40 Burst results for "Pharma"

Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

Citations Needed

00:54 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

"Funded technologies in the first place for the past. Fifteen years as i mentioned with collaborations incur virus research as well as the types of new vaccines the platforms like ma. Rene that are being rolled out now all of that public investment for the first place. So it's not just a question of like private investment. What happens private investment. It's we're funding the stuff to the tune of even in normal times. The national institutes of health are investing forty billion dollars a year in biomedical research and development. That's all publicly funded. So we got account for that secondly here. The entire world is the market for his technologies. There's not really like. There's not an incentive problem the company's vaccine makers in particular are are doing very well now and they plan to raise prices a great deal and so they will be just fine even if it's some point they have to deal with bio similar competition like every other industry and of course the the speed funding de risk the investment for these companies. So the idea that like we're putting innovation incentives at risk seems pretty ridiculous to me also kind of like we have the opposite problem because something like the waiver as far reaching as it is what it does is it gets the wto out of the way you still got to fight farm potentially country by country a little bit. They're still lobbies and roles in place in each member state and so we actually have a ways to go to to to clear each barrier. So that pharma in its thicket of rules are are not a problem. It's the i guess. I'm trying to say that. The problem really is that there are still far too many rules and incentives that protect the industry from competition even when the public has completely dearest. The best -ment for pharma the so-called madeira vaccine which is really the nih madeira not vaccine taxpayers paid one hundred percent the development of that project. So i don't even really know what we're talking about with this whole idea that we're going to compromise. The sky is falling. What are the ip lawyers gonna do if they have to make ten dollars less a month. The us chamber of commerce is very very concerned. That's a good point. You know it's really..

One Hundred Percent Fifteen Years Rene Forty Billion Dollars A Year First Place Each Member State Each Barrier Ten Dollars Less A Month Secondly
Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

Citations Needed

02:31 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

"Sector ran relatively few clinical trials. Other research related to this and the establishment of the new platform technologies was always a public private collaboration. Indeed the national institutes of health. Own key patents that are relied on by the major vaccine manufacturers against covid nineteen today so these have always been shared projects patrimony of humanity. And it's a mistake to limit that to believe we can't do better it's mistake not to be in bishops about the response and that's one of our real concerns right now that there are too many experts to many of washington serious people that are giving up on the possibility of making a difference in this pandemic which by the way hundreds of millions of people can't expect a vaccine till twenty twenty four perhaps more. It's not clear that it's the goal of public health intervention so far to vaccinate everyone in fact that's probably not the case. The goal is more vaccinate people in wealthy countries and manage the pandemic elsewhere while it becomes end and we all need booster shots enough to deal with the variant. So obviously we should be unleashing everything we can do but i don't want us to underestimate the challenges either. It's not just this one decision. There are a lot of things we have to do together in order to come up with speeder solutions. And we're gonna have to fund it and we're gonna have to push companies to affirmatively share what they known as well we've called for a twenty five billion dollar investment by the us government to retrofit factories with our production lines and then provide the drug substance and manufacturing bring eight billion doses of vaccine online by next year and that's enough for half the world's population and a big investment but it's pretty small compared to the trillions that the world will lose meanwhile if the pandemic goes unchecked. So that's a scale. We need to be thinking on. Just much more ambitious about what can be done and simultaneously unleashing capacity all over the world freeing it from these kind of monopoly restraints to experiment. Not only with vaccines but with diagnostics. With small molecule medicines or treatments with personal protective equipment..

Next Year Eight Billion Doses Washington Twenty Five Billion Dollar ONE Twenty Twenty Four Hundreds Of Millions Of People One Decision Half The World's Population Today Nineteen Too Many Experts
Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

Citations Needed

02:17 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

"April eighth twenty twenty one. There is been what appears to be increased momentum on this topic to get the white house to support trips waiver to allow other countries to nine fringe quote unquote intellectual property a vaccine makers four hundred plus progressive groups hundred members of congress including doctors without borders human rights watch the center for constitutional rights cetera et cetera. Zander's elizabeth warren. This is far from being a fringe position and yet there has been complete mum from the white house on this issue for reasons that we speculate i think not without cause at the top of the show we speculate as to why that is i want sorta talk about from your perspective what you see the trepidation being on the part of the white house or maybe not even trepidation. Maybe they just sort of believe it or don't really want it what you think. The current state of this campaign is and what. It's likely successes. I think that we're going to win. I think the binding ministration is going to change. Its position and that that will be an historic victory because the grip of the pharmaceutical industry on washington has been very powerful for a long time and as you know has been translated into power in these trade negotiations and an international regime that restricts what countries are able to do and how countries are or are not able to protect their own people choose to protect their own people. Even at these most serious of times. I think that power dynamic is changing because people see how wrong it is as evidence by the progress of this sign on litter so far this is a moment for humanity to rally to common cause and should not be concerned about patents wall so many people are dying the simple moral occasion. I think it is widely understood that everything we can do to shorten the pandemic everything that we can do to empower countries to design and distribute medical tools of all sorts. We're not talking only about vaccines we're talking about. Diagnostics and.

Elizabeth Warren White House Congress Washington April Eighth Twenty Twenty One Four Hundred Zander Hundred Members Nine Fringe
Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

Citations Needed

02:49 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

"About how the local population doesn't want a vaccine. They're they're not really giving it to them so they're sitting there expiring and that even the largest of the donors is being wasted right being wasted by local population april six two thousand twenty one and axios headline reads vaccinating. Africa country struggled to deliver the few shots. They've got where they basically say that a bunch of shots going bad now. Of course there are logistic hurdles to getting shots out in poor countries. But it's very clear that these articles are being planted in or being promoted certain way because the assumption is that the issue is not that the us is not giving away that. 'cause here's what's going to happen there's going to be a situation where people say wow africa vaccinated and it's the year twenty twenty three. Why is that. Oh they're going to go back and say oh these reports that you know. They had a hard time getting it out. They were corrupt wasteful. Because if you pathologies the global south of corruption narrative right if it is the corruption or if you pathologies as being morally fr- week then that justifies the gross inequities we see in so there's an incentive there's an institutional incentive either deliberate or conscious or just based racism because then mass death can be seen as immoral failing as opposed to a policy choice. Yeah because if you read these articles it's not that the global north is not providing enough resources. Not that we're not giving enough money. It's not that we're not providing the logistical know-how or whatever ono or rather we're not even allowing them to manufacture their own drugs or go to countries in the global south manufacturing jobs because obviously every country is not gonna manufacture their own but they can have partnerships with local countries that do are proximate countries. Do that's not the issue. The issue is corruption too poor to ignorant conspiracy theorists. This is why you see a lot of articles about black people. Not being trusting. Because it's it's a waste of preemptive they do this domestically black people don't trust the vaccine therefore justifies going the low vaccination rates of the black population right the golden sort of preemptively rationalize. What we all know is inevitable. Which is that there's going to be horrified inequities and distribution because at this point opening. It's fair to say a lot of people have foreclosed on the possibility of permitting generics to be manufactured in the global south and now what we do the way you move up the ranks of global health policy now in the way you move up the ranks of the of the gates world which is obviously funds most of the health policy. Now which is you. Don't touch the sacred cow of you've come up with more and more clever ways of looking like you're trying to fix inequities but without getting to the core issue which is that. These countries are not permitted to make their own drugs. And so what you have. Is you have an increasingly convoluted system. In place to come up with ways as josh rogin and his his art he offers here at the alternative to the trips waiver. Right and it's sort of like how there's a whole industry around. You can't advocate single payer. So there's all interesting on exotic ways of ono the the it's the way you go to this website and you click on this and you get to compare markets in and it's like the more clever is more you are the less you. So why don't we just make it fucking free like they do in other countries and make it simple. That's not an option. That's off the table..

Josh Rogin Africa Axios Twenty Single Payer TWO Thousand Twenty One Twenty Three April Six
Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

Citations Needed

02:16 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pharma" discussed on Citations Needed

"Make any additional vaccines available. He claims as many of these people do that. The handful of manufacturers in the world that would be necessary to make. These drugs are all located conveniently enough in the global north. This has been refuted by those advocating for the waiver including doctorswithoutborders. Who says that there are a lot of countries in the global south who again to be clear. The waiver is not a magic bullet would also necessitate assistance from pharmaceuticals which biden can pressure them to do to help with technology copyright and other issues about scale ability but it would be part of a broader government effort to make these technologies both legal and doable from these organizations. And there's a huge pushback from the chamber of commerce crowd from the ip enforcement crowd from the bill gates crowd to do what they cleverly do very well which is because you know they can't come out and say i is sacred because that's means that profits are sacred above human lives that so that's like bond villain evil. They can't say that so what they're doing is they're doing a very clever work around by saying there's two arguments now that are front and center there is number one. It's moot doesn't matter. They can't do the new age we just talked about. And this is great. It's a clever little cop out because it prevents you from having to address the core substance of what you're doing which is arguing for the sanctity of intellectual property regimes and to which is becoming increasingly common and i think will be the most popular one. Moving forward is a national security argument. So on april eighth twenty twenty one josh rogin sorta resident hardcore neoconservative at the washington post wrote. An article called the wrong way to fight vaccine nationalism. He's making the argument that this would be a win for china. They're giving away intellectual property rights and be win for china always because one thing that's also important to note is that there is national security implications to allowing poor countries to manufacture their own vaccines. Which is this. You cannot use. The grossly named vaccine diplomacy to leverage over them concessions. There's report that. Joe biden an exchange for delivering some vaccines to mexico. Told them to clamp down on central american migrants before they get to the border. So it's just a black male regime. Yes a blackmail game and this is something that national security hawks are are desperate to maintain no matter. How much these. Progressives hearts bleeds gonna read from washington post report april eighth twenty twenty one quote unquote now..

Joe Biden Two Arguments Josh Rogin Mexico Both Washington Post April Eighth Twenty Twenty China Central American One Thing ONE One Quote Washington
Philadelphia's Suburban Battleground: Can The GOP Recover?

Morning Edition

02:10 min | Last week

Philadelphia's Suburban Battleground: Can The GOP Recover?

"Reliably voted Republican. But the suburbs have changed. And last November, Donald Trump lost them in a big way. Now, with the 2020 midterms in view, both parties are wondering what's going to happen when Trump is not on the ballot. NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea reports from the vote rich Philadelphia suburbs. Leads drop in on Chester County, Pennsylvania, It's suburban Philadelphia but a place with its own identity. We have a huge agricultural community. We are the mushroom capital of the world. You could come here for a mushroom festival on New Year's Eve. It's quite fun Democrat Mary in Moscow It's his chair of the Chester County Board of Commissioners. And we have a lot of industry were very big in the bio Pharma life sciences community. We have new technology coming in. So ah, lot of great things happening here. Right Next door is Montgomery County, where lives create? Hey V chairs the local Republican party, she says she's watched these suburbs flip from red to blue some only in the past few years. But she says the shift began long before that, If you look at the trends, this has been happening for many, many years. I think it accelerated over the last couple of years. But when I moved into Montgomery County 21 years ago, it was already starting to change in 2016. Hillary Clinton beat Trump in these suburbs, but not by enough of a margin to make up for trump strength in the States rural areas. She lost Pennsylvania, but Joe Biden racked up huge margins in the Philly suburbs. It was key To his statewide victory. The suburbs are far more diverse than they were decades ago, and many suburban voters had an intense dislike of Donald Trump Republican create A V is hoping some of those more moderate voters come back to the GOP. Now that they don't have trump who people voted against because they didn't Like him as a person. He's gone now. And so people are actually looking at issues now and things that affect them on a day to day basis. The changing politics in the suburbs

Don Gonyea Chester County Board Of Commis Philadelphia Donald Trump Montgomery County Chester County NPR Pennsylvania Republican Party Moscow Mary Hillary Clinton Joe Biden Philly
Interview With Arnaub Chatterjee, Senior Vice President At Acorn AI

Outcomes Rocket

02:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Arnaub Chatterjee, Senior Vice President At Acorn AI

"Thanks so much for joining us. Yeah thanks for the opportunity. Great to be with you. Yes so talk to us a little bit about about you or not. What is it about health care that inspires you to stay focused on the field shirt. So i guess if i start off on a personal note i would say that medicine and health care are very much embedded in my in my dna. I come from a line of physicians that spans multiple generations and grew up with these stories of different patient encounters. Different clinical settings. So everyone my grandfather. My father my sister. My brother-in-law are all either physician or health services. Researchers are both could imagine that are thanksgiving discussion. They're pretty much heated. You know conversation over the state of health policy. Today you know type of my family. I had the opportunity to see across the healthcare system in in various roles over the last ten twelve years now and and kind of had a bite in in consulting in pharma in the government space in academia and. I think the thing that that keeps me going is that have been fortunate to be part of you. Know what. I what. I call these. The health dare movement and be they're gonna pivotal changes or sort of tectonic shifts in our healthcare system. I'm gonna happen within the last decade and kind of fundamentally transform the industry but also kind of thinking about how the healthcare system as a whole as evolving so some of the stuff that you you mentioned in my bio whether it was working on the affordable care act which was such a you know important piece of legislation or being part of of some of these larger data and technology movements even through the lens of the government big things that happened over the last several years and then more recently you know when i was at merck I had a chance to better understand what's commonly called. now it's real world data. Which is everything happening. Outside of data and clinical trials. And could that tie into improving economics research within that company. And i guess my most recent inflate of experiences are really pushing towards. How do you to move the needle in pharma research and development. And how do you better understand. Where data science and technology intersect with that changing space. So the the totality of everything. If you think about how interconnected the system is having those experiences. I have kind of shaped You know my my thinking now and really to where we are today. So that's been fun intents and kind of an inspirational experience to date for me. And i'm excited to continue development.

