24 Burst results for "Pheno Pheno"

Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:38 min | 7 months ago

Prof. Cecilia Lunardini, Professor of Physics at Arizona State University. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis the most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations. Bit researchers leaders. Who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info. Yesterday's dini whose professional physics at amazon is taking versity. One of the primary of usage focus is new leaders. Welcome to see you thank you. Yeah thanks for doing this. So i know that you have done a lot of work on neutrinos. You have a few papers. That came out recently. And i want to talk to a twenty eighteen paper dalogue and my own neutrino signatures of primordial black holes. invite you say. These studied primordial black holes ph is as sources of massive neutrinos by hawking radiation under the hypothesis that black holes emit nuclear no bass item states be described quantitatively called the pbs evolution and lifetime is affected by the mass and flew munich dialect my own nature of neutrinos before we get the details celia I wanted to get some definitions of folks would know what black court saw a few episodes of black holes Here we're talking about. The pride won't imprac codes owes The these black holes are fall close to the big bang And then as caulking radiation Sort of The black hole evaporating So to speak and that That lady Imitating these particles called neutrinos. Right is that. Do i understand that correctly. Yes so so pry bhutia blackhaws before we get the neutrinos what is sort of the mechanism of formation their ho- exactly what they have formed sure We believe that Primordial hose could form in the early universe from density fluctuations so We know that any object could can possibly become a black hole if you compress it into a very very small volume so this same process could happen in the universe with Density fluctuations that could be a regional space where there is an over density compared to the surrounding and each of over the east coast past Then then it could get to the point of becoming a black hole This this The details of this process are beyond my expertise But this is fairly reasonable thing to expect and The diesel really small rate in the scheme of things. Yes so when i started to Learn about time or their black holes. I was amazed by how different in mass can be. They can be may be the massive wouldn't but they can also be The mass of Being or they can be Even even smaller so they can really be very very tiny. Yes oh so. That's really really small so this is sort of quantum fluctuations only universe Kind of getting Getting concentrated in vide- small areas But we believe those. Those primordial black holes emit nucleus. we Have to go back to stephen hawking for that stephen hawking wrote this seminal paper Which is about what we nowadays. Nowadays call hawking radiation so he demonstrated that any black hole regardless of what it is could be primordial black hole or a stellar. Nicole doesn't matter any black hole isn't really black because it meets radiations so radiation particles And the the process that we call evaporation so Because a black holes fundamentally gravity objects they would meet any particle that couples to raggedy including trees so It's the moment you have a black hole you do. Have hawking radiation and neutrinos are just that are expected. Part of hawking radiation. You're so caulking radiation so that that happens to every black hole even the even the supermassive ones right so i it said gentle phenomenon And so going to neutrinos now Don't typically thing neutrino site Caltrans and electrons are really well known. neutrinos are particles. Dad don't interact with The matter Espionage don't interact much with matters. We don't really see them. They don't really see them. And and so it's difficult to measure that's right and so so this could you give a. What does the history of neutrino vendor we. I understand such things existed. Let's see We go back to the twentieth century and the story goes That the father of neutrino sees Warfare he. He made the hypotheses of a new particle existing as a way to explain Some strange behavior of neutrinos produced by by nuclear decay so It's it's a long story but Let me just say that For a long time. Neutrinos who just the hypotheses and then around the mead of this twentieth century They would actually officer so we started to Know that this particles existed and But that was pretty much heat. So we didn't know much about the properties And one of these properties the mass which we still don't know i'm easy after all these decades but we still don't know if neutrinos have something like a magnetic went for example And something that we didn't learn until much later on is the fact. That neutrinos oscillate. That's that that sounds. That's something that we that were somehow established Turn of the sanctuary around the around the year. Two thousand really after after decades of of testing with the solar neutrino selling trainers. So there are still there are still a number of no on your trainers. One of them is the mass one and the other one is the The nature of the neutrinos being the iraq particles or miranda particles we She's kind of a fundamental cost. So there are that. That's that's that's related to the fundamental nature of the neutrino as particle break. So so they do. They have a mass but masses small. Do they have a chunk. Neutrinos don't have charge so they are electrically neutral and that's Comedy the biggest reason for for them to be a so allusive as you were mentioning earlier on especially in the in early. Nineteen hundreds all the particle detectors so basically a electro-magnetic detectors they were looking for charge or Magnetic behavioral some sort. So neutrinos don't have that and so they They only have the weak interaction At that that we know wolf and gravity of course and so that's why they They escape detection so so easily because their interaction is very weak. Yeah so so. That's sort of the beauty of neutrinos right so because they don't interact V can go back digits of years. Simple hats Perhaps become pickup one on earth and it would have travelled that distance through all sorts of things but would not have affected wider rate right. Yes and so so the other phenomenon of neutrino is that you mentioned that they also late so are they're failures of tinos they go back and forth. Yes it's It's actually a fairly Easy to this cried kwan to sonam on We know that In quantum mechanics there is this Particles described by these function which is called the wave function. And so the neutrinos could be on. Neutrino could be born as a say an extra and then it's quanta way function would evolve over time in a way that after sometime. The wave function is no longer a purely electron neutrino way function. But the has a little bit or even law actually of a different flavor. It could be a new one or tau. So what we observe in the actors. Is this change of flavor and perhaps the most striking demonstration of this phenomenon is solemn. Neutrinos because we know that the sun produces an extra treatments and It doesn't produce a new on and talion trainers so But here on earth we do Have evidence that the solar neutrino flags that we receive has some You wanna talion. Trina in it and that can only be explained by sedation and Actually after this other neutrino data showed this phenomenon. This was also confirmed by a saint men made experiments so it's a fairly established phenomenon it and so that the flavors are Electron new on tall. Yes that's right and so. Did you understand the vendor made in the sun for example there they are made as electron Neutrinos and by the time they reached the earth day the Immunes dot. Yes yes Impart young. that's that's what happens so ease. It always the case that they get a manufactured so to speak as as electoral neutrinos always. It depends on where they are born. There are places where neutrino sutter born in or flavors. A so it's it's it really varies with With the type of environment We are talking about okay. Okay and so in the people you say ph is this primordial black holes. We talked about radiates right. Handed and left handed dutra knows in equal amounts so anybody right-handed unless the cleaners. Okay let me see so Yes you say. Indicates of dirac neutrinos. pba Left neutrinos in equal amounts possibly increasing deceptive number noon pheno species nest. Yes is that explainable. Yes so right handed than left handed. Neutrinos that may take why to explain what that exactly means me. Just say that It's related to the neutrino mass. So if you're truly knows didn't have a mass which we know they do but if they didn't have a mouse They would only exist as left handed particles which means that basically their spin is Is anti aligned with the momentum and but if they have mass and the iraq particles There could be another type of neutrino which is right handed. Which where the This being ease aligned with a mentor other than anti line and so If you are iraq these these two different species could exist and so instead of having one species of neutrino emitted left-handed one Indicators of a massless trina if we have not suv nutrients than you would have to species and so. The black hole radiate war energy compared to The case when neutrinos don't amass so when we started working on this paper i was interested in this phenomenon that A lot of the literature having to do with a developer. Evaporation of primordial black couls. Consider the neutrinos as massless about. Now we know that they are massive. And so i thought well Sixty speaking at primordial black hole could radiate more energy than previously thought. So i found that aspect interesting and then sees you mention the possibility to increase the effective number of species. That's related to what it was talking about. So then you the black hole would ra- gate more neutrino States or more neutrino Species to spe pseudo speak and then Would increase the number of neutrinos per cubic centimeter Data we observe today so I'm kind of glossing over a lot of these days. But basically cosmology gives us a measurement of this and effective which is called the effective number two species. And if you have this right. Handed neutrinos coming from the primordial black holes. This number could be higher than than expected. And so that would be may be a i way to tell that maybe there are more black holes in the universe yet. So so the hawking radiation essentially creation coming out of black holes Expected defined Expected that over a long period of time. Black holes radiate away lap. Later ray out the mass or information that didn't do it And so this. Radiation is hockey. Radio station is it is a new park. Or is it. Fundamentally composed of neutrinos hawking radiation is made of every particle that no of so A black hole. A camera gate Pretty much everything. Photons neutrinos throngs You loans It said cetera but There is the catch here. The fact that a black hole has a temperature which is another Big achievement of stephen hawking to end and others To that the black hole is thermo dynamical object and so Basically the bigger the black hole the lower the temperature so if the temperature is really low The black hole wouldn't be able to immed- Very massive particles because they are thermal energy would be sufficient for that so because masses energy Mc squared right so because massey's energy If a black hole has too low of a temperature It wouldn't have its quantum energy It's it's Wouldn't be enough to produce the mass off a particular particle for example a proton may be too heavy to be produced by a really low tanto black home so so the beaker. The black called the lower the temperature. Yes ed so. So then can expect the bigger black holes to have more of a neutrino content in radiation. Yes because The bigger black holes would as i said be able to radiate the heavy particles and so they would only be able to radiate away the low mass particles and so there could be black holes that only emit photons gravitons and Neutrinos do a of sort of the distribution of this primordial black holes Isn't you know sort of everywhere. What is what do we know about you. Know some of the distribution of bbc's you mean spatial distribution like where they are now. I'm wondering just like the easy would do sort of look at the early universe will find them everywhere Probably at the beginning they would be a more or less uniformly distributed Bug in the universe. Today they would probably be Behaving like the dark matter. Does they would Be part of galactic halos In other words they would be they would class gravitationally on large structures like a like a galaxy placido galaxy so these call still around They would they would behave like like the dark matter down. So they would be in in halo. Galaxies would have by. Now have april would would they not have disappear because it far it depends on the mass That they have when they are born so their if their mass is less than a certain value that trying to remember Basically yes they would have to By now they would have completely evaporate did their masters larger than they will take longer to evaporate and they could still be around So they roughly speaking the dividing line between a black hole. Steve being around today or not. I think it's something like ten to fifteen grams fiery recall correctly into fifteen clams though So this paper. Eusebio obtained the diffuse flux of right hill. Neutrinos from his idea and so so. So so the nikkei actually act to build these neutrinos. They'd be flying here do pbs specifically In principle that's a possibility we Considered that for certain Masses of these black holes and certain density of this black holes the flux of neutrinos that they generate over time could be fairly large and so we could Detect these neutrinos If we had a very Power who attacked so Now life is never ideally in the sense that a real Ut detector have substantive issues like ground And so on. So at the end of the people we conclude that impact is giving given the limitations that current nutrient doctors have It may not really be possible to detect neutrinos trump mortgage black holes but people. That's a possibility and that alone is interesting. Yeah because they suggestion that this primordial black holes could be as as you mentioned could be part of the dark matter that yes to seeking. Is that still About us that has been. There has been a debate on these Kind of going back and forth in the scientific community The latest i heard is that Black whose could be part of the dark matter. Maybe even a large part but probably not they entire dark matter so a one hundred percent primordial Battery is a bit difficult to justify the day. experimental bowels that we already have constrained so various types but there could be scenarios where maybe a fraction of the dark matter. He's made of primordial black holes. I wanted to go into a ended up paper in twenty twenty supernova neutrinos directional sensitivity and prospects for dissertation here the export potential of current and future liquid cinta league neutrino detectors. I decade old town. Mass a localize a super a supernova neutrino signal into sky in douglas was feeding the core collapse nearby star tens to hundreds of english Coated and don't be constructed policy in the detector can be used to estimate a direction to the star so so this is now neutrinos from supernova and You so so we. We have Idea here that before this opened on what happens. If please open over a time period it is creating neutrinos that could pick up and and potentially get ready to see the super bowl. Yes that's what excites me The fact that Think about bitter jews. Beetlejuice is the most famous nearby star. That could go supernova anytime and we don't know when that's going to happen and If it wasn't for these neutrinos that our paper is about we will know until the style literally Collapses and and then soon after becomes superman but in this paper we we Show that before the star collapses which is the beginning of the supernova process We can detect these. These neutrinos That are used at that at that stage and so increase the pool we could know that You know tomorrow. These days beetlejuice exploding and that that would be quite exciting. Yeah it's beetlejuice is is red joy and reasonably close to was really big star. I can remember Cecilia there was some suggestion that It could go supernova within something one hundred fifty thousand years which is obliquely in cosmic time so it is getting ready to go to Supernova right yes. I am not you formed about exactly the number of years give or take but it's it's ready it's ready. It could be any time and any time any time for an astronomer muse anytime the next thousand soviet so we should. We should hold their breath. But it's ready could be tomorrow. It could be in a hundred years could supernova. I know that this is not part of the paper but could the beetlejuice supernova avenue adverse effect on north really know a supernova is very very spectacular event. it's it's a star that collapses so it implodes i and that explodes and then when he explodes It's very bright. In the case of bitter jews we could. We could see by naked-eye shore but in terms of A fact of each radiation and neutrinos in light on on us and on our daily