting that really captures the shock and awe of Washington writing in on Prescott. I love it. It's interesting to me that after writing three books on the revolution, the carnage that you decided you wanted to you wanted to keep going and in a sense, enjoy the piece yourself since you'd had to go through this. That's a lot of books to write about the revolution. And before we go to the next, actually, we're going to go to break right now. Folks, I've got the joy of speaking with Nathaniel philbrick, we've had him on the program before I recommend almost all his books. The only ones I can't recommend are the ones I haven't read yet. We'll be right back. Hey, folks Eric metaxas here. Joe Biden and the Democrats have laid out the most socialist agenda, our country has ever seen. Instead of following president Trump's blueprint that had the economy booming, the Dems are going to raise taxes, increase regulations and skyrocket and.

NC Wyatt treasure island Washington Trenton Nathaniel philbrick Prescott New Jersey Eric metaxas Joe Biden Trump Dems
"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:07 min | 7 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"If you, I just love it. I just love the name Moses. So I'll say Moses. That's a good one. All right. Next question. I've been in believer since the age of 17. I feel like I lack apologetics, are there any resources you'd recommend? Wow, I've been a believer since the age of 17, and yet I guess this writer implies that he or she is no longer 17, what do I recommend? Well, I have written some books of apologetics myself, hard not to recommend them. It really depends on what kind of a reader you are. I mean, seriously, I take the politics seriously, so I have written a bunch of books. I wrote three books in the everything you always want to know about God, but we're afraid to ask series. Everything you always want to know about God, everything else you always want to know about God and everything you always want to know about God, but we're afraid to ask Jesus edition. That's kind of light humor. But I mean, I really poured my heart into those books. I really rarely talk about them. But and the new book is atheism dead is all apologetics. But there are so many that I'm embarrassed. These are all such good questions. I want to revisit them so I think more than a Carpenter is a great place to start. And I also think John stotts basic Christianity. I'll just I'll leave it at that. All right. If you didn't live in the U.S., what country would you move to? Probably California. Okay. Last question. Where do you get your pants shopping question? Where do I get my pants? What store? Well, are you referring to any specific pants? Because I use more than one pant supplier, I think let's see there's I think a lot of stuff I get lately from Ralph Lauren probably. So I'm gonna go with Ralph Lauren. And I met Ralph Lauren in his store in Connecticut, super, super, super nice guy. This is probably a Ralph Lauren jacket and yeah,.

Moses John stotts Ralph Lauren U.S. California Connecticut
"philbrick" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

06:18 min | 7 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Little. Did we know this zana. They really need saint patrick's day seriously biggest saint patrick's day parade in the countries that can always ship and it was kind of approach you. It was a weekend we will never and yet were washington was there. It was is being guarded to some things never change and so my wife and i are radio on. Stout were fun we. It's not all fun. This'll sober lessons to be were. But it's just a fantastic way in this country. Weren't they noticed that picture in the back of your book Was a picture of you. And i assume dora right. Which is it must be tough traveling with a dog door. Yes now four years old back then was pretty much a puppy and she's nova scotia duck calmly retrievers in energy very intelligent but she needed a couple of runs at day. And so we break up our tours you just had to have your stop or two but she was also a great way to initiate conversation. Rent dog santillana fox over the bushy tail She was great she was Narratives that at some point says anybody. I'm just so glad i i take. Your wife wasn't offended by being cut out of the cover photo out at work. What she did say. I had been a race from. Is you really want. She's not real. I'm just thankful she can't because just made it so much. I know your travel writer. You're supposed to be biters city bars. Jetting up but the two of us do good job of that and listen a character in. She's great ability disorder And overstating mrs so. Is there anything else you want readers to take away from reading your book. One of the things that became clear. That wasn't was how far washington travel. I don't just mean in miles towers towns but how far you travel is a name. I mean as human being this is a guy who was going to became a slave owner each letter aaronson slick word and goes into the railroad genres changes relationship regarding yet who are later sitting Sore the cause of revolution via not creating a of slavery friendship with lafayette persists. And he's changed. Things differ your england's. We've discussed free his slavers until his death but that doesn't mean he was wrestling with one point. During second term he was heard to say is slavery should ever divided country. I will go. With the northern par for ordinary state for verging. washington was able to recognize certain assumptions. He grew up with runs that he never able to completely escape from us assumptions. That doesn't nagging extrordinary journ when our president for our country but is being coming to terms with were cleanse nation. Play let you go. Is there anything new you working on. You've read this book up. Yeah well my wife. And i had already gone on yet another research trip. It's going to be the california garesh live on an island which is almost populating able bodied. Men were discovery hopped in there will whalers That were no longer rating. Any money sailed around. The horn abandoned the golden gate but i'm also fascinated with the overrun and also seeing votes and california wanted warriors phenomenon. Not just the anglo american's masion community hispanic in unity. African american it was an international event. And so i'm really for all at sound fashioning. We certainly look forward to it. Your book go. Travels with george is on sale now like urge everyone to grab a copy is very interesting. That philbrick. I really appreciate you appearing today on. The american revolution podcast. I would like to thank mr philbrick once again for taking the time to speak with me about. His latest book travels with george in search of washington. And his legacy. I've included information about his book and some of his other books on my blog site co two blog dot amriyev podcast dot com. There you can find a full transcript of this podcast as well as other useful links about mr philbrick and the subject we discussed today. I'm also curious to hear from you the listeners. It's been a few months since. I've released a special interview episode. I'd like to know if you wanna hear more of these. If you wanna hear about a specific topic or i guess let me know that as well. I can't promise that any particular guess. We'll speak with me. But i'll certainly try if you'd like to get in touch with me. My email address is on my website at www dot amr podcast dot com. You can also join my mailing lists there or become a member of my facebook group or follow me on twitter at an ref podcast. Well that's all for this time. I hope you will join me again next time for another american revolution podcast..