Pharma Academia Merck
How To Work Through Pregnancy And Menopause.

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

05:44 min | 2 weeks ago

How To Work Through Pregnancy And Menopause.

"Hi and welcome to help each other hurt a podcast dedicated to uncovering many of the women's health issues many of us are wondering about but few of us are talking about my mission is to expose the current gaps in knowledge and Care on all things Women's Health. Enjoy. Welcome back to the show. So today's episode is going to be all about pregnancy and how conditions may may have affected your pregnancy can come back to play a role in perimenopause and menopause. So you may think these two are completely unrelated and I am here to let you know. There's actually some really interesting themes that we may be able to gleam from our pregnancy that we can use when we look forward to or as we're entering into perimenopause and menopause. Before we get into that let's hear a word from our sponsor from Pharma. Thank you so much for sponsoring. Today's episode film Pharma is a woman's health care company the focuses on putting women first off then Farm was established to help women who are often forgotten about the pharmaceutical industry their products address vaginal and Volvo dryness itching and pain. We're always told how important it is to moisturize our face, but our intimate areas just as important many women have trouble talking about dryness with their doctors and do not know where to turn them far. My mom is here for you. This company feels women should feel comfortable making intimate skin hydration a part of their daily skincare routine try their products today for relief from vaginal and Volvo, dryness wage and pain check them out at fem pharma.com. That's, you are not going to be disappointed. All right, so here comes a fun job. Moment of Truth one of the reasons I wanted to do this episode today is because I am expecting and I've been hiding this fact for a pretty long time. I am in my third trimester and so far pregnancy has gone just fine. I'm not one of those people who really enjoys being a pregnant. I know many women who do simply not one of them. So I have been trying to hide it and I guess that's my way of not focusing so much on it. Thankfully. I'm lucky to be pretty healthy during this pregnancy. And this will be my third child is a surprise. We don't know yet if it's going to be a boy or a girl so it'd be really fun if you want to stick around and see I'm due in early June and not anything like my last baby. This baby might be a little early. So if there is a little break in podcast episodes, it's probably because I just had a baby now you also log I love working and I love what I do is I'll probably be back pretty quickly. And at this point I've gotten really efficient at getting podcast episode out to you. So I wanted to let you know because I do not feel like I was being honest hiding this any longer and I am really excited but it really led me to think about let's talk about how pregnancy relates to. Pause and menopause now. I just said I'm one of those people who loves being pregnant. That's mostly because I'm uncomfortable a lot. However, I have been really blessed to have healthy pregnancies, but every single pregnancy can be thought of as a stress test. So do you know what a stress test is if you don't we typically think about cardiovascular stress tests where they put the little leads you and you have to walk or run on the treadmill and they're looking at the EKG to see when you're under stress what happens to your body and this is gleaming information about future cardiovascular or current call log. Vascular risks that you may have and pregnancy is a very similar. It's a, you know, forty weeks stress test to see when we put your body under a little bit of stress or conditions that arise that may play a role in your health as we go down the line and we're starting to clean so much more information about what we can take from our state and as pregnant women into our health as we go forward, for example, if you had gestational diabetes or gestational hypertension preeclampsia, a preterm birth postpartum depression off or any of these other complications, and I'm going to talk to you about what all those could mean and we're still Gathering a lot of this data. So more and more is to come now what you've never had a baby or you haven't had a pregnancy in your lifetime. I think this episode will still be really interesting because we're learning so much about maternal health and female birth. Factors that are completely independent or different from the traditional and I'm saying those are question. You can't see me risk factors, which is based on the mail system. So thinking about these is also really interesting as well as if you have a friend or a daughter or a niece who's going to be pregnant. This is such a really interesting information to know about first. I'm going to walk you through some soft findings and soft findings means. This is just what I see clinically and I don't really know how it's going to go on to apply but one of the things that I do see a very common basis is women who have had a postpartum depression seemed to have an increased risk for either pmdd, which is severe PMS or mood symptoms in perimenopause and into

Pharma Volvo Farm Gestational Hypertension Preec Preterm Birth Postpartum Depre Gestational Diabetes Postpartum Depression
Nevada announces $45M settlement with McKinsey over opioids

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Nevada announces $45M settlement with McKinsey over opioids

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the vada reaches a settlement with the firm tied to the opioid crisis after electing not to be party to a multi state settlement the vada has struck a deal with global consulting firm McKinsey and company for its role in helping Purdue pharma increased sales of prescription pain killers during the national opioid crisis McKinsey and company has agreed to pay the VAT up forty five million dollars in February the New York based company settled for five hundred seventy three million dollars with forty seven states the district of Columbia and five U. S. territories according to state Attorney General Aaron Ford had Nevada been party to the multi state deal it would have received seven million dollars hi Mike Rossi

Mike Rossi National Opioid Crisis Mckinse Vada Purdue Pharma Mckinsey Attorney General Aaron Ford New York Columbia Nevada
All About Crane's Critter Care

Say What Needs Saying

06:47 min | 3 weeks ago

All About Crane's Critter Care

"We are back we are doing a new segment where we bring on a small business owner so we can talk a little bit about their business about what they do. What kind of issues or problems. They've come up. Come against in starting in running a business. You know maybe business during kobe and whatever comes up and so right now we have with us gen from cranes critter care john. Thanks for joining us for the first small business segment. Thank you so much for inviting us into i actually chow four chinchilla friends with me this ursula one thing. That's a little bit different about further care. Is we go far beyond just captain dogs. We do all sorts of exotic whether it's earned small mammals sarmiento reptiles anything because we have so many people that have pets chats dogs in. I noticed when i was working at the ap l. That was a big issue. People were having was not being For anything other than just basing cat dog or if they had animal what medical issues. So that's one thing that Critter cares able to do is we can do animals with medical issues whether that be needing shots multiple times a day medications multiple times a day. We can do dogs or cats with behavioral issues. That could normally go to a kennel or normal. Dog sitter whether it be sonic stranger danger or anything bats. We also work with harder cheeses. I personally love the challenges in house. Seven years experience were sheltered in animals because training shelter. Animal is so much different than training in that. You thought from the pet store in today's nickel company though. It's just a little bit different methods of going about things but it's been really great overall. We've had to change a lot of cova right. And that's one thing. This kind of bennett trick is as cova comes up each month. We have to kind of a daft. Do whatever we see that customers are looking for whether if the people going out of town so that increase number of training sessions of we noticed people wanting more medical care people wanting more educational seminars. So whatever people are looking for cranes critter cares filling in that gap and just go with the flow of were covance. Add in what people are meeting with as far as animal care. So where would you say you start. Sounds like such an amazing and valiant effort that you're doing especially for individuals in the community. You're almost like an immeasurable acid because through You're still trying to push still trying to make sure that the animal care is first and foremost so what pushed you into his avenue this world so i actually started adding animal shelter as a veterinarian assistant. I was there for four years and then i switched to another shelter as their main foster four nader doing educational seminars. And that's one of the biggest issues i noticed was i was in the intake department where people would surrender. Animals in have issues in a big thing is lack of education whether it be their animal has issued. They don't know how to properly train or fix it. So then immediately playbay. Just surrender or their four hours a day. Don't have anyone to let them out in the they don't have time to have an animal or someone passed away or moved out there. Sheila left behind. They have no idea how to take care of. It can shallow surrender over and it's one of those things where the more education were able to provide the public a lot. More people keep animals in their homes. Take better care of their animals. It makes a better relationship between the owner of pet in more animals. Just stay healthy happy home. So it's a little bit of keeping animals out of the shelter keeping almond good conditions just for improve quality of life for everyone right. Yeah no so. I wanted to actually ask about something along those same lines. Since we've been going through cova. This is something that we touched on. In in one of my classes actually we were talking about Pharmaceuticals and medications for animals versus for people Was he was business of biology through. You're talking about big pharma quite a bit but you know one of the things that came up is that there's different right if you have a life threatening disease or disorder. You're probably more likely to get that medication than you would. For a life threatening disease or disorder for an animal or at least some people are so along those same lines of what you were talking about. One thing that i was hoping to kind of get out there. One thing i think that needs saying is i'm sure that lots of people bought a new animal because the kobe right. You're locked up. You're stuck at home. You need a buddy someone. Yeah but that said tat. I'm slightly concerned that we're gonna see a big christmas dump ejup fact at the end of covid right where everyone is like. Well now. we're back at work now. We're back at school now. We're busy now. We don't have any time and so well. We have to get rid of the animals. So i guess i wanted to kick it over to jenin. Just see what you thought about that. Do you think that phenomenon is going to happen once we quote unquote get back to normal and like what could you say to pet owners. That currently do have their pet that you know maybe thinking of doing something like that so i completely agree and that's something even when i felt the shelter we talked about with so many people now that they're working from home temporarily were adopting animals but they're not thinking in the future a lot of those times so that's one thing during summer especially i focused on was doing seminars in different on how to prevent separation anxiety. That's gonna be one of the issues as well with on people getting poppies. The puppies are missing to people being home all day leaving for maybe two hours tops and all of a sudden you're drastically or changing their schedule their way of life pretty much by being gone nine ten hours a day. That's going to have a lot of issues with separation. Anxiety being the biggest one and then i see a lot of people once that happens to run around to shelters reasonable surrender.

