17 Burst results for "Phil Sheridan"

"phil sheridan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:16 min | 1 d ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Appears to be a domestic incident. And the victims were all known to our suspect. And so so at this point way, do not think that this individual is out targeting random people to shoot them. That does not mean that he is not dangerous. The suspect is believed to be a former detective for the Travis County Sheriff's Department. Had been charged with the sexual assault of a child. A seven year old girl was shot to death Sunday afternoon in a McDonald's in Chicago. Authorities say her father was injured. They were in a car in a parking lot when someone opened fire. Police say no arrests have been made. Closing arguments will be held Monday in Minneapolis in the trial of former police officer Derrick Show, Vin he's charged with the murder of George Floyd last year. In Indiana. Police say the 19 year old who shot and killed eight people and a FedEx facility last week, had legally purchased the two guns he used Phil Sheridan from member station W F Y I reports the gun sales happened. Despite the state's long standing law, allowing authorities to bar people from buying guns were deemed to risk. Indiana enacted a so called Red Flag lawn, 2005 after an Indianapolis police officer was killed by a man with mental health problems whose guns had been taken by police. And returned to him. Brandon Whole who killed eight and injured five others in a FedEx building last week, also had a gun seized from him. After a call from the holes mother last year she was worried her son might try to harm himself. That weapon was not returned. Police say hole was able to purchase two more rifles legally just months after his gun was taken. The county prosecutor's office is now investigating whether the red flag law procedures were followed after holes gun was seized. For NPR News. I'm Jill shared The U. S has hidden an encouraging milestone in the fight against the pandemic. More than half of adults have received at least one dose of the vaccine. NPR's Dave Mystics reports nearly 130 million US adults 18 and older I've gotten at least one dose of the vaccine, according to a tracker from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Data from the CDC show more than 84 million Americans of all ages have been fully vaccinated. Including 65% of those 65 older The CDC reports. More than 109 million doses of the visor vaccine have been administered on more than 92 million Moderna. Shots have been given Vaccine from Johnson and Johnson, which is currently on pauses. Officials evaluate rare side effects has been given to more than seven million people in the U. S. Dave Mystic NPR News This is NPR news. Public health schools. How high schools in Chicago are toe open Monday for the first time in more than a year, the third largest school district had closed because of the pandemic. The Chicago Teachers union has agreed to go back to in person instruction for students, 16 years and older. Younger students have returned in phases since February. Portugal moves ahead Monday with his latest face of easing coronavirus restrictions. Even its most European nations titan bears in the face of a fresh wave of infections. Alison Roberts reports for most of Portugal malls and even the largest on streets, doors will be able to open for the first time since mid January. Cafes and restaurants will be able to serve customers indoors as well as out, and theaters and cinemas may open with capacity restrictions. Jim's can't host exercise classes, but medium risk sports such as basketball are allowed. Only intend. Municipalities with higher infection rates are restrictions being kept unchanged or tightened. But even in those areas, all school pupils will be back in class. New cases are creeping up, but Portugal still has the lowest rate in the EU. Before it locked down. It had the world's highest rates of cases and deaths for NPR news. I'm Allyson Roberts in Lisbon. NASA will attempt Monday to fly a helicopter on Mars. The ultra lightweight ingenuity is to rise above the Martian surface, hover for 30 seconds and then land. This would be the first powered controlled flight of an aircraft. Another planet. That's a likens the mission to the right brothers flying and motor driven plane for the first time in.

Dave Mystics Derrick Show NASA Brandon Whole Minneapolis Alison Roberts Lisbon 65% Allyson Roberts Mars Monday Indiana Sunday afternoon FedEx George Floyd last year 30 seconds last week 2005 Phil Sheridan
"phil sheridan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 1 d ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A former detective from the Travis County Sheriff's Department. Had been charged with the sexual assault of a child. Seven year old girl was shot to death Sunday afternoon in a McDonald's in Chicago. Authorities say her father was injured. They were in a car in a parking lot when someone opened fire. Police say no arrests have been made. Closing arguments will be held Monday in Minneapolis in the trial of former police officer Darren Show Vin he's charged with the murder of George Floyd last year in Indiana. Police say the 19 year old who shot and killed eight people and a FedEx facility last week, had legally purchased the two guns he used Phil Sheridan from member station W F Y I reports the gun sales happened. Despite the state's long standing law, allowing authorities to bar people from buying guns were deemed to risk. Indiana enacted a so called Red flag lawn 2000 and five after an Indianapolis police officer was killed by a man with mental health problems. Those guns have been taken by police, then returned to him. Brandon Whole who killed eight and injured five others in a FedEx building last week, also had a gun seized from him after a call from the holes Mother last year. She was worried her son might try to harm himself. That weapon was not returned. Police say hole was able to purchase two more rifles legally just months after his gun was taken. The county prosecutor's office is now investigating whether the red flag law procedures were followed after holes gun was seized. For NPR News. I'm Jill shared The U. S has hidden in encouraging milestone in the fight against the pandemic. More than half of adults have received at least one dose of the vaccine. NPR's Dave Mystics reports nearly 130 million US adults 18 and older I've gotten at least one dose of the vaccine, according to a tracker from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Data from the CDC show more than 84 million Americans of all ages have been fully vaccinated, including 65% of those 65 older. The CDC reports. More than 109 million doses of the visor vaccine have been administered one more than 92 million Moderna. Shots have been given a vaccine from Johnson and Johnson, which is currently on pauses. Officials evaluate rare side effects has been given to more than seven million people in the U. S. They've missed each NPR news. This is NPR news. Public health schools. How high schools in Chicago are the open Monday for the first time in more than a year, the third largest school district had closed because of the pandemic. The Chicago Teachers union has agreed to go back to in person instruction for students, 16 years and older. Younger students have returned in phases since February. Portugal moves ahead Monday with his latest face of easing coronavirus restrictions. Even his most European nations titan bears in the face of a fresh wave of infections. Alison Roberts reports for most of Portugal malls and even the largest on streets, doors will be able to open for the first time since mid January. Cafes and restaurants will be able to serve customers indoors as well as out, and theaters and cinemas may open with capacity restrictions. Jim's can't host exercise classes, but medium risk sports such as basketball are allowed. Only intend. Municipalities with higher infection rates are restrictions being kept unchanged or tightened. But even in those areas, all school pupils will be back in class. New cases are creeping up, but Portugal still has the lowest rate in the U before it locked down. It had the world's highest rates of cases and deaths for NPR news. I'm Allyson Roberts in Lisbon. NASA will attempt Monday to fly a helicopter on Mars. The ultra lightweight ingenuity is to rise above the Martian surface, hover for 30 seconds and then land. This would be the first powered controlled flight of an aircraft. Another planet. NASA likens the mission to the right brothers flying and motor driven plane for the first time.