saint patrick washington dora mr philbrick aaronson lafayette wrestling california england philbrick george facebook twitter
"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:15 min | 8 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"To the author of travels with george. Yes it's nathaniel. Philbrick do you say nathaniel. How many books you've written. I can't even imagine because you've been doing this for a little while. How many books officially thirteen book your books are. I mean i think the reason you're popular author is because you don't only write about interesting things but you you write. Interestingly you right well. And i'm not just kind of butter you up. I think it's important people are. They don't like to trudge through pros and this actually seems like a fun thing to write about. What what else do we need to know. Actually let's go back you. You made the trip yourself with your wife and you said with your dog as well. What kind of dog do you have. We have toler A nova scotia. Duck polling retriever. A flip. A lot like a fox and high energy so a obviously had to stay in dog hotels but i had to say a melbourne is dog friendly so but so it really Sort of to george. This way gave you a sense of just how hard he you know. We all laugh about. Washington slept here. We go after. After a year and a half following washington's we really begin to understand the personal sacked bicycle sacrifice that were small. I was going to say it's amazing that you did this. How long was his journey. Was it a year and a half on his side. It was it was he. He brought them up into four different legs. But it was. He did the during the first two years of his president of his first term. And so we spent about that much time following him and one of the things that was. We were traveling in a car. Obviously but there are parts of the the south of particularly between charleston and savannah where rotea travel are still there and since the ninety five takeaway the traffic. You can drive down very much. The way george Seventeen ninety it's your. You have the sense of channeling the pass a in a way that i've never experienced researching other works. It just sounds wonderful. Sounds like a mini series or reality. Show or something really. I mean what a great idea. But what a great idea for a book but it's just fascinating to me to think that he actually did this and that you figured it out. How how did you do that. I mean why did he write about it in such a way that it was fairly easy to piece together. Where did you find. Was it his diary. Where did you find this kind of information to know the details. But he's he kept a diary and those paper second published and they're they're ended wonderfully and so you can really see the towns. He went to And one of the things. I did with this before we even left. I made a list of all the towns in more than one hundred and reached out to all the libraries circle societies of each town and which is a big job. obviously but i and an acid. What memories do people have in your community of washington's trowels. Soon i was getting articles. Newspaper articles along with Journals diaries local histories that were written in the nineteenth century. So even before we got hit the road i had this whole of archive formed and also content gives many the librarians. Archivists volunteered get in our car. We drove into town. Show us around so it was. It was just a great way to experience history in this country. I it just sounds delightful. Great idea a great idea. For a book thank you nathaniel philbrick for all you right And in this case for all your traveling book is travels with george. Thanks for being with us. Great to be with..