Cova AP Bennett John Sheila Jenin
Purdue Pharma Offers Restructuring Plan, Sackler Family Would Give Up Ownership

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Purdue Pharma Offers Restructuring Plan, Sackler Family Would Give Up Ownership

"Do Pharma submitting its bankruptcy restructuring plan overnight? Here's compost Frank Lindsay. The Sackler family owns the company. They boosted their offer to settle opioid lawsuits to $4.28 billion. That's 1.3 billion Maura than their original offer. Produce farm a file the bankruptcy restructuring plan right before the midnight deadline. Money from the settlement deal will go to reimburse states, local governments and other plaintiffs who super due for its role in the opioid crisis. Last month, Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson announced our state share would be $13.5 Million, which will go toward treatment prevention and other efforts to fight the opioid

Frank Lindsay Pharma Maura Washington State Attorney Bob Ferguson
Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

Morning Edition

03:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

"Pharma, The company that makes OxyContin filed its bankruptcy plan last night, And here is the plan, the company itself will be dissolved. A new organization will be created that will direct profits to help people. Hurt by the opioid epidemic. Now, two dozen states immediately rejected this plan to help answer why NPR's addiction correspondent Brian Mann is with us. Hi, Brian. Hey. Good morning, Noel. How did Purdue Pharma described this plan working overtime. Yes. So what the company's president Steve Miller says, is that a new company is going to be created from the ashes of produce farmer that's going to essentially exist to benefit the public. The sack lawyers will have no roller ownership. And over time, this new firm will generate hundreds of millions of dollars, much of it from selling OxyContin, which they say they can do ethically and safely. Will also produce medicines that will go to help people suffering from opioid addiction, and they saved a total value of all that overtime will be roughly $10 billion. Members of the Sackler family also issued a statement late last night, saying, this plan offers and I'm quoting here. An important step toward providing help to those who suffer from addiction. It was clearly thought through. Why did so many states come out and rejected? Offhand? Yeah, there were months of negotiations leading up to this and a big complaint from state attorneys general, most of them Democrats, Noel is that produce farmer and its owners. Seculars. They're gonna only offer of about $500 million, right. At first. The rest of the cash payments, including $4.2 billion promised by the Sackler is themselves. That would be spread out slowly in installments that would be paid over most of the next decade. And that slow pace really angers critics like Maura Healey, she's attorney general in Massachusetts. What the sacristy are offering essentially is a way for the payments to be structured. That makes it convenient for them. They get to keep their billions of bank accounts and make money and use the interest to pay. You know, the state's out over time. Well there OxyContin fortune keeps growing. And there's one other rub here for critics, and that's the fact that a lot of that $10 billion in value that produce farmer talks about it doesn't actually come in the form of cash, which communities really need to pay for addiction programs. And said the plan envisions providing low cost addiction treatment drugs like people, Morphine and the lock zone, which this new spinoff company they hope to create, would make and sell at a discount.

Brian Mann Sackler Noel Purdue Pharma Oxycontin Steve Miller Pharma NPR Maura Healey Brian Massachusetts
Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

Up First

03:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

"Pharma the maker of oxycontin filed. Its long bankruptcy plan just before midnight last night in a federal court right. So here's the plan. The company itself will be dissolved. A new organization will be created that would direct profits to help people who were hurt by the opioid epidemic but two dozen states came right out and they rejected that plan. They say it doesn't hold the sackler family which owns purdue pharma accountable. Let's bring bringing. Npr's addiction correspondent. Brian man Brian what does purdue pharma savings. This plan will do the company's president a he's a guy named steve miller and he says this new company that will be created from the ashes of purdue farmable essentially exist to benefit the public. The sackler will have no role or ownership going forward and over time. This new firm will generate hundreds of millions of dollars much of it from selling oxycontin which they say they can do ethically and safely. They'll also produce other medicines that will help people with opioid addiction. According to purdue pharma the total value over time To thousands of creditors will be billions of dollars and members of the sackler family also issued a statement last night. They said this plan offers. And i'm quoting here. An important step forward helping those who suffer from addiction. Okay but wire so many states unhappy about this a lot of reasons but a big complaint is from state attorney general most of them democrats who say that purdue pharma and its owners the sackler only offering up about five hundred million dollars right up front the rest of the cash payments including four point. Two billion dollars promised by the sackler themselves. All that money would be spread out in installments. Paid over most of the next decade that really angers critics like more healey. She's attorney general in massachusetts. What the are offering essentially as a way for the payments to be structured. That makes it convenient for them. They get to keep their billions and bank accounts and make money and use the to pay. You know the states out over time while they're oxycontin or chin keeps growly and there's another row bay for critics and it's affected a lot of the ten billion dollars in value. Promise by purdue pharma in this deal doesn't actually come in the form of cash that communities desperately need to pay for things like addiction programs in public health instead. This plan would provide low cost addiction treatment drugs like buprenorphine and lock zone which the new spin off company would make and sell at a discount. Then what happens to the sackler here. Because if the federal bankruptcy court approves this plan i mean they feel any personal thing at all. This is a really big question. After launching oxycontin and claiming it was safer than opioids other opioids the sackler and their company hauled in more than thirty dollars in revenue. Purdue pharma has since pleaded guilty twice to federal criminal charges for their marketing of opioids researchers say oxycontin contributed to this explosion of opioid addiction and death. Now the actors have agreed to give up control of their company. But some critics point out that purdue pharma was already sinking under the crush of all these lawsuits. So it's not clear how big a financial sacrifice that really is. Members of the family also added about a billion dollars to the earlier settlement offer. They made but in this deal they will keep most of their personal fortunes and they'll admit no

Purdue Pharma Brian Man Brian Sackler Family Oxycontin Steve Miller Pharma NPR Healey Massachusetts
Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

Our American Stories

00:17 sec | 3 weeks ago

Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

"Billion plan submitted to a bankruptcy judge Monday night Produce Farm, a maker of Oxy cotton would be transformed into a new entity that would funnel profits into combat in the nation's opioid debacle. The Sackler family, Purdue Pharma's owners would pay four billion out of their own pockets. His

Produce Farm Oxy Cotton Purdue Pharma
"pharma" Discussed on Think: Business Futures

Think: Business Futures

08:13 min | Last month

"pharma" Discussed on Think: Business Futures

"The things will probably go back so what they were. Precourt it So at the moment. The government's happy roy. A blank check to get Vaccines rolled out but If you look at how pharmacy of the big pharma has worked in the past. You know they've sort of being limited to the ac talk format and that has a limited number of funds so Wants things go back to normal. I think that yes. There will be some of that. Goodwill will flow. but i think that You know the government's gonna have the rain that back in when it obviously comes to issues economies of scale logic companies. Obviously have that in their favor. Is that how the system should work. You have logic. Companies at the top of the chain with their economies of scale and then smaller almost boutique companies if you will that specialized knowledge of of regulatory environments and commercialization is that way. You potentially say the industry heading. Yeah i mean. I think you probably need a big mix of both. I mean the other thing that comes into this is agility and i'm not sure that agility is necessarily only in the domain of small companies big companies could be agile to i think that's probably more about the mindset. The why they were that. That certainly something. That's critical. Whatever saw is organization urine. And we've all lived that right through the pandemic just just thinking about all of the the people that are in hospitality and and have have to change their business model law thinking about how quickly tally health came in. Everybody's had to be at jaw to me. That's the take home message. Is that you know the days of planning a long term strategy sticking to it a been sort of challenged not only by the pace. Which technology is advancing but also by the situation that we're in in the pandemic an i think all players in the system can learn from that what i think can be. Enhanced is the level of government and industry collaboration. So that's that's been excellent in terms of vaccine development but there are real learnings from that that it would be nice to translate into other areas in in pharmaceuticals medicines. There is pressure on the government to build infrastructure and manufactured in australia. And so i think what may happen. Is you'll see shifts to at least in a smallest go having some of the products produced in australia and that will lead to job creation than a late two other other pressures on the government to support it as an industry so i i think that that you'll have these two competing constraints one the budget which will try right back in. But i think that the manufacturing producing something that has a supply chain security is down to push it in the other direction as well. It would be nice. If some of the lessons learned from that could be translated to other areas of marinade and health because a lot of course you know the pandemic devastating it continues to roll on. But it's not the only health need in town right there menu anymore so it would be really interesting to to apply these learnings to other therapeutic areas women come to a point like goodwill is it possible in business to quantify goodwill is. That's something that pharmaceutical companies would be looking at the moment in many ways saying did they. Reputation is better than it has been in decades up telling you look this. There's been decades of research. I'm not necessarily in the pharmaceutical industry. In by what's good brand equity which is what's the value of our company beyond. What's on alan. So for example kirk just with the manufacturing plants and the products that they have sitting on the show for his the nine coca-cola with a lot more than the physical product in physical plants So i think that yes. The pharmaceutical companies should be looking at the issues of brand equity. But that's not going to translate. At least within the current system into any i think economic power because the way that these pharmaceuticals are handled through the system. Is that basically. You have these committees Pharmaceutical companies have to put up a case for why these The drugs should be Subsidized to the public Part of that. he's an economic case. But i don't think that Brand equity has been a part of that discussion in the pasta. And i'm not sure it would actually fly with the way. The car structure is set up. Easily is leading the european union into what many describing vaccine protectionism light last week. Obviously block the expert of a quarter of a million doses of the zenica vaccine that australia had contracted for what happens when a nation block supply of an order vaccine. And how would that be rectified. I think what i can say. Is that be the good situation. Australia's and this is thanks to the public health. Response and the ability that we've had to to control covid nineteen disease We are in a much better situation than the rest of europe and if one puts an equitable access hat on than taking away from from the legalities in the politics of shutting borders and an house over nations deal with that europe. Needs the vaccines more than we did. They So so i i think this is where we probably will look back to organizations like the kovacs facility who are aimed at equitable access. And and i guess in. Maybe this is idealistic. But what would be preferable is if the world worked together to make vaccines available according to tonight and it's always tricky to manage that in the context of all these individuals supply agreements that that companies and governments have and do you think the kovacs could evolve into potentially almost global pharmaceutical regulatory authority in the same way that after the first will be at the league of nations to second mobile the united nations. Do you think there's potential particularly with the way that we've saying the various different regulatory rigors of different countries being put to the test various vaccines having to pass a number of different checks and balances throughout the world. Do you think potentially there is an opportunity to have a more streamlined global supply chain for particularly vaccines think there are probably two parts to that on the supply chain. My understanding is that you know kovacs has probably been able to procure vaccine and roller out more successfully than than what happened in two thousand and nine with h one n one pandemic and again. I'm i'm not across the country by country details but but i do understand that the the main challenge getting vaccine out in in the flu pandemic of two thousand nine supply chain and and i think you know perhaps that that contributed to the way the society set up and the fact that they have started to roll out vaccines in low and middle income countries. I think is a success. Success story that could be built upon on the second point on regulatory collaboration. There's a lot of collaboration going on. the therapeutic goods administration which is at regulate to here is part of a group called the access consortium and its regulatory authorities from canada. Uk switzerland and singapore and includes australia and they have agreed to collaborate and share data for covid nineteen vaccine so whilst we lack a globally harmonize regulatory system. We do now have lorrimore. Mechanisms to sharing data. Another example in oncology would be the oldest project which is led by fda tj. also participates. Mrs wear on college medicines if they re reviewed by one regulated can be accelerated with with all this program so there is more and more collaboration going an unannounced. You a question. yes. I think events like this. They trigger that when they show.

singapore canada australia kovacs nine last week Uk tonight nineteen vaccine europe both first nineteen disease switzerland second point european union decades coca-cola two parts two thousand
Australia Asks European Commission To Review Italy's Block On Vaccine Shipments

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:18 sec | Last month

Australia Asks European Commission To Review Italy's Block On Vaccine Shipments

"Report later this morning, Australia seeking assurances from the European Commission that shipments of vaccines are not blocked again after Italy Banda large export of the AstraZeneca coronavirus shots, the quarter million does. Shipment was blocked from leaving. The EU is part of a system to ensure big pharma companies to

Italy Banda European Commission Australia Astrazeneca EU Pharma
Man Allegedly Flashes Pellet Gun With Laser Sight During Medford Road Rage Incident, Northwest of Boston

WBZ Afternoon News

00:22 sec | Last month

Man Allegedly Flashes Pellet Gun With Laser Sight During Medford Road Rage Incident, Northwest of Boston

"Bond. When another car tried to merge into her route of travel. That driver apparently brandished a gun. State police tracked down that man discovered it was a pellet gun with an extended magazine and then attach laser sight. The suspect, Patrick Injury of Stone, Um, was arrested shortly thereafter and faces charges. Students of Blue Hill Regional technical School close to finishing a home in Canton. WBC's Chris Pharma

Patrick Injury State Police Blue Hill Regional Technical S Canton WBC Chris Pharma
Drug executives: Big jump in vaccine supply is coming soon

WBZ Midday News

00:42 sec | Last month

Drug executives: Big jump in vaccine supply is coming soon

"Today in Washington with executives of Big Pharma as members of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. Look for ways to expand the availability and supply of covert 19 vaccines. Modern is president Dr Stephen Hold in his opening Collins. Hold the committee. The Cambridge drug maker has been able to ramp up its facilities already more than 100 million doses, and they're on track to beat their already ambitious production goals. They're not targeting delivery of the 2nd 100 million doses of our vaccine. By the end of May and a 3rd 100 million doses by the end of July, a full two months ahead of schedule. Hold also says they will continue to collaborate with manufacturing partners and the federal government to increase the Efficiency of their production process without compromising quality or safety.

