35 Burst results for "Pharmaceutical Industry"

Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:46 min | Last month

Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

"Hey Everyone Danielle. Here I'm excited to get into this episode with our guest and curly will be back next week today Monica royer joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Monica Andy An organic baby and children's clothing company. Monica had the idea to launch her company literally from the hospital after she gave birth. Who've with the mission of being the most thoughtful children's brand ever created and as we'll get into entrepreneurship definitely runs in her family Monica. Thank you for joining us today welcomed skin from the couch Danielle. Thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Thank you. So I just WanNa say that like literally I think one of the days after I had told our team that I. Was Pregnant I had a call with Monica and I was like only slightly panicked about the fact that I was maybe a first time mom and really had no clue what I was doing and was like everyone keeps telling me I need a lay at and I don't even know what that is and Google that and Monica was like such a calming presence and literally knows this case inside a now. Thank you so much what we're is really excited to welcome people into Motherhood, in new, parenthood. So congratulations to you. Thank you. So let's start with an easy question scam your resume. To actually take back to what you can't see on link to in, which is that I came from a very hardworking family and so at the age of twelve, my mom was the manager, the ultrasound department at Good Samaritan. Hospital in Downers Grove and she's like you're gonNA start volunteering. So she went an air sign me up I was working at the front desk outpatient registration and that at fourteen she was like job permit time. So we went I started stocking the shelves at now very defunct retail store of which I. Can't even remember the name but work ethic with something was really important to my parents and so I spent all the time before I graduated from college with all of my summer jobs in the hospital. So physical therapy like you name it I worked all around the hospital when University of Illinois in Champaign Urbana graduated and I immediately got a job in the pharmaceutical industry. So I spent the first decade doing absolutely nothing related to what I'm currently doing but I worked at both Pfizer and Novartis for that decade which was. Very different from currently in that I launched. Monica. Nandy officially in July of twenty fourteen. So now this is my new baby and what I've been most recently working on what's something that we can't Google about you or look up on Lincoln I originally wanted to be a marine biologist. nine or ten old I would have told you wanted to be a marine biologist terrified of the ocean look at seeing but being in it. So that was sort of a non starter, the marine biology career, but I remained totally obsessed with like orcas. Great White Sharks in my very favorite place to travel as the San Juan islands outside of Seattle, marine, biologist, and pharmaceutical industry. This is all very, very interesting. So we're GONNA get into your family. And the support system that you've built around you. But I when I was talking to you a few weeks ago, you were talking about your mom and how her story had such an impact on you tell us about what it was like growing up in your house. What kind of expectations were there? Yeah. So my mom is an immigrant from India. She moved here from India's her dad was dying of Emphysema and some money home when she was nineteen. Years old as I have always a revered both of my parents Andy I always say that will never win the lottery because we did the first time by the parents that we got. So a massive amount of respect for both of them. But my mom, there was something about the family that she came from her family was very matriarchal in in a society in India that was much the opposite in. So my grandfather had nine children altogether the first. Five of which were girls as in India, like at that time most people wanted boys but my grandfather really cherish having girls in he educated each of them like they were boys and so when my mom came here, she came here on sheer well of the education that she had received and so education was of the utmost importance specifically for my mom mom was the only person in her family to marry outside of her Indian cultures or a dad is. Know his ancestors from European background and so my brother and I were so close growing up because we were so different from everybody else we were between world instead of fitting into any world in particular and so I think that unique experience really shaped the adults that we became.

Monica Royer Danielle Founder And Ceo India Google Downers Grove Good Samaritan San Juan Islands Pfizer Emphysema University Of Illinois Nandy Andy Novartis Seattle
Supply chain officers are getting raises

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:42 sec | Last month

Supply chain officers are getting raises

"Senior vice president at Challenger, Gray and Christmas, says the Corona virus accelerated something that was already taking place. But with the trend Torti commerce That's making the supply chain officer now a key part of the corporate hierarchy, one that involves a lot of tech savvy, not managing forklift. With that prominence supply chain management salaries. Air rising, Challenger says it's coordinating technology and now bringing some production back to the US, You'll start to see more production being localized and domestic Challenger says the pandemics been a wake up call for companies unprepared for the disruption. Particularly in the pharmaceutical industry. They saw that the supply chains that were stretching across to China were not sufficiently

Challenger Senior Vice President Gray Officer China United States
Trump announces billions in funding for Puerto Rico

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | Last month

Trump announces billions in funding for Puerto Rico

"It's been three years since Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico and they are still rebuilding. Now, as we hear from correspondent Andy Field, the Trump administration announcing new FEMA aid Six weeks before the election of Puerto Ricans cannot cast electoral college vote, the president made it clear that his billions to help restore Puerto Rico's electric grid and pharmaceutical industry could help him politically. By contrast, Biden's Devastated the Allen to Puerto Rico. It's not clear how the president thinks Joe Biden hurt Puerto Rico, but Mr Trump needs citizens helped in a state where they can affect the Electoral College, Florida.

Puerto Rico Puerto Ricans Joe Biden Donald Trump Mr Trump Hurricane Maria President Trump Andy Field Fema Florida
This Virginia drug company is revamping the pharmaceutical supply chain

KCBS Radio Weekend News

04:33 min | 2 months ago

This Virginia drug company is revamping the pharmaceutical supply chain

"Awarded a contract worth hundreds of millions of dollars to flow. It's a little known Virginia company that is promising to revamp the way medicines are made and distributed. CBS News This morning's Michelle Miller with the story. So what is this? This is our chapel in the grand plan to streamline America's pharmaceutical industry was launched at Virginia Commonwealth University's College of Engineering in Richmond. So these are tour begins with Dr Frank Captain so the cameras would go into the tubes. They're inside these heaters. He oversees this lab where chemists are working on new ways to manufacture medications. And so this is what it's going to innovate. This is part of it. Flow is a company trying to bring back the pharmaceutical supply chain to the U. S. They went to India and China where labor cost over two years ago. His business partner, Dr Eric Edwards, approach Dr Gupta in with a goal to make affordable generic drugs. Right here at home. I was already witnessing massive drug shortages. That were plaguing this country, these area central medicines and their ingredients that really nagged me and it was a struggle. The market is immense Americans filled the equivalent of five point 8,000,000,030 day prescriptions in 2018 alone. But in 2019 the Food and Drug Administration estimated that 80% of active pharmaceutical ingredients And 40% of Finnish medications were manufactured overseas, mainly in China and India. Thiss allows you to be able to run these processes continuously flows key process a method called continuous manufacturing. They say it will increase quality control, reduce the risk of counterfeit medications and provide transparency in labeling. We're creating an end to end manufacturing infrastructure and supply chain. Right here in the United States from precursor, chemical active pharmaceutical ingredient to finish drug into a viol or a syringe. In the 19 nineties, American companies began to rely on a manufacturing process that utilizes large scale equipment and cheap labor. This method thrives under relaxed environmental regulations often found oversees the result. A weakened system here at home is a supply chain broken. Not only is the American medical supply chain broken, the pricing and reimbursement system has broken. This broken system became apparent in March. When the corona virus pandemic depleted the national stockpile of personal protective equipment and critical medications. Demand for these supplies was global, and it brought overseas imports to a halt. This made flows efforts not just relevant but critical. So what I have right now is like a It's a strange built with my starting material. So take this and turn it into like malaria. Developing a new drug typically cost more than 2.5 $1,000,000,000 takes more than a decade flows. Founders say their method will we're due spoke time. And expense. It's all gonna be together streamlining the supply chain, making sure that we have the highest quality that Americans and patients deserve flow is also looking to bridge the gap between underprice generics and those higher price drugs with the more limited market for Children or for rare diseases. There was no profit in these medicines. We've driven the pricing of some of these generic medicines into the ground. A bottle of Fiji water at an airport costs more than a lifesaving vial of medication. Edwards has been in the business for years and has faced some criticism. Calais of the company he co founded with his twin brother than left seven years ago came under congressional scrutiny after pricing for a popular overdose antidote rose by 600%. In three years, the company authorised a cheaper and generic drug soon after. How do you meet that skepticism going into a relatively new company? With these goals. I was not involved in any pricing decisions, and I was in charge of innovation. This is all about innovation and teamwork to try to fix a broken pharmaceutical pricing, reimbursement and distribution system that has left a lot of these generic medicines out of reach for patients.