Philbrick george toler nathaniel nova scotia washington savannah charleston Washington nathaniel philbrick
"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

08:04 min | 8 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks i'm talking to the author nathaniel philbrick. The book is travels with george. In search of washington and his legacy nathaniel. You were just saying if it hadn't been washington to be the first president who would've been and this is one of those things where it's almost impossible for us to reimagined it because he seems created to be that you know. It's like a a great assert of famous novel. You know if if If i hadn't been the captain would be the captain. You think that. I can't answer that question like the whole thing is all baked together can be no. That's how i feel about washington. I mean who was around at the time. You know this better than anyone who might have been president well. The second vote getter in that first presidential elections. John adams and of course he would be the second president after washington finished out his second term and yet he was clinton adams was acquitted central federal at new englander the opposite kind of personality from washington no interest in the those gran theatrical moves. As as he admitted to france you know a a Inter someone just. If he wasn't in the white house he was back home in massachusetts back in massachusetts much as he was in the white house when he became president on the other side is thomas jefferson who a better social social but also not anyone interested in getting out there mingling with people and they came from jefferson. Adams came from opposite sides of the political spectrum but made in washington unique was that he was a southern with a political views of big government. taxation program of the northern. And so he could number. Before there was an aisle he could reach across the binding both sides he also strikes me as as that kind of figure that he like the being divisive repelled him he wanted to be a unifying figure. And of course what you're describing in the book he travels around colony specifically to unite the country. It's almost a calling that he had and it's one of the reasons we call him the father of the country absolutely one of the things he he there would be brittle warfare with his within his own cabinet as jefferson and alexander hamilton. When at you know 'cause they were also from the opposite ends and there are these wonderful. Letters washington writes the to saying as soon as you get this far from another person in your point of view. The thing you have to start wondering is is maybe a middle course You know he's not the opposite of a dog is saying let's try to make it work rather than prove we are writer you are and and that that really is a unique kind of a position to be in. He didn't have to be right all us just trying to make it work. Well i mean that's a different kind of dogma. I guess in a way that that unity meant every he understood that. If we don't hang together we will hang separately. Something along those lines except a few years later but it's a similar idea that he understood that that's the priority for the country. I like the phrase He called the country in seventeen. Eighty nine the infant woody country. What a great phrase. It's such a an eighteenth century phrase too but i i love that That idea and it's hard for to imagine when you mentioned road trip. What were the roads like. and how. how far did he go. I mean to. What extent did he travel. Well it was the woody country You know if you travel from mount vernon to baltimore it looked like primeval forest. Seventeen eighty-nine as a made his way to new york of the roads. Were terrible The roads were terrible everywhere but the tavern public taverns in washington insistence saying only public taverns of you wanted to prove at no favorites on these sports and these were linked the roadside motels today. Hey were terrible beds. Worse food of fleas throughout washington. Felt that i am a leader of. I am one of you so he he did. This and it was an arduous ordeal particularly the longest tour. The mall south where he traveled from what was now the temporary capital philadelphia all the way down to savannah inland to augusta. Then back more almost two thousand miles can three months traveling by where stran- courage and it was while congress was recess. This is what washington was doing while all the other politicians were on vacation. Trying to pull people together by actually going a person's delivery or amway and did he. Did he get up to new hampshire. How far north did he get all the way to new hampshire and then during a harbor tour of he stepped onto kittery. What's now kittery point maine. It was then art of massachusetts and so that was as far north as he got. You know look at a man from portadown. Savannah is a huge distance. traveling When you he would average somewhere between forty and forty five miles a day stopping frequently eat both the people in the horses and So this this was. This was not getting an air force. One and virtually parachuting in new community is a real the. It's fascinating to me that he stayed in public taverns. That's a big thing. I guess i'm a little surprised by that. I would have expected him to stay at the homes of the wealthy people in each town. This was a real. This was a real issue for him to do. This would be a man of the pick and when he came to boston. The governor then governor boss john and cock a executive expected wash stay at his beautiful house on beacon. Hill in washington says no. I've got you know mamata policy. I'm not staying private. Homes and hancock took such umbrage. He didn't show up. When washington rode into boss and boss at washington's response to that was while hancock had invited washington dinner. Washington accepted assuming hancock with you. Know a comment come to the best cities he said no. I am not coming to your to dinner. I am the president's. You see me first before i see you and so hancock was enormously ocular. Massachusetts has to suffer the indignity of all jizing going to washington's quarter. saying yes. i made a mistake here. Please come to my house for dinner and he were that. I mean that's the other you you get about washington this formality and a real sense of these kinds of things of what is proper. Propriety was a big thing for him. But i've never heard that story. And i'm sure i've never heard many of the stories. In this book. I'm talking to nathaniel philbrick. The book is travels with george. We'll be right back believer from boston..