activities. It wouldn't it. Wouldn't affect them in any way so it's a save Show to just enjoy without any worry. Great answer so you talking about supernova neutrinos so so can be actually detect neutrinos from supernova. What different from what we talked about in the previous people Different from pbs I'm not sure. Can you repeat yes. So the new teen emanating from a supernova different from the Neutrinos of expectancy from a primordial black hole. Yes the the different In many ways disney trails have higher energies. So it's much much easier to attack them and indicates will beat the jews. We would detect thousands or even more of dan millions. Probably of them Indiana so different in the way they are born because in our primordial black hole ordinary black hole The processes volcanoes the asian. Which which is a gravity phenomenon in a supernova. You're born out of the very hot and dense environment That the that that the star as after it has collapsed so star collapsing on its own way to become very dense and so In this very dense in hot environment nuclear processes take place that produce these nutrients. So i guess the main difference is that indicates supernova it's most nuclear phenomenon and in the call is really fundamentally a gravitational sonam. Okay you discover technique in this paper and you saved sin principle possible unique the identify the progenitor star so So the existing technology and ideas discussed in the paper viki see teacup a neutrino decode. Identify valid came from or what direction thing from embed you can go back and look at the in that direction if he find to supernova then you could say that the supernova that created in-principle Yes let me. Just say that There are situations and this is not one of them but there are situations where if you have one neutrino you can point to the pointing the sky. What came from in these case. It's a little more complicated. Because what really gives us. The information is the statistical distribution of these nutrients so we are talking about may be the tax in hundred a hundred Gable take from say be for example and What did detector really observe is not the neutrino is kind of a vector which is related to the products of these neutrinos so this neutrino sues interacts with the interact with the detector. And then out of this interaction you have a positive on the new thrown and those can be observed and you can you can create a factory using these two and then and then these rector will have a certain orientation but each each neutrino coming will give you a differently oriented vector but statistically if you look at the distribution of these factors you you can tell you can you can do for with a certain of course The direction of the neutrinos because these vectors are not uniformly distributed they are they have a non uniform distribution of the direction. And so using this information we can we can define a regional the sky where The new three could come from so we can. We cannot now down to a point but we can now down to maybe a cone of a few tens of degrees Width and then we look in that cone and see what stars that com and maybe be juicy one of them. Yeah so As you say you if you see a few Neutrinos Statistics bution of those will give us some some probability That it is in in some region of the sky. And then you say the paper You can then that if it is happening please open nola. You learnt other observational. Modalities multi messagero rations Invisible in radio and other other types of observations Do actually pick up more data so this is almost like a early alert system If it is in place right yes i would call it a very early I learned to because it's we're talking about maybe our worse or insert very fortunate cases. We are even talking about maybe day Before the assad goes supernova and. so that's enough time to plan for for it so a something that fascinated me When i heard about this from a from a an experimentalist is that there is a human factor which was not aware of but The factories so if you have come up with thirty minutes to plan for watching supernova this may not be enough because it just takes stein to make phone calls and get a hold of people and and decide what to do. Come to a consensus in that. I saw in addition to technical things. Like okay have to maybe turn your telescope Direction which takes time. But i i was really fascinated by the human factor. Those things that if you had style we'd be you can kind of gathered. Relevant people decide something but if you have thirty minutes or or or minutes maybe not so. Yeah yeah i wondered. If such a earlier system is in place Perhaps could be something programmatic. Crises is picking up And you have some you know. Maybe some ai techniques or something like that that identifies the region and it goes. Programmatic returned the telescopes look. Yes yes exactly so. There could be a protocol in place For that so e if a telescope was suitable for observing a nearby supernova which which is not always the case than than now that we showed that it's possible to know beforehand if a star is going to go supernova then there could be some sort of protocol in place already so that when the alert comes which is we can just activated the protocol and oriented telescope. maybe automatically will in some sort of Organized way yeah as you say if you remove humans from the process it becomes not better there is actually already working this direction It's called this new two point. Oh a network which has to do with Exactly these using neutrinos as alert for the astronomy community and That has to do with exactly a creating alerts and also creating protocols for how to react to an alert rate. I want to end the people that just came out. it concordant scenario for the observation of neutrino from the tidal disruption. Even eight hundred twenty nine hundred ninety s t You say be induced at phenomenology concordance canadia with the logistic jet of for the title disruption event Between ninety s jesmyn proposes a source of the astrophysical neutrino event. Ice cube So the title disruption even this is star getting cooler into a black hole getting Getting sucked in rate is that the is that even up to the match yes This is something that we We had about be in in popular science stalks What what happens if you get too close to black hole and It's kind of scary. So the answer is you would be ripped apart because your feet will be pulled in with a strong force than your head and these. This is what happens to two statehouse. Use the star gas to close than by guests Ripped the park. Which is what the tied is option means and so instead of a star Rotating around a black hole we just have a stellar stellar That dr intially. I created by the black hole and so This is something that The happy neighbor cops serve did so so we have. This does happen this particularly Eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s and Bequeath actually see a new cleaners from that particular even so tightness. Deduction events are fairly well established phenomenon in astronomy. We have many of them served They they are Fairly a common plays events But what's special about this particular one. Eighty two thousand nineteen years. G is that We could let's say It could have Produced on neutrino that was detected a ice cube so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety s. She is the first either direction event. For which is coincident. Neutrinos detected a dice. Cube in queens. This coincidence is likely to be accidental. So on approachability estimate tells us that these coins. This is pretty causal not accident so eighty twenty nine hundred ninety. The g could be the parent of this neutrino. And that's that's that's a i. That's very interesting. Yes i skew. is a is a big ice cube in the in. The south is I'm not sure it's exactly cuba. But it's it's the biggest block of is which has been Eastern With values Small detectors So it's it's an array of swarner detectors but yeah it's basically a big block of ice which has been transformed into a detective and so so the idea that this high energy neutrinos from what they were System montemar even that happened Out there this high energy neutrinos passing through that ice q. believe some telltale signs All of that happening and yuxi picked up Then began back Just like you were talking about the previous creeper begin. Please back to a region so this is one of those cases where you can tell from a single neutrino of course the with with a narrower where you can tell the point in the sky where three neutrino kate from. It's doable with one single neutrino because this high energy neutrinos when they enter the is They produce ca a shower so they kind of illuminate. They you me nate. The is but the do it in a way which is very much Beat so and then and then the direction of the the direction of bigotry knows. We have a pretty good accuracy often. How often could be a pickup something like that. Do we have an estimate of how often that would happen. Meaning ice cube detects something like this. Every year ice cube the tax Of the order of ten high-energy neutrinos froth outside our galaxy. Tadesse the number for the entire crop of neutrinos that ice cube has It went we talk about tidal disruption events in the specific these are fairly rare phenomena and so they estimated that maybe a few times so percent of the entire neutrino flux the thais cubeys of serving could be from tidal disruption events. Not much more than that. So we are talking about less than half of the total flats being to tell this option events okay and so the tug disruption burned as as you mentioned It starts getting clipped applaud and pulled back into a into a a black hole but this ten percent. Do they have to be these braces as they call it. The things that have a jet that is sort of lying towards us. Is that it necessarily condition for these types of high energy neutrinos. It's it's a plausible scenario Let me just say that. There is an important difference between blazers in tidal disruption events. In the fact that the ablaze is something that has a jet. She's always on so the jets kinda kerman feature of of these particular galaxy but the title is adoption. Event is transient events. Saw dotcoms creates the accretion. This accretion of the star of the black hole produces flair is flair can last year or two but then it would just fade away so There could be jet and in fact in our paper we present where there is a jet so they partisans the user chat But if there is a jet in tiger disruption event. That's a transient suggested. That's born when This starts to create the stellar debris. And then it's on for months or years and then and then shuts off and it has two point in our direction as you as you mentioned because otherwise we would. We would see the trains your so this high energy neutrinos sillier how. How many orders of magnitude are we talking about coming to the one set you pick up. Let's say from the sun I'm not sure about the question. Can you maybe rephrase yet. So when you say this high energy neutrinos that is coming from let's say a tidal disruption events or something like that How much comedy orders of magnitude more energy Outdoors come to you. Know the ones that might be created the sun a lot menu of this magnitude so It is a big difference. So the sun produces new three meals. over a wide range of energies Higher energy neutrinos from the sun reach energies of the order of ten am pt and mega awards and for the ice cream. Neutrinos we are talking about one hundred of the older one hundred t. v. or even thousand teams. Which would be p so. Let's say maybe eighty tortoise magnitude finding the mass rife or okay and so this e. v. measure it is actually measuring the mass of the neutrino of newfield. Now these these neutrinos are have such a Such high energy that basically It's impossible to know their mass Because because as i said massey's energy so they talk energy of neutrino Detected is to be so high that that percentage view to its mass east so tiny that this practice mutual so i was wondering if we know the energy couldn't be sort of back computer to save the mass is or it doesn't follow The reasoning is a bit different and The way to sink about this is perhaps they let me see the formula for energy particle Which used the rest energy Applause the kinetic energy and So connecticut is so high that he thought the overwhelms direct energy. So it's it's and of course every time you measure the energy when three no. There is a narrow associated with the measurement so You we can't really we can't really tell what What led the boss of the detroit news but both roughtly this. This appears to be sort of an early warning system for many many things right topped the supernova the in the title disruption events producing heightened plano's So this could be sort of inundated with a monkey message. Observations protocols as you mentioned that gives us a higher success. Wait suspect. I would think certainly nominated be one right That's the power of multi messenger astronomy the integration of different signals coming from Photos tree knows navigation waves Causing me craze and Danger plays very powerful emmanuel cases and maybe supernova case is the most striking Xenos come first. But that's not always the case So in the indicates of tidal disruption events Did you know that was observed. Came about five months later than the initial dhammika looser version of the tidal disruption events so It's if it can go both ways. neutrinos can be early alert or they only alert could be for example a radio salvation or or an x-ray use ovation and then and then the neutrino attacked or could Focus a surge in that direction as see what they find which which has actually been done ice cube sometimes. Does these these archival. Search this on the basis of others from From for example x ray or gamma ray surveys interested. Exciting eighty that said a lot to be owned It seems It seems like these till don't know all the production mechanisms for neutrinos but if we have robust with to pick them up on than we can place them back and and talk asking questions What might be there definitely So yes so. People celia the next five years Wanted the aid is that you believe Be will make a significant crocus in this Innovative neutrinos then two different areas. That a very promising One is Broadly speaking Manmade nutrients so there is. There is a big push especially hitting the united states to build Create very powerful beams of trainings and then these beams are manmade. So we know that very well. We know that energy we know the composition and we can use them to learn about The properties of treatments and then That other men bead neutrino experiments where Scientists look for the between months so that's also very promising In something i really. I really excited about that. That may be a furious novel with noble the neutrino mass us from these very high position laboratory experience. Then there is the whole Topic of neutrinos as part of the mouth of mike messenger astronomy and in that area. I think what was was to look forward. To among other scenes is the interplay gravitational waves shock waves. You still Somehow a science of its own into a large extent but there are so many possible connections. We've neutrinos tidal disruption adoption events should produce reputation ways so baranov shoot us gradation ways So so there is. There is a a lot of potential there which is still unexplored in and that's where i see myself Working on in the next few years you adjust very quickly The do gravitational waves travel bid closest and new ashtrays and so if If they both are produced in In uneven they're expected to arrive on earth close to simultaneously. It depends on the timing of the production if the answer is yes the waves ending a knows are born at the same time which may not be exactly true because the physics that governs tation waves is different from the one that that governs neutrinos. So but the difference in timing would be the difference Accumulated that birth But but the two were were generated genetically the same time. They should arrive the same time. Just thinking this a systematic difference in the production time than guan lorries given early warning for the other. But that doesn't seem to do a case right. There could be cases where significant lag in the production of rotation way with respect to the production of the tree nose and one example is. We haven't touched on this before but let me just nation mergers so if we have if we have a merger for example we have maybe a merger of a neutron stars or black hole neutral star before the merger happens so when the two objects that kind of still approaching each other we should start observe serving ways and this is what this is what has been seen so Delight experiment observes these these nominal But if we have a merger After the merger has occurred and the two objects have become one than a. Dan could be the formation of of over an accretion disk and he secretion Trainers which we can which we can back so the neutrino We come After they initially asian waves and so relation as would be the alert for the neutrino. That does excellent. your this has been great as celia. thanks so much complaining pleasure. Okay thank you bye. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on variety of topics. If you like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com.