Dave Mystics Darren Show Vin NASA Brandon Whole Minneapolis Alison Roberts Lisbon Allyson Roberts George Floyd 65% Indiana Mars Monday FedEx last year Centers for Disease Control an 30 seconds last week mid January Jill
"phil sheridan" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:09 min | 1 d ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Incident and the victims were all known to our suspect. And so so at this point Way, do not think that this individual is out targeting random people to shoot them. That does not mean that he is not dangerous. The suspect is believed to be a former detective for the Travis County Sheriff's Department. Had been charged with the sexual assault of a child. A seven year old girl was shot to death Sunday afternoon in a McDonald's in Chicago. Authorities say her father was injured. They were in a car in a parking lot when someone opened fire. Police say no arrests have been made. Closing arguments will be held Monday in Minneapolis in the trial of former police officer Derrick Show Vin he's charged with the murder of George Floyd last year in Indiana. Police say the 19 year old who shot and killed eight people and a FedEx facility last week, had legally purchased the two guns he used Phil Sheridan from member station W F Y I reports the gun sales happened. Despite the state's long standing law, allowing authorities to bar people from buying guns were deemed to risk. Indiana enacted a so called Red Flag lawn 2005 after an Indianapolis police officer was killed by a man with mental health problems. Whose guns had been taken by police, then returned to him. Brandon Whole who killed eight and injured five others in a FedEx building last week, also had a gun seized from him after a call from the holes Mother last year. She was worried her son might try to harm himself. That weapon was not returned. Police say hole was able to purchase two more rifles legally just months after his gun was taken. The county prosecutor's office is now investigating whether the red flag law procedures were followed after holes gun was seized. For NPR News. I'm Jill shared The U. S has hidden in encouraging milestone in the fight against the pandemic. More than half of adults have received at least one dose of the vaccine. NPR's Dave Mystics reports nearly 130 million US adults 18 and older I've gotten at least one dose of the vaccine, according to a tracker from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Data from the CDC show more than 84 million Americans of all ages have been fully vaccinated, including 65% of those 65 older. The CDC reports. More than 109 million doses of the visor vaccine have been administered on more than 92 million Moderna. Shots have been given Vaccine from Johnson and Johnson, which is currently on pauses. Officials evaluate rare side effects has been given to more than seven million people in the U. S. Dave Mystic NPR News This is NPR news. Public health schools. How high schools in Chicago are to open Monday for the first time in more than a year, the third largest school district had closed because of the pandemic. The Chicago Teachers union has agreed to go back to in person instruction for students, 16 years and older. Younger students have returned in phases since February. Portugal moves ahead Monday with his latest face of easing coronavirus restrictions, even as most European nations titan bears in the face of a fresh wave of infections. Alison Roberts reports for most of Portugal malls and even the largest on streets, doors will be able to open for the first time since mid January. Cafes and restaurants will be able to serve customers indoors as well as out, and theaters and cinemas may open with capacity restrictions. Jim's can't host exercise classes that medium risk sports such as basketball are allowed. Only intend. Municipalities with higher infection rates are restrictions being kept unchanged or tightened. But even in those areas, all school pupils will be back in class. New cases are creeping up, but Portugal still has the lowest rate in the U before it locked down. It had the world's highest rates of cases and deaths for NPR news. I'm Allyson Roberts in Lisbon. NASA will attempt Monday to fly a helicopter on Mars. The ultra lightweight ingenuity is to rise above the Martian surface, hover for 30 seconds and then land. This would be the first powered controlled flight of an aircraft. Another planet. That's a likens the.

Dave Mystics Derrick Show Vin Lisbon Alison Roberts NASA Indiana Centers for Disease Control an 65% Minneapolis Brandon Whole Allyson Roberts Sunday afternoon Monday George Floyd last year Mars Jill 30 seconds FedEx last week
"phil sheridan" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

06:07 min | 3 months ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"I've ever met was the dead one. Yeah right so. And if he didn't say those exact words the same thought them he. He did You know the these are the more complicated complex people that get into phil. Sheridan is also a great advocate for black americans. Yes wise. He an advocate for black americans but not for indigenous americans. This is reality. This is the complexity of history of people. What you know. Prejudices have been have been introduced to what extent. Yeah these are three dimensional figures. They have shiny nightside's yeah they have really dark sites just like all of us. Yeah so i mean. I am not making an argument for moral relativism here. But you know the good guys do bad things. The bad the bad guys do good things Sometimes good things are done for the wrong motivations and you know vice versa. Wrong things are done ulysses grant with his peace policy. That is a very good man who has very noble ambitions and his peace policy towards the indigenous. Population is It's it's not it's not working. Yes yeah it is. It's it's unworkable right. He can't enforce it and it doesn't enforced. I frankly i i love grant. The he's one of these people that the more i learn about him for the part you know the more i think of him. My esteem increases You know but he's human being he's gonna make wrong decisions. Yeah do and those have huge ramifications. Absolutely do so. Yeah i it's just it's important to tell the whole story about any person and and if we can not expect perfection more historical figures we can realize that their lies are as complicated and difficult as ours Yano and include those and statements like you were saying earlier. Don't jump to the or statements jumped to the and statements phil sheridan. Did this good thing and this bad thing quote unquote. Yeah yeah well. I don't know if there's a better not wrap up then on that Yeah i mean. He's a really hard subjects honestly. It's it's the sort of thing where i wish all of you could be a classroom with me. And we can have an actual discussion It's one of the one of the frustrations of it. All being you know over a mike and so one dimensional earth not wanna mention one directional right But i hope that you've gotten a lot of good information and and things for for you to think about and be able to discuss right. How well making very radical shift. In topic seattle your. I'm leaving even i'm leaving. Hdd tedious this is my last episode. With h t s. it's There are a lot of exciting things happening in my life didn't make it palatable to leave But it is it's hard. It's hard to acknowledge so For the past year and a half. I've been getting a master's in academic advising and all graduate This coming august and in the meantime i have re. I've accepted a position as an economic advisor. Actually at the same university. Where craig works so. I think our paths will still cross occasionally. Well yeah. we'll still see. I'm going to miss working with you on this though and i'm gonna miss working with you on this. I mean i'm. I'm excited to launch a new part of my career. Absolutely and i'm excited for you as i told you from. It is kinda funny thinking about both you and josh and the like. I don't know you had a similar facial expression when you when you break me as news i. I'm happy. I'm so happy for josh. He is doing fantastic You know and i'm happy for you and obviously at. Yeah i i miss working with josh rates. Yeah we love lindsey and airship But it's not like josh disappeared. I i have seen the man if you times. You know and yeah. We'll bump into each other on campus and definitely. I'm going to have to figure out what epilogues look like. But yeah there won't be these conversations anymore. That will be different. No they won't. But i'm happy for you. I'm sure everyone listening for you. Thanks yes i guess that does it. I guess it does so for the last time. I'll say goodbye to everyone and i hope you keep Well i know you'll keep enjoying the podcast. Shucks while sale gehenna sinus soccer right. Join us so innocent. Two weeks where. Greg will tell you a story. History that doesn't suck his created and hosted by greg jackson researching and writing by greg jackson sale. Salazar production by airship sound designed by derek. Baron theme music composed by greg. Jack's arrangement and additional composition by lindsey graham of airship for bibliography of all primary secondary sources consulted writing this episode visit hdd s podcast dot com. Https is supported by fans at casey on dot com forward slash. His doesn't and i are beyond grateful to you kind souls providing funding to help us going thank and a special thanks to our hatred whose monthly gift puts them at acer status. We'll call jason carstens john. Frugal dougal michael. And rachel wounds bob. Dracevic heath and downer drew hill. Andrew for janata rice can bernie dax jones john. Jeffrey news and bryan joy needs to be weeks. Where i'd like to tell you a story..