Dr Stephen Hold House Committee On Energy And Big Pharma Washington Collins Cambridge Federal Government
How to keep your love of chocolate from destroying the planet

PODSHIP EARTH

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

How to keep your love of chocolate from destroying the planet

"In case you're wondering dark. Chocolate is in fact the more environmentally friendly and healthier choice. 'cause no milk is used and there's less sugar than no chocolate dark chocolate. Even been linked to lowering blood pressure and heart disease and at its best. Cocoa production has the potential to do no environmental harm and fortunately sustainable management practices that widespread which leads to damage of the rainforest. Ecosystems in which cocoa is grown to avoid these impacts trying by chocolate. That's fair trade. Direct trade and certified. The result is chocolate. That's healthy for you the pharma's and the planet

Heart Disease
Jared Leto on new movie 'The Little Things' and being an Oscar winner

Popcorn with Peter Travers

06:38 min | 2 months ago

Jared Leto on new movie 'The Little Things' and being an Oscar winner

"Hi everyone. I am peter travers. This is popcorn where we tell you. What's going on at the movies. And i saw terrific movie right now called the little things. This is a movie about two cops played by of all people in washington and rami. Malek in search of someone they think is a serial killer in nineteen ninety los angeles and this guy that they focused on is played by my guest today. jared leto. Who usually gives them a run for their money in terms of letting them twist in the wind deciding whether his character is guilty is he. A serial killer is he not. I've got to tell you jared that this is one of my favorite performances of yours. It's it's like a co lassic kind of movie villain that we don't know if he's guilty of what he's accused of but we know is guilty of something definite strange character but he has humor is playful. He's all those things that make you remember character. So did you feel when you first read the script. No i said what is this. I don't wanna do this. I is was actually buy those my response. I thought you know. Maybe i should explore different territory. You know. I played a kind of than the darker side of the moon. A bit and You know. I thought maybe this wasn't the right thing to do And then after talking to john lee. Hancock and i realized that there there could be an opportunity. Here's he seemed really open. I said if we're going to do this together. I'd like to to to kind of use it as an exercise in transformation to to really try to sculpt this this this wild man albert's pharma Into something quite unlike anything. I'd done before so he seemed really game And the prospect to working with denzel washington one of my heroes and then rami malek in the mix. It was just couldn't say no. And what i love about you. Working with them is that yes albert. Your character trump really tries to drive the both of them crazy and with a kind of zen deadpan. That you have yourself you know. There's i don't want to say there's a little of you albert but there's there's some of it in. Yeah sure i've been. You know you you take parts of yourself. Other people Experiences that you've had and you kinda just build this collage you know i it with. Albert's parma was head to toe from the walk to the voice. I had different color is different knows different teeth. I had some other prosthetics different way of carrying myself and it was quite exciting to put this guy to life and to really take risk and push things right up to the edge And hopefully not crossover into absurdity But yeah he is a bit An un unwittingly unknowingly zinn. He is the voice of like maybe a soothing yoga teacher or something does. There's one i don't want to spoil any platt detests. But there's one point where they both taking you to the police station in la. It's an interrogation room and the phone rings and albert says is that for me. You know quite a quite innocent with it. It's that kind of thing that he's open to sort of any moment until he's ready to spring with something that will make denzel crazy. Sic chrissy i. there's nothing more fun than you know. antagonizing the other characters in the film and for spar he knew he uses that as a tool a likes to keep people off balance off center and humor is one of the ways that he does it and it was quite fun to show on saddened to bring all kinds of different Ideas for ad libs and improv and John lee hancock was amazing. Because you know he was the writer as well but incredibly generous with the opportunity to improvise ad-lib and he really just let me go to town. Would you haven't worked with denzel rami before right. No no no. I had an an. I didn't know them Either and i mean what was kind of fun as well as that didn't do any rehearsal like for the interrogation senior talking about that was the first scene with all three of us and the first big seen it was quite intense and intimidating Exciting there was a lot of pressure and it was explosive on sad. It was it was there. Were fireworks going off. It was really exciting to get in the ring with those guys. Everyone came prepared. I think we all knew there was an opportunity there and we all took advantage of it. Well you know all you have oscars so now. Nobody can ask you to do anything. You don't wanna do right. You just hold that thing up. You can take it with you that day. You want you could certainly a casa damage with it It is a you know. Denzel washington said the other day. You know trophies the they it's like when you're a prizefighter that the belt you won the last times not going to help me this time in the ring and Is true you know you you. It's beautiful thing to be acknowledged and winning the oscar. Was you know. An unforgettable highlight of my life and share that with my family and my friends and supporters Through my life was a really special thing. It doesn't help you when you're sitting opposite denzel washington and you've got to

Albert Peter Travers Rami Malek Malek Jared Leto Rami Denzel Washington John Lee Jared Hancock Los Angeles John Lee Hancock Parma Washington Denzel Rami Zinn Platt Chrissy UN
Jazz Pharmaceuticals to Buy GW Pharma for $6.7 Billion

Rick Hamada

00:13 sec | 2 months ago

Jazz Pharmaceuticals to Buy GW Pharma for $6.7 Billion

"Continue to rally Spurred on by News that jazz pharmaceuticals will be buying cannabis based drugmaker G W Farmer for nearly $7 billion, a move that's expected to boost investor interest in the plan and its medical benefits and electric

Jazz Pharmaceuticals Drugmaker
Despite Biden's Executive Orders, Vaccine Production May Be Hard To Ramp Up

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:49 min | 2 months ago

Despite Biden's Executive Orders, Vaccine Production May Be Hard To Ramp Up

"Biden's been signing executive orders to try to ramp up vaccine production and supplies. Sarah Jane Tribble of Kaiser Health News, says these new measures, which include invoking the Defense production act Well, not necessarily mean more vaccines anytime soon. Sir Jane Tribble joins us now. Thanks so much for being with us. It's good to be here. Thank you. The Defense production Act, of course, gives the president sweeping authority to try and and speed up the supply of materials and services from domestic industries. What could it do? And where does it fall short when it comes to increasing the supply of vaccines so that they can do immediately is really make it possible for glass vials and the production of Materials for that to come in and be laid out for the manufacturers. The other thing the DP taken duo is it can help the company's discuss what kind of supply needs they have. And get those on market so far with Visor and Madonna. What we've seen is them announcing big ramp ups in the second half the year and we're going to see a lot more vaccines coming out. What about the vaccine itself? How do you convert in industrial system for making all kinds of stuff to making room for 300 million Doses of vaccine. Well, it's not easy. You can't force these companies to produce more vaccine. Necessarily. They have to repurpose facilities that could take months. Making new plants can take years. Also part of the challenge relates to the vaccines themselves, the messenger or in a data that vaccine itself is fragile and breaks down easily, so it needs to be handled with a lot of care with specific temperatures and humidity levels. It's also massive quality control needs that need to happen, and scientists and engineers are needed to run it, so there are a lot of factors at play. The other thing. I think a lot of folks don't think about is that supply chain the upward supply Jane that it takes for these companies to make him these vaccines are made in one plant and say, Kalamazoo, Michigan. These vaccines are produced by multiple plants around the globe, and we're talking about shipping and feeling it takes many different parties to make one vaccine. Does the Defense Production Act permit American president to compel Fizer, an American company? To provide the vaccine for Americans first. I think that's very questionable, highly questionable. Biden could use it to force private pharma companies to transfer their technology to either another company or to just make more because what we're talking about is companies that actually tap into contract manufacturers across the globe. Not all the parts of these vaccines are being made here on American soil. So to say, you must make it just for America that gets pretty tricky and dicey. From a political standpoint,

Sarah Jane Tribble Kaiser Health News Sir Jane Tribble Biden Madonna Fizer Kalamazoo Jane Michigan Pharma America
The Power of Decentralized Marketing

Strength In Business

09:25 min | 3 months ago

The Power of Decentralized Marketing

"Of the centralized marketing gone are the days of critical thinking and freedom of speech. Those who don't comply with the mainstream narrative are d. monetize d platform and often labeled mentally. Ill it's time to leave the centralized marketing land of Facebook twitter youtube and all the other platforms and join decentralized networks. That welcome people who are bold enough to question everything. I joined twitter and facebook game. Twenty seven. I mean those were fun times because nobody really what we were doing. Social media marketing was a new term and the vast majority of people and businesses including major league corporations had no clue what to do with these platforms. I remember the first. At s-. I ran on facebook. I mean back then. Ads were approved instantly and costs. Were ridiculously low. Like in the good old days of email marketing everybody on facebook was clicking on your ass to find out more about this new feature along with whatever you were offering early internet marketers. Were mostly running ads for free e books. You can download from a website you were sent to. It was simple and straightforward marketing approach. That worked seamlessly then greed kick in and what used to be a peaceful place together with loved ones and like minded people turned into an ugly spot. That reminds us of certain behaviors and character's humanity rather knock made acquaintance with so here. We are today as more and more people awaken to the luge of this three d game which is designed so perfectly that a tricks even our most advanced spiritual teachers into believing it's trip for those of us who decided to go all in and up our level of consciousness in order to play this game to our utmost capabilities. We're now faced with incredible challenges. Those who think they can control this amazingly designed game by enslaving the entire planet when most likely encounter some cataclysmic surprises that being said. Let's leave the spiritual playfield for moments and discuss a few tangible marketing solutions to assist your transition from centralized to decentralized marketing networks. And i like to talk to you about the new marketing disruptor which is blockchain so library odyssey minds float p- research. None of these brands and companies are a household name remember two decades ago the same for facebook twitter and youtube the blockchain technology that underpins bitcoin therion coin and all the other cryptocurrencies is already changing the way we do marketing and promote our businesses the biggest difference between the centralized social networks and the decentralized blockchain based attorney tiv- that i just mentioned is that these companies reword users for using their product instead of gathering questionable personal data and selling them to third party corporations and even government entities. Now if you wanna find out more about library minds and flow for example. I highly suggest you listen to my other podcasts. And also check out the my blocks on strengthened business dot com especially the one aware i Wrote and i talked about minds adds that episode is called. Why bother with blockchain social ads. And you might want to hop over to strengthen business dot com and going to that block. Because i shared some a screenshots with you as to how i set up these ads on mines Although there are in the early stages of the platforms per se aren't sophisticated as aloud words any especially facebook but still a lot that he can do. Okay so here are some of the podcast episodes. That are highly suggest. You check out First one is where to go win. Centralized social media kicks off their platform. The next one as i already mentioned why bother with blockchain social ads and another one would be humans or machines. Whom do you create your content for so if you've been listening to strengthen business podcast simply search for these episodes the one with the centralized social media where to go with the kick you off their platforms was the episode that are recorded before this now a lot of my clients and also people that i talk to come to me and say okay. What now especially professionals medical professionals who have different opinion than big pharma. They'll like okay. How i wasted my entire life Or mine tire to last week. All the laws of decade posting on youtube and facebook and now that they banned me were the platform. me what do i do i mean. Have i literally wasted my time. And here's something that. I want to highlight an. I want to suggest That you do and first of all Something very critical in terms of thinking and mindset so first of all your time invested into f. a. m. g. is not wasted so in the past two to three decades f. a. m. g. with Fans for facebook. Amazon apple microsoft and google had a blast they seemingly appear out of nowhere. I mean that's what the majority's purposely deceived to believe and slowly but surely they gained control over our behaviors are thoughts are interest and social interactions. Now to this day. I recall the article written by robert booth with the title. Facebook reviews new speed experiment to control emotions. It was published in the guardian. On june thirtieth. Two thousand fourteen. I repeat facebook. Reviews newsfeed experiment to control emotions. If you're interested in that go to the guardian. It's on june thirtieth twenty fourteen. Very good article. You might wanna read it now. The offensive strengthened business. That was more than six years ago cake. Twenty fourteen now. What do you think happened in the meantime so knowing all these highly unpleasant and disturbing facts about facebook and all the other companies. Why do you think. I still suggest that you haven't wasted your time on social media. Look i've been running ads on the face of ecosystem since two thousand eleven. I educated hundreds of students in my life courses and workshops on how to run profitable ads on facebook instagram and messenger. I created their academy. Where i taught students how to opt game so that they can get the most for their buck went advertising on the social platforms. Now don't you think that. I learn quite a few things about targeting copywriting design call to action network interoperability and so forth that i can immediately apply to block chain advertising. You bet i can. Actually it makes things super easy as these platforms are still in the early stages. While facebook's advertising product is a behemoth in terms of complexity structure and data points compared to these platforms so facebook compared to minds as i mean. It's it's still a joke. Or if you take a p- researches which is a decentralized search engine keywords taking compared to google ad words or google ads. I mean early stages. There's so much that you can take away from everything that you learned on these platforms and apply to the blockchain. Now for you specifically this means the following if you have run ads on any of these platform. I don't care whether that's facebook. I don't care whether that's lengthen pinterest. Snap tiktok whatever you this if you have done. Follow management on twitter or instagram. If you have worked on improving your copywriting skills if you have learnt to shoot and edit videos an audience say for example for youtube if you have engaged in any kind of social media marketing and david these you most definitely can take all that knowledge and apply it one to one to the decentralized marketing networks based on blockchain technology. Remember their technology changes that is there is no one entity controlling whatever it is that you're saying you're putting up now. The only thing. I'd encourage you to do is to stay humble. Be open to learning new things. And more importantly to be willing to engage in marketing activities that are created for humans. Not some stupid machines. And they're all greats like in the early days everybody's setup their pages and all these. Seo thing for google please write for humans create content for humans