Dr Eric Edwards Food And Drug Administration Dr Frank Captain Counterfeit Medications Virginia India CBS Michelle Miller China Richmond Virginia Commonwealth Universi America United States Partner Dr Gupta Fiji College Of Engineering
A Virginia drug company is revamping the pharmaceutical supply chain

KCBS Radio Weekend News

04:33 min | 2 months ago

A Virginia drug company is revamping the pharmaceutical supply chain

"Year, U. S officials awarded a contract worth hundreds of millions of dollars to to flow, flow, a a little little known known Virginia Virginia company company promising promising to to revamp revamp the the way way medicines medicines are are made made and and distributed. distributed. CBS CBS this this morning. morning. Michelle Michelle Miller Miller has has more more So So what is this? This is our catalyst. The grand plan to streamline America's pharmaceutical industry was launched in Virginia Commonwealth University's College of Engineering in Richmond. So our tour begins with Dr Frank Captain so the cameras would go into the tubes. They're inside these heaters. He oversees this lab where chemists are working on new ways to manufacture medications. And so this is what it's going to innovate. This is part of it. Flow is a company trying to bring back the pharmaceutical supply chain to the U. S. They went to India and China where labor cost over two years ago. His business partner, Dr Eric Edwards, approach Dr Gupta in with a goal to make affordable generic drugs. Right here at home. I was already witnessing massive drug shortages. That were plaguing this country, these area central medicines and their ingredients that really nagged me and it was a struggle. The market is immense Americans filled the equivalent of five point 8,000,000,030 day prescriptions in 2018 alone. But in 2019 the Food and Drug Administration estimated that 80% of active pharmaceutical ingredients And 40% of Finnish medications were manufactured overseas, mainly in China and India. Thiss allows you to be able to run these processes continuously flows key process a method called continuous manufacturing. They say it will increase quality control, reduce the risk of counterfeit medications and provide transparency in labeling. We're creating an end to end manufacturing infrastructure and supply chain. Right here in the United States from precursor, chemical active pharmaceutical ingredient to finish drug into a viol or a syringe. In the 19 nineties, American companies began to rely on a manufacturing process that utilizes large scale equipment and cheap labor. This method thrives under relaxed environmental regulations often found oversees the result. A weakened system here at home is a supply chain broken. Not only is the American medical supply chain broken, the pricing and reimbursement system has broken. This broken system became apparent in March. When the corona virus pandemic depleted the national stockpile of personal protective equipment and critical medications. Demand for these supplies was global, and it brought overseas imports to a halt. This made flows efforts not just relevant but critical. So what I have right now is like a It's a strange built with my starting material. Silver. Take this area, right? Developing a new drug typically cost more than 2.5 $1,000,000,000 takes more than a decade flows. Founders say their method will we're due spoke time. And expense. It's all gonna be together streamlining the supply chain, making sure that we have the highest quality that Americans and patients deserve flow is also looking to bridge the gap between underprice generics and those higher price drugs with the more limited market for Children or for rare diseases. There was no profit in these medicines. We've driven the pricing of some of these generic medicines into the ground. A bottle of Fiji water at an airport costs more than a lifesaving vial of medication. Edwards has been in the business for years and has faced some criticism. Calais of the company he co founded with this twin brother Than left seven years ago came under congressional scrutiny after pricing for a popular overdose antidote rose by 600%. In three years, the company authorised a cheaper and generic drug soon after. How do you meet that skepticism going into a relatively new company? With these goals. I was not involved in any pricing decisions, and I was in charge of innovation. This is all about innovation and teamwork to try to fix a broken pharmaceutical pricing reimbursement and distribution system that has left a lot of these generic medicines out of reach for patients that

Dr Eric Edwards Michelle Michelle Miller Mille Food And Drug Administration Dr Frank Captain Counterfeit Medications CBS India Virginia Virginia China Virginia Commonwealth Universi U. S Richmond America United States Partner Dr Gupta Fiji
Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

The Bio Report

05:09 min | 4 months ago

Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

"Ronin thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me on. We're GonNa talk about regulatory compliance, which may be an area that's not well understood a outside of the folks who directly are involved with it. I thought that the work I Cuba is. Interesting because it gets at the way, artificial intelligence and machine learning systems have the potential to transform all aspects of the pharmaceutical industry. We we hear a lot about how data silos impede research, but. I. Don't think people tend to think of this problem as it exists within a company on the regulatory side of the business, how big a problem is the creation of data silos in terms of regulatory compliance? Daniels a great question and it's. The one that we have been wrestling with tens of solutions because it, it is a growing problem I think it has always been an issue at. A healthcare and pharmaceutical companies, but I'm with the huge increase in regulatory requirements, changing regulations additional regulations. It is a growing problem and. In. Most companies have set up systems. Very they're very point solution base. The safety group will have their system regulating teams have. This is have multiple systems whether it's a publishing system. Tracking system. Validation systems can be different, and then the quality systems are also independent. It's an one of them and act. And so that? There's a lot of Ju- -plication interns of cross-referencing. Duplicate entry of data. And it makes it very hard and the administration regulation compliance reporting. A lot of work goes into. Trying to ensure that the data is connected and clean so that the submission timely end of good quality. As you think broadly about the the range of challenges. Companies face with regards to compliance and keeping up with changing regulations and. All of the high volume data they touch. What are some of the other challenges? I think the key one really is around into the evolving regulatory requirements. I mean if you think about Marketing of product in one hundred fifty countries, and each country has a different set of requirements when it comes to frequency and data that they require either on safety real of a product or something as simple as manufacturing chain, sure label change and having to do that across multiple products. That are on the market multiple. Those levels is a huge burden on companies I mean. The larger pharmaceutical companies have teens of over two thousand people looking in this space and a lot of what they do is a. Regular operations is collecting information sifting it from various different sources validating that to make sure that is accurate, and then understanding what the requirements are for the submissions that every country. As I think about the types of data that a regulatory department might touch. I think a lot of unstructured data. Things that don't lend themselves to automation. How labor intensive is this area working? And what's the opportunity to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to improve efficiencies and reduced time and cost? So. That's a really good question and I think you know one thing that is quite surprising to many people. Is that even in a clinical trial setting nowadays seventy percent of the data? Doesn't come through the traditional case ripple. Scans. It direct lab feeds. It's connected devices increasingly as we started to use them in clinical studies, so there's a huge amount of unstructured data. And, this is where machine learning and. Becomes really important because. Certainly NLP can be used to extract information. From these unstructured data's. Catalog it and then put it in a full that can be used in traditional safety, regulatory systems and I think that is where we see huge benefits from the use of. The more

Cuba Daniels JU
Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

The Bio Report

04:49 min | 4 months ago

Using AI to Improve Drug Companies Regulatory Performance

"Ronin thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me on. We're GonNa talk about regulatory compliance, which may be an area that's not well understood a outside of the folks who directly are involved with it. I thought that the work I Cuba is. Interesting because it gets at the way, artificial intelligence and machine learning systems have the potential to transform all aspects of the pharmaceutical industry. We we hear a lot about how data silos impede research, but. I. Don't think people tend to think of this problem as it exists within a company on the regulatory side of the business, how big a problem is the creation of data silos in terms of regulatory compliance? Daniels a great question and it's. The one that we have been wrestling with tens of solutions because it, it is a growing problem I think it has always been an issue at. A healthcare and pharmaceutical companies, but I'm with the huge increase in regulatory requirements, changing regulations additional regulations. It is a growing problem and. In. Most companies have set up systems. Very they're very point solution base. The safety group will have their system regulating teams have. This is have multiple systems whether it's a publishing system. Tracking system. Validation systems can be different, and then the quality systems are also independent. It's an one of them and act. And so that? There's a lot of Ju- -plication interns of cross-referencing. Duplicate entry of data. And it makes it very hard and the administration regulation compliance reporting. A lot of work goes into. Trying to ensure that the data is connected and clean so that the submission timely end of good quality. As you think broadly about the the range of challenges. Companies face with regards to compliance and keeping up with changing regulations and. All of the high volume data they touch. What are some of the other challenges? I think the key one really is around into the evolving regulatory requirements. I mean if you think about Marketing of product in one hundred fifty countries, and each country has a different set of requirements when it comes to frequency and data that they require either on safety real of a product or something as simple as manufacturing chain, sure label change and having to do that across multiple products. That are on the market multiple. Those levels is a huge burden on companies I mean. The larger pharmaceutical companies have teens of over two thousand people looking in this space and a lot of what they do is a. Regular operations is collecting information sifting it from various different sources validating that to make sure that is accurate, and then understanding what the requirements are for the submissions that every country. As I think about the types of data that a regulatory department might touch. I think a lot of unstructured data. Things that don't lend themselves to automation. How labor intensive is this area working? And what's the opportunity to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to improve efficiencies and reduced time and cost? So. That's a really good question and I think you know one thing that is quite surprising to many people. Is that even in a clinical trial setting nowadays seventy percent of the data? Doesn't come through the traditional case ripple. Scans. It direct lab feeds. It's connected devices increasingly as we started to use them in clinical studies, so there's a huge amount of unstructured data. And, this is where machine learning and. Becomes really important because. Certainly NLP

Cuba Daniels JU
Boston - GreenLight Biosciences raises $17M to ramp mRNA production

WBZ Midday News

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Boston - GreenLight Biosciences raises $17M to ramp mRNA production

"A biotech company in Medford that specializes in RNA based products for the agriculture and pharmaceutical industries is shifting its focus toward the effort to develop and manufacture an effective vaccine for covert nineteen greenlight biosciences announced this week that it raised seventeen million dollars to build out its messenger RNA production capabilities with the goal of eventually being able to facilitate the manufacturing of billions of doses of Culver nineteen vaccine using the company's proprietary bioprocessing technology the company does caution though there are very early days of this and the approach is still new for vaccine development and that developing a safe and effective vaccine could take up to a year and a

Medford Culver
"Transformative" coronavirus test could produce result in five minutes

Chris Plante

01:16 min | 7 months ago

"Transformative" coronavirus test could produce result in five minutes

"Kids we've invented new test kits you know China was sending test gets out and are they sent the Czech Republic a planeload of test kits which they found to be eighty percent defective eighty percent four out of five defective the Chinese test kits we have new test gets the and a multiple new test kits coming up with various industries that the left always attacks the pharmaceutical industry and and manufacturers of medical devices and things they may try to undermine and tax and put out of business because they don't understand the world they live in or or anything that's going on around them as a rule and all these amazing things have happened we just discovered this virus really a matter of weeks ago we now have drive through testing facilities in states all over the country with with our brand new test kit that was just invented that gives results in five minutes we're hearing last week about some given forty five minutes now we've got test kits it will give you results in five minutes industry is stirred up our testing regimes were standing up hospitals in Central Park brought in hospital ships to New York and and in California and amazing things are happening things happening with that National Guard the military you know elements of the military belt medical elements