phil sheridan josh Sheridan Yano phil greg jackson seattle craig lindsey Salazar lindsey graham soccer Greg Baron derek greg jason carstens john Jack dougal michael casey
"phil sheridan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Back to the Jim Bohannon show at one eight six six five O, JIMBO is we look at the impeaches that is story in Brenda white apples, look at the trial of Andrew Johnson and the dream of just Dacian I gather, there was a brief honeymoon period in which it looked as though Johnson might get along with the radical Republicans. But that, that quickly changed, what was the, the, the major turning point, the, the crossing of the Rubicon, if you will. Well, there were several crossings, actually, it seems to me. I mean, it's you know when as I said, John's Johnson starts issuing executive orders. He's starts, you know, allowing he basically allows what we call states rights, you know, the issue one of the issues that the war was fought about in terms of home rule when he sets up so their state legislatures basically and starts. Can, you know, pardoning former confederates at the rate of almost a hundred day, a lot of these people started who had been thought of as traitors they started getting into not just government, the police force. So there was that there was the effort that he made to make these states part of the union again with, you know, by ignoring and running around congress. And then when congress started to pass legislation to help the formerly inflate. Saved of the south like civil rights legislation, which was only granting people citizenship due process. You know, it's, it's not really very radical at all Johnson, would veto this kind of legislation in congress would has legislation over his vetoes, then when congress decided had to enshrine civil rights in the constitution with the fourteenth amendment. Johnson went out on us, speaking tour that was that was lampooned is the Andes swing around the circle where he basically campaigned against the fourteenth amendment in started abusing members of congress saying they should be hanged that they were responsible for what had been now murders in the south murders of black people, and white loyalists as they were called or white Republicans, particularly in, in major. Cities like Memphis in New Orleans, where the, the there were massacres that had occurred and even union form. You know, union generals like, Phil Sheridan who is not exactly. A radical was so horrified. He said that he'd never seen anything quite like this in Johnson tried to suppress this, you know information, so it's getting worse and worse and worse as time went on. So did you wanna ask them? I wanted to I wanted to ask you, I guess about secretary of war, Edwin Stanton, who spent you say. Gonna say so what happened was congress thought. Well, you know, we're going to have to pass even more legislation reconstruction legislation, which basically, in franchise, the blacks of the south, and who the people who are going to protect them at the polls was military, the south is divided into military zones. And so in that particular case was in charge of the military was General Grant, and Edwin Stanton, who had been secretary of war under Lincoln, and in many cases, and many people thought that he was is much as Lincoln or grant responsible for the union winning the war. So, so the congress, congress want to keep standing in office, and they knew that Stanton by this time, couldn't stand Johnson and Johnson couldn't stand him. So they passed what was called the tenure of office act to protect Stanton that meant that none of people known of the people in Johnson's cab. Cabinet any civil officer who had been confirmed by the Senate needed Senate could only be fired with Senate approval. So Johnson to make a long story short, what he did was he fired Stanton anyway. And that that'll help rope live. We're down the path of impeachment. Now, I'll read that article two section for again, the president vice president and all civil officers of the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for and conviction of treason bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors, unquote. Very short little section, there, don't want to the extent that you think that Gerald Ford was correct, when he had defined the criteria for impeachment as whatever. A majority of the house of representatives says it is at any given point in history. Tirelessly wrong. But it sounds terrible. And the reason he did not entirely wrong. Is that the constitution is very vague on this. So even if you go to federalist papers, where Alexander Hamilton writes that impeachment that pause for impeachment can be something like maladministration, or abuse of power. What does that mean necessarily? So in some sense, what happens is the what, what Ford means is that all you need is a simple majority in the house to vote for impeaching president, it's not the same as removing from office, and it's not the same as conviction. It's, it's the impeachment, which means then he goes, he because it always was a, he is, is tried in the problem, of course, is, we know what treason is we think we know bribery is, but what are high crimes? These days, you will we hear a misdemeanor. That means all. Well, it could be worse. It could be a felony. I mean, the term has somehow lost the meaning and context over the decades. And it didn't have it, then they know what that is do that could could, you know, misdemeanor be stealing chicken. Would you throw somebody out of office for doing that, you know, and also different states have different laws for what constitutes misdemeanor? So what's a high crime? You know what is it a high misdemeanor? And so these are very, very unspecific terms and conditions. And so in that particular case that's why I say, there's a way in which Ford is right, but congress is very, very rarely, as we know in our history, only Johnson and Clinton takes that step because it seems like and it is such a radical step because we have a democracy, and people voted the, you know, the chief executive into office with Johnson. However Johnson wasn't voted in this. He was the accidental president. So we didn't really have a constituency. He didn't really have the kind. Of base. Whether we call today that we think of a president is having to have gotten in we'll come back and we'll talk some more with our guest again. She is noted historian, Brenda, white apple, the book is the impeaches the trial of Andrew.

Andrew Johnson congress Edwin Stanton president bribery Brenda Ford Jim Bohannon Gerald Ford Phil Sheridan Senate Andes executive officer JIMBO Alexander Hamilton Memphis John secretary
"phil sheridan" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