Facebook Twitter Youtube Robert Booth Pharma Google Amazon Microsoft Apple Pinterest Instagram David
How to Avoid Becoming a Meal for a Cheetah

60-Second Science

04:15 min | 3 months ago

How to Avoid Becoming a Meal for a Cheetah

"The cheetah is the rarest big cat in africa less than seven thousand adults remain on the planet think of it this way for every cheetah on the planet. There's more than four starbucks. Coffee shops the most important cheetah stronghold is in central namibia but the cheetahs. They're don't live within national parks. They live on privately. Owned farmland. Pharma's having huge problems with cheetahs losing a lot of stuck and there are other farmers who actually didn't have any problem at all ecologists you're melts heimer from the live knits institute for zoo and wildlife research in berlin assumed at first that all farmers had cheetah trouble. It was just that some were more likely to complain about it. But after tracking fifty collared cheetahs he began to suspect that there really was a pattern to their killing by the time his team had data from one hundred six cheetahs colored over the course of a decade. Not only was. He certain that cheetahs were more likely to kill in some places than others but that he could solve the problem. We indeed found. These communication hubs of cheetahs which spread evenly across the landscape with a high activity of cheetahs within the hubs cheetahs. Aren a social species but they still need to trade information. They don't meet physically typically not but they leave marks and prominent lent marks and whether they either use during fees to communicate with each other. Think of it as a coffee shop for cats where animals trade gossip even though these communication hubs only comprise around ten percent of the landscape cheetah. Spend most sometimes all of their time within them. These basically a long-term tradition which is passed on from cheetah generation to cheetah generation Some of these communication hubs basically no-no. Let's say the mocking location. Mocking trees were known by farmers. For sixty seventy years like the grandfather of current farmer already knew the mocking cheese in this area. What the farmers never realized is that only some farms overlap with the cheetahs communication hubs melts. Heimer thought that if those farmers relocated their most vulnerable herds. It could be a huge help. Here remembers the first farmer. He tried to convince and i told him. Look wilfred i have. I have the idea that they are actually there because of these mocking trees. And you happen to have your small shops accepting the same area. Let's try to move your herds out of this area and and keep them somewhere else and then let's measure the losses. And he was laughing at me said i can nice idea but i'm not sure whether it's going to work. They would probably follow the cast so we tried this. Actually it worked and he. He earned much money because he lost less cavs. After that thirty-five more farmers agreed to try it out in all the number of calves to cheat. Predation fell by a whopping eighty six percent. Of course some cattle outside of communication hubs were still lost. The cheetah's but it was at a low enough level that most farmers seem to tolerate it. What this means is that. Cheetahs aren't actively following the cattle. They simply take advantage of whatever food is available nearby. If it's not cattle then they go after. Wild ungulates springbok orix or coup. There are no so called problem. Cheetahs who intentionally seek out cattle instead there are problem areas. That's a much easier problem to solve. And it's one that doesn't result in farmers killing cheetahs melts. Heimer is now hard at work collecting tracking data from cheetahs in other parts of africa to see whether his findings hold up in other ecosystems so often it seems as if the goals of wildlife conservation are incompatible with the goals of commerce but this story reveals that infect biodiversity and agriculture can coexist allocates is really one of these nice example which can go hand in

Heimer Live Knits Institute For Zoo A Namibia Pharma Starbucks Africa Berlin
"pharma" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

06:17 min | 5 months ago

"pharma" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"He says that when he goes to local pharmacist meetings with her name comes up, everyone in the room cringes and moans because of her practices he says, she's doing all kinds of wacky dosing and tablets strengths. He feels like she is not doing what she should be doing medication on occasion he has refused to fill prescriptions from her office. He's at, he's been seeing some crazy dosing of oxycontin coming in. that's June of two, thousand, ten, one month later new sales reporter. Another physician said he had a patient from the doctor who was eighty milligrams five times a day. Thought this was over the top and asked me what the maximum dose was. He felt this patient was definitely exceeding it. I told him. Again now, this is the produce sales rep tongue back I told him since it was a single entity opioid, there is no ceiling dose. It is only limited by side effects. He said he would not continue this type of dose. I could read lots and lots more but produced conduct is unconscionable. So They've now pled guilty to three counts of conspiracy. The first is what they call a dual object conspiracy that is a conspiracy to violate to laws at the same time and that is to defraud the United States that is defrauding Medicare and to violate the food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. The. Second count is a conspiracy to violate the federal anti kickback statute. That is by paying off all these doctors with these lavish gigs to continue to overprescribe. Cotton, and the third is another count of violating the anti kickback statute in connection with an outfit called practice fusion. I had to learn a lot about practice fusion, but it is A. So it's an online, it's an electronic health records platform that doctors use and as far as I can tell like. They got the practice fusion people to like code in. Began I'm a I'm a I'm distinctly not a doctor I'm trying to read this from court pleadings, but I'm envisioning this sort of like you know met Rx like you know when you when you type in like you know I've a fever of one, hundred, two and chills and My tongue is dry. What you know what what what symptoms rare some pills yeah. Tells you. So it spits back You know like like Web MD will say like, well, you know seventy percent this is probably the common coal twenty percent. It's you know pneumonia four percents that right? I think that this practice fusion was like an internal product that doctors used. That was the sort of cloud based electronic health records platform and. The purdue people got it to spit out like maybe you should take some oxycodones. Like yes. So that's kind of a holy clown Orrin moment. It's like the doctor. Hey, this this was probably stressful for you as a doctor as well. Why don't you smash if you? Yeah. So this plea agreement has an agreed disposition and I'm going to read it to you. It says the US and purdue agree that the appropriate disposition of this case is as follows one a fine. The sentence imposed shall order criminal fine in the amount of three million. Star three, billion, five, hundred and forty four, million dollars to forfeiture purdue consents to the entry of a forfeiture judgment in the amount of two billion dollars three restitution no restitution for probation no probation now, you might be serving. What's the difference between a fine and a forfeiture? And, the difference has everything to do with the fact that purdue as we have discussed previously is presently in chapter eleven bankruptcy. As a result of all of the claims across the country both civil and criminal against purdue for causing the OPIOID crisis. So in a bankruptcy. You can't get money in or out of the debtor's estate, right? that has to be approved by the court. So forfeiture get super priority, right? It is what we call an administrative claim, and so it means you get to go get that money immediately paid out of the bankruptcy. And so you're like, okay well and as I was reading this, I'm like, all right look getting two billion dollars from Purdue Pharma Right now. Okay I can live with that right because that because the rest of it that the three and a half billion, that's just going to be a general unsecured claim, and so it will get paid out. You know at the very bottom of the bankruptcy after all the vendors are paid and and taken care of. but okay two billion dollars right on top sounds good except five pages later. In the plea deal detailing how the forfeiture works is the section which says. Purdue agrees that she'll tender to the US marshals a two, hundred, twenty, five, million dollar payment in partial satisfaction of the forfeiture judgment within three business days following the entry on the judgment of conviction, right? So okay two, billion they're going to get what eleven percent of that up front two, hundred and twenty five, million within three days. Okay then. On the next section in order to avoid, this is the bottom of page nine to the top of page ten. In, order to avoid the unnecessary imposition of duplicative fines, penalties and forfeiture of the same or similar misconduct. The United States agrees to credit against the two billion dollar forfeiture judgment one, point seven, seven, five, billion of the value distributed or otherwise conferred in settlement of claims asserted by state tribal or local government entities under the plan of reorganization. In bankruptcy well.

Purdue United States Purdue Pharma reporter Drug and Cosmetic Act Orrin fever chills Medicare
"pharma" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

04:10 min | 6 months ago

"pharma" Discussed on What A Day

"Of children from their parents, majority of whom were deported back to Central America while their children remained in custody. Even though the ACLU successfully sued to end the practice and ended up reuniting many of those families over five hundred families who are subject to an earlier pilot policy remained separated. The locations of the parents were not reported in three years later, they're still unknown. Local elections and especially sheriff's elections had a huge impact on isis across the country. We put a link in our show notes to some of the most important ones to vote on this year. Just a few days away from the upcoming football season of cities that are home to ten universities called on conference organizers to be more. Cova cautious eleven mayors signed a letter on Tuesday asking organizers to work with public health officials to set standards for things like community positively rates to decide whether or not. It's safe to play a game. Even fans aren't allowed inside the stadiums. Health officials are worried about things happening outside the Games like tailgating in Football Baseball Trie. The mayors also want game scheduled to be released as early as possible, and for there to be fewer evening and nighttime games because as we know in October nighttime is when Pumpkins and goblins come out. I don't see the Puck is come out at night. Conference organizers have not publicly responded to the mayor's request as of now, the first game of the season is tomorrow in Madison Wisconsin. Aches. The Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe announced at a press conference last night that Iran and Russia have obtained voter information that they could use undermine confidence in our election system. This came after voters in Florida Alaska and Arizona got that appeared to come from the proud boys if our right hate group which threatened to quotes come after them if they didn't vote for trump, the Department of homeland security now says, these emails actually came from. Hackers in Iran, who take advantage of an unsecured proud voice domain address the hackers also access voter registration information, and the FBI says, Russia access those same files separately the FBI, the press conference Lee yesterday afternoon by saying it dealt with a quote major election security issue. Please for the love of God. FBI. Dispense with hype fragile heart simply can't take these late October announcements. Yeah. We're just trying to. All right. Well, another quick bites the dust. The widely mocked streaming APP Qube announced yesterday that shutting down after raising one point seven, five, billion dollars in releasing a slate of sub. Ten minute shows that celebrities thought of as they were driving to the pitch meeting really fast Kobe was made to entertain viewers who are on the go, but it came out six months ago when we were mostly on the stay that led to week subscription numbers and at the time quickly founder and advocate Jeffrey Katzenberg. said quote I attribute everything that's gone wrong corona virus everything Mr Katzenberg if you're trying to make me stand up for cove it, I, won't do it frankly you should be ashamed of yourself following the great qube shutdown it will attempt to sell it shows and will return it's remaining three hundred, fifty million dollars to investors. If you get money back from Qube, please give it to a loved one to bury a secret hiding spot because honestly lost your investing privileges. Honestly the return on the investment will be as high in that secret. I mean if that money on fire more people would see it and those. That's all for Xanthi like the shirt make sure you subscribe the review invest in Wadi are short-form streaming APP on the way until your friends listen. And if you're into reading and not just major election security updates like me, what day is also a nightly newsletter, check it out and subscribe at crooked dot com slash subscribe ign Akilah Hughes I'm getting interesting and don't Disney puts you around if you're making grey's anatomy and scandal and how to get away with murder, the least you can do is get on the jumbos for free. That's right. You could get away with murder for making all those shows for Disney s May..