washington nathaniel philbrick clinton adams massachusetts jefferson John adams thomas jefferson alexander hamilton savannah inland white house george Adams france new hampshire cabinet mount vernon hancock
"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:10 min | 8 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Ones i haven't read yet We'll be right back knock software folks. I'm talking to nathaniel. Philbrick celebrated author of many books. The new one is travels with george in search of washington and his legacy now. This is a very clever cover. It hit shows. George washington looking in the rear view mirror of a car. Very clever not just because it's funny but because it says something that he's looking in the rear view mirror he's wondering about his legacy. He was somebody who was also keenly aware of legacy Not to a fault. I don't think from what i have read. It wasn't about burnishing his credentials. It was simply about understanding that idea so talk a little bit about that. That had something to do with why he was making this trip. He was deeply concerned about his legacy. He really wanted to be on the right side of history When people like us we're looking back end so he carefully scripted a lot everything he in his life as best he could and just as he would script Entry into town. He would receive addresses from Each each of the citizens of each town city and he would respond with addresses many ghost written by stat but he was laying the groundwork for how this would be remember. And you know this is one of the reasons why he struggled. So the issue of slavery you know he. He was obviously a slave owner. And after the during the revolution he came to begin to change his views from being an unrepentant slave holder From virginia he began to see that the future of the union might be imperilled by sleep but he was hopelessly involved himself and you know it was his legacy that caused him. I think really to dwell on this issue. However how should i make my own feelings. No if the creating the union rural alma do it publicly as president. So that's why freed slave workers upon us debt. Yeah that's extraordinary. The i guess my Take away from what i have read about. Washington is that he's he was humble in some ways. There was something about diffidence that i guess i pick up. I'm trying to think there's a two volume biography of him that was written about one hundred twenty years ago. I can't remember who wrote it but it. It almost felt like you were there with him. Because there were letters of people that that Were with him and he really did seem like one of those figures that history throws up now and again and think that they were. They were made for that moment. I mean his his size His physicality a number of things. Just make him seem like an outsized figure actually rather than just you know. It's a fascinating combination. I mean he really didn't want to be president he and his diaries. He's it's the most miserable he's ever been a after achieving miracles in the revolution he just sees the potential or throwing it all away as president because he knows how difficult a job is going to be and yet combined with that that difference that lack of faith in itself is tremendous ambition and realization that he is the only one in the country who could serve as president and you know that combining that often you're you're you say the best person whose job is someone who doesn't want it not interested in something else. Why shouldn't you perfect instance of that someone. Who had the skills. He really wasn't doing this because he had spent all his life to be president. He was doing this because he felt he had no choice and And so key. Had you know the charisma he had. He had the charisma. He had the talent for the small gesture that would completely win. Staunchest critics suicide when he enters a new york city during his as. He's making his way to a tortoise inauguration huge crowd and the leader of the religion house up to him and says. Can i escort you to your quarters. And he says no need to. The people gathered around me. Are all the escort i need. You know this is the ability to it. That the moment on the head that very few people have i was going to say and of course we all remember the famous moment when he pulls out his glasses giving his The famous speech. I can't remember that francis tavern. Or i don't remember where it was no or maybe this has been in newburgh new york. He says something. I've gone grain your service and But that seems deliberately theatrical to even though it wasn't put on but he he seems to be aware of the effect he's an extraordinary figure. Obviously the father of our country who himself had no children who was with him during this time he said he had ghostwriters. He had a retinue was martha with him. During this season. no martha..

Philbrick nathaniel George washington george washington virginia Washington us francis tavern new york city newburgh new york martha
"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