China Czech Republic Central Park New York California National Guard
A Look Back at HIV

2 Docs Talk

08:31 min | 8 months ago

A Look Back at HIV

"Before we jump in. Let's clarify what exactly HIV and AIDS are good call. Hiv stands for human immunodeficiency virus which is a virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or AIDS. Yes so HIV is a retrovirus which means it is an rn. A virus that is a cellular machinery from the infected cell to do a reverse transcription of itself a DNA version which is inserted into the cells on DNA when the cell becomes active. It will make new copies of the virus that go out and continue the cycle and this is important because the drugs that we use today to combat HIV a variety of antiretroviral agents target different points in the cycle. The right combination of drugs can keep the viral load solo that it isn't detectable exactly so HIV infects a specific immune cell the CD four cell and over time the virus kills a CD foresaw which being part of the immune system plays a critical role in the body's ability to fight infection as de decline. The body becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections. Right these are often infections caused by pathogens that are normally present in on or around the body but a healthy immune system recognizes them and keep them in check someone with the depleted immune system however is susceptible to unusual infections. That healthy folks don't need to worry about. Plus they're they're susceptible. To all the irregular infections even healthy people get okay so an untreated course of goes something like this. A person is infected with HIV. The virus being transmitted during sexual activity directly into the bloodstream during childbirth or breastfeeding or a blood transfusion at this point the virus makes its way to the lymph nodes where has access to lots of CD. Four cells and replicates like crazy? This goes on for about three weeks three or four weeks. The patient may experience a viral type of illness during this time period. Fever swollen glands rash but not everyone experiences this yes and it feels like a regular just viral infections. So you don't really think about that. That might be what it is but after about two weeks the viral load in the blood is at a peak and CD four levels fall. This is a period of time where it is really easy to transmit the disease to another sexual partner because the viral load is so high after about six months the viral load and CD. Four count stabilized to set point and the chronic phase issue begins. This can last a up to ten years without treatment during which HIV gradually destroys CD. Four cells at some point the CD four count gets low enough. That opportunistic infections are possible. Yes and that's how we define AIDS either the CD. Four count is below two hundred cells per mil or the patient has an AIDS defining conditions such as retinitis from cmv cytomegalovirus or invasive cervical cancer or many many others so this was the typical course of disease for people early in the epidemic. Did you amy? That AIDS was around before the Nineteen Seventy S. That's when the epidemic began but it is believed that the virus jump from chimpanzees to humans in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in one thousand. Nine hundred and sporadic cases were reported from then until the mid seventies when the epidemic got its legs. Very interesting now. It wasn't until Nineteen eighty-one that we really understood what was happening in. La There were five young gay men who develop Mrs to screen pneumonia PCP which is now new. Mississippi'S VICI pneumonia. I know I can never get used to that. I still call it. Pcp Yeah. I'm sure a lot of school. It was pretty much standard at the time right. I mean that was like defy so defining but anyways another group in New York in California who developed Kassy's sarcoma which is an aggressive cancer caused by the human herpes virus eight that wouldn't normally happen without a suppressed. Immune system right both of those diseases. And by the end of that year there were two hundred seventy cases of severe immune deficiency among gay men and nearly half had died. Yeah that we knew so fast forward. A few years by the end of nineteen eighty five. There were over. Twenty thousand reported cases coming from every region of the world. The virus was officially named in Nineteen eighty-six and in nineteen eighty seven A. Z. T. was introduced. The this was the first antiretroviral drug this drug worked by inhibiting the initial reverse transcription of the virus into DNA. This was a very exciting development because the epidemic was growing quickly. Now there were three hundred seven thousand reported AIDS cases worldwide compared to the twenty thousand. You mentioned just fine. Harsh prior and two hundred and seventy just nine years prior to that. It's impressive how. The pharmaceutical industry kind of ramped up so quickly research development. Yeah and those remember. Those were the reported numbers so they estimated that there were actually a million AIDS cases in another eight to ten million living with HIV worldwide. At that point. So if you're younger just in med school residency right now. It's hard to explain. How unsettling this was that how fast it was spreading right. Yeah and these patients were so sick and dying in such large numbers and there didn't seem to be in and site to the expansion of the epidemic. So there's a lot of fear and misinformation out there the had a policy to not allow those infected with HIV into the country and it was still viewed as a gay disease. So that created a lot of stigma for the LGBTQ community so by nineteen ninety three. There were two point five million AIDS cases globally the US Congress dug in and voted to continue the travel ban. Things are not looking good even with easy. T- which wasn't really panning out as everyone had hoped. And the fact that it was approved at all was questioned by many. Yeah so but in one thousand nine hundred things really started changing. This was kind of a turning point. The first price inhibitor was approved these inhibit the protease enzyme. Which is important in the translation of HIV v? Virus back into Aurigny. Yeah and this was the beginning of Heart H. A. RT highly active antiretroviral therapy and it immediately dropped deaths from AIDS related diseases by at least sixty percent but still there were thirty three million people living with HIV by nineteen ninety nine and fourteen million people had died since epidemic began. Those are huge as is to be expected the UN had to step in and negotiate prices to make antiretroviral therapy available to the people who need it The World Trade Organization that announce the Doha Declaration allowing developing countries to manufacture generic versions of drugs. Go See Fire Dallas buyers club. Yes also yeah so in the two thousands people who needed it weren't getting treatment aids. Was the number one cause of death in sub Saharan Africa. That blows my mind by the two thousand ten. A lot of goals had been set to get treatment where it was needed and have the spread of HIV an organization such as the UN and the World Health Organization and individual government agencies are getting involved at this point yeah the US finally lifted the travel ban for people with HIV treatments that decrease the chance of spread were discovered pre exposure prophylaxis or prep was shown to reduce transmission between male and male sexual partners by about forty four percent. Yeah in two thousand. Eleven research demonstrated that early initiation of antiretroviral treatment reduce transmission to partners by ninety six percent. So this is a real game changer. Because until this time the antiretrovirals weren't started until HIV was had started advancing and causing aids. So this is when they started the treatment early after the infection was discovered and it really changed things as far as transmission. Yeah as related. Deaths fell thirty percent from the peak. Year two thousand five and thirty five million people were living with HIV dramatic slowdown in the spread of the epidemic compared to previous decades. Yeah Okay but now we may find yourselves at a standstill here. We are twenty twenty because the immediate crisis of the wildfire spread and almost certain death is well behind us. Attention has waned key populations that account for over half of new infections are not receiving access to combination therapy and the gap between resource need and provisions as widening. The funding is is shrinking. It's pretty typical right. Yeah as a species. Humans aren't very good at thinking long term. If it's not an immediate threat it's not threat right well. It is a threat to those populations. So there's clearly still stigma that has marginalizing

HIV Aids Nineteen Seventy Partner Pneumonia Immunodeficiency Us Congress Retinitis UN Congo AMY Saharan Africa California MRS Mississippi New York Aurigny
Brutal Biden campaign ad mocks Buttigieg's experience as South Bend mayor

NBC Nightly News

01:36 min | 9 months ago

Brutal Biden campaign ad mocks Buttigieg's experience as South Bend mayor

"We are just three days from the first primary of the two thousand twenty election cycle and as the race heats up the tone on the trail has taken turn with the front runners coming under heavy attacks. Seventy rule is in New Hampshire for US tonight across New Hampshire today a Mayor Pete Pylon Salon. And he's a good guy is a great mayor but guess what he was a mayor. Having experience of getting things down matters change is not going to be coming from somebody who gets a lot of money from the CEOS of the pharmaceutical industry judge coming off a virtual tie for first in Iowa now clearly in his opponents crosshairs under threat of a nuclear Iran. Joe Biden helped to negotiate the Iran. Deal this new digital ad from Joe Biden mockingly. Kingly compares the vice president's record with the former small city mayors Buddha judged negotiated later licensing regulations on pension scanners by suggesting adjusting. He'll do whatever it takes to get the nomination. If I'm you standby and lose my country to not GonNa let it happen in all this just hours after prime time debate. We're both Buddha. Judge and New Hampshire Front runner Senator Sanders came under fire Burns label himself not a democratic socialist socialist. It doesn't come politics that says it's my way or the highway. Are you talking about Senator Sanders. Yes we have a newcomer in the White House and and look where it got us. Senator Clove Char another said. Look what a new guy in the White House Dot us you have the problem with. Donald Trump

Mayor Pete Pylon Salon Joe Biden Senator Sanders New Hampshire Senator Clove Char Buddha New Hampshire Front Iran Donald Trump White House Vice President Fire Burns Iowa
Bernie talks healthcare and climate change

Hugh Hewitt

02:01 min | 9 months ago

Bernie talks healthcare and climate change

"Night we got a cover a little bit of burning a document CNN's Anderson Cooper cut number third Jenny talking about your health care again well actually most members of Congress I believe or think the majority are on board for Medicare full in the house not the Senate all this is how you do it and and this is the answer I'm gonna get off tonight time and time again the what our campaign is about and I admitted it is a different type of campaign because I'm not here to tell you both for me and I'm gonna do all these great things can happen that way it never happens that way real change never takes place from the top on down no matter who present the president maybe we need to involve millions of people in the political process and when millions of people stand up and they say the Mitch McConnell or any Democrat we are sick and tired of paying as is the case right now for the average family twelve thousand dollars a year which took a bite of the deductibles with sick and tired of the copayments was sick and tired of paying the highest prices in the world for prescription drugs we are going to take on as a nation the greed and the corruption of the pharmaceutical industry that's when it happens and that's what our campaign is about that's why we call our campaign office not me so I'm not here to tell you all I can do it alone I can't do alone we all stand up to take on the power of the health care industry then Bernie went on and on about climate change cut number fourteen in terms of climate change Anderson the debate is really awful nobody can say with a straight face while it's about jobs when we are talking about the future all of the planet what we're talking about whether or not cities in America and around the world will be on the water whether we're gonna see more more drought everybody knows what's going on in Australia right now if we don't get our act together that is the future of the world we are seeing a prelude to that in California with their terrible far as far as I was in paradise