13:26 min | 2 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Right from the south who's kind of, you know, his closer nice because he was a tailor but can't handle the moment at all. You know, and contemporaneous, people at the time we're like, oh, they were horrified. They were whispering. They said you know what is he crazy? You know and, and Lincoln presumably, you know, reported to say keep when we, let's keep him away from me. In other words, I don't want to have anything to do with this guy. You know, we've one that's the end of that. And it was a vice president after all on which meant he was going to be inconsequential. Right. You know, we would. He served as purpose, basically, we vice presidents in the nineteenth century, can you count, you know, in that sense? So he'd served as purpose. Exactly. And he was an embarrassment. And, and then lo and behold, a month later Lincoln is dead. And Johnson is taking another oath of office. But this one is to be come the president, and it should have given more people. Pause. But people wanted continuity. I mean, how could you not? I mean you have a dead president, you have a war that's barely finished just about finished. But nobody knows the direction of the country, who is this person? You have to put all your faith in this person in the beginning, everyone is kind of, like, okay. We have faith in you going for them and trying to see the best in him. And he was the guy that stood up to the slavers of Tennessee. Not only that he had said, treason is a crime and must be prosecuted. So it seemed like he was on the same page of radicals who are basically saying, we have to change the entire. Tire structure in nature of the south, and we cannot let this happen again, and we have to really rebuild the country. So it seems that that was the case and he left Lincoln's cabinet intact to even the Democrats because he was a democrat. Even the Democrats said, you've got to get rid of some of these guys, you know, in the cabinet Johnson, wouldn't do it. He wouldn't list hidden. He never listened. Really listened? So then you have to major questions that confront the country, what to do with the states that seceded right how to reintegrate them into the union, and what posture legally and morally and morally the government takes towards the millions of four million, formerly enslaved people who had been deprived of schooling who had been deprived of the ability to move who had no jobs. No land didn't really in a sense on their own clothes on their back. What's going to happen to those people? Where do they go? Where are they going to live? Lots of those plantations have been confiscated, you know, who want them. Nobody knew I mean it's a it's an enormous problem. And what was also a problem in relation to the first issue, which is how do these states come back was that people who had been count. Counted as very fifths of a person are now whole persons. So if you count them toward representation in the electoral college, but you don't give them the vote then incense your we kind of populating the southern power structure, but not with people who can vote in their own interests. This is a really important point. So take away the moral question here and just looking at in political terms, recalled fry while I'm just saying for Republican northerners who have just thought this bloody war because of these asshole southerners, these treasonous others. And I'm just saying take away the people that have that are actually like about abolition gal just like the partisan practical, these assholes. Right. They waged a war against our government costs six hundred thousand lives. Right. Seven fifty seven hundred fifty thousand and counting seven hundred and fifty thousand that's the latest count. And we end up in a situation in which we take them back to the union. What the three fists are now full. They don't have any political rights. They have basically come back live lost their slaves, but we've just given them all this political power. Exactly. It's exactly right. And everybody knew that, you know, so that's becomes a tremendous problem. And then there are two issues that are related to that one is political power, but one is citizenship, even you know, so, so I you have to get citizenship before you even get political power political power in terms of the vote. So these are normal questions and you're right. Taking aside the moral question people in north would know that and they would be very wary about giving southerners that kind of a thority once again, even if they were loath and reluctant. To give people the vote, and there were many who were because women didn't have the vote. So there was an argument. Why are you not enfranchising women when you wanna win? Franchise black men. Give them the vote. And they can't read or write, and we can you say so there is a lot that was going on that had to be judicata that had to be ironed out and Johnson is in this mix and his position is just basically say that the southern states never seceded, just push them back in and of story. Yeah. Just come back in. Yeah. Which means that basically, the south will rise again immediately. And in fact, you have a situation in the south that you still have slavery by another name. In other words, you've passed eventually ratified the thirteenth amendment. There's no more institution of slavery. But in the south while he's sort of legislating without congress. What he's able to do is allow the south to pass these black codes. Cbs which makes it impossible for the formerly enslaved people in the south to move really, to marry to have all of the rights and privileges of a citizen. So Johnson's confronted with this. And he just starts to take unilateral actions in which he is giving huge pardons. Yes. Anyone who comes and says, I'm loyal now or pays pays you. You're back in. He starts pointing these provisional governors now, south, some of them are really dubious backgrounds confederates. And then you've got you've got, you know, you document in the book and there's great passages of this. I mean, basically they set to work immediately reconstituting, the power of white supremacist, a violent deadly white supremacy. They passed black codes. You have sheriffs rolling around in confederate uniform, I know shooting people shooting and killing. Yes. What are quote unquote Freeman? Right freeman. They that they kill a few white ones on the side to lists. We say they don't to one of the things and. This is one of the things I think it's important to get the conscience of the north as well. Right. It's not just racial is violent. It's also targeted at white loyalists people proceed oh, who are perceived, as Republicans and who were against the war effort. You know, in some southerners were fared at the sound totally, you know, so in that sense, the white loyalists, white Republicans, as well as all black people, you know, we're targets the Republicans and the northern abolition press are watching this happen as Johnson's basically what they see snatching defeat from the victory. The war has been won and now he's turning around and giving the southern treasonous leave power back, all of its power, re putting them in power, and they are, there are horrified and congress is out of session. Remember abound of congress, people go to Johnson and say, don't you think we ought to have a special session because, really? It's Congress's prerogative to decide who is its own members. You know, we decide who goes into the legislature and. He said. No. So he kept doing this. So all the things that you're enumerating, he was able to do that spring in that summer and early full because congress wasn't in session. I mean, that was forgetting the press for a minute. I mean to be in congress and watch your powers being taken away from you is horrific, that's called executive power sense, or to them was an abusive power in a loss of the balance of power. So that sets the stage for a couple of major incidents that end up pushing impeachment full, steam ahead and we're gonna get into that right after this. I'm chuckling Rosenberg. My new podcast youth truck Rosenberg is based on a simple premise thoughtful conversations with interesting people like Jim Coleman. Lisa Monaco and pre Peron. Each of them took an oath as I did to support and defend the constitution of the United States. The oath with Chuck, Rosenberg. Listen for free wherever you get your podcasts. There's two key precipitating incidents that really. Capture the imagination the north which is Memphis, New Orleans. What happens there that so captures the imagination of the country, particularly New Orleans? But Memphis to there were basically, what general Phil Sheridan, who is in charge of some of the southern states and he was away from New Orleans. And he said, there's no other word for what happened. Here was a massacre, and it was basically, there was a parade that was going on because there was a state constitutional convention being called in New Orleans. This was in late June early July and it wasn't just a white mob that went after the blacks, and also people who were going to the constitutional convention. It was firefighters and police. And the police was mainly composed of ex rebels ex confederates. It was a Malay was a slaughter. It was a mask or went on for three days, and in Washington. Johnson had gotten word that something bad might be happening, shall we send in the military Stanton, who is war secretary should have known. Nobody knows why he didn't do anything Johnson didn't do anything Johnson, basically authorized the mayor of New Orleans to go ahead with what he had planned because he said, oh, there's going to be trouble. And the mayor of New Orleans was a known confederate, and he had just recently been pardoned by John. So just to be clear there's a state Republican constitutional conventions. The Republicans are all gathering. It's black Republicans, white Republicans and of the war who'd fought for the union, and they're congregating in a place. And basically the mayor allows essentially state-backed militia, that's right to come in massacre. That's right. That's right. And then while Sammy is garrison and lets it hap-. That's right. And they come in a couple of days later and Sheridan as who I said, was outta town when it comes back, and he's horrified. But what is sees? I mean there there are bodies on the streets. And that happened in Memphis to not to the same extent earlier. There are bonded, some the street and people are afraid to claim the bodies on the street because they themselves were frayed. They'll be shot. I mean, that is so horrific and a congressional committee goes down to investigate, and that's how we know some of what happened because we're a lot of people testified to this congressional committee, and they were just they were appalled by it into the extent that they needed wake up just probably quite a bit. It woke up the north to what was going on in the south because before a lot of what northern journalists who went south were reporting was dismissed as propaganda or just isolated incidents. So, so this happened this person was running away got shot in the back. Well, these things happen, it doesn't really represent anything. Sort of scattered reports, and people sort of swept it under the rug. This was you couldn't deny tonight. And also because the military is I said couldn't deny the military was horrified. And believe me, the military was not made up of abolitionist are anti-slavery people. There were a lot of pro slavery people in, in the northern in the union military who are also, you know, for one of a better word radicalised, you know. So what's happening here. You've got Johnson who's taken these unilateral steps, violence and tyranny descending on the south, and the violence and tyranny starting to radicalize, white opinion, the north who were kind of I think ready to move on. Everybody was ready. But now sounded if that if we move on what we get is, these bastards are going to write come back and power, but one thing I wanna mansion. You're absolutely right. But there were people in congress, and this is very heart warming to me. And that's why I wanna mention who even before this happened had been. Sounding p alarm. We think today some of us soar some people think that we're you know, very woke or liberated or whatever. And if you know they were these people, and there were a number of them, who saw four saw this happening. If in fact legislation protecting the free people of the south and also the white loyalist if that wasn't passed civil rights wasn't passed if there wasn't a, a mechanism and institution called the Freedman's bureau, that was allowed to persist, and was fully funded if these things weren't happened than the whole country for the rest of its history, going four was in trouble. They saw this. There's people like fatty Stevens, and particularly who saw this radical Republicans who are white people committed to a vision of multiracial equitable,.

Johnson congress president Lincoln Memphis New Orleans Phil Sheridan vice president Tennessee United States Freeman Jim Coleman na mansion Cbs Washington fatty Stevens Rosenberg
"phil sheridan" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