09:08 min | 8 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks i'm talking to nathaniel philbrick celebrated author of many books. The new one is travels with george in search of washington. And his legacy. I just finished my third over about the revolution in what Obviously figures but. I still wanna know what happened to x. I also had had enough. War and bloodshed I needed to do something entirely different. And it was. Then i alert about washington's decision upon becoming Head out on a road trip at lou unite. This is already divided country and to make it interesting. I thought what if i follow. Washington's footsteps as touring the country at a time deeply divisions and try to find out our president dried the united beginning. So i set out my life. Listen dog door doing my best. John steinbeck imitation and follow washington across the country. Travels with georgie. I get it. I get it now. This is wonderful. Well first of all So then we're talking about What year did he leave. If he's inaugurated in eighty nine. Was it a ninety seven. I can't remember was inaugurated. April thirtieth seventeen eighty nine and. He quickly made a decision soon after that that he needed to do something to get out of the office. See the people resist job to lead. O i'm during his presidency. He did this so to be clear. I thought that washington went on this journey Immediately after the end of his second term. You're saying he did it as he became president. So this is in seventeen. Eighty nine ninety. He decides to go on a journey. I'm fascinated that. I've not even heard this before. Is this common knowledge and i. I just missed this part. It's an underreported ardo. Washes his presidency. Where you know people focus on the policies e created how we created presidency but whence forgot his initial decision that needed to get out of the office and see the people resist job. Read this time of deep little division already constitution and divided the country. Those ordered a strong government. Those who wanted the government the power to the states so washington set out and yes. It's it's kind of slipped under the radar twin. It's fascinating to me to to go back and because we all have the mythical view of how things started but obviously Even the fact that they had to go back to the drawing board and create the constitution. So when you say. The country was divided then. What were the states that were particularly hostile to the idea of a strong federal government. And who was in favor of it. Yeah well when. Washington was inaugurated two states north carolina and rhode island at not yet even ratified constitution so they had participated in his election. I mean it was That that close to to not happening really and so washington out said wait a minute. We have to get people thinking of the country as united states of america not as each state which is really worthy. Power had been under the articles of confederation so he went out on this road trip now when we think of a road trip of course we think of a motor home or we think of we can think of a lot of things. What did that mean. I mean this is a road trip before. There was such a thing as a road trip. So if you're the president of the united states in seventeen eighty nine. What did it mean for him to leave new york. I guess and they go on a road trip. How did he do it. What did he what did he do. I mean obviously. That's what your book is about. But give us an idea. He traveled in or strong garrett. A full by four horses There was a non-treasury about a dozen people Two of them as slaves servants. Giles in paris is accompanied by a retinue will is what he called it. As what he was traveling in a horse-drawn carriage baggage wagon behind that in behind. That was white. Charger named preska and washington headed flair for the dramatic. And before you would come into a large our city you step out of the carriage dressed in his general's uniform on the revolution that big white horse and ride into town. Isn't that just beautiful. There's something about i mean. There's no question that washington. He was a rare figure in having a really keen sense of the role that he was playing he. He wasn't just some bureaucrat. Who happened to rise. You know into that office he. He was keenly aware that everything he did was setting a precedent for the future. But the the idea that he had that sense of theater and that he would ride into each town that way. Tell us more about that. I just fascinated. What a wonderful thing. Yeah sense of theater. He he loved going play. He was not in one small talk but he understood the dynamics room. He understood the dynamics of coming into a town or city in doing or eight years during the revolution and so yes. He would come in very dramatically. A guilt goal epaulettes on its shoulders. The either side of the road crowded with citizens yelling their applause and he would come on and for many people. This was their first glimpse of the national hero but it was also a. Hey this we now have a president of the united states. Not just our little town. It's just not not just state is a country here. This is the leader. It's george washington. The more i looked into washington's life over the years the more i felt guilty really almost for not having appreciated him sufficiently. He really had a bird in a personal burden to bring the country together. He understood that that wasn't normal and that an effort had to be made obviously He did that in part during the revolution but the idea that he saw this as a as a as an important part of his presidency. He wasn't just an executive. He was actually a figurehead. He understood that role. It's almost like the monarch. I guess there is something about him. That seems monarchic. A slight it ended. Worry thomas jefferson secretary of state who accused washington administration of being monarch in washington. Understood that what made watching indifferently was not someone on an ego trip trying to turn himself into a deck dictators. He was trying to use his personal slavery. I mean he was the most popular man in the world. At this point he was trying to use that to create an office that would transcend the ego of any single curse a country of law laws. And so it's a fine line. Those who trust in him said okay. That's great but there were others on the other side such as generous. James madison saying whoa. This is dangerous this is this is going away the british monarchy and already. You're seeing those divisions in america's washington tries to pull everybody together. It is interesting because you don't think of him as a showman He was not allowed mouth but he really did have that sense of The importance of presentation. Just what you said about the way he would ride in on that white charger. Now what do we are their paintings of of that scene. I'm sure i guess. I've probably seen one right. Well there's one terrific any by nc lia- you know the illustrator treasure island Just a wonderful ater of washington riding on that great. Big white horse into trenton new jersey and it was there was an all female group greeting him there. Throwing rose adults in front of heads. And it's just a one eight that really captures the shock and awe washington rioting in on prescott. I i love it it is. It's interesting to me. That after writing three books on the revolution the carnage that you decided you wanted to. You want to keep going and in a sense. Enjoy the peace yourself since you had to go through this. That's a lot of books to write about the revolution and before we go to the next six. Actually we're going to go to break right now folks I've got the joy of speaking with the nathaniel philbrick. We've had him on the program before recommend almost all his books. The only ones. I can't recommend are the.