FBI Kobe football Iran Disney Russia murder Mr Katzenberg ACLU Central America Xanthi Cova Madison Wisconsin Wadi John Ratcliffe Department of homeland Florida
"pharma" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

04:17 min | 6 months ago

"pharma" Discussed on What A Day

"What a is brought to you by Roman being able to afford your medications shouldn't depend on what insurance you have or what coupon you can find. That's why there's row pharmacy row pharmacy is a different kind of pharmacy that fills prescriptions for a flat rate of five dollars each per month with for over five hundred generic indications now copays no coupons no catches just five dollars row pharmacy automatically ships, FDA approved medication directly. To Your door so you never have to worry about running out four.

FDA Roman
"pharma" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

12:17 min | 6 months ago

"pharma" Discussed on What A Day

"pharma" Discussed on Sounds of Science

Sounds of Science

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"pharma" Discussed on Sounds of Science

"The parent molecule and these soil metabolites can also be taken up into the crops and subjected to plant metabolism. Also, if slow metabolism extensive unregulated company outside is generated, then we will find radio products in plants. So for example, stock gray. So the actual metabolic pathway can be very extensive lots and lots of different metabolites which require. Identification. So the vast majority of work on these studies is not spent on the life as spent in the Laura trae revamping extraction from Mike -cation. So. How do you see this work fitting into? Charles. Rivers, larger goal of supporting sustainability. I believe these chemicals in agriculture offers considerable benefits by contributing to sustainable production food feed across the globe government set high standards for the registration of Anchor Chemicals to ensure. They may aren't health environmental safety standards. The vote that the plant metabolism department does contributes massively to human decrease safety since we define what metabolites full in foodstuffs. Good understanding of how agrochemical behaves of these crops. We cannot make judgments on if it is suitable for use and how to monitor those foodstuffs derived from. It went ask follow questions about specifically how to care for some of the more exotic plants. So like for example, we can go with the bananas. I understand bananas are tropical product. So how how many different variables do you have to take into consideration when you're trying to grow them in Scotland okay about his opposite from tropical as you can get get the biggest challenge to Groin Bananas in Scotland as. Well recycle. That's still them. As as we we see the first one is getting. So. We got up and honors from the Canary Islands which off the west coast of Africa. We purchase those boatmen to the south of Spain and then roll them into the. Probably three to four months to setup. We also need high specification glasshouses which we have on-site here. With heating lighting. Tring on people who have an understanding of the whole Toco check. Does a horticulturist need to be specialized in something like that or is that part of the General Curriculum? Someone who's training hold culture is not easy to find. That not not nota gun that someone who can grow a plans. And Maintain A. Through its life cycle and the plight of plants that we grow hair a not necessarily. Scottish. So we need people who will be able to grow anything from Pinellas to wait to. Will thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me Simon. It's been really interesting to visit the site here Denver. On, thank you. Thank you..

Scotland Anchor Chemicals Mike -cation Charles Canary Islands Pinellas Spain Simon Denver Africa
"pharma" Discussed on Sounds of Science

Sounds of Science

08:18 min | 6 months ago

"pharma" Discussed on Sounds of Science

"Include security is a growing global concern because obviously we all need to eat. In order to protect our crops from pests, companies are constantly developing newer and safer fungicides and pesticides. In order to increase yield, they are also developing better fertilizers however in order to not contribute to the problem of pollution and global warming these agrochemicals have to be tested. That's replaces places like Charles Rivers site come in. Here among acres of fields and greenhouses the latest agrochemicals are thoroughly vetted for toxicology. Do they seep into the groundwater? Do they linger in the plant causing issues for the human or animal that eventually eats it? Do they poison the plants pollen causing harm to already vulnerable pollinators these questions and more must be answered before the agrochemical is approved for use joining me today is Simon. Chapel, you functional manager of the Plant Metabolism Department here number. He is here to tell me about the exotic crops they house and how they keep them safe and sustainable. Welcome. Simon. Thank you Marilyn. Welcome to me actually 'cause I'm here joining you as opposed to the other way around. Thank you. So to begin with can you tell me about the site here and how long it's been in operation? Suddenly will this site be no printing since the nineteen seventies unplanned metabolism the operation for which I'm responsible has been operating since the nineteen eighties. Okay. How long have you worked at this particular site I've been working since the late ninety nine hundred s okay what? Kind of a off topic a bit. What are some of the biggest changes that you noticed in that time biggest changes here. we've punches. Sites within John's river, which is unable. To. Expand from Jeff's Edinburgh to Edinburgh. North Spain, which is enabled us to grow more crumbs. We've also had different types of studies of required. We also need to look at residues which lower lois regard to identify lower lower residue. So the types of analytical techniques we've had to develop an purchase on reflects become more. Refined yeah. I guess technology has also just gotten better. So can detect smaller and smaller amounts of these things. So. Do you have any legacy crops that have been here for a long time? Yes, we have enough annoyed. Coach twenty four apple trees. The we can use when necessary we also have an established field area. So grassland field area, which is agricultural providence for round three decades. On most of the crops, we grow grain from seat or can be purchased locally sourced from abroad tell me about some of the more exotic plants you keep here. So we support the global agrochemical industry. We often need to grow crops which far into the UK or even foreign to Europe for example, infamous common crops that we grow is rice support Far Eastern uses. But we have a long list of unusual crops such as bananas, citrus grapevines, mango sugarcane. The plans can be crowning temperature control glasshouses to simulate growing conditions here in the UK with. Not glasshouse rooms, which we can use when a study be. Does I understand from someone else who I was talking to earlier that the glass in glass houses can quite very you've got the typical glass but then you've got like What he say courts glass very expensive but allows you through and also some sort of special type of plastic that also allows the Youth v through but is has a short lifespan. Yes it's true. Sounds pretty cool. So I understand we have sister sites like you said in northern Spain. Do we use them to get a sense of how these chemicals behave in variety of climates? Yes. We have another science yet during the Nova Spain. and. That's operated by field crowns department were possible. We will run a study unto doors rather than glasshouse because out dose study. is exposed to natural sunlight. So the in life as the study with a crop Mike Citrus, cotton, olives would be in. Spain whilst that for crop like weeks. Oh, shook abate. As it make sense. He wanted mimic real world conditions as much as possible. Absolutely. What is your background this work? Why Line? Why this line of work? Why Agriculture? Having completed, doctoral and post doctoral. Studies in plant metabolism at Southampton University in that gave me foyers training in the underlying principles. Fun Recovers them under very specific analytical approaches associated with this type of work. A couple of terms that come up pretty often when I've been looking at your work are metabolites and the radio labeling can you explain what a metabolite is why it's important for the for the testing and then can you explain the radio labeling a little bit? So metabolisms is a degradation product from. This case in agriculture and Foam from the violence system. In this case, the plans that the radio labeling you do, how does that work it's applied to the chemical or mixed with the chemical, but then it's able to be tracked through the whole plant. So we use a test item which has a radio label inserted into the chemical structure. So vast majority of Agricole's are organic. So we will use a carbon fourteen isotope inci-incidentally. Net just makes it easier for the instruments to pick up where the chemical is moved through the plant. It makes it easy. Goes on also to. Rent excellent. So what kind of tests do you run in the plants here? The million studies we run investigate plant metabolism. So that's the metabolism of chemical after to cross and sometimes after application to soil. We is regulated test item. We use that to enable accurate metabolite analysis and it supplied to the crop in a manner similar molecule with us to field. Greatest impotence is the pots of crops harvested for human life consumption what we would call agricultural. Defined that a little bit more. So raw agricultural commodities. So if you to a supermarket. A banana fruit, his a raw agricultural commodities. On Apple Fruits Agriculture Ghanzi. From these crops would not be an agricultural commodity. They don't go into human or livestock consumption. Okay. Would it also be called a live agricultural commodity? If it was like banana pudding, it had been a little bit prospect from one. Okay. Interesting on something like week Tang because of livestock feeding on. Okay. So it could you go into detail about one of these tests. An idea of of the level complexity sure I'll I'll choose our most challenging. Arco for most challenging studies or relational crop metabolism studies amazingly like several real life agricultural scenarios all in one study. Multiple contains soils treated with the radio labelled agrochemical crops then sewn into this treated soil usually at one month. Months and nine to twelve months after treatments the crops grown onto maturity. Typically, we will use a serial wait a rid crop like radish Anna leafy vegetables like lettuce on we will take harvests like forage. Hey, stroll grain needs cheever's. Thing for analysis this study Herod Molecule can be degraded to soil. METABOLITES by bacteria living in soil..

Spain Simon UK Edinburgh Charles Rivers North Spain Arco Europe Southampton University Marilyn Mike Citrus cheever John Tang Jeff Nova Spain.
"pharma" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