Policy Technology Economics Science Stephen Hawking Eappen Eappen Dot Info. Iraq Dutra Eusebio Dini Celia PBS Sonam Gill Munich Trina East Coast Miranda Nicole Amazon Massey Dr Intially
Robin Givhan on the US Capitol Siege and Vogues Kamala Harris Cover

The Business of Fashion Podcast

08:03 min | 9 months ago

Robin Givhan on the US Capitol Siege and Vogues Kamala Harris Cover

"To better understand the gravity of the political moment in washington. Dc and how evoke cover became a flashpoint amidst the us political crisis. I spoke to robin kvant. The pulitzer prize winning writer. Who is the senior critic at large writing about politics race and the arts for the washington post and whose own column on the topic was headlined. Vogue got to familiar too fast. I i asked her about the mood. In washington dc. Right now and how it feels. As an american seeing american democracy under threat i start with just A deep sigh. Because i think that for most people. There's just an element of just. There are no words to really express what we're witnessing and you know it's been for a for a significant part of the country. The last four years have been an exhausting emotional emotionally draining time and You know and then add in a pandemic and than to see this. It's just extraordinarily disheartening. And and shocking. And i would also just say i i think there's also an aspect of Sort of sad inevitability Would have seemed like this was predictable and yet we were incapable of south it. Yeah i agree. Everyone kind of you could see this coming with the rhetoric and that president trump has been Spewing out over the last four years using social media as a kind of bullhorn to broadcast this kind of you know hatred and divisive rhetoric. That's from our perspective. Over here in london and i know people other part in other parts of the world you know. We always look to america as his beacon of democracy and to see you know a country that we admire and look up to so much going through this. It's you know we find it. Refined it heartbreaking and really sad as well but you know that point around inevitability. I couldn't agree with you more Later today you know. it's wednesday were recording this It seems as though president trump will be impeached by the house of representatives. What do you think this will signify in this crisis that america's going through right now this political crisis. I think that's a really good question. I i'm not sure You know. I think we've gotten to a point what in at at which every time there's been a sense of okay this is you know the nature like it has to sort of shift at this point shift where the batter And we've kind of been proven wrong so You know an a president who has been. We'll have been impeached twice as a pretty extraordinary thing. But i think we have really clear evidence from last week that there's a certain percentage of the population who will be undeterred and he will be even more exercise and ultimately a it will it has has starting to cease to be about president trump and he has just bad. A you know the the key. That's unlocked this avalanche of darkness. Really because a lot of the the rhetoric that was being spewed out there at the capitol was related to trump fights. You know there were a list of grievances that people had that really had nothing to do with. He was in the white house I think it's bad you know. They've just sort of been given permission to express their grievances in this really violent way. But i do hope that You know i'm wrong and that The vote will will mean something and will mean something that will shift things for the better. I guess some people's perspective could be that this process that congress is going through over the next few days Will be the end of a very dark chapter in. Us history and we have a new administration Starting on january twentieth that seems poised to kind of address some of the critical issues that have surfaced during the current administration's tenure but others are worried. Maybe like you that. Actually this isn't the end of the chapter. It's just opening up and has highlighted that have seventy four million people voted for donald trump. There's at least a portion of those people represented by the groups that showed up at the capital last week. That have been kind of in a way activated by trump. And you know there's you know ten potentially tens of millions of these people depending on which you know opinion. Polls you believe what do you. What do you think of that. I get is the end of a particular chapter. What the next chapter will look like however I is is the question. And i don't think that You know on on january twenty at twelve a one pm you know the sun is magically going to come out and everything's going to be washed away. I think it's going. We're going to have a lot of really difficult difficult work to do. And i think there's going to be a lot of sort of weeding out of some of these pheno terrible elements in our culture and. I don't think that we can really do that until we sort of. Reckon with our history you know for so much of the the rhetoric that's coming from the people who were you know the mob that writing at the capital so much of it to my mind seems to be kind of rooted in american history Of that deals with race and gender issues And what exactly you know freedom and equality need that have never really that we really never really come to terms with and i don't think that we can really move forward productively until we do come to terms of died and you know a lot of people you know the first thing that They will say when people try to go and examine history on and understand what it means for. The president is bat either. Don't wanna go back there. They don't wanna revisit it. They don't want to have that conversation or they simply want to serve you at through these rose colored lenses and sort of glorify it And ignore the the worst

President Trump Robin Kvant Washington United States Pulitzer Prize The Washington Post DC House Of Representatives London White House Donald Trump Congress
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 10 months ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Am I Drinking Too Much How Do I Stop Drinking Janet Gourand Worldwithoutwine Alcoholic Alcohol Free Alcohol Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
"pheno " Discussed on Limitless Mindset

Limitless Mindset

02:59 min | 11 months ago

"pheno " Discussed on Limitless Mindset

"This is john and this is the november. A podcast and eat questions for this one. So i'm gonna try to have a little bit. More of a rapid clip going through them questionable. One i heard from buckle landi. He commented on youtube jonathan. I'd like to ask you. What is the best neutral. Pick in your opinion. What is better. Oxy rasa tim with pheno crossed him or new pepped with final peraza attempt. So there's two questions in there the best nutro pick in your opinion okay. This is a question like when people say hey. I want to travel the world to seduce exotic women which country has the best women. Tell me which ones are the best go there. And it really is subjective and based upon what you're trying to accomplish and based upon your unique neurobiology and your cognitive and personality and make up your different motivations. I really can't tell you what the best neutral pick is. I'm just going to have to recommend that you try a couple of the ones that are held in high esteem by bio hackers high-performance successful people. And you'll be able to select something from that that you really really liked it. You consider your personal your personal favorite. You may also be asking Jonathan what in your opinion what. Your personal view is the best and i have to go with the product that i created myself and obviously created it largely so that i could have something that really worked. Great for me and that is kabaija rasa. Tom rich stack that used to special proprietary ingredients that really increase the bioavailability of the other teams in it. That took all the other rasa dams that i've been using for all these years and that are held in such high esteem and took it to the next level that product was called combined. Joe and i sold it to about one hundred people at this point now a little bit more than that and i will consistently here. People that are veterans of pharmacological enhancement. And they'll tell me. Wow this is like the best or one of the best things that i've ever tried. So yes i have to personally. I'd probably rank that number one. The second question asking about female president and the other those rows attempts new pepped and oxy rasa tim because while you can take phenyle on its own.

Jonathan Joe john president Tom rich pheno
"pheno " Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"pheno " Discussed on Latina to Latina

"Tell me about a time in your life that captures your good girl behavior <hes> I time in my current life like as an adult. . As a child take either. . Okay. . Well as a child, , I could definitely paint the good girl image open up my book with this image of me as going to Catholic school wearing my uniform being really nervous my pony tails really tight. . My shoes are very polished and this feeling of are the girls going to like me? ? Am I going to be accepted having a lot of anxiety about going to school and really feeling like I had to be the best daughter of immigrants I could possibly be. . To repay my parents and the way that played out in my later years in adulthood has been being a hyper achiever like just. . Wanting to excel in every area of life from work to every relational role and having this chronic sense that I'm not enough for I'm failing is what? ? I call the good girl myth of perfection, , which is as we'll get into my primary goal. . Meth. . What were the messages that you were receiving about what it meant to be good. . So, , there are four main systems that shape us the major system that shapes us into good girls called the patriarchy, , which is cultural social system that's been around for thousands of years has very deep roots and it's really privileges men over women in and other genders in a way that makes us form a good girl protection mechanism. . 'cause we think Oh, , if we just were good girls go along with the program we assimilate. . And we are committed to the patriarchy will be safe. . So we developed the good girl mask and the good girl archetype as a protective mechanism. . So the main place it comes from the Patriarchy but the Patriarchy is like an abstract thing right when you're seven, , you're not thinking about the bag. . So to grounded in what I call. . Messengers. . So who are the messengers that we have as children that spread? ? Patriarchy to us and these messengers are often they don't even know they're doing it one major places family. . So I always ask every client that I work with to look at what are the rules you inherited from your family the messages you got from your parents, , your siblings, , your uncles, , your aunts, , the tribe that you were born into. . So what were the rules in your family? ? For me it was very much get the highest degree of education possible because that's how you. . Get lifted out of poverty because that's what my father did. . So steady has to work hard. . Choose a safe path in your career. . So that, you , can earn that salary. . So everybody is safe. . Don't take risks. . You argue and break the good girl that there are different types of good girls depending on which myth is at the core of your value system. . So there's the myth of rules, , the myth of Perfection, , the myth of logic, , the myth of harmony and the myth of sacrifice. . You Say, , your dominant myth is the myth of perfection. . How did you determine that? ? Well I took my own assessment that I created. . It felt so fun I felt like I was in a women's magazine being like B.. . B. B. A.. . It's like a cosmic Christ like back to your. . Days. . Good I definitely play into that I. . Think the one telltale sign that the method perfection could be your primary is is my primary. . The way that I know is persistent feelings of failure and guilt tend to mean. . You're probably in the perfection camp because every good girl meth has a core fear. . and. . So for perfection, , it's the fear failure for sacrifice the fear being selfish. . For each one, , there's a particular fear that really will tell you and particular desire you know with perfection, , the desires related to perform. .