washington nathaniel philbrick John steinbeck preska united states of america Washington georgie george rhode island washington administration of b garrett north carolina Giles united treasury paris new york george washington thomas jefferson nc lia
"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:11 min | 8 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Of books in my hands. I hold the book. We've been talking about this. The title is end game. The churches strategic move to save faith and family in america the author jp ganz. He's the founder and president of community. Oh and he designed and oversaw you ready for this. The largest privately funded community marriage project in us history which lowered the divorce rate in an entire us city by twenty four percent in just three years j. p. d. ganz first of all congratulations on the book and tell us this story. This is so great. Thank you so much erik Yeah we got started on on a big transfer big question can churches act is cultural change agents in a big way at a city wide scale and knowing and recognizing that That marriage just is the central piece for society and really for the faith. Get into it in the book We were able to work with more than fifty churches. Moving fifty eight thousand nine hundred twelve folks four hour or longer relationship education and lower the divorce rate jacksonville florida by twenty four percent and had independent evaluation of our work by scholars out of the university of virginia and florida state confirmed. There's no demographic explanation for that decline other than our intervention and then the churches themselves Grew in the process of a group of thirty three churches baseline there are attendance and giving saw attendance. Grow by twenty three percent and giving grow by by twenty eight percent so even doing this for utterly selfish reasons. You want to grow your church. You don't care about marriages. this will grow your church on the other hand. If you care about marriages. I i mean honestly the fact that you did this in such a buttoned up way and you had people from the outside come in to say yes in fact and again. We're not talking a little town. This is jacksonville florida. This is a big city. And you're telling me that citywide divorces went down by twenty four percent over the course of three

us city florida jacksonville ganz dr mark lawrence university of virginia erik Paul vitz us
John-Paul 'JP' DeGance: Can Churches Act as Cultural Change Agents?

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:11 min | 8 months ago

John-Paul 'JP' DeGance: Can Churches Act as Cultural Change Agents?

"Of books in my hands. I hold the book. We've been talking about this. The title is end game. The churches strategic move to save faith and family in america the author jp ganz. He's the founder and president of community. Oh and he designed and oversaw you ready for this. The largest privately funded community marriage project in us history which lowered the divorce rate in an entire us city by twenty four percent in just three years j. p. d. ganz first of all congratulations on the book and tell us this story. This is so great. Thank you so much erik Yeah we got started on on a big transfer big question can churches act is cultural change agents in a big way at a city wide scale and knowing and recognizing that That marriage just is the central piece for society and really for the faith. Get into it in the book We were able to work with more than fifty churches. Moving fifty eight thousand nine hundred twelve folks four hour or longer relationship education and lower the divorce rate jacksonville florida by twenty four percent and had independent evaluation of our work by scholars out of the university of virginia and florida state confirmed. There's no demographic explanation for that decline other than our intervention and then the churches themselves Grew in the process of a group of thirty three churches baseline there are attendance and giving saw attendance. Grow by twenty three percent and giving grow by by twenty eight percent so even doing this for utterly selfish reasons. You want to grow your church. You don't care about marriages. this will grow your church on the other hand. If you care about marriages. I i mean honestly the fact that you did this in such a buttoned up way and you had people from the outside come in to say yes in fact and again. We're not talking a little town. This is jacksonville florida. This is a big city. And you're telling me that citywide divorces went down by twenty four percent over the course of three

Jp Ganz Us City Ganz United States Erik Florida Jacksonville University Of Virginia
"philbrick" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