09:32 min | 2 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Stuart, the beau ideal of the confederacy at the tongue, Jeb Stuart had twenty five hundred men, he plants himself between Sheridan and the capital and the battle is to the death much like two nights, meeting, emit, evil tires Sheridan. And Stuart this scene is a piece of the enormous success of a new book terrible swift sword. The life of General Philip h Sheridan by Joseph. We learned the success. Yes, here is that it's not romance. It's gory. It's massively violent, and you can see that the civil war is not about state policy. It's about men demand murder, and that's what happens this day as Sheridan rides towards Richmond. Joseph of very good evening to you. Congratulations. Jeb, Stuart and Phil Sheridan. Who are they at this point in the war may have eighteen sixty four good evening? Good evening, Jeb. Stuart was well known throughout the south and the north. He was the most famous cavalryman in the civil war at that point. Amazing raids at one point. He had encircle the union army during the peninsula campaign of eighteen sixty two. He dressed flamboyantly yet. Keep. Feather in his hat highly polished boots. Sheridan was more down to earth. He was a small man who wrote came from humble beginnings and rose quickly through the ranks of the union army, and taking charge of the cavalry. Coral is kind of a hard walkout fed at that point. Starting to get better. But in nearly every battle, Jeb Stuart's cavalry men had defeated them. So this was during grants. Big of, of, of may eighteen sixty four the overland campaign where a massive offensive with twenty thousand men, he crossed the rapid, Dan river steam down towards Richmond hoping to destroy army. Point in the battle shared and proposed that they just turn the cavalry corps loose down. And he said that he could defeat the southern cavalry and beat Jeb, Stuart quite a. Quite a statement to make at that time and grant, who liked Phil share aggressiveness. Said, well, go ahead and do it. And to, to take the cavalry corps ten thousand men, and they basically just marched down the main road toward Richmond. Very like it for miles an hour, hoping that Sheridan steward would see them in head head him off, so that they could do another words, they were going down there to make contact with the enemy, and, and kill as many as possible. That's right. And out front was a famous figure. Sometimes this is like an opera there only five characters in Joe and his name is Custer. He's leading the wolverines Michigan and they make contact with Stewart late in the day, and the, the fighting appears to be hand to hand. They flanked they charge. The cavalry corps is using Spencer, repeating rifles, which means that they could shoot at seven time up to twenty with before reloading much better than the single shot rifle. Nls or the pistols, and at very close quarters, you write a forty eight year old private in the in Custer's Michigan. Jonah huff. What happens, of course, Stewart was leading from the front has he always did when no one of the final attacks curve? He was on the left side of his position on horseback. Most of his men were dismounted. So he was a big target and. Was running by and he was a member of this special sharpshooter outfit before he joined the wolverines, and he turned in with this pistol, shot, Jeb Stuart in the side. He was dismounted huff was on foot and was on his horse shot him when he was on the run and Stewart slumped as saddle. And he's bleeding heavily and his men led the. His horse over under tree, and they helped him off and he was in very bad shape. He handed off command of his cavalry to Major General fitzhugh Lee, actually was a nephew, Robert. And then they took him down to Richmond. He died. The next day Sheridan, led the attack to rate into the outskirts of Richmond, he no, he couldn't hold it when the infantry showed up. But this is one of the moments that define Sheridan he is all aggression. He's a shark on land. And I find no explanation for this Joseph because he's born humbly March of eighteen thirty one. We're not even sure if he was born in New York America, or in, in Ireland in county cave-in. We can't be determined about that. No one knows. That's true. Yes, you know, he and his mother variously claimed Albany, New York, and Hieaux. But there is a stone Mark marker and county cave in Ireland, saying outside of the house thing. This is the birthplace. Phil sheridan. So it's probably very likely. That's where he was born there. No documents in New York or in Ohio stating that he was born in either place back in, you have to remember in eighteen forty eight which is when he entered West Point. And he gave his birthplace. He gets an appointment from a congressman and Ohio. Yes. Go ahead. Joe? He had to tell his birthplace and. The Irish were very much being. They were very much denigrated at that point because of the flood of immigrants coming over because of the potato famine. So Sheridan thought that would be one less. This is what I think, he, he figured that, that was one less strike against. You could just saves born in America, rather than go to West Point where they had a very impressive caste system and say that he's from Ireland. So I think that's why did he is in the cla-. He joins an eighteen forty eight the West Point on, on the Hudson and he throws himself in his studies. He's not a perfect or good student. He's determined. He's vigilant about being a student, but all around him, Joe in the reading of your book, I could just see the parade grounds at West Point, we were surrounded by the young men, who would become the generals and off. Fishers, and dead men of the civil war on both sides. That's right. Yeah. He was in a class with a number of others that fought on both sides over generals during the civil war. He was originally in the classic fifty two. He got kicked out for misbehavior for fighting and came back in the classic fifty three. So he was with crook and mccook and McPherson and hood and Scofield and Tara. Let's tell the Terrel story who is William Terrill in what happens. Tara was in, in Sheridan's eighteen fifty two class and he's Virginian so he's, he's very he's very high falutin in the class. Hi cast at West Point. Anyway, he was the drill master and this one day, and he kept he kept correcting Sheridan to, to realign themselves and everything chaired as being picked on, and he just blew up and he charged with a cry and occurs. He charge Terrel with his rifle and bayonet ready to impale and at the last minute at the. Recovered himself and went back and ranks calling out curses to them then they met later that day and they got an fistfight. Sheridan, who small did not do very well, but not only in the fist fight in the investigation of followed. And so he was suspended for year, and he had to go home. That's why he was kicked out and he came back in the class of fifty three. He graduates West Point he's assigned into the army as a bottom bottom officer breath, second Lieutenant, and I just note the romance of his life, he marries very well. But at this point at one point he sent out west and you make a note that he falls in love with a native American woman who is she she lived on this reservation in Oregon. Very beautiful woman, and it was not uncommon for army officers were.

Phil sheridan Jeb Stuart West Point Richmond union army Joe army Joseph Stewart New York wolverines Ireland murder Tara Jonah huff Terrel fitzhugh Lee Dan river Michigan
"phil sheridan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The business later on that's Phil Sheridan. This is Bloomberg. This is world where you can buy anything shipping. Meet anyone anywhere twenty four hours a day in the old days. It was simple should go for your business. News to what stands out for you in terms of the headlines here. Do you give a shared European budget in the next decade? Explain what Exxon did wrong and what Chevron did right? Limburg radio the Bloomberg business app and bloombergradio dot com. Blue bird the world is listening. You interested in challenging exciting career one where you can be part of solving complex challenges across industries and geographies. Bloomberg's ever-expanding technology data news and media services foster innovation empower clients for nearly limitless opportunities for career growth. Visit Bloomberg dot com slash careers to date. Current job opportunities. Bloomberg LT is an equal opportunity employer. The address once again is Bloomberg dot com slash. Bloomberg business of sports podcast. Where the money is blowing inside sports from the marketing perspective where the dollar spectrums union owners snicking, Michael bars, the names that power is multi billion dollar industry threat stock CEO sent Kennedy National Hockey League Commissioner Gary bed. Bloomberg works. Listen today on Bloomberg dot com. The move. Scribe on handle podcasts. Where in the world is the financial news you need. Do you think that the Bank of England will actually follow through where is the business and market information? That drives your success. This game of chicken is going to end the and where will you find information on political events around the globe? These Vince going to have an impact on the Chinese economy, anywhere. And everywhere you are is America energy independent. Bloomberg radio. The Bloomberg business happened bloombergradio dot com. Bloomberg the world is listening. Let's get you a quick check latest business headlines with Annabel drillers bell. Thank you. Well, another setback with Samsung profit that missed analysts estimates even after that already Bain recently reduced first quarter net income with full point two billion dollars acapella to estimates. Close to five billion grappling with falling memory revenue and a fourth light of its first potable pain after ports of defects and early test models properties up the biggest lend any night at Arab Emirates. I Abby Dhabi Bank reported first quarter games of four percent mating. Analysts estimates as income from FX and investments rose net income advanced to eight hundred forty six million dollars from year ago state controlled Leonard said it's outlook for the unchanged. And if I'm track to make twenty nineteen financial targets. Didn't they hit a new high as a vengeance? Endgame shattered box office, records, the film's one point two billion dollar weekend. Prompting analysts expect the studio division to contribute much more to the company's overall profit. It also stated the positive of head of the launch of the Disney. Plus.

Bloomberg Phil Sheridan Exxon Arab Emirates Bank of England Chevron Abby Dhabi Bank Annabel drillers Disney Samsung Kennedy National Hockey League Vince America Michael bars Gary bed Leonard CEO Commissioner Bain
"phil sheridan" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