Mama pheno Catholic school
The Case for Police Abolition

The Nod

05:29 min | 1 year ago

The Case for Police Abolition

"At. The time of this recording one thousand seventeen people in the US have been shot and killed by police this past year, and as the numbers continue to grow. It's got meany questioning why we're even need cops in the first place, but the question of polishing the police also makes a lot of people nervous so today we're going straight to the source in talking to an actual abolitionist. Bill Fina Y'all on. It's an important conversation that you don't want to miss. This is the nod. We've heard it all before. Give Cops Body Cams hold them accountable, cautious need diversity and bias training. We need community policing black police. We need Brown police, but as the years roll by an efforts at reform are showing no signs of stopping the brutal violence against black people in this country, a different call gaining traction is the call to abolish the prison industrial complex, which is made up of prisons, policing and surveillance all forms contrary to what a lot of. Of people believe this isn't a new school. Of Thought, it's been around since the eighties, and it's been embraced by people all over the world. Much of what we know about it. Today has been studied practice and built upon three black women. We have to mention Angela Davis Ruth Wilson, Gilmore and Mariam Kaba Today. We're joined by bill. Fina Y'all want a Baltimore based restorative justice practitioner. Who writes about abolition and how to practice it in our community? It'll pheno. Thank, you so much for being here today. It's awesome. Have you thank you? Thank you for having me so abolition. Is Abolition essentially what we talk about admission we're saying is that a world cannot just without the physical presence of police in prisons, but a world where we all have, our needs met in a way that we do not have to commit the crimes that laid us in prison, and with policing right, and so abolition forces us to complete your frame how we think about the concept of prisons and lease, and to be honest about the history of it prisons. Prisons were created as an alternative to slavery. It says so and the thirteen th amendment, and so when we look if that that violence and genocide history of policing prisons, abolition says it's not possible for us to have world rabies dynamics exist so I'm sure we've all seen a lot of the back and forth in the media, and even just an online conversations about what's reformist versus what is abolitionist. What sorts of things are absolutely out of the question or Believed that we can have rover prisons and policing exist. We just have to make it better. And abolitionist believed that is not possible behalf to completely get rid of it and create new systems and structures. How did you come to fruition? Personally had become part of your life identified. The woman is came to woman is during college was definitely my sophomore. Year of college and I thought begins to stand what it means to exist as A. A black woman in this world I understood this system is structured. That are against US I think a lot of people don't understand that the reform to slavery with prisons. The reform to slave catchers was police, and so when you have stopped with that truth as a woman as as a former refugee as an immigrant to this country will hold, I, experience, it was not possible for me to say I love blackness and not become an abolitionist. Something else. That's near and dear to your heart, and also the work that you do is the story of Keith Davis Junior talked to us a little bit about Keith and his story so keep Davis Junior. Is a twenty eight year old black man for Baltimore, who was shot at? Times by the Baltimore Police Department in June of Twenty fifteen. He's being accused and they're saying that it gun was founded in Keith was connected to a murder. In March he was sentenced to fifty years, and after five years in five rows, Amish. It's been an ongoing case that five years WWLTV's dedicated to. Always bring her into the space. Kelly Davis has four beautiful children and Khloe Amari and Jaden and his case is so connected to what was happening in Baltimore after Twenty fifteen after the murder of Freddie Gray talk to me a bit about how keeps life and story relates specifically to your Abolition Work Keith case is connected to abolition one, if forces us to see kids humanity beyond what he did as a child chief, interaction with the criminal justice system started very early, and what we know is that it was a result of all of the conditions that came with Keith birth his stories parents. Parents his poverty, and so forth, and so as a result of that chief found himself funneled into a system. That once you've been in there. It's easier to keep coming back. If Selah commits a crime, we have to ask ourselves if the necessities of somebody is not being met, and instead were thrown them in a cage cage is actually more violent and transformed into a even more violent person with Keith case what we've seen has been a blatant disregard for any kind of laws, any kind of good faith and what we saw for the past five years is lies and lies and lies and confirms. That meet cannot possibly rehabilitate a system that has no

Keith Davis Bill Fina Baltimore United States Baltimore Police Department Angela Davis Ruth Wilson Kelly Davis Murder Brown Selah Davis Freddie Gray Mariam Kaba Wwltv Khloe Amari Jaden Gilmore
The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