06:39 min | 8 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Was was how they were funded and all that. But it's happened in the south And get you know. It's not unanimous by any means but it's A one of the things we found was yes. We're a divided country but was remarkable for us is when you're looking at the pass locally and looking towards washington people Show real pride in their country. What side of the fence. There they are in a gave me hope that. Hey maybe we can work our way through this. Find time in the future where we can get back to. What's important fighting over stupid things like. Should i get a vaccination or should i pull down a statue of robert. Lee said this is the the times we're living in now where people are going. You know what first of all all of those civil war memorials were really erected long after the civil war. These were Kind of screw used to the to the you know the the african americans who were getting equal rights. This was a jim crow thing to say. You know we're white and where superior something so now right so now americans are going hold on that. Be a part of our history. But it's certainly not apart we want to honor and so there's a big movement that thankfully is successful to pull down these memorials civil war quote heroes. I and we went to a monument avenue and all the all the statues were up there. Study had been done in their plans to take on jefferson davis but of course that became When the crowd took it into their own hands and and i respond to people who say well when a statue comes down we are losing our history. No we're not. We're not remember when the declaration of independence was. I read in new york city. The people's response was charge into the bowling green where there is a huge statue. George third on a horse. They put it down they Then melted down the lead into bullets. That were then used to fight. The king are statues like that. Come down we aren't losing history. Were making history. This history is history isn't doesn't sit frozen pedestal like a statue. History is ongoing dynamic as each generation. Redefines what this country was founded on that all people are created equal. Yes but but what. I'm i'm getting at is. I mean you said yeah. History isn't being lost when his statue was toppled to the ground. History's being made. And that's true because everything we do is part of history so the the mere act of saying we reject this part of our society who many years after the civil war decided they were going to You know flex their white supremacy muscles by putting up these horrific status while now we're taking that back There is a place for these things in museums where you can learn about history and put it in that in that perspective but there's a portion of our society right now that is fighting it saying we need to honor these people and that's the problem. We have people going around with confederate flags empowered by the former president. Who says you know after charlottesville. There's very fine people on both sides because go figure. They supported him This is really dangerous in texas. They are so rewriting. The history books. They're taking out meant they're they're referring to slavery as an immigration program. Some of these books business really dangerous. isn't it. It is dangerous because what you're doing is muzzling. The process of history. The process of history is is looking at the past through the lens of the present. Inevitably you do that. You know and and to to say wait a minute. You cannot say anything bad about the past Create something that never existed. It's a disturbance to the the the heat. What heroes we may have. Because you're not a hero if you're flawless and you just follow through with your Your perk nece You're a hero if you somehow matter the flaws. We all have induced something actually. That's good for the country. In the world and so two to you know completely whitewashed the pass to refuse to see any other a portrayals of other than of sainthood is to Is real disservice especially to our children. And and that's what's troubling to me. Is that talents. Are getting into the curriculums Handcuffing the teachers preventing them from teach teaching the history that you know is is is is acknowledged to be what actually happened in coming up with a myth that is really teaches nothing except for wish fulfillment that are in many cases fulfills our our worst. Our worst i think are were insticts with without a doubt and the thing is with history the further removed. You are from it. You know the more especially now are different. Stories come out. So here you go. Nathaniel travelling in In george washington footsteps to sort of get a that perspective on his life and his presidency. What what new things can you learn. Two hundred and some odd years later And know that what you're learning is accurate and hasn't been perverted by these people who just want to impose their own beliefs onto what was actually historical fact. Yes well i you know. That's where you gotta go to the original documents the archives. You have you know you can't rely on you know someone's ghost written account of what happened That that reflects the ideology of their talk show. I mean you've got to go into the archives. Come up with the documents that were there you know and when it comes to washington. It's the it's such a rich archive of documents. Where he he went to newport rhode island which also happened to be the capital of the slave trade in america which americans may not be aware of slavery is not anyone by any means..

jim crow jefferson davis Lee washington robert bowling new york city charlottesville George texas Nathaniel george washington newport rhode island america
"philbrick" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:07 min | 8 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"But you did try to go to the same places he went to. I want to ask about in the south. You brought up slavery but in the south there are a lot of those old slave plantations better. Now what are they restored and they give tours and i guess some of them operate in a in a way to show the evils of slavery but some kind of celebrate it. What did you find on there. What we found was this book is also about public history about how interpretations of history are changing and a lot of them. We did our tour before The great protests for social justice. That that that was happening as i was writing the book which gave that process a real urgency. But what we discovered is that there are reinterpretations. Happened when you go to for example hampton plantation in south carolina They were washington. Visited it was there that he famously. The owner of the plantation wanted to cut. Down was live oak right in front of their newport. And he said now you know the guy who supposedly cutoff cherry trees tree. That beautiful cannot be replaced by man still there. It's a living monument to his is preservationists instincts. But you go inside. Also they list of the african americans slave people who were on the docket there and so that You know and their costs and with very moving Testimony to sufferings. They had not only while enslaved but their ancestors their people after them would have under the what was essentially shared rockin situation so i would say it's changing the there. Buildings are are massive. They they were created through slavery was was how they were funded and all that. But it's happened in the south And get you know. It's not unanimous by any.

hampton south carolina newport washington
"philbrick" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