CNN Anderson Cooper Congress Medicare Senate President Trump Mitch Mcconnell Bernie America Australia California Jenny
Sanders on role of private insurance in Medicare for All

Hugh Hewitt

02:10 min | 9 months ago

Sanders on role of private insurance in Medicare for All

"Bernie Sanders on CNN last night we've got a cover a little bit of burning document CNN's Anderson Cooper cut number thirteen is talking about your health care again well actually most members of Congress I believe or think the majority are on board for Medicare for me in the house not the Senate all this is how you do it and and this is the answer I'm gonna get off tonight time and time again the what our campaign is about and I admit it is a different type of campaign because I'm not here to tell you both for me and I'm gonna do all these great things can happen that way it never happens that way real change never takes place from the top on down no matter who present the president maybe we need to involve millions of people in the political process and when millions of people stand up and they say to Mitch McConnell or any Democrat we are sick and tired of paying as is the case right now for the average family twelve thousand dollars a year which took a bite of the deductibles with sick and tired of the copayments what's a good point of paying the highest prices in the world for prescription drugs we are going to take on as a nation the greed and the corruption of the pharmaceutical industry that's when it happens and that's what our campaign is about that's why we call our campaign box not me so I'm not here to tell you I can do it alone I can't do alone we need to all stand up to take on the power of the health care industry then Bernie went on to talk about climate change cut number fourteen to in terms of climate change Anderson the debate is really awful nobody can say with a straight face while it's about jobs when we are talking about the future all of the planet what we're talking about whether or not cities in America and around the world will be on the water what we're gonna see more more drought everybody knows what's going on in Australia right now if we don't get our act together that is the future of the world we are seeing a prelude to that in California with their terrible far as far as I was in paradise California right you know I I think that was last year but I

Bernie Sanders CNN Anderson Cooper Congress Medicare Senate President Trump Mitch Mcconnell America Australia California
"Pharma Bro" Shkreli charged with price-fixing

Joe Pags

00:48 sec | 9 months ago

"Pharma Bro" Shkreli charged with price-fixing

"New York Attorney General in the Federal Trade Commission suing a drug company and two with former CEO is claiming they're maintaining an illegal monopoly on a lifesaving drawn Attorney General Leticia James says Vieira pharmaceuticals and former C. E. O. Martin Shkreli enrich themselves by despicable jacking up the price of daraprim by more than four thousand percent and held the drug hostage from patients and competitors Vieira bought the rights to daraprim in twenty fifteen and immediately raise the price to seven hundred fifty dollars per pale Shkreli infamously known as farmer bro defended the hike saying the former price of thirteen fifty wasn't profitable the lawsuit seeks damages and lifetime bans for Shkreli and his business partner from the pharmaceutical industry Shkreli is serving a seven year prison sentence for financial crimes committed before he launched Vieira Steve Rappaport

Federal Trade Commission CEO Leticia James Vieira Pharmaceuticals C. E. O. Martin Shkreli Vieira Farmer Bro Partner Financial Crimes Vieira Steve Rappaport New York Attorney
Getting bisphenol A out of food containers

Science Magazine Podcast

12:56 min | 9 months ago

Getting bisphenol A out of food containers

"I up in our Green Chemistry special edition of the podcast. We have contributing correspondent. Warren Cornwall here with the story about finding a replacement for the common can lining chemical this funeral a or commonly known as EPA these days high. Warren you start with this fulcrum this point where the tab of a can of soda attached to the body of the Cana Soda. Why is that a good place to start the story? I never knew how amazing the science and engineering around making I can was started reporting this story in this particular case. Ace this point where the pull tab is. Attached to the top of an aluminum drink can is subject to these huge stresses. You have to imagine that the inside of this whole can is covered in this. Thin layer of plastic can't break in order to attach this poll tab to the top of the can Dan basically after pound with a machine on the can top to create this little bump and then the pull tab sits on the bump and then you mash that bump flat because the what is saying. It's the most difficult fabrication in the whole universe. But I think he says in their whole universe okay that makes you and the whole universe the people at Sern would appreciate that but in the universe can fabrication for linings. That's their crux. We're GONNA talk about the lighting's the special liner inside of these cans usually contains. BPA OR A. What exactly is the purpose can't ends contained all kinds of material that can potentially be corrosive all kinds of acidic drinks? I don't know if you remember from elementary school. Well experiment where one of your teachers would put a nail inside of a jar with coq a few days later. It'll be gone so yeah stuff is corrosive And apparently the kinds of stuff that we're putting into cans now is even more corrosive than it used to be. All of these kinds of fancy craft beverages energy. He drinks so they don't want to eat holes in the cans and then the flip side of that. Is that if you've ever put a piece of aluminum in your mouth. It tastes weird and you don't I don't want that flavor to go into the food or drinks so the properties a can lining material have our resists corrosion. Obviously obviously what other things are important. Doesn't create any weird flavors of its own. Ideally it's inert so it doesn't react with anything It's inside the can in a perfect doc world. It's not at all toxic. It's still a benign. It has to be as cheap as possible and it has to go on the cans really easily really quickly quickly because they're cranking out cans at a rate of two thousand a minute so BPA. Which I think most people have heard of at this point because of concerns about its effect on health? Health checks these boxes except for the health one. What are the health concerns when it comes to? BPA well the main concern is that it can mimic estrogen when the body encounters BPA it can bind with estrogen receptors. Enough that the body. Can I think that it's binding with estrogen. There's a lot of debate going on about how much of a health risk is really posed by. EPA in the levels that it's founded pardon people's bodies the FDA still allows it to be used in most food related containers with the exception of baby bottles and sippy cups so the is said that the science suggests that it's not really a problem in other settings said the chemical industry and other industry groups have taken that got same message but you have consumer groups environmental groups and some university researchers that have done work suggesting that it can be problematic one of the stats. You mentioned in your story. About how more than ninety percent of people who live in the US have EPA in their urine. We pretty much that'd be a and US And some governments non. US governments have also decided to ban PBA right. You know the only one that I know of its flea abandoned his France right and you know one of the thing. I should know just going back to a comment that you made earlier about. BPA and cans. I've been told that for food cans in the United States about ninety percent of it is non. BPA At this point so food cans like peas and corn drink cans to or know for aluminum. EMINEM drink cans. It's about fifty fifty. Okay they've cut way down on this but about how much. BPA is still out there. Do you know how many cans with US liner are made. Every year they are every month. Yeah estimates are worldwide that we crank out about four hundred fifty billion with a B. Tans every year yeah three hundred hundred and fifty billion of those are aluminum drink cans the other one. Hundred billion are food cans some not small percentage are lied with. That's right you talked to. Scientists at a company called Thou spar that came up with a a new alternative a few years ago and a very unusual way. How did they get involved? Vow Spar in two thousand seventeen was purchased by Sherwin Williams. Okay this company had a business. Making chemical can linings and and one of the significant parts of that business for them was making BP based linings but they and other manufacturers were seeing the pushback from consumers and some governments guest EPA and so they were looking for alternatives. What they were finding is that? The alternatives had drawbacks right. Some of them were for more expensive or didn't hold up as well or did perform in some way that Kanye manufacturers wanted or for if they were trying to find a replacement in the same family of chemicals as BPA that family abyss females. There was concern sern that those chemicals were going to have some of the same health related concerns that beep at everybody was pushing to find a replacement because the biggest fear fear is that governments are going to step in and say no more. BPA Right. I mean the thing that's interesting to me is that they decided to go for it. Because you can imagine a company saying Oh man that could be a really expensive yet and there's a guy in the story who kind of figures in the Tom Tom Mallon and he's interesting because he's very much industry insider he's worked at. This company is whole life but he from the outset said look. We're going to have to go about this a different way. We're GONNA have to reach out to people outside the industry people outside. The industry don't necessarily trust US anymore when it comes to things like BPA safety so we're going to have to think about this a different way. People tell me that this is really unusual. This is a real culture shift. So what did they do to narrow the pool of chemicals out there to replace. VP aligning so they bring in a chemist from the outside who has experience in the pharmaceutical industry and the pesticide industry. So basically he had this long list of bisque dolls. That might work as can liners and the first green that he did was running them through a computer program that would see whether they were likely to fit in the estrogen receptor or not and then the ones that came out as potentially a non estrogens they then sent off for a series of slab screenings. The basic one was a yeast screening where these yeast cells have been engineered to glow when they're exposed to estrogen compound. At that point they have to do more tests to find out if these chemicals are also going to work well as a can liner they finally narrow it down to one candidate. Wow it's called Tetra. Methyl BIS Funeral F or T. Mbps they narrowed it down to this one mechanical and it had passed them basic tests when it came to its ability to affect estrogen receptors. And it was able to stand up to The harsh environment of inside a can. This is where they turn to. Basically they turned to their critics and said you tell us that this isn't safe to wasn't said they were challenging them the way they described it to me as they were coming to scientists and saying we want to build a better molecule for this. What should we do to make sure that it's actually going to be safer? Yeah they posed this question to environmental and public health advocacy groups and they impose that same question to researchers who have done a lot of science studying BPA and they actually took the chemical to their labs and tested faceted out and a bunch of different ways. That's right they set up the payment in a way that the scientists said they kept their independence so so the best example is a endocrinologist at Tufts. Anna Soto has done a lot of work on. EPA and its effect on in breast tissue the company made a contribution to tufts with no strings attached so it was not hurt to her lab specifically and then she came to tufts and said give me money for my research search and she found that there weren't Astra genetic effects from this alternative to be. Yes right she didn't find any evidence that was stragetic And then the secondary element that that was interesting is that she didn't find evidence that the can lining was leaching any of its T. M. B. PF contents into into the liquids. This letting him ICAL has been approved by the FDA for use in food product container. So it's already on the market. It's already something that people have probably encountered in their day to day life. The company has their chemical has been used to line twenty two billion cans since twenty seventeen nine. Wow so a lot of cans but a small fraction of the overall universal cans right going back to the safety testing that we talked about. I think it sounds is wise to approach people who have built up the skills to test for Indian disruption in their labs but is there ever a way to know if something is safe. It's kind of like the bigger question if the FDA's testing aren't necessarily rigorous enough. What should be happening to show that a chemical a safe to go sit next to food that might absorb it? That's an open question. Part of what was interesting to me about. This story. Is that when val spar went looking for an alternative Bernard route for testing their product. There was no road map for them to follow And that's still the case. They can't point to a battery battery of tests and say look. We have jumped through these hoops that everybody has agreed are the hoops that we should jump through did it successfully and therefore we can declare our chemical to be a gold star. Green label chemical. Is there a movement to codify. Something is an endocrine disruptor if it does this and if it doesn't do these things these five things or these ten things and it's not an endocrine disruptor. There are various efforts to come up with better more more rigorous more detailed ways of screening chemicals for possible construction. Regulators would argue that they currently have tools for declaring declaring whether a chemical is an endocrine disruptor or not and they're working on improving them so it's not like they're saying that their ways the the only way and there's no improvement to be done right our other companies going to follow this model of looking for chemicals to replace something that people have a lot of questions sweat and then turning to people outside industry to test it for health concerns. I don't know I mean I've talked to some people who've said that they think it it's a promising model. They think that the experience of Alice bars had suggested a company can do it successfully. But you know I've talked to other people who've said that there are companies who are working to develop greener safer chemicals but have really chosen to do it internally and keep it to themselves salves partly because there is a concern that if you say that you're trying to replace one of your chemicals with something safer you're bringing attention into concerns about safety of the clear curly us. Well thank you so much more and I sure thank you Sarah. Warren Cornwall is a contributing correspondent piece in Washington State. You can find a link to his article and the rest of the special section on chemicals. Tomorrow's Earth at science mag dot org slash podcast