21:30 min | 1 year ago

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Life Sciences

"Live. Let's kick it off as Glenn with Meta data. You're on the and business podcast. So Glenn Are we're GonNa talk a bit about the future. And we're in this wild time in your industry with the corona virus, but I wanted ground us in the now. When when you look even in the space for twenty years you look at where data are starting to transform processes in life sciences. How do you like to frame it? What's the state of affairs today? So I think if you. If you look at what happens in life sciences outside of data, we just look. People, the big trend that we're seeing is it's good trend. That's the world I. WanNa live in as a patient. Therapies are getting more. Effective therapies are getting safer, and it's because they're being designed very different. Way used to be that you try to create a therapy that worked for as many people as you possibly could, and you would maybe high fiving in the hallways. If you right for Outta ten patients, you know this. This was the world of the blockbuster drugs, and it was about as imprecise as possible like a patient has a blood pressure over this. Give him this drug. Patients got cholesterol over that. Give them this other drug, and now as you start to get into these more effective therapies because they're more precise. Actually start to create an interesting data problem, and that is you start to have smaller and smaller denominators. If I'm starting to in well, this drug isn't district people who have a blood pressure over this. They also need to have this gene. They also need to have or not have this pre existing condition. ETC, acceptance every time I come up with more criteria. The pool of patients who are going to bed. And remember. We're making things that people take. They put in their bodies, and we've to make sure that they're safe. Not just effective, and there's a good way regulatory bodies who are protecting that safety and efficacy. So now as these patient pools, who will benefit therapies get smaller. We also have smaller smaller pool of people who we can use from a research perspective would be volunteering. Stoke the specificity, which is great means that we have a scarcity of patients that we've got to deal with a new way and I think that's been driving at least I have a very kind of drug development centric view of the world. About a drug discovery. Can I find a new molecule I really focus on the will what do I? Do if I think I've got something that's going to cure this kind of cancer. Think about making more evidence, but with fewer people line. Smaller denominators I think that's a big piece of what's driving the data landscape in life sciences. The other thing that I'll tell you which is kind of interesting, is that the life sciences industry has not been really good about data, standardization and a guy. He was a big influence in the way I think about data medi data chief data officer starting from about five years ago, his name's David, Lee and He came out of the insurance industry. Any any taught me that data standardization. Doesn't sound sexy, but until you do that, you can't benchmark until you do that. You create a predictive model and the life. Sciences Industry hasn't been great about data standardization because everybody was doing stuff for this one drug in this one area, and so I see people outside of Medi data as well, but certainly the kind of stuff that we do is we try to use AI to climb that data value curve. How do we a figure out how to standardize data in different ways data from different sources about different things? Let me just give you one quick tangent example. I got asked very kindly to speak at a conference about Ab-. Stroke and I do not know anything about cardiology like I did cancer research before we started medi data I'm comfortable talking about oncology, so I figured I better. Get ahead of it if they're asked me to. Present and I got up on stage and I said listen I. Don't know anything about stroke. But if I was speaking to a bunch of oncologists, and they were trying to build a predictive model around cancer diagnosis, and they were only looking at cancer research. They're not going to be very successful because everybody already has cancer in those research studies, but if you were to be able to go and look at large-scale cardiology studies, stroke studies studies about hard tax. If I were to go, pull data from studies research about diabetes. Then I'm going to know what those patients looked like before their cancer diagnosis, and then I can start to use. Use that to build that model so when you put that Lens on things, you realize I need to standardize data across a lot of different kinds of patients and a lot of different kinds of research patients who are in research. I have to stack the deck. I don't mean that in a various way create to create the biggest possible denominator to create the most evidence generating. Data set that I can, and even just generating that data set requires ai tool sometimes, and then once you got that data set. I think probably inherently obviously you. You've got more traditional statistical tools and methods with frankly work great and a lot of the shared also can start to apply things like machine learning neural that works and look for look for signal that you might have missed or enhanced signal. That wasn't there traditionally so I. I do think that's happening I. Feel Pretty Good. There's a lot more we. We can do, but we're. We've started as an industry getting that right. Yeah, until there's couple of things to poke into here I. Like the landscape paint I'm going to dive into a couple of things. You mentioned one of which was around standardization, so yeah, I mean what a tough problem! I think everybody. We've interviewed in healthcare. You guys are in Pharma. If I was ever GONNA be selling a product, probably said the six time on the podcast never be selling artificial intelligence solutions to hospitals like a break one. One of the Pharma companies, but in healthcare, broadly whether they be life, sciences, or or diagnostics, or whatever the case may be just data, being goofy, and like in silos and locked up and not uniform sort of this big ubiquitous issue is this when you talk about the standardization, clearly from what I understand of our look into companies like the MERCS and the bears of the world. They're beginning to try to do this with their own big corpus's of historical information, whatever being able to streamline things so that it's. It's findable, maybe not machine readable yet. They don't necessarily know where that's going to add value just yet in most cases, but but at least make it more uniform. Is this something that the industry is GonNa have to get to the same page from kind of a regulatory or kind of soft law level, or is this just per company? We're GONNA have to come up with data governance policies within our firm and just be really steady about those across silos. Like how do you see this rolling out? Yeah, so? Well I. DO think that individual companies are working on that, but I also think that there's industry organizations. There's commercial entities. My own included who are trying to do that beyond the walls of an individual company and I think we're GONNA have to I. Don't think the data that one company has is going to be sufficient. Across all the use cases that we'd not just a good idea commercially, but we have a medical ethical obligation to create the best care possible when data sets and I do think that the data quality is a really important thing to think about if if it's a a regulatory prescriptive method of doing it or the way regulation works today, which is demonstrate to people that you've done a responsible set of work to standardize things and prove it, but a lot of people will point a finger at regulators and say they're slowing down innovation, sometimes particularly and Pharma and I do not believe. believe that at all regulators. Job Isn't to be like Glen, you're a great guy, so you know I believe what all your data and Algorithms put out. No job is to protect the public health and say Glenn proved to me on paper that you did something that was scientifically ethically responsible to jobs. Is So so i? Think if that requirement is there? What you'll see is individual companies trying to solve this on their own, and I've seen this before in life, science space with other technology things, even just the management data used to be every company tried to do it their way. Out of their basement, and then twenty years later, this medi data do Thanh, research and again we're not the only company doing it, but you see platform providers that are doing it at a larger scale so when I see everybody trying to do it individually get excited because that means that there's actually a market demand for that. And you're creating a marketplace where the best technologies, the best rhythms, the best data sources will create something that more and more people will come onto, and that's how that's everybody clearly. I think we could extrapolate that for those of you. Listening into almost any industry right I think people say this. Even about I'm just GONNA throw some random stuff at ya like automotives. Hey, if we're GONNA make safe self driving cars. Do we want Ford my develop something about some certain snowy driving circumstance like there's GonNa. Be Some things that are going to have to be transferable so that everybody's safer on the dam road and with drugs. Maybe it's the same way. Business Opportunities Hey if we can be the ones who even through kind of soft news. Can Be. The folks that people rely on to develop a system instruct sure that's going to build a really sticky market position in clearly from a business perspective. That's that's an appeal as well part of the challenge see in life, sciences and I know you've obviously you guys have dealt with this and found ways around or whatever there's there's a way to frame it, but you know I. Look at companies like we just did a piece on Johnson and Johnson for example looking at some of their current innovations and investments today I. Frankly we. We don't see a tremendous amount, but they're involved in a consortium called Melody Out in Europe somewhere from not mistaken where Santa a bunch of other big players are from what I understand exposing a certain amount of data is being trained on in some aggregate sense in everybody's GonNa get a little bit of the benefit from it. How do we do this? Hey, we all have the same uniform stuff. Hey, we're able to kind of like mould things across companies. How do we do that without giving away the secret sauce, because of course? Clearly as a drug development firm that there's a humanitarian side, and then clearly we have to make payroll in in. That would mean that we've got to keep some of the things that are secret. So how do we uniform things and maybe cross pollinate without the risk of US losing her crowned jewels yet? So that is not an easy thing to do I'm I'm super appreciative of it. The way we've at least tried to tackle that problem is by creating like a give to get dynamic. There are definitely companies out there that sell data. And I think there's a great place for them in the world. Probably doing and we'll do some awesome stuff I. think there's there's a great place in the world for not for profit groups who say hey just throw your data. Here will create naturally yet. For sure, that's all all good, but I also think there's a place for a model where you say look if you put your data into this, what is effectively proprietary bucket, but with a third party that you trust and let that third party that make sure that everybody who's putting their data into that pool is protected in terms of not showing the specifics of your individual data points, so in your example. You know Sanofi doesn't see Johnson and Johnson's data. But you've got enough people in there that you can do things in aggregate and let people compare their own specific data to the more generalized bigger denominator that Medi date, or whoever it is or you and it's done at the standardization is done for you in a way that this transparent and you can believe in the results I think that's a really interesting commercial model, and then must exist in other industries I just not an expert. Well, it's. The way you're talking about it makes it sound like it's kind of a Nathan idea, even for you guys where it's like well. We think that there could be a space for this like it's something that could have all right. It's like an I believe you're right I, think actually it absolutely. Could I just think you Mr Glanton? Whoever your your absolute best partnership guys, you know you'd better be drinking beers or some of these people because there's a lot of trust that goes into those kind of relationships. So. There's a lot of trust that goes along in life sciences anywhere for sure yet. You're dealing with data about patients in some way. Holly anybody in medicine right has a person's life in their hands, but if if we're working on a vaccine for SARS, come to I, mean literally billions of people are going to get it like you've got billions of lives in. In your hands, so he's already. A lot of trust is important in our industry and I. do think that what will see by the way. There's posters at scientific sessions that we've done. There's clients right now are taking some of these aggregated data sets to regulators, and they're using them to demonstrate exactly what I was saying before. Their drugs are safe and effective. But with different kind of aggregated denominator, we call it a synthetic control arm, and it's not that is android senator anything synthesis out of the people it, synthesizing people who are in lots of different research studies into a cohort they can be used as. As a valid competitor to the patients who you treated with your new drought, Nisa solving that problem, you're saying of the narrowness if you have some super niche allergy medication for people with a certain kind of whatever then yeah, maybe you really need to extrapolate in that kind of uniform data, way and and kind of square that circle that you. And I actually think that not only by I know this is happening. See it happening, but this is a harbinger of things to come because. I gave. Let's take it to its most extreme, so in all US oncology, because it's happening there I and cancer, but I think it's going to happen in almost every therapeutic area, probably even like analgesics, and what the next tylenol is, but we are all so interestingly I mean at biologically individual and people talk about cancer therapy, and almost every patient really is like an end of one problem. There is nobody who has your. Your exact same tumor right in your tumor has probably different kinds of cells that have different mutations even within this one problem in your body. So when you start to think about that, we have to use these techniques to extrapolate what the best therapy is for every single person at the right time down to individual. We're going to need as an industry and I'm not just talking about now. Life Sciences although I think by scientists. Imprint part of the for sure. It's GonNa. Pay For a lot of this Oh. Yeah, sure I sure, but but these mathematical models that we used to figure out what to do for individuals there being born right now using these techniques stacking up all this data and figuring out how to use as a group. We're GONNA use that against individuals, so this stacking I'm just going to clarify this point will move into the next question, but I wanNA nutshell this for the audience the stacking is it sounded almost like a combination of two things one if we can have some. Unification, around the data, we can combine it in certain ways where nobody's giving away their secret sauce, but maybe we were able to get bigger cluster of people who have a specific genetic condition, or whatever, and then use that for for our clinical trials. That's one side of it. You also mentioned Kinda the synthetic sort of element. was that kind of like you know what immediately came to my mind? was you know we're we're? We're training an algorithm to read handwriting. You know we'll come up with a bunch of programmatic generated handwriting. That might be slight variations of things like using that I. Don't think that's what you. You meant there, but what? What did you mean by synthetic again? No, so you got that stack. We've got stack of every patient and I'm coming to see you I say all right well. What am I going to treat Glenn while I got to figure out because Glenn's unique. WHO's similar to Glen and so what you do? Is You build these kind of like Matrix views, patients and you start to use algorithms to compare Glenn with everybody in the stack. Yeah Okay Okay you, you pull those people out of the stack, and you then synthesize them into a group of smaller stack, but that is purpose built. To make a guess about what to do best for Glenn Don or all them. You synthesize one of these smaller stacks from the big one to use as a competitor the same way if I had a group of patients who I gave my new drug to and I'll give another group of patients a placebo sugar pill right I, compare them with like. Well, should I be giving people sugar pills if we have tons of people who are in research, who already gotten the standard of care? Can I reset the CISE? Those people into a comparative instead of exposing a whole bunch of volunteer patience to something that. Does, not effective, and that's the synthesis of the group. Yeah, it's not robots. You're not talking about programmatic degenerate I wasn't suspecting were so. It is it is quite interesting. Because the direct analogy, some of our listeners are avid readers that emerged dot com, always covering use cases in different industries. We think about how a net flicks or Amazon does recommendations you know. You're stripping, you know. In their case, it's purchase behavior. Geo Location whatever else for you. It's genetic stuff in health history, whatever and yeah, you just find in those similar clusters and being able to extrapolate a little bit. You know the movie Gatica. People haven't seen it like the ideas like your DNA decides whether or not you're going to be an astronaut or somebody who's cleaning, toilets or something, cleaning toilets, and of course, of course, that's patently ludicrous, because your genes interestingly don't change that much there. In instances where mutations and things, but actually I I can't tell you much more about your health today than I could have told you about your health the day you. You were born because it's a static data. Set Your Connecticut Right. That is a very simple view of it. There's a lot more elaborate stuff, but if you think about all the stuff that is changing about you overtime, Gina Type, and then all of your phenotype, and you start to measure that stuff and you start to think about it. It really is a problem of finding not one needle, but the right ten. Ten needles in the haystack that allow us to make the best comparison between Glen or a group of patients and patients like them, and that's another place where these artificial intelligence tools are used, so we use them to create stacks, but we also use them to select the right needles out of those haystacks to create these comparative groups Yup I. See those reasonable applications I would be you know. BE FRANK WITH YOU IF If that struck me as not possible based on precedents and other industries, but that clustering strikes me as quite possible, particularly solve that data harmonisation issue. I mean that's a Lotta. The crux of it I know we're just about to wrap up I know you have seen a lot of things change with covid nineteen. Thinking about what that means for the future of your industry. Any closing thoughts before we wrap on. What this means for now in the near future in life sciences. Yes so at the risk of making Not Look that good? Because, I'm definitely including myself in this criticism wouldn't have been nice if we had all that patient data stacked up. And I mean they're. They're few million patients around the world who are in studies on the Medi Data Platform. It's all different companies doing the research with their data, but can you imagine if we had that stack? And we were paying attention to in the hundred fifty countries that we do research knowing some of these patients, genetics, and all of their pheno types in a better way than we normally do in medicine, because we see them consistently wouldn't have been great for layer on like who seems to be coming down with cove nineteen I mean no, no, no, no doubt, no young. And I think that that that's an interesting. You put like an exclamation point on why we need to do this. It's like there's an ethical imperative, not just a commercial driver to think about data in different ways. Yeah, yeah, well. To some degree you know my thought is like what you're articulating makes a tremendous amount of sense. Given Your Business Model. It makes slightly less if I work at Bayer. However like despite the biased tilt, I do understand the value prop and I do think that it is compelling and I think it does feel like it'll have to be the future. People are not going to keep distance silos forever. I do think it make sense. Air Because, if you if pharmaceutical a pharmaceutical company B. comes out with the same effectively drug, and and they're competing for the same group of patients, and neither of them knows that you might be better off taking drug Abe before drug be or drug be is better in a certain kind of of patient than drug. As than actually, you are not serving your customer and you're. You're not generating the revenue that you could be generating, and so you should be motivated with other companies to lineup tightly. In terms of what is the best way to treat patients I actually think it's in your best interest. i. e Clayton clearly is I mean there's a little bit more potentially to lose while in your firm, it's it's almost explicitly to game but I. I think he'd do things like you see things like melody you see companies like yours have been tremendously successful. You guys were acquired recently. You know massive congratulations for that and yes I think long term it's not against their interests by any means, and hopefully I think Glenn. It'll be part of the future. I know these are things you've thought about for. People are interested. Interested in some Glenn stocks is a book coming out in August called the patient equation by Wiley. It's about precision medicine in the age of Covid nineteen and beyond Glenn. If people are interested in in stay in touch following your thoughts, we live sciences I. Know We have a lot of people that follow that space. Where should they go on the web to find you? Cou. You could find me on twitter, etc, at captain, clinical a fictitious superhero for good science. And meditated accomplish our website for anybody interested. There's all kinds of papers and men links to publications. We do academic stuff, too, so it's not all commercial awesome, all right,

Glenn Cancer Glen Johnson Diabetes Europe Bayer United States Twitter Sars AI Covid Pharma Glenn Don
"pheno " Discussed on All The Kings Men

All The Kings Men

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"pheno " Discussed on All The Kings Men

"Father's Day. Right now not sure not sure. If people can hear it or not, because you and I can't notarize, we'd scripted, but the takeaway for me besides the money going to wags and walks, which is a great charity. It's just look at that beard, and I mean I know I've been growing my My Quarantine Goatee I've been trying to keep it contained on the sides, but that is a Jeff Carter playoff beard, and I always forget just how majestic some of them can get. Jeff does. It really help him. There's there's nothing patchy about it. It's like he has you're not times like forty just around like all around us cheeks and there's some there's some depth in their more Stanley Cup silver in mind than his, but he'll catch up I'm sure. For sure for sure, okay next up. We've got Willie Mitchell Milan Lucci each out onto pheno marina on their well on Willy's boat. Is the name of the boat and Jessie. What's bringing this back up here because? Two Cups here. It's taking place of the I and both king and size. Do you think this is the same kind of Folk God as the Other? I'm fine with it because this one is just a a logo and the the I in King has two thousand twelve on it, and the I and size has two thousand fourteen on it and it's. You know it's it's I don't know if wordplay is exactly the right phrase, but it's a you know naming a boat boat names are usually sort of clever fund little plays on words. They have puns in them. Whatever so I'm fine with King size in this setting with the two Stanley cups or with the Stanley Cup represented twice I should say. So. I Like I'm just stunned that it's two thousand and twenty and we're just now finding out about Willie Mitchell's boat name I don't know how long he's had. Must have been a while shared with us. Oh, by the way my Pajama Pants.