13:29 min | 2 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on KGO 810

"Absolutely. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Peter cousins is here. Yes. We'll get to Custer soon enough and Custer's first blundering onto the planes when he shoots his own horse. But we begin with two Indian cheats who tell the truth. Peter cousins, his new book, the earth is weeping. The epic story of the Indian wars. One is set Tanta who is something of a blowhard. But when he gets a chance he delivers the message to the peace commission that comes out to be to talk the Indians into not resisting having their low land stolen. I know I'm going very fast, Peter, but it's very difficult than amateur reader to hold myself back your judicious. I'm the reader. I'm not Setanta says the building of the homes for us is nonsense. We would all die. My country is small enough already. He's telling them the truth. They don't listen. Do they Peter the peace counselors think he's lying to them? The they think he's foolish. They think he wants more when he's when he tells them. No, it's not so much that they think he's lying or that. He wants more. It's just again, one one of the common interests instances of people talking across purposes, and the and wanting very different things, the peace commission was operating on the principle a principle that had guided in very mad at the stations and with some some subtle. Differences had guided US Indian policy at least. As it was articulated since the foundation of the public, and it became more crystallized in the west. And that was the purposes were first and foremost to get the Indians off the overland travel routes where they posed as from the government perspective. Eight danger to settlers who are translating a Great Plains. Obviously any perspective. It was quite different. These tragedies sellers who are translating Great Plains destroying game filed following the country and and also had begun to settle on the planes. They wanted to so the government's purpose. What hit the Indians off overland travel routes to settle them on reservations, well, removed from the rows and much smaller than the land that they traditionally enjoyed remember these these were nomadic people you had tribes likes Atanta skyway who really never number more than say perhaps twenty. Five hundred souls who were accustomed to roaming across. Every everything from western Kansas. Southward. Deep into Texas. They roamed over huge swaths of land as the government's purpose was intention was to get them on smaller tracts of land. And then and then with within the context of the nineteen th century and nineteenth century thinking. There was a certain humane logic to the intent that was intent was not to physically exterminate them. But essentially to. In the powerless today. Chretien is and civilize them and turn these nomadic Indians into. Red. So to speak version of white farmers to make them into the image of the white man and make them into responsible respectable farmers on small small much smaller tracts of land. So from the things that the commissioners were offering the Indians, offering them houses schools farm implements from the government's perspective that was completed logical and had a had a a. Humanitarian rationale do it again from the point of from the perspective of the time. The of course, this was entirely foreign to them as one general later said you you might as well take a plains Indian and and put him into Elgin watch factory and expect them to become a watchmaking effort as it. Try to turn him into a farmer says something utterly foreign to them utterly foreign away of life that govern was proposing from a pneumatic life moving across the plains at their at their pleasure to suddenly being being shut up in a small cabinet and and compelled to work a small bit of land on land that frankly, the whites at that time believe was unsuitable for farming. So it was they were rejecting a way of life. That was utterly foreign to them. They were not asking for anything more anything with us. They simply wanted to continue their traditional way of life. As buffalo chips says you give us presence and take our lands that produces war. I have said all Sheridan comes to the same opinion. Sherman says there are attempts meaning the Indians attempts at civilization or simply ridiculous. So let's go to Custer who's a rascal and is charismatic at the same time. So it's impossible to get around him. Even though I very much appreciate the Indian chiefs in the war leaders Custer's first entry and Peter's book, he shoots his own. He's out on him. But that's sixty seven let's go to sixty eight because this with the seventh cavalry making a what Sherman calls predatory war at the battle of ouachita. Why does Custer attack? What does he believe he's going to achieve by attacking? Is acting under orders from is is immediate superior general Phil Sheridan that preceding summer and fall the tribes that he was going after specifically the southern Cheyenne, the southern arapaho had launched the numerous raids against settlers on the western Kansas and eastern Colorado frontiers in retribution for for white settlers taking their land and other provocations. These are these raids were quite grizzly and were again, and they were they were according to white way of thinking women being being gang-raped again bodies being mutilated. So and the army had proven himself absolutely incapable of fighting the Indian wars on their own terms during the summer and fall during. During fair weather. Thinking was okay. Let's go Astrum in the dead of winter when they're hunkered down in ten twenty thirty below. Weather in their teepees war ponies were gone in Hungary. They have no maneuverability. Let's go after them. Then when they're most fun and pay them back for the raise that they conducted that fall and summer and to show them that they are vulnerable that winter is not there ally. As India's always assumed it was the Indians never believe anyone could hit them in the wintertime. Particularly the plotting white whites and the plotting military who they were easily eluded during better times as year. So the strategy was hit them in in their villages in the winter and show them that they could be tracked down anywhere anytime, and if that involved collateral losses, well that was unfortunate. But that was part of the total war that Sherman and Sheridan were advocating against India's to their credit. It must be said. And it's it has to be said that. Neither neither Sheridan nor Custer ever advocated killing women and children as a matter of policy that although both Sheridan and Sherman made some some influence, it is public utterances country in their hearts, I do not believe they ever attended that. But that was in a in a scape. -able consequence of the sort of war that they were calling upon Custer to make attacking Indian villages at daylight, you know, in in morning twilight in the dead of winter attacking the Indians in their TV's. Obviously, these collateral losses were inescapable, and they were attacking they attack black kettles village attack black kettle because black village happened to be the first village he came upon when he was searching for the southern Cheyenne and arapaho and the great tragedy of it was very very few of the Indians who had stage these raids during the preceding fall. All in summer had actually come from black kettles village and those few who did acted without is a thorny effect acted contrary to black kettles wishes that was one of the that was perhaps the greatest tragedy of this tragic attack. Right black kettle ties. His wife dies much of the villages captured and Custer and his seventh cavalry, take ninety female hostages for plunder. They act like pirates back to the Ford. The rules of engagement are extraordinary at this time did Sherman and Sheridan. No, they were taking Indian women. Do they understand that back in Washington? Well, he certainly understood that there were women and children taken prisoner. And that was that was extremely expected and was of course, obviously preferable to in the eyes of the higher command and the government preferable to killing them outright on the field of battle. And also, you it was a matter of policy to take women and children prisoners because they were in a sense. They were marketing ships to bring warriors who were still inclined to make war to bring them to terms which is. At work that we're both ways because the Indians would then take white women and children hostages as well. And that becomes a trigger for many of the dramas that Peter has an endless number of dramas. We're just skipping between them we're going. Now. This is the first instance of Custer or going now to the last effort the last effort to make peace, but it's failing. So they make war on the southern plains and control it we now go to the politics of this because Peter has attention to that back in Washington. There's such thing as the Indian ring, what is that Peter. The Indian ring was a a sort of Lucy defined consortium and the term Indian ring was applied to those who were appalled by the corruption that was rampant throughout the bureau of Indian affairs, which then as now was charged with magic. Relations with the Indians when they were not at war with the government. And then as now was part of the department of the interior, although there was a throughout the Indian wars. There was there was wrestling between the war department and the interior department as who should have the Indian bureau under their control and within congress. There was a lot of back and forth on this because the Indian ring was seen as a consortium, and it was legitimate. So of corrupt Indian bureau officials in Washington corrupt Indian agents newfield who connived with Indian traders that is to say those people who are licensed to trade goods with the Indians. And also with nefarious local politicians in the west potential purpose of cheating. The Indians out of their annuity. Monies an annuity good. That is to say when the Indians signed treaty for the government. They were promised annuities. Either goods being blankets, clothing, farm, implements or cash and the he's corrupt Indian agents would cook the books and engaged in often resell these annuities through through Indian traders and through other other, you know, crooked person on the on the west and higher ups in Washington would look the other way or intern be paid off themselves for looking the other way. And then you had the politicians in the west, you know, senators and congressmen for whom. These positions as engineers were political patronage jobs there were ways of rewarding those who had who had supported their candidate season and helped them into office. So it was it was a it was a nasty mix of people, and it was very real. It was the grant administration there were attempts to clean it up and clothing, bringing the Quakers in the book is the earth is weeping. The epic story of the Indian west for the American Indian wars the American west Peter cousins is.