EPA United States Warren Cornwall FDA BPA Green Chemistry Tufts Cana Soda Sern DAN France Vow Spar PBA Tom Tom Mallon Eminem B. Tans VP Kanye
Designing Anticancer Drugs with Reinforcement Learning

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:24 min | 9 months ago

Designing Anticancer Drugs with Reinforcement Learning

"Having a background in cognitive science and computational neuroscience and so I've been like focusing focusing on brain research for my pastor five years of education and now recently I've been doing more work on computational tation assistance biology and specifically on cancer and cancer trying to understand mechanisms of how cancer work and how we can find new treatments against cancer specifically quickly and in this work. I've been using mostly deep learning techniques and this will be part of like my presentation here at this conference. It's also and so yeah. So how do those things go together. So I think like many people think it's in a way weird if you come from brain scientists and then you go into machine running right and this is something I would say. It's like it's a very obvious thing to do in a way because if you look back into the history of machine she learning where it all came from like McCulloch and Pitts the first artificial neuron and then a few years later Frank Rosen ballot the perception. And so these were all computational neuroscientists and they were in the end really trying to understand how the brain works and they basically develop the The fundamental of the field of machine learning and so at some point this community and in a way it split up into groups and one group was more trying to and actually understanding the brain works and the other group was more interested in solving the problems. Right right and from this from this community. The machine learning learning community evolved into but whereas computation neuroscience right. Now it's it. It's still a field. It's still out there. It's has been separating more and more from the machine community what's there and originally it has been one like one big community. Yeah and so therefore I think it's quite natural to to have the process. Yeah Yeah you know I think Particularly here at Noor ups I have opportunity to speak with many folks that are kind of working on on that edge of cognitive sciences brain sciences and both using that to inform the way we think about machine learning using machine learning to validate you know some of the biological theories it was maybe more novel is coming from Cognitive Science and brain science and applying machine gene learning to developing cancer pharmaceuticals out in that. Come about yeah. How did that come about a good question? So like if you look at brain scientists this really this problem of seeing the brain which is arguably the most complex thing we have in the universe and and seeing like observing this brain and trying to understand his brain from at different scales at different spatial scales so to speak. So you can think about about the brain in the very abstract and cognitive ways thinking about cognitive phenomena like language and memory those things and you can think about it more from from neural perspective like how do act like what is the most fundamental unit of information processing. How do these units interact? How does information arise? And so like these two fundamentally different approaches and so I like in the first three years of my studies focused on cognitive science which has more top down approach unlike thinking from the big concepts and then down towards the implementation level whereas competition neuro science. They have more like the spot. Him Perspective They in the end and they're trying to solve the same problems but they start first with the basic building blocks like having a biologically plausible neural network model will that imitates basic behavior of neurons. And then they try to scale it up in order to understand more complex cognitive phenomenon and so like these field they really deep. They help each other and they need to work together in order to better understand how the brain works and so after after Android area defeating. Okay I need something a more solid and I really wanted to have this bottom up perspective from competition neuroscience which then I got my masters and so afterwards I I I mean I have to say that I was keen to explore and applications of machine learning because while studying the brain I got really interested more and more into the whole field of data signs and machine learning but and I wanted to apply those techniques but at the same time I wanted to I wanted to still somehow how work with the human body and with humans in general so this is how you how I came about him doing cancer Consume drunk modeling and so the poster is titled Pacman. Tell us about yeah Eh. So pacman is a frame. I mean it's an acronym so spelled with a double double and so it's an acronym. We came up during in my like about a year ago. During my master's thesis for prediction of anticancer compound sensitivity with multimodal attention based neural networks. And and so like when my supervisor came about with this acronym one of very long nights we spend in the lab. We like okay. There's no discussion. This is GonNa be the name for the project. Ah So quite funny how this came about so and we what we're doing in this work at that was the first step step off of the project and presenting at the conference. We were trying to basically forecast the effect the inhibitory effect of emol against a specific type of cancer and so we are treating this problem of predicting cancer drug sensitivity. Not really as the property of a pair and the pair is con- like composed of Itself the chemical the drug that you give to the patient and then the particular to more sell that you want to target because cancer is really like A. It's a family of diseases and the SORTA verse I. I mean there has probably never been two types of cancer that have been exactly alike because the Medicaid of mutations you have they vary like hillbilly inbetween of every individual patients. So it's really unfeasible to try to investigate whether molecule has some onto cancer effects in general. So you really need to treat this problem as the property of pair. So is this drug like hesitant. inhibitory effect against this specific type of cancer patient individually one of the questions. That comes up I is one of the techniques. You're applying here reinforcement learning. How does that play into Into achieving that goal so it comes about in the second step first that was really just trying to predict the sensitivity so the efficacy of Audrey and so what we what we did in consecutive step after we had built this model what we asked ourselves was like. Wow wouldn't it be amazing to have a model that can generate rate new drugs at can like come up and propose new anti-cancer candidate rex. Because in the old pharmaceutical industry there's a huge uh-huh productivity decline in the last few decades and the estimated costs that you have pulled new truck there Estimated to be two three billion Indian USD and most of these drugs that are like FDA approved and approved on the market. So they're really specific only for like very few types of diseases sort of even one disease only so the cost in our indeed that go are like spent in this business. It's just huge and and so we I mean we came up with this framework reinforcement. Learning is really core component. Where we're trying to design anti-cancer cancer drugs specifically for individual patients or groups of patients so we tried to envision the precision medicine perspective here where we're really We're not trying to generically. Come up with new cat. anti-cancer candidate drugs. But we try to like in the design process itself. Both we try to tailor the Monaco the drug specifically to the need of the patient himself or herself and so forth for this framework we use. We're using reinforcement Okay you also mentioned in the title of the poster transcript domain data. What is transcript Tomac data? You're right so you can think about transplant. Tomic data as basically The the expression of every single gene that you have in your body like you do you know about the human genome and so part of the human genome and code for specific proteins and these expression of these proteins. You can measure in the cell. That's different techniques techniques to do that so the most commonly used technique and the technique that was used to measure the data we work with is called are on a sequencing thing. Data we are you measure basically the M. A. Snippets in the cell. And so from this. You can infer basically which genes are expressed to what extent so so you end up if you if you do the sequencing step you end up with a vector of about twenty thousand genes and for each gene you would have an expression value view. This is usually just an integer. Like how many times did you find these Slip it in the sample. And then so this this vector Tori you can really think of it as like a fingerprint of the cell. So it's like it's a proper characterization of the cell there's different types of of comics data. So this is true. Tomic's data right. There's like also genomics data which directly directly measuring gene data and there's also also appropriate mix data actively measuring the the proteins

Cancer Cognitive Science Frank Rosen Mcculloch Supervisor Tomic FDA Pitts Audrey
parents Putting Their Kids In Danger By Not Vaccinating