Jeff Carter Willie Mitchell Willie Mitchell Milan Lucci King pheno marina Jessie Willy
"pheno " Discussed on Cannabis Karaoke Podcast

Cannabis Karaoke Podcast

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"pheno " Discussed on Cannabis Karaoke Podcast

"Better for parents or in laws right but if you want to cultivate though it's not it's not. It's not complicated. You got to pick the right. Genetics have good had good soil. Not Know How? Much water to give makes us getting off light and harvested at the right time and then dry it properly and make sure that when you put it inside of a jar of the humidity is right so that you know. Have a mold. Problem It can be much more complicated. Now if you want to get into the details nitty gritty. But it's it's very much within reach of the ad that the average person Nice. I can use my miracle. Gro You can stop smoking. Your Miracle Grow and you can tell wear long which is in the sort. Sharpen your Crayon and take some notes mark. Hey Eric last question before we wrap it up. led versus Sodium yes sir. Led's have come a long way. They're they're fantastic I don't have a I grow outdoors at a at home And when I get anything indoors absolutely GONNA go. Led's I think that they're just more. They're expensive more expensive upfront. But they're doing from everything that I'm reading and hearing they're doing just as good a job as as as HBO citizen. And the like. I think that there I think that especially because zip because they throw off less heat. You think it's easier to keep the RH at a at a more stable level. Or why why do you think? Led's 'cause barry every was shitting on him when they first came out and now all of a sudden. I'm walking into places that look like Vegas. You know I I. It's all suppressant a precedent. How blight how bright they can do need in his sunglasses. So it's the heat factor. It's that they require a lot less energy in a lot. Longer factor and also their digitally controlled right. So just like you've got the led lights at home or you can control your smartphone. And you've got you know you can put a disco party on in your bedroom if you want with the Philips Smart Bulb. It's kind of the same thing and the goal here is to Mimic. What's coming from the sun so if you have more granular controls over that by way of digital digital controls mechanics You'RE GONNA be able to dial that in a lot a lot more. I've heard people say that their investment into led has resulted in them saving on tonnage for a C. Because they don't have because even those the sodium lights are good. They put off so much heat which causes which causes humidity to go up. Which then you gotta cool the place down and constantly going up and down and you know any grower you know. You should be asked him to things and one of them being. What's your average our age you know. And if they can't answer your it's in the wrong range stay away. Hey thanks for the time today. I really appreciate it. Mark thanks jumping on and bringing eric to the table Always solid to be able to interview someone with you. Even I give you a hard time. You know we're just kidding around Let's let people know where they can you know? Give us a website Talk to us about your Social Media. And then wrap it up cure dark nursery. Dot Com Social handles also darker nursery for for all the all the majors Feel free to at us. Follow us And if you are if you're a consumer and you're growing at home and you WanNa know where and Wendy Clones. You can sign up for the drop announcement yet you know. And that's on a dark heart. Nursery DOT COM mark. Everything left for Mister Rosen. No thank you for dropping the knowledge my man we appreciate it the guys that they should have me on love. Thanks Eric Toxin speaks. That's a wrap. Thank you for listening to this edition of Cannabis. Karaoke another kick ass. Podcast about all things cannabis you can find us on. Itunes spotify soundcloud and our website cannabis Karaoke dot TV. And if you or someone you know would like to be on the show please it the book your interview button on the right candidates. Karaoke grabbed the MIC. And Tell your.

Eric Toxin Led Cannabis barry Wendy Clones Mister Rosen Mark
"pheno " Discussed on Cannabis Karaoke Podcast

Cannabis Karaoke Podcast

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"pheno " Discussed on Cannabis Karaoke Podcast

"From a history lesson standpoint there were. There were a number of growers and slash breeders. In the. We'll call it the late sixties early seventies even through the late seventies that traveled around the world and Click seats. And this is important because there are strains of grow with indigenously natively to certain parts of the world just like Slick every other animal plant in a link creature on the face of the planet. There's there's there's biological entities that are just native to certain parts of the world so what you'll find is that strains that grow in Thailand for example you get you get wonderful. Tvos that grow very very tall That have extraordinarily cerebral effect in terms of how they make you feel. It's much more in the head in the body but from a from a profitability standpoint and an efficiency standpoint they take forever to finish with that means is the flowering cycles vary like upping sixteen to twenty weeks in some cases which for commercial growers is not ideal right. So what these breeders did was take. This is just one example but take a strain leica sativa topic for example and then bring that back and breathe it with something from a totally different part of the world that grows and looks and feels totally different. So we're GONNA use an Afghan Indika as an example. So in contrast as tvos which grows very large and sparsely and takeover and don't yield very well per square foot and also take forever to finish. Afghani indicates are very short. Very stout have very dense. Buds are very resonance also finished flowering in about half half the time so breeder started doing this from around the world with these indigenous strains known as landrace strains and those were known as the first version of hybrid strains that we we saw and a lot of this unknowing California now Santa Cruz all the way up to Humboldt Mendocino and Those are now categorized as I the post landrace strains are now categorized or what is what's knows airland strains and this is really what put cannabis on the map from a product marketing standpoint. Now there was this is when you Cannabis Cup starting to come into play and strain started to have different names and or crosses attached to it so like northern lights numbers. Five Times or cross with Hayes is another example of a sativa and across to get the best. Both worlds where Hayes is growing. Twenty Tall. Northern lights goes very short. You put them together and you get something. That's wonderful specifically for indoor cultivation and so the second part of the history lesson is you have to remember things were totally illegal back then so and still are in some parts of the country so growers Need things that finish fast. They can squeeze extra cycles per year. Meaning how many different flowering cycles can they squeeze into a twelve month period? What can you'll be within each one of those cycles. I and the highest. The percent is possible and also bag appeal so if you think about it from a selection standpoint there's artificial selection there's natural selection natural selection is just the the variation that exists out in the world on its own. Artificial selection is like what we don't dogs. You got a Labrador retriever. That has been the culmination of specifically selecting for various traits and attributes and over and over. And over again. Until you don't have a wolf anymore. You've gotTa Labrador. So this is the same thing but with plants with with canvas so The of the distinctions between the oldest rains in the newer strains that new restraints will definitely peak higher on the TC percentage front. Because that's what they've been bred for. Its Web is exciting to consumers that think more is better. What's what I find most enjoyable or actually older straights because when you artificially select for any number of variables needed that repeatedly your by accident. You're going to inadvertently breed out other traits and characteristics and in this case candidates and plenty of interesting chemical compounds that in my opinion make for a much richer. Experience when Ingesting Canvas Then a lot of the newer strains which.

cannabis Hayes leica Thailand Ta Labrador California Humboldt Mendocino Santa Cruz
Patricia Scanlon, CEO of Soapbox Labs, on Speech Recognition That Actually Works for Kids

The Voicebot Podcast

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Patricia Scanlon, CEO of Soapbox Labs, on Speech Recognition That Actually Works for Kids

"Okay voiced by listeners. I've been looking forward to this Patricia. SCANLAN IS CEO of Soapbox Labs Patricia. Thanks so much for joining me today. Thanks Oh man okay so to get started. I know a lot of people know about soapbox labs but I think a lot of people do not and so why don't you this sort of introduce yourself. Elf what you do with the company and what is so box labs do at a high level short. I'm the founder and CEO Soapbox knobs on a very high level. We are voice his technology for kids so we power third party APPS web services products that want to voice enabled for children and this is is important because Asr's automated speech. Recognition are generally tuned to adult voices adult speech patterns in Africa children correct. Yeah historically cleo always has been it's it's pheno people often told us I know kids as us like just another accent. We've just throw of audio into you into the models have been built frauds. Motley novels behaviors. Just tune it to a kid's voice on it just does not work. Historically clean never worked on on people are still trying to unfortunately no. That's why we pretty much standalone Nariaki for speech recognition for children Tick because we had laser. These are focused on this problem for over six years right. So how did you come to recognize. This is a problem we we can go back act to the fact that obviously your your time at UCD you're really focused in speech recognition. But a when was it that it came to you that hey kids are is different in the way the technology handles speech wreck. I had my own house. Basically my daughter was three at the time mm-hmm and I was observing her interacting with technology. You know she was it was. It was kind of twenty thirteen and with the dawn of Oh absolutely ipod everybody. There was at millionaires. All over the face of people really invested in making a lot of cool apps up through the in education that age group as well. I was observing her. Interacting with a reading up those teach ner emergent stage reading where you're teaching them sounds and blend them and the Dakota his watching in how a really cool piece of technology that actually it's been designed with pedagogy experts in university collaborations beautiful graphics and really it was a great a product but a reading light on the ability to assess her pronunciation. Recall what was trying to teach her so seem. I'd spent a thought point joint. I've been in the area of speech recognition for like thirteen over thirteen fourteen years. I'd always worked on speech recognition to me just seem so obvious that we should be using voice these technology to assess a child's pronunciation recall and I don't know when you're read or learning language and it just really struck me that wow there's nothing thinned out there that doses ANA level of accuracy for children's voices so I started to investigate researcher for many years. Why is this a problem? You know why nobody managed to solve this. Given the fact was twenty. Thirteen right to think that it was everywhere. The technology space was gaining gaining traction and gain not quite becoming accurate Still Good Way to go with twenty thirteen while I was working in the space and seeing the leaps we're making in Adel speech recognition and then looking at this neglected area of children's speech I'm realizing there's a huge gap here a huge opportunity. You know from an entrepreneur to be addressed To be able to give children a voice to be able to let them be hard weather they were reading or learning the language or gives playing with a toy or game. I know seen how different a child's speech is. You're talking from age three. You're very. The child is very physically. Three different from Exposes a good way to describe Indus- their vocal tracks are thinner. VOCA trucks are shorter on vocals. Walter smaller. I'm what happens in not as the of the signal. The voice signal actually resides in different parts of spectrum. were certainly former frequencies concede to Then the speech behaviors are very different than adults rights of pink or five year old seven year old or nine year old. How they speak? Take the patterns of speech Elongate Over a nun seeds there. They'll sing the whisperer. Spur the But they also don't tend to follow language either so this whole series of aspects to this stuff should inform Sola should be should have been more obvious feeless like It will fall apart. Adults Systems are trained on adult voiced as adults speech behaviors With full apart with kids on the younger you get worse spouse was in my learning. By absorbing observing in my own daughter I mentioned to scratch heckle. Why is this knocking solved in on quite a bit of Exact problem

Founder And Ceo CEO Scanlan UCD Africa Adults Systems Motley Sola Adel ASR Dakota Voca Researcher Walter
"pheno " Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Dom cathedral and the damage devastating CBS evening news anchor. Jeff glor- spokesman unfort- pheno told French media. Everything is burning. Nothing will remain from the frame police are warning people in Paris to stay away from the area around the cathedral, the concern for those firefighters in shops restaurants, everything else near the cathedral remains the the flames could potentially spread. There had been renovations underway at the cathedral. It is not yet clear if the work being done is related to the fire CBS news special report, I'm Bill calm down the block from this fire is Linda mcklusky, she's originally from shown furred, Massachusetts. I just got off the phone with Linda, she was very upset. And she said this. Outside of the structure is standing, but everything inside are mature is looks like it's the outer shell has stayed because it's made of stone. So that kind of contain the fire so it's not going to turn onto the neighborhood. And again, she's been living in Paris for seventeen years. We'll have more on this here on radio on the iheartradio app throughout the afternoon. Again, the iconic Notre Dame cathedral up in flames right now. The winds and the rain stopped. But the runners kept on going even though they were slowed a little bit at the start of the one hundred twenty third Boston marathon today they delivered an eye popping finish on. Both. The men and women signed are Chris foam cut the final seconds of the elite men's race where Kenya's Lawrence Toronto edged out two time winner Louisa deceased photo-finish..