Peter cousins Custer Phil Sheridan Sherman John Batchelor Washington bureau of Indian affairs Kansas Great Plains US war department Texas India Setanta Hungary Chretien Elgin Astrum arapaho
"phil sheridan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:54 min | 2 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"You don't take that off refunding five dollars. Well, I wish I could say there was some learning curve in terms of grant and money. But there wasn't and you know, unscrupulous people seem to spot grant a mile away in fact during his second term in office, the so-called whiskey ring scandal. The brewers were waiting this tax by paying up revenue agents run the people who was very involved in it was grants really chief-of-staff global Babcock and when Babcock is being investigated grant writes a letter to Babcock's wife Sanger have full faith in your husband's integrity said I've had the most you know, intimate and confidential relations for fourteen years. And he says I can't believe that he's not trustworthy person that I imagine guess what he said he was kind of. Chief of staff he had the desk right outside grants office, reviewed incoming and outgoing mail and GRANDE fire demo he signed him. He became inspector of lighthouses on the Florida coast. So after he leaves office grant goes on a trip around the world with his wife for two and a half years. How is he received in the strip? It's kind of a post-presidency unlike any other during that almost two and a half year period he meets with virtually every head of state in the world. Queen victoria. Windsor castle. Princeton Bismarck, receives them in Berlin. The pope at the Vatican. Czar Alexander the second in Saint Petersburg, and then he goes to the far east and the Kratzer immense like a two hundred fifty thousand people that time would turn out and even the emperor of Japan would never actually touch people when he saw grantee step forward and shook hands with grant, which was unheard of ingredients actually high near as a certain post-presidential role. That would be followed by other presidents that he arbitrates dispute over a postwar islands offshore islands between Japan and China, you know, so, but he comes back with really great reputation very much enhanced he's become a statesman on the world stage. It's amazing. After trying to get the nomination again in eighteen eighty not not winning it. He decides to move to New York City and try his hand in the investment world. How does that turn out? Well, again, money disastrously. Question answers itself. He formed a partnership with young man named Ferdinand. Ward was twenty nine years old who was lionized as the I'm gonna probably and finance. They create author Ron chernow's speaking at the national book, small partnership called grant, Android was the only time grant ever allowed his name to be used in business and of Chris grants name attracted a lot of money lasts for those. The story of Ferdinand word was the Bernie Madoff Ponzi scheme. He was using money from new investors to pay outrageous rates of interest to the old investors, and so poor grant with this incurable naivete grant imagines that he's a multimillionaire, and he wakes up one day to find out that instead of being a millionaire. He's worth eighty dollars in Julia's worth one hundred thirty dollars. Not only had grants. Unfortunately fortune been wiped out, but you know, we'll have his children had invested with made off. He had a lot of cousins he had a lot of friends elite entire grant family was engulfed in this catastrophe. In eighteen eighty four grant falls ill. What was wrong with him? And what was the prescribed treatment? By now, this the illness really come sides with the exposure of the problem. With. Grant one day. They had a house in long branch, New Jersey, Julius servicemen played of delicious pizzas. And he bites into the peaches and says Ouch that Keach stunned me for some reason. And it was the first time he realized there was a problem with his throat. He finally with some delay. Consulted is Dr in New York found a cancerous mass on his throat and tongue. It was incurable. So grant realized that this was a terminal illness, and he was petrified. That not really when he died that Julia will be left destitute because they lost all their money. So he decided to do something that he's worthy wouldn't do. He wrote his memoirs so during the last year of his life in excruciating pain and his mind often fog, do I the opiates he managed to write a memoir that is considered the greatest military memoir. Probably an English language ten thousand words in a day while he had throat cancer and his publisher was Mark Twain wonderful letter, you know, Mark Twain rights to grant Rhode ten thousand words today said it kills me these days Steven Wright five thousand words in a in a day couldn't believe grants productivity in this member really poured out of him and many people. Imagine that twain wrote the memoirs twain wrote their style is flawless. Oh man can improve upon them. Why is grant buried in New York City, and what was his funeral like? Because less fears of your lives. Ulysses grant who living on east sixty sixth street in Manhattan, his funeral. I was just thinking about this today. Because of the John McCain memorial gathering at the National Cathedral. Grant was buried in New York. Julia felt very grateful to New York and the city provided this beautiful spot in the new riverside park grants funeral. Spoke to the public very much in the way that John McCain's memorial services. I've been speaking to the public that is it grants funeral a million people fled the city the funeral parade went on for five hours. But grant and his family made a statement. So it was a north-south reconciliation there were among the honorary pallbearers they were great union generals William to come to Sherman and Phil Sheridan. But there were also major confederate general Joseph Johnston and Simon. Buckner? Again, this part of this spread conciliation theme. The stonewall Jackson brigade from Staunton Virginia came up in watching the parade. Black regiments marched in the parade because grant had been very instrumental during the civil war in terms of recruiting and training and equipping black soldiers. And so this was really grants final statement from beyond the grave, and I think that grant in many ways reminds people have been saying about John McCain terms of his patriotism, his bravery. His dedication to public service. The fact that he distinguished himself in civilian service and military service and kind of reminds us of what fashioned patriotism should look like last question before we take some questions from the audience as we reconsider grant as you have in this magnificent book, which we learn from grant and his leadership. Well, I think that one reason people have responded to the other people that I've written about. For be successes in life. They were sort of builds for success at kind of great drive, and energy and focus grant didn't. And I think people are responding to the book because Heiser highs any story in American history. The lows are a lot lower. You know? So this is a story a lot of light and shadow. It's a story about a man who suffered repeated failures and setbacks, in fact, as I was coming into the room. Someone said to me I loved your grandpa because it's the greatest story about a comeback. Repeated comebacks in grant's life. You know, success was kind of a greasy pole keeps slipping back down to would after work as way back up again. Terrific. There are any questions for Ron would be happy to take a few. Hello. Very good luck. Loved it. Just want to ask a quick comment on grants relationship with George Armstrong Custer, how you described that relationship in the book was very it was very troubled relationship and grant was very very critical of customer really blamed customer for the massacre at little Bighorn felt that it was really not following orders. Put himself and his men in harm's way, Custer also had been an outspoken critic of grant as president and that certainly helped to fuel the animosity. We eat. Managed. To be two questions by Becky grant, had gone by his first name would anything be different? What is happening with adoption? I know someone. Right. Okay. I grew grants. Name. He was born Hiram. Ulysses grant, which gave him the initials h? And he was mercilessly teased by the other boys. So he dropped the Hiram and became just playing Ulysses. Then when local congressman nominated for West Point, he bundled the navy s grant actually found one letter where was his writing. Julia. Who wants to know what the stood for didn't know what it said Rebecca's funny Lateran says the fans for absolutely nothing. In terms of the it's not going to be hip. Hop musical. Shucks. But it will be a feature film, and it's going to be directed by Steven.

Grant Ulysses grant grant New York City Julia Becky grant John McCain Mark Twain Ron chernow Steven Wright Babcock Florida Japan Chief of staff Ferdinand George Armstrong Custer Windsor castle Queen victoria New Jersey
"phil sheridan" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"So a wonderful i've been thinking like this last few days there's a wonderful passage and bruce catton's biography a history of the civil war and he talks about the day on a on a presidential yacht and the potomac when you lucy's grant and phil sheridan and williams sherman and abraham lincoln sat down to confer and he said and canton remarks it when those four men were finally assembled together to work together the war was decided in principle and you know lincoln like trump went through a lot of people to get the ones you wanted and i noticed that these appointments get stronger and see i think hr mcmaster is a great guy and i i think bolton is better suited than anybody to be national security adviser and that's the only reason he would be better than mcmaster and so i yeah i think it's exciting i think they're gonna know what they're doing and i think they're probably going to get along that's always hard to say and you know they madison bolton don't know each other and but bolton is you know bolton is there's a kind of a foreign policy establishment on both the left and the right among the thinking classes chattering classes whatever they are and they have reached agreement about some things in the past that didn't always turn out to be fortunate in bolton has often been a rebel against that so i think there'll be some i think he's gonna think like trump about protecting the interests of the united states i and i think he's going to see that our strategic position is difficult and you know lately getting worse and so i think he's gonna understand that he's maneuvering in a situation where we need to be smart and if we will be fine you know and we need to build some more weapons to and as we saw from this last budget deal people need to understand this the last spending bills are just outrageous you know massive and and on the other hand that's the kind of game same game that went on in the reagan administration where you couldn't get military increases through the congress without paying for him twice or twice over or more so but you know we we need to.