Lynne Hayes-Freeland

07:04 min | 10 months ago

parents Putting Their Kids In Danger By Not Vaccinating

"Dr John Williams sue as the chief of pediatric infectious disease at UPMC children's Hey doc how are you this morning I'm great how are you doctor this as a scare you as well well it does as a pediatrician you know I live here for many kids in my career over the last twenty five years who suffered and even died from influenza and many were otherwise healthy kids so it's a very serious disease unless worry for my own for kids because I make sure they get a flu shot every year like my wife and I do you know it's fascinating that you should bring this up all I do is post these numbers on my Facebook page in these anti vaccine is go off I don't know what the hell I'm talking about people get sick from the vaccine Hey doctor what's going on in our culture where parents actually jeopardize their kids life over crap information they get from the unit Sir well I think it's it's a couple of things one is that you know as parents all parents we want to keep our kids safe and it's easy to be scared by things you see or hear about on the internet and even though in a typical year in this country several hundred kids die from flu dash for too many but it's a small number so most parents don't know anybody who's died of a vaccine preventable diseases because vaccines are very successful and so they don't feel as scared about that as they do about things they see on the internet and they can't always judge which accurate what's not accurate there's also just a couple of minutes out there vaccines have been proven not to cause autism vaccine the flu vaccine doesn't make you sick and vaccines are not big money makers a lot of people see all which is the former companies making money vaccines are less than two percent of the pharmaceutical industry profit they could drop all vaccines tomorrow and it would be a blip in their radar Hey doc about the folks who say well you know you know this is a new strain of this vaccine doesn't work for that anyway so it doesn't matter if I get the flu shot they're not totally wrong so the flu vaccine is very good but not great the problem is the flu changes every year and experts from around the world and in the U. S. half to decide about six months ahead of time what they think is going to come around that fall so this flu vaccine that we have right now was decided back in the spring it's a very educated guess but it is not always perfect and so it's not always a perfect match for the vaccine that circulates the thing is that some protection is a lot better than no protection and there is good evidence that even if the vaccine is not a good match it's still reduces the severity of disease how many do you want to have no guards when the raiders com or you won't have a few guards from the invaders come you're better with a few guards what about the symptoms doctor if you see your kids getting symbols what we look for well of course runny nose and cough most kids with flu are going to have a fever so all from kids with the flu will have more fever oval seem a little bit sick or than they will with other common colds Hey is there who work well if they're a flu and other over the counter things like that can help with the symptoms of flu so they have things like decongestants to dry up your stuffy runny nose and cough suppressants to keep you from coughing you know this can help you when I go to work during the day so we're not dripping snot everywhere right and I can help you sleep at night because you're not coughing so much but they don't do anything to actually treat the virus the best way to deal with that is to get a vaccine ahead of time she'll get a sick with the virus Dr oz blue glass lamps in the table talking like kids about this because I want them to know this is serious stuff almost five thousand acid I think Americans are blown away when you tell them twenty five thousand people die a year from the flu are they not Dr well yeah it's it's twenty five to fifty thousand it's flu is in the top ten causes of death every year and people are completely blown away because people think about you know all the horrible things another bad diseases now for older people and I might be heading towards a group myself you know there are other things like heart disease and cancer but for younger adults and kids Lou is right up there and yet it's not on most people's radar why is that what happens here where we hang on the flu Sir well I think you know it it doesn't sort of it only comes around once a year and it doesn't really make for individual cases you know that horrible crash on the turnpike lastly see a multi vehicle crash that was all over the national news right a bunch of people died it's a sudden van everything's oh my god I better drive carefully the term I can wear my seatbelt but when you see these kind of impersonal numbers even though they're big they sell the CDC says there's already been five thousand deaths well it's nobody I know so it doesn't seem real and so I think if we saw I mean to me personally I think of all the children of care for who have been hospitalized in the wind died it's very realistic pediatrician but I think to the average citizen that's why it's not on the radar because it seems remote and distant such as John Wayne she's a pediatric infectious diseases at children's UPMC Hey doc why are most of the deaths older folks in children well that's two reasons one is just weaker immune systems young kids have weaker immune systems and older people have weaker immune systems they're more likely to get a secondary bacterial pneumonia on top of the flow and you know for young kids we're not nearly as good as we should be getting on the vaccine because too many people think well it's just the flow Hey Douglas vaccination rate I hate to put you on the spot here no vaccine rations vaccination rate overall in the country of the people who should get vaccinated only about half of those who should get vaccinated do give us the latest so as a society we're not doing a great job and it's not just protecting ourselves and our kids who get the vaccine we're protecting our fellow citizens our fellow Americans you know people with weak immune systems those younger kids in those older adults we just mentioned me getting a flu shot helps protect me from getting the flu them so I'm not just doing it for me and doing it for the people around me doctor Williams your fantastic Sir thank you so much I thank you for making people aware of this wash your hands get a flu shot it is not too late in the season I'm in

Dr John Williams
House passes bill to lower Medicaid's prescription drug costs

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:21 sec | 11 months ago

House passes bill to lower Medicaid's prescription drug costs

"The full house will vote today on a bill that would lower Medicaid prescription drug prices speaker Nancy Pelosi so should you savings from lower drug costs to limit what seniors pay out of pocket for medicines and she just apple's new Medicare coverage for dental hearing and vision care the pharmaceutical industry opposes the bill so do president trump and Senate Republicans who say they'll

Nancy Pelosi President Trump Apple Senate
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Self Made Man

Self Made Man

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Self Made Man

"Your your name keeps popping up so i was fortunate all good things i help yeah now absolutely and it's been it's been really cool to to get to know you in and get to know more about your business and it's been really interesting as far as your story goes because you come from the pharmaceutical industry here pharmacist right and it turns out that you've now built an incredibly fast growing personal brand and business and health and wellness industry which i think is really interesting because at least in my experience the pharmaceutical industry is almost like a fourletter word to most people in the hope and all of us at history saw the i would love it if you could take some time to bring us up to speed on your story and how you ended up doing what you're doing i would love to sow linked up i farmers this whole right out of housecall on eleven august thinking working pharmacist eight club that i just knew i want you something madison number amber like tackled our parents and thinking oh may be you know i could do something in cosmetics or maybe something different just thought it was a good base degree to have an really at the time what's funny as i was i was told and agreed that it was a great job for women you know if you wanna have kids you can works rear in a three days a week and get your hours in so that was kind of vitamin taliban i was him there was nothing wrong with that it's just shifted so drastically since then so i went to pharmacy school and i loved what i was studying uh actually really want to be a news anchor my parents are heard and imprisoned cultures have been torius for wanting you to do some other dr lawyer in what they want you to it's literally not majoring communications i studied firms e that i moved out to la i i lived here part time with my dad live permanently moved here and i started working at i'd just immediately day one hated it and had this kind of overwhelming i had this a roman feeling first of all i was just graduated and i said like okay.

pharmaceutical industry three days
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"That of difference to the usual most of us are quite used to the pharmaceutical on serve as one that is most frequently trotted out by the practitioners that you and i see and it's come time for us to stop in our tracks turn around and say there's got to be another way we can't always be looking to the pharmaceutical industry to answer a question and furthermore if we do all we're doing with drugs is really masking the problem it's time for some new and create of innovators so how do you find these people they would have to be a very special group that'd be people who care more about their patients than all of the other factors those factors being financial bear in mind that there are a high financial incentives on any medical provider to just keep doing what they're doing as long as the insurance companies pay and to depart from that beaten track is very often to subject yourself to financial uncertainty they are also individuals who would have to step aside from their colleagues opinions from the insurance company reactions pap's even from the rebuke and the calumny of the public who might respond by saying you're doing what they would have to have the courage to step away from preconceptions from the criticism in the condescension and to embrace something new and then fight sometimes for decades in order to bring to the public this new concept of how you can get.

pharmaceutical industry insurance companies insurance company
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Is is that a fair this is a of the pharmaceutical industry i well i think that medical industries should step in and instead of having kind of and these blind vaccinations for people we should really have markers and there are actually there are some markers their somalia's for example for patients would lyme disease there is in it chile d r four vac aleo that you can check in blood and see if these people will be predisposed an adverse reaction to align back seen or can develop chronic symptoms and i think the medical community is kind of not catching up and we're just vaccinating everyone because there are three months older six months old but people should be checked than some of these things can even be checked in chord blood when the babies born so you would know ahead of time kind of yeah if you need is spread out there vaccine yes so lyme disease how do we treat lyme disease properly which you we do if some and a whisker what are the symptoms first of all with lyme disease itself so early on in the disease process the symptoms are kind of baid which is why it's hard to diagnose and so it's a headache fever joined ajax dizziness and at the rash the rash that everyone looks forward the holes i'll may red inchoate uncommon so only about twenty percent of patients will actually have a rash and that sort of a false sense of security for people when they don't have a rash at means i don't have lyme disease but that's not the case and then later on as i mentioned it can present as various problems including unrelenting headaches a insomnia as the you know fibromyalgia chronic fatigue fibromyalgia lady gaga said she has that what does that yeah actually that's interesting later gogga in her latest documentary by foot to talks a lot about how she has fibromyalgia and fibromyalgia is really a symptom um and that's how i look at it where he have basically unrelenting pain throughout your body out which we don't have a cause for and can they can also have headaches and they can have fatigue and.