06:38 min | 8 months ago

"philbrick" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"The american embassy in iran was taken by a by the militants on november fourth. Nineteen seventy nine. I remember that day as clear as if it were yesterday because number one it was my twentieth birthday and my mother had died ten days earlier. And i remember thinking. Oh my god. My mom's gone and the world has just changed and it was a year later on election day. November fourth nineteen eighty that ronald reagan was elected. It was the first presidential election. I vote in. I voted for. Jimmy carter against ronald reagan but ronald reagan won the presidency on my twenty first birthday november first november fourth nineteen eighty and. That's the day that the hostages were freed in iran. That was that should have given everyone. A giant clue as to reagan is doing some shady behind the scenes negotiating. Here so ronald reagan fucked everything up. Everything he he he he enacted he brought us trickle down economics or reaganomics In one thousand nine hundred eighty one. Shortly after he took office he cut domestic spending and taxes he slashed. The top income tax rate was seventy percent when reagan came in. He lowered it to fifty. That was the low and lowered the lowest tier from fourteen percent to eleven and then in one thousand nine hundred sixty did it again. He cut the highest personal tax rate from fifty percent down to thirty eight point five and the following year. It went down to twenty-eight percent. Ronald reagan lowered income taxes on the wealthiest americans from seventy percent. Down to twenty eight He did a lot of other things too. I mean and most notably probably the iran contra scandal which was probably going on. And that's how he got the hostages out ronald reagan. That's right What am i just dan. More so in the youtube chat room said he did. What trump did with the taliban except reagan did it with iran to and sold them arms to give money to the to the contras who were fighting against the sandinistas in nicaragua. What the hell. Of course. His vice president was papa. Doc george h w bush who came up through the cia director. He was one of those people. So after Reagan served two terms and the those last few years he was not all there. You know. it's funny these. Republicans should point joe biden. Who seems to be a hell of a lot. More lucid than than ronald reagan ever was But then george w bush george h w bush. I'm sorry takes office. He's then from eighty nine to ninety three and he invaded panama. And overthrew noriega he launched operation desert storm in january of nineteen ninety one to thwart saddam hussein's invasion of kuwait. In fact i went to saudi arabia on the eve of that. The beginning of operation desert storm to a morning show is produced. We went over there to do a show and come back. That was my that was are like you know. First entree into war since vietnam. Oh and papa. Doc also put clarence thomas on the supreme court who's in the news again today. I'm earl thomas said nicole. What about the. Lapd's crash unit. Reagan supported during the eighties. Obviously i'm not going through everything. This is a very cursory. Look at the president's who've who've been in the oval office during my lifetime. I'm just giving you the highlights. We could go for hours and hours and hours. I'm not gonna be able to hit on anything. Thankfully h. w. papa doc. Bush only only lasted for one term and he was beaten by bill clinton. bill clinton. What do i need to say about. Bill clinton come on. I'm watching. we're watching the american. What is it called. The american crime story impeachment on fx. That is about the the bill clinton monica lewinsky affair whole story. Bill clinton talk about a flawed man. Who should have known better who just couldn't keep his dick in his pants. And that's what you know. What as as as much as his administration you know there were some good years there. He balanced the budget. Not that. i think that's really important but he did. And in another time might have gotten some credit but all bill clinton will be remembered for is that he couldn't keep his dick in his pants. And then that gave us george w bush who just might be the dumbest man to ever become president now again. I'm not a historian so there may have been some who were even more dumb then doumbia. But i did when he left office. I put together a montage of bush. 'schisms ad. I went through the whole alphabet and did whole thing And it goes on for about a half hour. The man was a walking. I don't even added him I was glad when he left he. He got us into two horrible wars that we never should have been in the first place one of which we just finally extricated ourselves from twenty years later. Thank you w. And that led to barack obama and barack obama and i'm going to piss off people in the chat room but i'm sorry he was the most overrated underperforming president that that gave you know that that ran on hope hope and change should gave us none of that who left the democratic party. Frankly in the worst position than i than any other president. I can pick up again. I'm certainly no historian But you know the democratic party. After barack obama had You know the the worst i he left the party in such bad shape. We had no bench congress We were not in good shape and state. Legislatures were all in republican control. He did not do a good job for the party. And you know and that's a shame. That's that's his legacy He he came in with such fanfare and such.

ronald reagan iran reagan Bill clinton Doc george h w bush american embassy george w bush george h w bush Jimmy carter Reagan clinton monica lewinsky noriega joe biden earl thomas nicaragua taliban clarence thomas