bruce catton trump bolton mcmaster united states reagan administration congress lucy phil sheridan williams sherman abraham lincoln madison bolton
"phil sheridan" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on WGTK

"A wonderful passage and bruce catton's biography a history of the civil war and he talks about the day on a on a presidential yacht in the potomac when you lose grant and phil sheridan and williams sherman and abraham lincoln sat down to confer and he said and remarks that when those four men were finally assembled together to work together the war was decided in principle and you know lincoln like trump went through a lot of people to get the ones you wanted and i have noticed that these appointments get stronger and see i think hr mcmaster is a great guy and i think bolton is better suited than anybody to be national security adviser and that's the only reason he would be better than mcmaster and so i yeah i think it's exciting i think they're going to know what they're doing and i think they're probably going to get along that's always hard to say and you know they madison bolton don't know each other and that but bolton is you know bolton is there's a kind of a foreign policy establishment on both the left and the right i'm thinking classes chattering classes whatever they are and they have reached agreement about some things in the past it didn't always turn out to be fortunate in bolton has often been a rebel against that so i think there'll be some i think he's gonna think like trump about protecting the interests of the united states i and i think he's going to see that our strategic position is difficult and you know lately getting worse and so i think he's gonna understand that he's maneuvering in a situation where we need to be smart and if we are we'll be fine you know and we need to build some more weapons to and as we saw from this last budget deal people need to understand this the last spending bills are just outrageous you know massive and and uh on the other hand that's the kind of game same game that went on in the reagan administration where you couldn't get military increases through the congress without paying for them twice or twice over or more so but you know we we need to.

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"phil sheridan" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Had bob gates of all people they had quite the collection of talents and i think with this collection of talents we're getting close which brings me to bolton i have to play for you and you know john bolton well and i know john bolton well here's secretary of defense general james mattis welcoming john bolton to the pentagon yesterday cut number one festival the secretary thank you thanks for thanks for coming in finally i've heard that you're at did you hear that i heard you're the devil incarnate and i wanted to meet you number two marine talk nice out what do you think about john and this is his he's prepared is tire life for this job that's what i tell people and talk about the smartest guy in the room i don't know who wins the jeopardy game between maddest pond pale and bolton do well there so this wonderful i've been thinking like this last few days there's a wonderful passage and bruce catton's biography a history of the civil war and he talks about the day on a on the presidential yacht and the potomac when you lucy's grant and phil sheridan and william sherman and abraham lincoln set down to confer and he said cat and remarks that when those four men were finally assembled together to work together the war was decided in principle and you know lincoln like trump went through a lot of people to get the ones you wanted and i have noticed that these appointments get stronger and.

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"phil sheridan" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"And he would take over the just think you're right that team and if you look you know north korea and china and and uh russia and the terrorist threat that's a lot of bad stuff going on in the world and we need is guilty and aggressive team to deal with it and you need us secretary of state when he speaks actually is understood by the world to be speaking on behalf of the president not in opposition to his policies whatever they are that is the profound difficulty with the secretary tillerson not a bad man i don't think he's prickly accomplished administrator because oil companies are not bureaucracies but it does seem to me that you've got to have very little daylight it you need a nixon kissinger's situation need a george shultz reagan situation you've got to get along with your secretary of state you know trump every presidency goes through this and trump trump starting from a lowerplaced trump's never been in politics before every presidency is gutted pleats king's together and find the people it could work with you know just think of the way churchill in lincoln went through generals until they've found that they could work with and you know there's really great thing in the bruce canton history the civil war who he describes ask phil sheridan and william sherman ulysses grant and lincoln meeting on the presidential yacht as a kind of dream team you know kind of like what you're talking about with madison kelly and cotton and pump and he said the two when those men sat down links came across the south they did yeah of course you know and why is john kelly the white house chief of staff well trump met him and trump put him in a heart job homeland security and they just got on really well and it was effect is and they were on the same wavelength and that matters and of course the president is the elected head of the.

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"phil sheridan" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Then americans to they know nothing about in eighteen sixty seven the south was under military rule in the years after the one grant is too general chief general phil sheridan who's the commander in louisiana rights us grant but following wedded to general brand in sixty seven we desegregated streetcars in new orleans this week he said the whites and blacks have been riot riding on separate cross the black press had stars on the side he said that black citizens started piling onto the white streetcars and protest the street card companies protested to sheridan shared told streetcar companies unless you integrate regarding to bar you from the streets and he then rights to grant and now after some rock is he said everyone is cheerfully adapted to the fact that soon rights arriving together not the strategist told you cured almost ninety years before rosa parks decided to give up his seat on them on henry russian here we find out reading this letter that there were many blacks who were piling on to white streetcars i doubt that a single listener to this program has ever heard this story before release of forgotten a piece of american history ron tell me at ballot here struggle with alcohol very you're in that press chants well during the presidency actually he did better because when his wife julia was around he didn't drink and also britain was a solitary drinker a although if your present at your own of a lot of solitary moments but it was a terrible struggle during the civil war uh when he had the fate of tens and hundreds of thousands of soldiers showed now what happened was.

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"phil sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Assassination attempt if he'd been there what we're grants military duties during the postwar reconstruct while very powerful is kind of an untold story because he was still generalinchief a radical republicans in congress um carved the south up into five military districts grant was still general chief saves like czar the south and this freed slaves were winning liberties uh that they wouldn't be seen again for nearly a so it is right that later this is completely you know unknown territory most america's we had a civil rights movement in this country and late 1860s early 1870s the same way we did in the 1950s 1960s handy report that streetcars in new orleans would desegregated in eighteen sixty seven the having was the single most throw a moment of the research letter and eighteen sixty seven general phil sheridan writing to new orleans we desegregated streetcars in new orleans they blacks and whites are happily sitting sidebyside this is there's like you notes of black hole of american memory that this never happened when would they reciprocated um you know by the time that grant left office in eighteen seventy seven the socalled redeemer governments in the south uh had recaptured control of all these by racial states andrew johnson is blamed for many of the problems that happened during reconstruction this is the most racist president we've ever had in history both in public and private regularly use the n word andrew johnson said this is a white man's government felt he and woodrow wilson but even if much more blatant andrew johnson uh his slogan was this is a white man's governed by god as long as on president waitzer young to rule so was grant elected partly in response to johnson well you have simply because he was the most popular he he he he was he was nominated just really weeks after the impeachment johnson was acquitted but right after the impeachment trial of a johnson and grant was like the anti anti johnson and so they're the radical republicans swept them into office and he was the youngest man ever elected president at that time young ford at free was forty six for its existence rudder you you've firm uncovered evidence of grant support for african american rights and education why isn't that bit there's somebody thinks in terms of his record with the african americans uh you know frederick douglass accounted a 250 black employees in one department alone frederick douglass.

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"phil sheridan" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"phil sheridan" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Let's go to cost are but the rask's goal and is charismatic at the same time so it's impossible to get around him i even though i very much appreciate the indian chiefs on the board leaders customers first entry and peters mookie shirts is on the whole ertz and what he's out on the got i'm so but that six two seven let's go to sixty eight because this is cost or with the seventh gallery making what sherman calls predatory war at the battle of wash she took a why discussed or attack what is he believe he's going to achieve by attacking because shares is acting under orders from his is a me disappear your general phil sheridan that evening summer and the all the try route that he was going after an specifically just other shy and of southern or rafa both head launched and it numerous ready to against the senators on the western kansas and eastern colorado's frontiers in record for him to right settlers teeth in their land and other provocations newark these read for quite grizzly him in the event and we're again they were they were according to white we're thinking not women the of being being gang race these being you don't waited that so you and the army unproven itself absolutely incapable of fighting.

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