pharmaceutical industry somalia lyme disease fibromyalgia twenty percent three months six months
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"We gave hormones to women because we thought it helped everything so when you became postmenopausal we gave you hormone treatment out of the box because by gosh it's good for everything that ails you and that was none off at observational study meaning that people who just basically filled out forms and they were mostly nurses it was a nurses health study and this was thinking hey this is going to be a great source of information and we got some some ideas out of it but when they finally did a proper randomized trial where the people didn't know what they were taking a followed them they look for clinical outcomes they found that you know what this isn't necessarily true not everyone meets hormone therapy in fact and some people can be dangerous and so there you have to be very careful you know what the quality of the data is it in all the guidelines they ranked the strength of the recommendations they ranked the quality of the data and it's up to your physician to keep up with that ultimately some time yet to follow the money the the source of funding of the study is very important and so if it's a government in age funded studies usually going to be possibly less biased then if it was sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry but everyone has a in agenda on this tried to make it work but ultimately don't get lost in the trees and missed the big forest no is many times people will come in with this and you know the us a hey i'm worried about this one medicine and i'm like you know what mr three hundred pound overweight smoking diabetic you know when knew drop some waiting quit smoking then we can talk about these smaller more minute pains because you know humans like to do that we like to focus on small things and ignored the bigger things that are jeweler is a deal why why should we we we admit we've got the get an issue absolutely and so it becomes very challenging with some of this though i can understand i mean we we hear somebody ah conflicting things you should use regular sugar as opposed to the artificial don't use the artificial use regular butter instead of nods too fat don't use the fats will go lowfat no low fence bad so i get so confusing canada while you're supposed.

pharmaceutical industry follow the money three hundred pound
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"You to have a drug czar who had supported the pharmaceutical industry and the drug industry and had carried a law through congress that made it more difficult for the dea to do its job i think was a nobrainer i think mr marinos saw the his nomination was dead in the water there are a number of members of congress who felt that they were hoodwinked by this law um the admit that they should have ran a closer but that they relied upon you know the word of people like tom marino that this was a a good bill immune has called the ensuring patient access and effective drug enforcement act i mean who would be against that and so i think in the face of all that mr marino realized that his nomination wasn't going to go any further so they just cut their losses and in addition to that trump has also made some promises about what he's going to do about the opioid epidemic center story has been reported what are some of the things that he he said i'll do now well i mean i think some of the big things we'll have to wait to see what happens i mean next week he's rolling out a national strategy and i don't think really quite know what that's going to look like so were coasting tuned see what happens this crisis it really affects people in is effective all across the country but it affects people in many counties who voted for trump it seems to me that if trump took concrete steps to actually solve this crisis he would pay off for him not only by saving lives but also politically does that seem likely to you that if he could make a dent in this crisis it would have positive political consequences for the president.

pharmaceutical industry congress mr marinos tom marino president mr marino
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"So if a distributor sees that there's a pharmacy in your community that one month is getting ten thousand doses of oxycodone and the next month at pharmacies ordering fifty thousand doses well that's a suspicious order it's not like suddenly you've got like a pain epidemic in this one pharmacy is one community so the distributor system notify the da hey we got a suspicious water we red flagging this and we're sending it to the da for your investigation and that was not happening and that's what the da was was finding all over the country and that's where they started going after some of these distributors so hypothetically the distributor could make more money if they're distributing more pills right exactly and in this with da was alleging is that they were turning a blind eye to these suspicious orders because there was so much money to be made so instead of reporting them they would just let the the shipments fly and uh and not say words the federal government said these cases we're coming up often distributors reporting these incidents says the da enforcing law against them but then that seemed to slow down what happened there on the pharmaceutical industry got upset that they were being singled out by the da the da was being very aggressive in their enforcement actions and he started to push back so they've serb pushing back with lobbyist they started pushing back with campaign contributions they began to recruit some of the best and brightest out of the da's office diversion control it's a small division within the does nothing but regulate the pharmaceutical industry and one of the lawyers who left the da senior attorney within this division then went over to the other side and helped craft this law that tom marino then introduced into the house of representatives.

oxycodone federal government pharmaceutical industry senior attorney the house tom marino one month
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And from the listeners of kqed public radio the time is five twenty one this is all things considered from npr news i'm mary louise kelly and i'm robert siegel when hurricane maria crashed into puerto rico had dealt a powerful blow to the pharmaceutical industry the island is an important exporter of drugs pharmaceuticals or a fifteen billion dollar business there and that includes some medicines that are produced only in puerto rico which raises the prospect of shortages who and the mainland reporter katie thomas wrote about this in the new york times and she joins us from chicago welcome to the program thank you put the puerto rican pharmaceutical industry in some perspective how does it rank as a drug producer well it's one of the top drug producers in the world drug companies and device manufacturer started doling plants there decades ago if things to tax breaks and plentiful available if skilled labour there you wrote this week that they're 80 pharmaceutical factories in puerto rico do we know how many of them are up and running at this stage we don't and i should say that there is there a mix of factories there affirmative local products are also medical device makers and never close supply manufacturers and we don't have an exact tally at least not one that's being released that several of the companies have told me that their air not back up and running or they're just barely starting to get into limited production what kinds of problems are those people experiencing in puerto rico would of the told you bet well there's been a host of problems the biggest find is actually just getting employees to come in to work these residents have lost their homes and they're still struggling with many of their basic needs the second obstacle is electrcity most of these plants are running on diesel generators and while the company say that they're pretty comfortable and with the fact that those are up and running and they're working there's questions that how long they will last if this is a longterm problem in and if it goes on for months you know will they run out of diesel fuel will the generator start breaking down said that's also a big concern what are some of the drugs that are produced in puerto rico and for that matter only produced in puerto rico so.

robert siegel hurricane maria puerto rico pharmaceutical industry katie thomas new york times chicago producer kqed npr mary louise kelly reporter fifteen billion dollar
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Drugs isn't that right the trade any one of the provisions of the affordable care act is a sure there's our chat terms know what percentage frothy revenue the process that they are allowed to cheat but it doesn't apply to pharmaceutical makers your device makers athletes in the by pharmaceutical industry tremendous it is our analysis sheds a little light on we found that the revenue after approval for these drugs is to put it in context a cost about seven billion dollars to bring 10 drugs to market in the first four years of those drugs being on the market these companies read the not sixty seven eight billion dollars which is a tidy amount of money and and it they had probably on average ten more years mix the city left so it's gonna be a lot more money so i guess i would say date is clear financially the drinks it only business is highly lucrative for companies in regrets to market well it's very very important finding in a really needs a lot of attention you know mine my take away from it is uh first of all you'd almost if you were just heartless invest street almost be crazy to invest in anything else nowadays which is a horrible state of affairs but secondly the term gets turnaround political economy the idea that that money basically drives a political said some there's a relationship between what happens in the economy and politics in these guys just must have the might take away and i know you didn't go this far new research my takeaways these guys must have the best lobbyists in the business well i guess that's my lead you from having studied this issue over the years free applications by any you have to look at his sister this is not a free market is i mean cancer patients some really uh don't have the freedom not ditches these these are often lifeprolonging medications these there are so many rules.

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"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"Yeah one senator bernie sanders unveiled a new healthcare proposal this week he calls it has medicare for all quiet of the independent senators reform plans calls for a single payer universal health care it's very similar to what he proposed during his campaign but it's come under fire because he has an explain how it would be paid for and today we tell drug caught that the american people of the greed of the pharmaceutical industry we are no war ripped door and pay the high prices in the world and that don't like the fact that raymond royal is calling me a johnny one note with milsovic i can't stand the music i'm not i just because i want single pay and i've always wanted single pay except when i said it was going to destroy the healthcare system a few years ago just ignore that i've got to say i'm almost two years old and i shall to end the microphone mark the man shouts ellie time we understand bernie eurosocialist we get that you want more government control not less than we also get the fact that a good the fact that you think this is a limitless amount of money it has never in where the money's gonna fall from the sky but now they're all very upset about there's a debate happen sunday night okay bernie sanders has convened this big conclave a big discussion about healthcare and they are going to debate single payer on monday night now what do the democrats fear most when it comes to substantive issues starts with a d and ends of an e it's called the debate they never want debates and it's not just democrats let me to say this it elites in both parties and you'll you'll see this when when you read billion here at the barricades because i i discuss this a lot in the book the bipartisan collusion that trump busted he busted the monopoly on politics in november of 2016 he smashed that monopoly they were very happy to have all things done all behind closed doors were there really isn't a public debate on these issues.

bernie sanders pharmaceutical industry raymond royal healthcare system bernie eurosocialist senator johnny two years
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on KKAT

"But let's say this he has talked about taking on the pharmaceutical industry a lowering the very very high costs for prescription drugs and here's white to make the point that the drug companies are ripping us off so president trump let's go forward together and do that yeah let's we'll see i don't know if there ripping us off in a way that a lot of people think i think it's it's a double whammy i really do i think it's a huge double whammy they're they're ripping us off because they're trying to do all they can to maximize profits because they've got to put so much into it the government that's all it cans because it wants to make sure that you jump through so many hoops you got to put so much into it so when you do get something it works yet the men is the hell out of it in that comes at a cost to us the people so i think it's it's a give and take their but i want to see what he's going to do about that i really do alaska pars will tell you what our toll everybody that right now we got a long time to go so let us focus on the issues that the american people care about politics will follow that long time ago we do some of its going to be interesting some it's going to be uncomfortable some of its going to be crazy in some of it is going to be good it really is and i think the first step that to me i found it to be refreshing even though it pisses a lot of conservatives off and it's really angered the mitch mcconnell's of the world which i'm totally fine with awe churn i thought we were friends we're not we're not we can't i can't be friends with somebody like you i can two two too much cheek car cheese is not that he sided with the democrats and that's the whole thing and because he he tied with the tama croats chad he didn't side with the democrats he thought i'm going to do what's best for the country in this time of need and we've got this debt ceiling heading over a hanging over us if we can just get this stuff sorted out and get the money to the.