14:21 min | 1 year ago

"pharma" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"Week the sharpest minds the freshest thing in the world of finance take you beyond the numbers hype right to the heart of the big issues of the day in recent weeks the investment landscape like that in the media just about the less frankly has been dominated by the Global Corona virus outbreak and today Alpine is going to discuss the potentially enduring impact of the pandemic on how healthcare is delivered. We'll ask whether broader trends around the digitization of the space will continue to be accelerated as we've seen thus far we'll also consider some of those areas less impacted by the disease and its aftermath. And we'll look to what else in the sector is. Seeing interest from investors away from the more immediate and intuitive areas like diagnostics and telemedicine also in focus on the program we'll be pharmaceuticals from gauging. The challenges of Vaccine Development to the risks implicit in developing new products and technologies in the sector. We start today with Lackland towered equity sector strategies for UBS wealth management as. I just mentioned that a pandemic seems to all my stomach. Everything the new cycle the whole discourse really. Can you give us a sense if you can have exactly how profound the impact of this outbreak is going to be on healthcare as a sector on how that healthcare is and will be delivered going forward there will be a large number of changes just as we think that will be a large number of changes in the economy and broader social changes that followed in the public in the near term most of the healthcare companies Holding up reasonably well but there will be some disruption if we try to be on that disruption one of the things that we have seen. That is a real step change. And we've seen this in the last. Few weeks is demand for remote treatment or for telemedicine. We've seen a huge says of interest in this because hospitals are busy looking off to patients in the DEMOC and of course other patients don't want to go to the hospitals as well at the moment Give you data points leading telemedicine company in the. Us recently said that they'd seen a fifty percent increase. In visits this was doing much appetites have surged and the US. Government has even spawned this and has loaded the regulatory barriers. That were part of the reason. Telemedicine had been held back in the past. So it's early signs and this is only one area. But I think we're seeing indications of this has been adopted quite quite rapidly so looking does it therefore follow that that interest in telemit's specifically but I guess in the whole sort of digitalization of healthcare generally will outlast the pandemic. I mean I guess that's that is the strategic sort of question to ask at this time. I think it's a great question. We do believe that both telemedicine specifically and the polka trend of digitization hell cat will end on time investable trend sesame on telemedicine specifically we think one of the reasons telemedicine hadn't used what it was. Tyson's just went away and of course patients have reluctant to try something new as well. Both of those issues that I've been changed have been addressed by the pandemic so if some of the people who have tried it turns out they like it. And we expect telemedicine lost on the broader topic of digitization telemedicine is only one part of what we call health tech and this is really a trend about increasing use of digital data communications remote monitoring to deliver health cap and we know that the world spends an enormous amount of money on healthcare. Loaded up money is wasted and a lot of that could be spent more efficiently so with the demographic trends that are driving that increased healthcare dimond having a way to bend the curve down and get more value for money in the money that we're spending is absolutely necessary. An incredibly valuable so healthcare is a system or health. Care is a system has not used enough. It's in the past. But then no mismatch of data in the industry something like five percents data in the world is generated healthcare system and if we can use that data and if we can use new technology five G. to better communicate and get data into the hands of physician sooner than we think outcomes can be. We think it isn't investable trend. We think this is the white coat that people will realize. It's it's important that we expect us to continue over the long term. Well if we top then look into more broader question around invest ability across all of healthcare. What about those areas that are not so directly impacted or affected by the pandemic plainly? You've described telemedicine this. The digital realm is absolutely fundamental. It's right at the heart of the discussion. What about areas that are that are less immediately impacted? That's also a very important question as you said earlier the pandemic dominating and you cycle at the moment but if we step back if we step back and look at healthcare more broadly if we look at the illnesses and the health challenges that people have to deal with over time we see a different picture so take cancer for example cancer the second leading cause of death in the world and nearly ten million people died of cancer in two thousand eighteen. We know that cancer is linked aging. And we know that well population's aging so that number is going to go up. We spent the number of new cases of concept to keep rising for at least fifteen years at double the right to population growth and we've seen progress but survival rates are still hovering around sixty seven percents in the US and they've been there for at least the last five years so there is more to do as more to do from a social perspective. There's more to do from an economic perspective because the cost of the global economy of cancer zyppah trillion dollars a year and we think there's more from affirmative perspective because around one third of drugs in the global drugs pipeline. I've actually talked in cancer. So there's a huge opportunity here and to answer your question. This is absolutely unaffected by the undamaged. It was a problem last year. It's a problem now and it will still be a problem next year. So we think this is very interesting. Investable what are the risks? Implicit in not just oncology lack lamp but in all of the biotech space the biotech. The primary risk is the failure of the drugs company pipeline and it's inevitable that some of the drugs will fail so we think the best thing to do is to accept that risk but try to mitigate it my building portfolio so you can diversify across different therapeutic areas you diversify in areas such as oncology but you want to build a portfolio of companies that allows you to control your exposure to the risk of failure of any one individual put any one individual company. Tower is important to keep a focus on the longer term secular trends. Is it Jemaine to say that those themes that we've discussed before on this program will be impacted in the short term? Yes but there are also things. We need to keep front and center in order to make better decisions in pursuit of exactly the kind of well balanced portfolio that you were just mentioning there. I think it is Jimmy. I think it's always relevant to look at the long term trends and in fact our clients are looking all the time for those long term second investment trends especially at a time when you have seen a drawdown in the markets if this could make some of those more attractive entry opportunities for those trends that we think are essentially unaffected at a fundamental level by the kind of pandemic. So one of those for example would be genetic therapy's which I believe we talked about before these Treatments that are intended to modify patience. Genetic information so that the information inside that sells to get at the underlying causes of disease so the tensely one time cure for certain inherited diseases. Something that is potentially a pass on shift in medicine if it can be broadened out to treat a wide range of a wider range of treatments. Luckily if we can finish house by coming back to to where we started and considering how this pandemic has altered the landscape. Do you think that the current health crisis because of its scale because of its geographies? It's almost everywhere is a game changer. For the healthcare sector. Or do you think we need to be a little bit cautious about that and actually four large areas as you've already described it's kind of business as usual and it probably will be once. The worst of this is over. Is there a risk of looking at this as as an inflection point I think one of the things that will change for the drugs industry as a result of the dynamic? Is that an industry that had been under a lot of political pressure. You remember. There's been lots of media attention price of drugs in the US. For example people have realized now that found the companies can also do some good and so can other parts of the healthcare system is don't be the hospitals and the workers. This is very clear but also parts of the industry that didn't get a lot of focus before like diagnostics industry so it will be very important with the newly developed tests to understand how. The pandemic is progressing. These questions will still undecided. We're still waiting for important data but I think the political environment media environment around the industry and that is important for investors because it has been weighing on stocks. I think that now as she could be changed somewhat by the realization that companies appears to be delivering towards helping to his apartment. Let's hear next from Laura Sutcliffe. Phd UBS Investment Bank lures area of specialism is pharmaceuticals research. Laura what are some of the sector-wide dynamics across healthcare across all farmer in fact in the context of this new scrutiny investor interest and media interest across the space in recent weeks? You're absolutely right. A lot of interest in health care not just following a broader healthcare as well and unwise. Wouldn't there be because ultimately. I think solution to the predicament. That we find ourselves in the moment is probably only going to come by developing drugs in developing a vaccine for foreign companies. I think in some ways they have very different dynamics and other businesses so in general are D- continues. People are looking at these businesses to do something rather than to shut out at the moment. And I'm sure you've seen in the news press releases things like that about some of the some companies laws. I'm small really guessing. Involved IN ESSENCE. You either drugs repurpose old jug or contribute to the development of a new vaccine so these sort of high profile projects are. I suppose of some of the social responsibility that these companies have these unlike to be put up that make much profit if they get from the. Okay well certainly are no reasons to invest but these these kind of are indeed projects are underway at the moment Interesting I think to a whole cross. Section of people and unwind off despite that unique backdrop. All of what's going on at the moment I wonder. Is it ever more important to try and ignore if you like the media white noise and keep focused on the big picture on the longer term trends? It's important presumably to strike the right balance here. Well I think that's right and for a lot of businesses sort of follow business especially big ones. What's going on sort of Doesn't doesn't stop so in the financial markets people are looking maybe to twenty twenty one already. They've already accepted that this will be a year of disruption so I can understand on a personal note why people are very keen to know if there will be a good truck for treatment when of oxygen might be widely available. That sort of thing but yes Like you say there's also a much longer term view on the future of these businesses which I think is probably quite safe in the in the context the former but also from the perspective once West. Through the the short term lumps and bumps that this cording what the role of these businesses as might be an longtime preparedness lure browsing some recent research notes and reports. You've been producing in recent weeks as part of UBS's ongoing work here. There are some interesting notes on risk in this sector and obviously if we look at Pharma and particularly I guess this was in the context. A piece you wrote and explain her about the development of vaccines but just the way. It might be interesting to get a sense from you. About what those risks are particularly this this question of of development risks with with new drugs with clinical trials and so on. Because that is again. It's very front and center at the moment. Just tell us a bit about about the risk profile here and don't wait. The risks are not changed by the short term existence of upon them. It right so developing drug is a very long process. One that people keep trying to make shorter. And the I think the risks in that sector folly well discussed you out of every ten or twelve dogs that makes it into Ali trials. Maybe one guess Tamaki terribly expensive and like I say it takes a long time in fact scenes of maybe a little bit different. It takes longer to find a really good one but they tend to sort slightly better success rate between the different phases of development. And then actually they. They have quite good characteristics in terms of how much risk they present in futures. They sort of have they patent expired in the same way that that drugs do so. Those things are quite different. Risk profiles for the risk profile doesn't change. I think too much at the moment. I think. Maybe you see people delaying trials and little bit because people are home or that come about recruiting patients but the level of risk I think to drug development is the same as it was before paps. Finally can I ask you about the the quest for vaccine? There's a scrutiny illness. Of course like never before for obvious reasons but what should people bear in mind? I think ties to some of the things we were discussing earlier..

US Vaccine Development Laura Sutcliffe Lackland news press Phd UBS Investment Bank telemit Tyson Tamaki UBS Jimmy D
"pharma" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"pharma" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"So there's a there's sort of an insulin in access problem where you know ineffective because of all this They're going to be people who can't get the vaccine simply because it's owned by one company that could be a very real possibility and you know the companies will say. We're not going to do this. You know it's a pandemic we understand but that logic is very insulting you know because you've been saying you're committed to access and affordability but what have you been doing for the past decade. You know. We have people in this country who are dying because they can't act as insulin. You know we. We have an HIV epidemic. That is not being curbed because TRAVIATA. Prep was at ahead a list price of twenty four hundred dollars a month. You know what what makes you think that these companies who have been price-gouging us for decades are suddenly going to turn around and in this situation be like. Oh yeah you know we're working on Providence non-profit basis and we'll we'll make sure did to to supply everyone at an affordable price if what we have seen from the companies in the past is any indicator of how access and price and supply is going to turn out. We're going to have massive problems not just in this country but globally as well. We could have a unprecedented moral catastrophe. Where a few countries supply a few countries are able to get the supply and the rest of the world is completely shut out. And you see the virus just spreading unchecked. I want to think about now. What are the solutions like? How do we fix this? Why are we so vulnerable? And what should we be doing about it? The good news is that these are all choices where making and so we can make different choices. There's really three things that we need to prioritize. One is that there should be no monopolies on any Kobe. Nineteen treatment or vaccine you know. Some companies are actually stepping up. Some drug companies have relinquished their monopoly rights and have allowed generic competition to to in supply in some in some cases and if the companies don't do that then the government should step in the government has the inherent authority to use patents to break monopolies and to allow generic competition and to allow suppliers. The government should do that one two. We need to massively skill up production so that means pouring much more money into scaling up both the public private production facilities and also getting the pharmaceutical companies in line to get ready for these treatments and Vaccines. Ideally want to treatment or vaccine is proven effective issue. Be available to everyone world as soon as possible but right now we have. We're going to have time gaps. We're GONNA have time legs and we don't want any of that and so we need to be getting ready to for a situation in which we have the treatments and vaccines stockpiled waiting. Ready to go ready to be deployed as soon as we fit configure out if they are safe and effective and a third thing. We need is global cooperation. You Know President. Trump has made some pretty horrible remarks about the World Health Organization and the World Health Organization is certainly not without its flaws but a key element of this crisis is that it is a global crisis. Nobody really knows where the tree back seen will come from you. Know countries around the world are spending millions of dollars for research and development. What we need is a global system that allows companies and countries to share knowledge to share manufacturing. Know How to to work together to be able to address this common challenge. I really really appreciate you taking the time To break that down for us and help us to understand How the system works and what. The potential dangers and traps look like. How are you spending this moment? what is what is what is your Quarantine life look like. I work on these issues day in day out and it still hasn't really hit me yet. I'm looking at what is going on and what the world could be and it just it's it's terrifying but the full scale of the crisis really still has not hit me and I think part of it is. I've been doing a lot of reflecting this crisis. The key question asks of US is who we consider disposable. We're making choices right now. That could shave. The lives of billions of people and none of these choices are inevitable. None of these paths or the natural way we decide you know in the past. We've chosen disastrously the global AIDS epidemic. That is still going on and we let millions of people die because of the high price of medicines. I've been really just trying to think about. Are we capable of making that same mistake again? Is that the path that we WANNA go. Are we going to face another moral catastrophe? And I just I I. I hope we don't I hope we don't well. I really really appreciate Your leadership in this moment in making sure that we don't and Thank you for joining us today and And for laying out Rizvi. Thank you so much. Thanks so much as usual on our way out. I want to tell you what I'm watching right now. Cove in nineteen is having a major impact on the American Food Supply. Restaurants and caterers are a major source of food consumption and without them. Food demands falling through the floor. Meanwhile cove in nineteen is making factory operations and shipping nearly impossible. The result dairy farmers are leading milk flow down the drain and major.