Dom cathedral Linda mcklusky Notre Dame cathedral CBS Paris evening news anchor Jeff glor unfort- pheno Boston Kenya Massachusetts Lawrence Toronto Louisa Chris seventeen years
"pheno " Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on Science Friday

"Into that. Because you you say that is one of the main themes of your book is the bond the breaking of the bond between doctor and patient. Right. That is because for example, the lack of even eye-to-eye contact in those limited minutes, so that is a real a real hit there. You can't both on the patient side. And on the doctor side beyond that, if we not we know from how expert diagnostician makes diagnosis if they don't have it within five minutes to chance of it. Being accurate is twenty eight percent. So that's about the time that you actually have with a patient. So we can do better than this. We can transcend this problem of burn out and depress. Russian among clinicians who feel that they aren't able to do what they went into medicine for in the first place in only think just the opposite that if you bring computers in it's going to it's going to make the time less that you have with your doctors because the computers will be doing the work. But you're saying just the opposite because the computers may do some of the original scanning, for example, that you as a physician may have more time to spend talking to the patients right there. Well, there's so much data that no human being could have their arms around it for each person. We're talking about terabytes of data between the the records in the scans and sensors genomics all these things together. So that's that's really a critical aspect, but the other thing is about speech recognition is so advanced now there are over twenty companies that are already starting to get in the clinic to use the voice to synthesize the note and also whatever needs to be done. After the visit to basically liberate from keyboards, which are mutually hated by both patients and doctors the the three principal three components of the medicine. You write are deep pheno, typing, deep learning, deep empathy and connection. Tell us about those three things will the deep FINA typing refers to gathering all that data that's appropriate for each individual. And so today, we don't do a good job of that. Because the data is in so many different places each person goes to lots of different doctors and health systems, and we'd like to have that from the time a person is in the womb till the present moment, but that's deep phenotype ING, and that would include all the medical literature about a person's condition. And then basically deep learning is what's so exciting today. This is the most radical jumps we've seen in the history of AI, which has been. Going on for decades deep learning, which is a neural network that can process data with remarkable accuracy for speech for images and for text. And so overuse that appropriately we can outsource to get to this deep empathy state, which is to restore medicine the way it used to be decades ago when there was his precious relationship with the presence with the trust. And with a really tight bond. You write. It was surprising to read this in the book that you write about the failure of electronic health records to actually live up or actually be very, very helpful. You say the the use of electronic healthcare records leads to other problems the information. They contain is often remarkably incomplete and inaccurate electronic records are very clunky to use. And most on average of eighty percent of each note is simply copied and pasted from previous note, so mistakes go along with it. Right. It's amazing. You know, that's been documented in the literature in recent Relator that these notes are error in an errors just get propagated from one note to the next the software is just beyond the clunky description. I mean, I I recently had to get retrained in epic twenty five hours of training to use the software. This is. As in. And it's just so many steps to do such simple things. This would never work in the real world of technology. But it's the way we have it companies like epoch Cernan, many others as the way medicine is practice and burdened in this country. It's been it's been an abject failure. Without question. I wanna get into that a little bit more. But but mad in south bend, Indiana has a question related to that high. Matt. Hi, go ahead. Hey, well, thanks for taking my call..

south bend principal Indiana AI Matt twenty eight percent twenty five hours eighty percent five minutes
"pheno " Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Diana with devils in my hands. I did have a thirteen hour laying out like a like a life like slept eight not for the night. Seven sixty seven manage got bedroom minister. Done a lot. Nice. Price. Sites. Nice. Kayce checks stripes. That's what I like. What we respect? When I must shut. Shakes shots that are took way. Wet like I'll be spending valley circle routes too. Busy. Pheno china? Back in high school. I used to. Now hit the FBI. I did have a thirteen hour out like a light. Light like a like a light. Yeah. Keep that on like, I say you noticed this guy. Right. Jamba juice. Back on the road. Shorty in back. She says she working on the crew. Check check the first. On the show. Got these other shook freeway.

devils Jamba juice Diana FBI Pheno china Kayce thirteen hour
"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"And it gets up out of players that got caught into the netting. Mirages? Gotta stick on it lumbar dozy gotta stick on it for Bentley outta plight. Twenty four seconds left to this air force power play twelve twenty one left first period. No score. And you look at us airports power play. They got one shot right away. Durgin on a stuff chance on the short side. After that air force hasn't gotten anything. Hake will take this face off in the offense zone against Novak gloves side of Aden, Pollino, the puck comes out of the circle. And it's picked up by the Bentley falcons Dylan patera, the freshman. They're trying to bring it in trying to get around. Evan pheno pheno tangles with him ties him up in the puck comes free air force housing. The falcons running out of time on the power play. Ten seconds remain. They try to dump it in hit a body at center, ice and picked up and cleared by Bentley enter the air force and the natural pretty much. Do it for the air force. Man advantage is over in both teams penalty kill get the job done here in the first period. Eight minutes in no score. The falcons bring the pop in at full strength against Bentley at full strength. And Bentley with a takeaway in the corner to the right of Aden Pollino, good play. Though by max Harper to get the middle of that. And they reverse it over here to the other corner were Soloviev picks it up and chips at out of there. It's loose in the neutral zone. Bouncing opera players finally picked up by Bentley leads to a shot that one MRs wide. It's off the back wall that was center. No, pulling the trigger their leading score. And there's a puppet goes all the way up the ice the wave off the icing and Jay go will play it behind his own net. The defenseman for Bentley senior out of Manitoba toes a long stretch pass to the neutral zone. It's going to be picked up and skated in a dropped pass in a shot there by debuts MRs wide, and they try to pick it up off the back wall collision there, and we got a whistle. Stopping play. Bentley coming in.

Bentley falcons Bentley Aden Pollino Pollino MRs wide Evan pheno max Harper Dylan patera Hake Jay Manitoba Novak Twenty four seconds Eight minutes Ten seconds
"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"He gotta stick on that that puck was heading to the net. Great chance shorthanded by Trevor stone four twenty-five left on the power play for the pioneers. Air force wins another face off. That's Evan pheno pheno skates into the corner with it and they tie him up in the corner down low on the goal line near Sidon air force. Just happy to let the clock run right here. Finally, three pioneers combined to take the puck away from Evan pheno. But that killed another twenty seconds. Will bring it in against steel strip to the pot and pheno will get a clear but only as far as the neutral zone. Under four minutes now on the Sacred Heart power play the puck at center ice. Kaplan has it for Sacred Heart drilled in from the blue line picked up over here near side by Levin rimmed around by Bailey, but kept in by cap now, he fumbled the pot. Kaplan fumbled at at the blue line back to the neutral zone. So the pioneers we'll have to touch up and get on site. They do and here they come again right to left. Mike Lee sends the puck in rolling sliding easy. Save their by Christoph A-List who just covers it up in the paint off the number two penalty kill unit in the country. That's air force at just under ninety percent. They'd killed fifty three of the last fifty six a big moment right here in the middle of a major the falcons of killed off the first ninety seconds of done a great job. They still have a ways to go. Faceoff won by Sacred Heart Bernard at the blue line censored across for cotton. Cotton drops low to tug tug net back wall. It comes out. Nearside Bavaro hazard in the corner. The Daro feeds Bernard who sends it across for cotton cotton's pass is blocked by Matt where it's back to the neutral zone, Sacred Heart or opt to catch up and get on side. Again, they do cotton comes in taken into the boards by sack Mirages. The puck is in behind the air force net now feed feed the Bavaro he shot got through traffic knocked down by Christoph. Lewis couldn't control the rebound pioneers habit. They're buzzing over on the far side.

Sacred Heart Bernard Sacred Heart Evan pheno Christoph A-List falcons Kaplan Trevor stone Bailey Mike Lee Lewis Levin Matt ninety percent ninety seconds twenty seconds four minutes
"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Had to flip ahead to pheno. Pheno didn't get to the pot Lloyd beats him to it. And it's loose over here on the near side at the blue line, keeping by Levin Levin. Tees up his shot hit a body and ends up in the far corner. Back to Lebanon at the point feet. High in the slot tomato down the slot. Redirect redirect just wide retrieved by pheno good buzz here by air force style. With a little bit of a Porsche, I shot from the point Maynard not one hit off the back wall dug out of the corner by Evan geese. He's ler feed to Levin point over to Maynard on the other side, Maynard will shoot that one got through traffic covered up in front. A big pile in front of the net. Benson's on that had bodies in front pucks to the net bodies to the you have a chance to score goals. Feber stone. An Evan kiesler were right in front of Benson. Good job. I Alex Maynard of getting that through some traffic sneaking in on the back door was pheno. They had a lot of blue jerseys at the top of the paint. Pinson covered up an air force. Couldn't get to that loose puck. Pioneers up to zero sixteen forty six left in the second air force is best offensive portion quite awhile right there. You think you could go after the face off here. The tapping the far circle controlled by the pioneers. But a keeping by that Paul who knocked down gets a to pile hay hay with a shot. The save is made by Benson. Butterfly save. And he didn't know where that up was he turned around right away and looked over shoulder hoping it wasn't in the net. It was not. It was between his legs. One thing. Air force. Did not do last night. They had no sustained offense. So right now, we're seeing air force. They had a little bit of offense. They got a shot through. They want face off. They got another shot in on Benson. Keep throwing pucks at him. He's a freshman hasn't played a whole lot. Try to make him work a little bit down to zero escape dill lot of hockey to be played sixteen and a half to go in the second period. And the face off one by Sacred Heart. They don't put out to the neutral zone it slides between the legs of a couple of players and Sacred Heart.

Benson Alex Maynard Levin Levin Evan geese Sacred Heart Evan kiesler Lebanon Lloyd Pinson hockey Paul
"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"At twelve fifty six of the first period on the power play the goal scored by Matt Cooke. There was some confusion cook from the top of the slot fired one at the net. And it looked like it may have been Evan pheno who kept it in down. Deep were Kyle Hake down deep boys. Also, Evan kiesler. That they initially gave the goal to Kyohei then everybody looked at the replay. And about about ten minutes later or so during the first intermission. They changed the official scoring and said, Nope, it didn't touch didn't hit anybody. It wasn't tipped it. All and a winning clean off the stick. Matt cook. And for Matt Cooke. It was his first goal of the season nine of his career. His first power play goal of the season. His fourth power play goal of his career. And it gave air force a one nothing read. That's how the first period ended up one nothing air force on the mat cook power play goal stood that way until nine eleven of the second period when air force got on the scoreboard again. And again, it was on the power play. And this time it was Evan kiesler who got the power play goal. The fourth of the season thirteen of his career and pheno assisted on the power play score came in just a little past the halfway point of the second period, and it gave air force to nothing lead. And that's how the second period ended up without comes up by.

Evan kiesler Matt Cooke Matt cook Evan pheno Kyle Hake Deep Kyohei official ten minutes
"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"The draw. Carter record has it. He'll fire one at the net tipped out front by noting. But tipped white kept in at the blue line. Farside? Whistle back in the pocket. Slow below the goal line as Manala watches over his right shoulder. Coming off the goal line. Evan pheno turns the corner fires away MRs high and wide. Don't can't pick it up. Cook rather, Joe Tyron has it. He'll pound one at the net blocked right off his stick. And it back comes back to the neutral zone. Doukas control it there. Here's Ekberg expert comes in three on three passes to his left leads to a shop. Manala puts the stick down and kicks it into the corner that was off a Bailey. And then the pass it gets out of play farside really good shift by that second line. Sean was active. He got a shot on goal. Gaiger Tehran down low air force to change Pulver pheno Durgin the top line for air force. And this will be Fito picking this face off in the saints into the right of Manila. Forty eight here in the second period. Kind of discussion going on now between Dylan one of the captains and the lines. We just announced the Golden Knights Pete. Anaheim tonight drawing a cheer from the crowd air force wins the draw. They tried to get a shot from Durgin. It's blocked. Picked up at center ice by. Neilson.