pharmaceutical industry trump mitch mcconnell president alaska
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Well there are the food scientists in these corporation standing up the ever ever think about it i mean that it's like two completely different departments i get it very big company you know would and they're sitting there inventing new recipes and coming up with new food items and do it and then they're like while the marketing team is totally blowing it what can we do about it let's talk to upper management held upper management like well we're rigging the money you know what i mean like it's that's i know that's very simplistic way of looking at it but in essence though suit your those two scientists can't change the company that easily i'm sure they might i'm hoping you're saying things but it's not working and we know that there are there i mean i would i would consider walking out i mean my company starts to netted i worked for from a food scientists have guys this is ridiculous a matter here you know been tried to take as many people with me well the thing is we are seeing this disconnected pharmaceuticals as well where the marketing people wants to promote certain uses that may be a not completely supported by the studies and and the scientist generally fight quite hard not to have that done but marketing very often wins yeah but in pharmaceutical industry at least here in the united states the fda hey has very strict limits on what the marketing department is allowed to do they carefree free will it they have to they have to strictly follow fda guidelines and if they don't they get fined sometimes billions of dollars i mean they can it's big big big fines from the fda so if you think about it even in such a highlyregulated industry is still seeing that how they're trying to stretch it to the extent that the cash still pushing the envelope you're pushing it absolutely but there is but there are lines third lace.

food items scientist pharmaceutical industry united states fda
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Freakonomics

"The other thing i point out his those two point one months these clinical trials that are often conducted by the by pharmaceutical industry they really choose sort of healthiest patients on the people who are the fittest of the patience on average the asia is almost ten years younger in pivotal trials for the fda drug approval than in the real world and then when you start to extrapolate drugs that have real side effects in very carefully selected pa and and small benefits and carefully selected populations to the average patient that walks into my clinic whose older who has other problems is taking heart medicine there was a paper that came out about a one of those costly expensive drugs fort liver cancer and in the pivotal trial it had a benefit of about two three months something like that but in the real world and the medicare data said it had no improvement in survival over just giving somebody good nursing care um and get supportive care and i think that's the reality for many of these marginal drugs that when you actually use them in the real world they they start to not work so well and maybe not work at all you've written and spoken out about cronyism and conflicts of interest between drugmakers and the doctors who prescribe drugs i'm curious um what happens when you go to an uncalled you conference are you a an unpopular person there steve and i always wear bulletproof vest when i go to an height but this has really been sort of the way medicine has operated for for many years um that to some degree practising doctors in the community having ties to the drug makers that's one thing but increasingly we see that the the leaders in in the field the ones who designed that clinical trials who right up the manuscript to write the review articles who sort of guide every one and how to practice in those feels they have heavy financial ties to drug makers and there's a large body of evidence suggesting that that biases the literature two words um finding benefits where benefits may not exist um toward more favorable costeffective analyses when drugs are really probably not costeffective um it's a bias.

asia pa cronyism pharmaceutical industry steve two three months one months ten years
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And for decades literally decades it has not been a bad thing for democrats to take pharmaceutical industry money they add they were they would deficit hometown industry and new jersey exactly and and they would defend it but even on nationally it was not looked at as a bat their money did not because they're saving lives and innovation and there are great american innovator and then what we've seen is that they're not they're not doing innovation that you know they're martin scrambling now and people are so mad about their drug prices in heather brush and exactly a mile lien in the epi bin now their money is tainted and the magnitude of cory booker taking that flack and then saying i'm not going to take any more money from the industry is huge and that's why we have to push this advantage we have to make it really toxic to be associated with the pharmaceutical industry right and meanwhile let me just uh i've i've been talking about this a lot lately to to uh to our our audience to do people watching listening the program um the scam that senior executives of in plain ever since reagan change the rules on executive compensation used to be prior to the 1980s you couldn't compensate somebody was stock the tax code didn't allow for it in fact the cat tax cut excluded it and uh reagan change that reagan and the republicans change that and the democrats frankly as well this whole ownership society idea and so now uh ceos and senior executives are seemed to be far more concerned about the you're.

cory booker pharmaceutical industry reagan executive
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I don't think that's what it's about it's the give away but the interesting thing farmers so reviled right now that when we were walking around the hill you know we've been doing grassroots grass tops as much pressure as we can to keep this out and there was a law of like nodding along i do not want to be seen as giving anything to pharma right now i it's seems just looking at this politically and that i want to get back to the you know what's actually going on in ours are with share buybacks mmhmm um but it seems to me that there was a an inflection point in the last year and that was when cory booker supported or voted against the ability of americans to import drugs from canada and other countries but canada would be the major supplier and an and was doing so apparently because he was taking big money from the pharmaceutical industry he took so much flak for that that he changed his position on may publicly came out and trash the industry that have been funding him obviously the guy wants to be president statesen and and is noticing which way the wind blows which i think is great i i want my politicians to say oh i shouldn't have on that and i'm going to change my position when it's in a positive direction but i'm guessing a whole lot of other politicians particularly in the democratic party looked at the serious flack the cory booker gut and said you know i don't want to have an enemy i just extending that slightly because i think you're completely right and that we saw that in this if a fight are the user fees shorthanded here eufor i want to point a couple more things out though cory booker then promised he wasn't going to take any money from the pharmaceutical industry right which as you said it's a good thing but the magnitude of that i think excaped people a little bit because that'd be like chuck schumer saying he wasn't going to take any money for on wall street at this are the biggest donors in in new jersey especially pharmaceutical companies new jersey is there backyard and for decades literally decades it has not been a bad thing for democrats to take pharmaceutical industry money they were they would defendthemcom town industry energy hersey eggs actually and they would defend it but.

cory booker canada pharmaceutical industry chuck schumer president pharmaceutical companies
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"We're learning that the pharmaceutical industry really cannot replicate mother nature mother nature doesn't way better we just have to make sure that we allow mother nature the right things into our body in our body will figure out what to do with that so i'm a with the gluten intolerance were learning that right now in seattle disease autoimmune disease i think that there is gonna be a combination in the future of a polyphenols compound that will actually protect the barrier once we do that were rooting put the brakes on all autoimmune disease and in fact all inflammation because all disease as a result of inflammation ultimately and i'm talking everything from autism to parkinson's in all autoimmune disease so do you have certain life hacks that you figured out that you'd like to share selling for me it's just a couple and i caravan advert having based on season so that right now i'm taken asas and then a lot because i don't burn at all i'm very fairskinned i don't burn it off i take it as i do take a lot of omega3s especially when nursing a baby just 'cause i thought i get depleted pretty quickly i did a lot of piping us from fu but i'm definitely going to experiment more i take i've taken turmeric and that kind of thing but i'm going to experiment more i know i'm gonna get this question from listeners a lot of my listeners our moms so our is there anyone who should not take at trent he'll or is it contrary to kait it in pregnancy or nursing any any warnings there does rick russian so.

pharmaceutical industry autoimmune disease parkinson seattle rick russian
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"And it's not because we get better health outcomes it's because we're paying off monopolies in the how hospital industry the cleveland clinic all of these like teaching hospitals which liberals love their terrible monopolists um when you ah when you talk about the pharmaceutical industry on which had just been infected with private equity these are monopolised that have happened to have a few drug factories maybe or research labs maybe you're talking about pharmacy benefit managers you're talking about urgent care centres you're talking everywhere you look you can go into a hospital room and pretty much every plastic thing in their costs hundreds of times uh or is is being billed that hundreds of times what it actually costs so the the healthcare problem really is a monopoly problems and you can look at cross our culture and say pretty much not every problem that we have put a lot of the problems that we have from actual income inequality to regional inequality too bad outcomes in healthcare to transportation problems you can actually pretty much link them directly to the concentration of corporate power matt stoler the piece is the return of monopoly uh we will linked to it a majority died fm over the new republic thanks so much time today really appreciate thanks a lot of our folks that's it for i can sure bolt doors marwa who's greatest monopolised malta all this shows wanna monopoly and his contracts were hitmen so she can keep the prices low disgusting.

cleveland clinic pharmaceutical industry
"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"pharmaceutical industry" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"As the battle over health care rages in congress one constant complaint from consumers is over drug prices judy woodruff is in colorado with our look at that issue judy thanks hari the pharmaceutical research and manufacturers association or farm up is the nation's largest group representing drug companies steven you bowl as its president and ceo i sat down with him here at the aspen spotlight health conference today and began by asking about the latest republican plan to overhaul obamacare world still very fluid dynamic as you know we haven't taken a formal position on the bill i think it's clear that there is a direction towards more autonomy for states to shape their insurance markets as well as shaping their own insurance designs so we'll be very engaged in this discussion in the prison with which will look at it is making sure that patients have access to the breakthrough treatments and cures that our industry is developing the other major health care associations hospitals doctors and others had been pretty critical is is the pharmaceutical industry alone in a way or almost alone and not being as worried as critical of what the republicans are doing well i think it's fair to say that those stakeholders are focused on the same issues that we are uh but again but i think the bill was still making its way through the process and will be very engaged as as the process unfolds we heard president trump during the campaign now speak about the high cost of prescription drugs i guess it was not long after the election he talked about the drug companies getting away with murder we're now hearing know that the administration may not be coming down as hard on the pharmaceutical industry is some thought moving to a uh a a different system is that your sense of what's happening that that day you're going to get maybe of.

congress judy woodruff colorado president and ceo pharmaceutical industry murder obamacare president