Manala Durgin Sean Joe Tyron Evan pheno Carter Ekberg Neilson Pulver Manila Golden Knights Anaheim Cook Dylan Bailey
"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Of Saint Lawrence. The winner for the championship tomorrow night against western Michigan. The Broncos starting in golden at four Saint Lawrence. Daniel Manila, six games played as a record of one and three goals against average is three point two zero saves percentage is ninety two percent. And in his last start. He made forty eight saves in a win over Clarkson, Daniel, Manila and the nets for Saint Lawrence. And in the nets, of course for air force. Billy Christopher seventy six game and is seventieth start between the pipes for the falcons. If you're fourteen games fourteen starts eight five and one ninety one percent. Save percentage. Two point four zero goals against average and three shutouts this year seven for his career. We are ready to go the puck down at center ice, and we are underway ice Vegas. Calkins? Win the draw. Bring the puck into the Saint Lawrence end saints try to bring it out. But it's intercepted at center ice by pheno for air force pheno pumps it right back in the battle over here in the near corner as goaltender for the saints watches over his right shoulder. The puck comes out of the zone, and it got passed Durgin and all the way into the air force. And it goes. Thirty seconds in. Falcons. Try to move at two hundred feet intercepted by the saints and sent back into the air force in that was cayden Pickering doing the honours. How can try to bring it up the near side and keep him at the blue line there, and it will be Jake Stevens who's been injured. He's back in the lineup. He's only played in eight of the sixteen games for the saints this season. He hasn't played since well before Christmas the sophomore. He's back in there. Howkins get the puck through traffic but untouched and that's an icing. Call an air force air force having trouble against this trapping defense of the saints will give that lineup for air force tonight, Pulver pheno and are the top line Sean Noten playing with Eric Yeager and Joe tie ran on the second line summer ache and stone the third line in the fourth line the night Brady, Tom lack in max Harper. So the face off will happen in front of Billy Crystal Palace. Farsight circle rimmed around to the near side and a stick battle in the corner enforce taking it the other way Kyohei has it. Chipped out of there by the falcons, they go airborne with it. It lands at center ice picked up by Geezer put one on net from the neutral zone, and that's kicked away by the goal lead. Daniel manila. Actually that was who took the shot took the shot Hake. Tracks the puck down in the corner reverses it to the far side and it's kept in by air force. Their can take low taken away deep by Saint Lawrence and here come the saints from left to right pitched in the air force and Christoph watches over shoulder falcons, picket, they had it. But they got a little sloppy turn it over saints. Keep the puck in deep in the air force in legal behind the air force met feeds to the other side of the shot from point comes in white. It's behind the net at Bert trying to pick it up for air force does and the freshman defenseman up the near side gets it to kiesler kiesler on the fly pulls up just inside the blue line for. Up and gets it to Bailey poked away from Bailey back to center ice, but control there by air force, Joe Tyron will send it in. They chase it down over in the far corner. Couple of people with a chance to pick it up legal does. But he can't clear it. It's going to be a shot by Mirages from the blue line that one wide off the back wall, the rebound upfront but cleared out of there. We got a penalty coming up here on Saint Lawrence, leaving the ISIS. Christoph? Lewis extra attacker is on for air force, the delay penalty. There's a shot by cook that MRs white falcons keep the puck away though. And finally a touch up by Saint Lawrence over here along the near wall stops play. First penalty of the game goes against the saints. It is going to be crosscheck penalty in heading to the penalty box freshman, Jeff Clarke, two minutes for a cross check. He took down..

saints falcons Saint Lawrence Daniel Manila Jake Stevens Durgin Christoph Michigan Broncos Billy Christopher Jeff Clarke Billy Crystal Palace Calkins Clarkson MRs white Pulver pheno cayden Pickering
"pheno " Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Complete pheno typic- drug susceptibility profiles seventy eight percent had complete Gino typic- predictions among which eighty nine point five percent of profiles were correctly predicted among the four thousand thirty seven pheno typic- profiles that were predicted to be panned susceptible ninety seven point. Nine percent were correctly predicted Gino typic- predictions of the susceptibility of Mycobacterium. Tuberculosis to first line drugs were found to be car lated with pheno typic- susceptibility to these drugs. Helen Cox from the welcome center for infectious diseases. Research in Africa, Capetown South Africa writes in an editorial that a diagnostic test that can accurately determine the complete drug susceptibility profile of the infecting strain or strains of m Turkey losses would make it possible to give patients the correct treatment and thereby decrease the amplification and Anward transmission of drug resistance. Alex peg and colleagues bring us a step closer to this goal on the basis of their results, public health authorities in England, the Netherlands and New York have already decided to discontinue pheno typic- drug susceptibility testing of isolates that are predicted by sequencing to be pants susceptible to these first line drugs, a policy change with substantial cost and time saving benefits. So what comes next..

Gino typic Tuberculosis Alex peg Helen Cox Africa South Africa New York England seventy eight percent Nine percent five percent
Houston Rockets extend Clint Capela

Mark Levin

03:34 min | 3 years ago

Houston Rockets extend Clint Capela

"Through the weekend, with upper nineties in. The forecast through Sunday and Monday I think we'll see a little bit of a change to the weather pattern. For early August next week with thunderstorms taken over for. Much. Of Texas. By Tuesday and Wednesday we could be included, in that mid seventies for the overnight tonight partly cloudy. Hot and ninety seven degrees on Saturday upper nineties on Sunday I'm Scott Lawrimore at. The Weather Channel eighty eight now under mostly clear skies at the KTAR h top tax, defenders twenty four hour weather center KTAR h news time nine. Oh one our top story President Trump join KTAR ages Sean Hannity this afternoon to discuss several topics among, them the upcoming midterm elections in which the president predicts Republicans will do better than expected I will be campaigning, for all of these great people that do have a difficult brace and we think we're going, to bring them over the line so I really, believe that because we're doing, so well as a country and. So well with, the economy I. Think we're going to be A surprising a lot of people president vowing to. Hit the campaign trail as much as six to seven. Days. A week. In the weeks leading up to election day, a judge today ordered the Houston livestock show rodeo to. Follow a separate lawsuit against former television reporter Wayne pheno over a public records request. He made on behalf of an alleged rape victim stems from countersuit the rodeo filed against, twenty four year old Briana Williams who claims she was assaulted. Along a trail ride back in two thousand twelve ultra Fino's now seeking records in the, rodeos finances past, sexual harassment allegations and security issues One single report of a crime ever happening at the rodeo in the last few years that's not possible he spoke with RTD, partner channel to the rape trial involving this Williams set to, begin September third a sixty three year, old construction worker died every was run over my forklift in the heights today happened. On Lawrence near twenty-third and shepherd police say the victim was helping guide another construction. Worker who was operating the forklift. Somehow the driver lost sight of the victim who ended up track between the front and rear tyres the operator of the forklift was questioned and released gun control advocates dismayed by a recent federal ruling that allows a Texas nonprofit to resume posting blueprints for three d. printed guns online State Department. Reversed its earlier position that Cody Wilson is Austin-based defense distributed had to stop posting the blueprints online which he first started doing back in two thousand thirteen coalition of gun control groups this week filed an appeal. In federal court to block that decision claiming the guns, while lewd metal detector Actors and background checks and have no serial numbers Nick ranking bitch NewsRadio. Seven, forty KTAR each KTAR h. news. Time nine oh three the rockets of science center Clint Capella to a five year contract extension worth a reported ninety million dollars twentyfold Capello was. The runner up for the NBA most improved player last season, after, averaging career of nearly fourteen points eleven rebounds in two blocks per game ESPN NBA insider Adrian ward Morales ski says it's the, same contract the rockets offered cappella weeks ago the marketplace was, really devoid of salary cap space for, a team to give Capella offer sheet he would have needed to take back to. Houston and having them match rockets are also still considered the front runners to sign. Veteran star Carmelo Anthony One noticeable absence from Texans training camp this week linebacker avian clown who so far. Hasn't taken part and he drills clowney underwent knee surgery in the off. Season and. Head coach Bill O'Brien says they're being cautious I'm not concerned about him though I think we're just you know he didn't because of his rehab and all that wasn't able to be not as so we're just trying to. Be intelligent about the way we bring. Him back home. Brian says..

Rockets President Trump Bill O'brien Texas Houston Wayne Pheno Briana Williams Cody Wilson NBA Scott Lawrimore Rape Sean Hannity Carmelo Anthony Clint Capella Reporter Brian State Department Nick Harassment
"pheno " Discussed on Fore Play

Fore Play

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on Fore Play

"And fifty underfire the parfive supposed to be in those things up part all four of them today that but he did birdie fourteen birdied sixteen and then par par to get in at what felt like a great seventythree yeah you it's one of those days where it's it's a grind people all people are going to grind or gritty performance but a lot of glide comics tiger golf guide tweet today was as if you were tweeting about tigers around you were like he did today would grind ultimate grinder tiger what a really was because that around could easily be seventy six seventy seven and we're talking of very very different outlook on the tournament now the he's only you know handful shots off the leader so he's still in it it's it's an impressive seventy three if it can be one so let's go through this leaderboard a little bit this is going to change slightly when this podcast comes out from what we're seeing right now it's about almost seven pm on thursday evening we got jordan speed is four under through fourteen holes tied for the lead with tony pheno who's obviously in the clubhouse another guy on the course we got rori and kucher three under and they're still on the course fills to under these are all inside the top ten right now patrick reed with three hundred day he draws the ball lots that makes sense the patrick re people but saying forever the patrick read should be able to play well in the major championships in general but especially at augusta yeah nicest patrick read up there charley hoffman thursday charlie no way thursday at the master's charlie's three under yet even deeper years four five under one point four hundred a one point we had him on the podcast presidents cup we awesome do that call the seagull because he's just flies over and shits everyone said which is great musical really good dude love charlie on them but he always has played really well on thursday friday of masters henrik stenciled three under that's a great name he was the soulier there for a little bit early today i think at four under saw people or kind of sneaky pick him especially with how good he looked at.

tony pheno charlie patrick reed augusta charley hoffman three hundred day
"pheno " Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"pheno " Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"Imploring of course you know an hour and a half of soulard hits you know so people hopefully will be wholesome exhausted by the end of the show i think i v you know you saying the slowing down i think i'm thinking of getting electric rollerblades man just honest to god and it's not me it's it's like i worked with warners which is the third time in my correa and time chom doing great the two projects we've had together the eighty seven project and and the public dvd on i'm working as you know with the fabulous funds is sarah pheno mario they've been so supported through my illness you know that you know we have to send some legal letter saying false majo which because of illness flus could go you know it was incredibly devastating flew a lot of people the lines you know and thank god i was in shape to be able to fight it off but it took some time but seeks weeks leave able too yeah well that was just recovering kick my ass you fall over at my age it's not a giggling oh my god shaken out of your aura goodness a little warm white whitesnake wine with a set you're right i'm sure david calculate well actually the irish whiskey helped i'm sure i'm sure hey can you wine shoot i'm shoot has healing properties but they go i wanna talk to you a little bit in detail about this the the album the purple tour that's come out it's a live record that has come out to celebrate that it came out recently can you can you give me a few minutes that we can talk about this record.

warners correa sarah pheno david