World Health Organization US Vaccines President Trump Rizvi
"pharma" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

09:57 min | 1 year ago

"pharma" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Right. We have a lot of new viewers. That are maybe not aware of the plot and deposition but just so you know One of the issues. We've always had on this topic. Is that we get attacked by like I said these people that have no reference point. They don't they're not immunology specialists we also have scientists and doctors and we said. Look. Let's have a debate. Let's just sit down pull off? It knows better. Stanley parking knows better. We have some scientists and doctors and lawyers. That would love to have this debate with you about your science to some of the things we just prove. Cdc where Your Studies in the end? They didn't have the studies. They said they've had they have but we got lucky. We got lucky I think is now a couple of years probably two years ago now. I'm sort of losing track of time because so much is going on but Dr Stanley. Plotkin is degraded the godfather of the vaccine program and there was a divorce case. Going up in Detroit Michigan where the father wanted to force vaccinate the child even though there'd been agreement with their wife when they were married to not back sonate the child now he wanted to force backs and he's actually something we're seeing. Horrifically happened across the country. Usually it's the father but sometimes its reverse but it's a way to try and get more you know to really inflict pain upon the spouse is to do something they know that they don't want which is vaccine the child and they also use it to get favor with the judge and try and get more visitation rights. It's really ugly and it's happening all over the place But this was one of those cases Dr Stanley Plotkin the leading authority on vaccines decided that he would go in to be a witness for this child and why the child should be vaccinated. This is a nine hour. Deposition you can find online. I believe the transcript is out there. Also we have shown many parts of this than segments. This is a section where we actually you know where it's discussed with Stanley. Blocking the idea of a vac vs on back study why not just do want so much could be answered there. And while you're gonNA hear is a lot of the same type of argument that I heard when I was at a meeting at the National Institute of Health Bobby Kennedy and I and several lawyers and doctors and scientists were all invited by Donald Trump to meet with luminaries of our vaccine World and we asked him. Why don't you just do a Baxter's on back study? And they said to us we never will we hear inklings of. We don't know how to control different arguments. Well this argument is put tash now. This is a fairly long segments. Y voided for a long time. And we're about to really geek out so if you're not interested in science or you don't have enough brain cells left right now. I totally understand. You're not into it and you can tune out now but for those of you want to watch. This is the type of thing I really get into this. Is what the producers here at at at the high wire really dive into in care about this. Discussion is fascinating. But it's going to take a little bit of an education so very quickly. I want to give you a couple of terms you need to understand. You're listening to it so that you can understand what's going on so first of all. Let's look at this term a Founder confound was a founder is something other than the thing being studied that could be causing the role. Zolt seen in a study now. This is a real issue when they do demographic studies when they look at a large population. They compare one group to the other. Is there something? We're not seeing a hidden thing that could be causing an outcome that misleads us one of the examples you'll hear about a founder is imagined someone decided to do a study about lung cancer. And what they did was. They looked at people who drink twenty five shots of vodka. Let's say a week and they show that people who drink twenty-five shots vodka a week end up having higher rates of lung cancer then those that only drink two glasses of wine now study could then prove that vodka causes lung cancer except founder that you would be overlooking people that drink twenty shots or thirty shots vodka tend to also be more likely to smoke cigarettes and that would only you would only know if you really looked at more details in the person so if you don't you know isolate the cigarette smoking then you're going to get a false positive so then you would take out all the people that drink twenty shots subotica and also smoke cigarettes a pack a day or whatever it is and you would find that those levels might even at least the example that I've been given many times. I hope that helps you understand it. So the compounder is something that's GonNa come up. Give me another hour. There's another term. I want you to understand because we hear it. A Lot. Pert retrospective study. A retrospective study looks backwards and examines exposures to suspected risk or protection factors in relation. An outcome that is established at the start of the study. So in retrospect study just like it sounds is in reverse. It looks back so this is people that have already eaten whatever food you studied or already taking whatever drugs they take or already covered whatever pesticides or breathing. Whatever you know. Fumes are coming from the factory down the road because you know in this way we can go back and look at those that you know took this drug and those that did not and not affect those people at all because the other term we always here is. We will not do a placebo study. We will not do a placebo study because they will put people at risk. We can't have people not getting lifesaving vaccine when they're talking about that. This is the term. They're using a prospective study a prospective study watches for outcome such the development of a disease during the study period in relates to other factors such as suspected risk or protection factors. Now remember virtually every drug we take goes to a prospective study. Vaccines do not. I think you now have enough definitions to sit back and remember that. This is not an informed consent action network case. This was a personal case in a divorce up in new in Michigan. But what you're going to hear is the lawyer for the informed Consent Action Network ahrends theory. I almost accidentally just said Doctor Erin. Siri he would laugh at that. But when you walk this you'll get a sense of. Why almost made that slip? Watch a lawyer take on one of the greatest scientists in the world and watch how the scientists tries to confuse him but fails very badly grab some popcorn. Enjoy Dr Plc. And has there ever been a study which looked at the total health outcomes of children following the CDC's vaccination schedule and those who are completely unvaccinated? Such faith not that. I'm aware of. Why is it studying up and done probably because It is considered bad malpractice. Not to vaccinate that child. So you're saying a prospect of study is might be improper because we'll leave a child unvaccinated. Correct okay what about a retrospective study? That I suppose could be done but it wouldn't be randomized. You're familiar with the vaccine. Safety data link yes. Are you aware that there are a few thousand children's that are my understanding completely unvaccinated? Vsd Oh I don't doubt it can couldn't edit vaccines safety. Data link us to conduct a retrospective vaccinated versus unvaccinated. Study to look for health outcomes. Well I don't know theoretically perhaps but One would have to Be Convinced that the children were were compare comparable in in other ways besides being vaccinated or unvaccinated. Every time you a retrospective study that you always need to control for potential co-founders correct correct and that's what you're talking about controlling for co-founders right. Yes CD Pharma. They conduct studies all the time. Right yes yes including studies that have co-founders that needs to be control for right. Yes vaccine right yes. You Vaccine Studies especially for efficacy happen all the time correct. Yes clock and I'm GONNA hand you. What's being marked as exhibit plaintiff's Exhibit Twenty three? Sorry do you Dutch plug. And what's it is CD nine code. Well it's it's Essentially way of coding diseases for usually for remuneration purposes. So when a doctor administers drug or diagnosis. A patient or something similar. They are as a code that they would answer into the system right. Yes and the ICE CD. Nine codes are published by the American Medical Association. Correct yes okay. So if you go to the second page do you see? There's a code. The six four point zero seven. Yes what is that code for a vaccination not carry out for religious reasons. Okay so wouldn't it be feasible for example to compare children? Who have this coding who are not being vaccinated with those who are being vaccinated. Who are in similar. Communities have similar demographics and otherwise avoid as much as possible other potential co-founders. Well if you could eliminate the cofounders it would be feasible. Can you tell me co-founder that's not easily easy to control for.

founder Dr Stanley Dr Stanley Plotkin Cdc co-founder Michigan lung cancer Detroit National Institute of Health American Medical Association Donald Trump Bobby Kennedy Baxter Zolt Doctor Erin Dr Plc CD Pharma
"pharma" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"pharma" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"It now. You only knew that from doing marge. Clinical Trials with tens of thousands of people. I mean I think that because we falsely overrate or incorrectly rate. Listen to this. We falsely overrate or incorrectly rate. What the mortality rate is. We're willing to accept. The things will be rushed through back. Corona virus doesn't have a high mortality rate. There's a virus that the CDC currently estimated his killed between twenty thousand and forty five thousand people in the United States Influenza. But only half the country gets that backsied. There's only fourteen deaths in the. Us has a Friday afternoon from Kobe. Nineteen but everybody would get a vaccine now. The point being were not very good at assessing risk. I think that's really quite informative and shocking to be coming from Dr Paul Off. I was scratching my head saying. Isn't this exactly what he wants to rush into a vaccine and isn't that what he wanted? One every adult on the planet to believe that we need back scenes. Orders Survive yet. He's being very cautious. If you don't find that shocking enough there's another person that likes to attack us all the time attack me all the time Dr Peter Hotels who actually works at designing vaccines. I'm going to agree with him or in fact I think in this case he really is actually agreeing with me. Because he's about to tell you know in front of I believe. This is the congress that is in front of yes. Oh speaking in front of the Congress. This is what he had to say. And by the way I already told you much of this a couple of weeks ago but here we are me and Peter. Hotels like this saying the same thing. Take a look. We partnered with a group at the New York Blood Center in Galveston National Laboratory to take on the big scientific challenge of Corona virus. Vaccines and I say a scientific challenge because one of the things that we're not hearing a lot about is the unique potential safety problem of corona virus vaccines This was I found in the early nineteen sixties with a respiratory virus vaccines chill and it was done here in Washington with the NIH and children's National Medical Center. That some of those kids who got the vaccine actually did worse. And I believe there were two deaths in the consequence of that study because what happens with certain types of respiratory virus vaccines you get immunized and then when you get actually exposed to the virus you get this kind of paradoxical immune enhancement phenomenon and what how and we don't entirely understand the basis of it but we recognize that it's a real problem for certain respiratory virus vaccines that killed the RSV program for decades now. The Gates Foundation is taking it up again but when we started developing a corona virus vaccines in our colleagues. We noticed in laboratory animals that they started to show some of the same. Immune pathology that resembled what had happened fifty years earlier. We said Oh my God this is going to be problematic. These clinical trials are not gonna go quickly because of that immune enhancing. It's going to take time so all and unfortunately some of my colleagues in the biotech industry are making these inflated claims. You've seen this on the newspapers. We're going to have this vaccine in weeks or in this and that what they're really saying is they can move into clinical trials but this will not go quickly because as we start vaccinating human volunteers especially in areas where we have community transmission. We're going to have to proceed very slowly very cautiously. The FDA is on top of that they have a great team place at the Center for biologics Evaluation Research. They're aware of the problem. But it's not GONNA GO QUICKLY. We're going to have to follow this very slowly cautiously to make certain we're not seeing that immune enhancement so now we're hearing projections year eighteen months. Who knows pretty shocking? Right I mean to watch these guys. They're usually screaming vaccine vaccine vaccine. It's all coming all of a sudden. They're tapping the brakes. But I really WanNa address the fact that we already covered this discussion. In fact we gave you a lot of detail more than two weeks ago. This this speech happened on March fifth but Two episodes ago I actually brought up the animal studies that Dr Houghton says is referring to. I want to show you this because these same people that are agreeing with me. This week tend to say that I'm spreading misinformation. But the truth is that we're bringing you information even before the scientists are. I have proof of it this time. Take a look what I told you on this show. Two weeks ago about the animal studies. Immunization was SARS Corona virus vaccine leads to pulmonary immunopathology on challenge with the SARS virus the long section suggesting hypersensitivity that was reminiscent of the description of the type. Immediate pathologic reaction in young children given an inactivated. Rsp S. V. Vaccine and subsequently infected with naturally occurring RSP. This is an older study. Here was the conclusion from this. Study's this SARS covy vaccines all induced antibody and protection against the infection. They seem to work. However when challenged challenged given any vaccines led to currents of T. H. Two type immune pathology suggesting hypersensitivity to source. Kobe components was induced. Caution look this caution and preceding the application of a Koby vaccine in humans is indicated so this study even went on to say what we're series seeing reminds us of a human study. We did on children. Totally different vaccine are be where they seem to do. Great with the Vaccine. Antibodies but then when they came in contact with the disease they actually had hyperstimulation reaction. What they found was the body took in more of the virus with the bacteria. This this is something that's known to happen on occasion and made them more sick than they would have been and as you know. Hotels went on to say something called immune enhancement for some reason. The vaccine appears to create. Antibodies and the person or the the animal using it in in the children was with RSP but then when they come in contact with the illness that the backs are supposed to protect them from for some reason they have a hyper stimulated calling immune enhancement reaction. And as as as Peter Hotels said we don't really understand it. We don't understand why it happens or how it happens. And that's why we need to proceed very very very cautiously as we move forward. He even sort of you know rags on a couple of his. You Know Fellow. Biotech companies are saying we can this in twelve months to eighteen months. He's like yeah. We'll see now. Part of me really found myself grappling. With why all of a sudden is Peter Hotels tapping the brakes and Paul off at tapping the brakes and it really made me realize that because something is about to happen. That's never happened before. In fact it may be a really strange type of gift you see. What's about to happen is a vaccine trial as stage. One vaccine trial under the microscope of the American people of the world actually billions of people are about to watch this study. Take place here it is. Let's go back to that headline Kaiser Permanente washing enrolling participants in First Corona Back Seen Trot Grun virus vaccine trial. Moderna is that name of Modernist Corona Virus Vaccine Ready for clinical trials as pressure. Crooner BUYS THE VACCINE. Mount scientist debate risks of accelerated testing. They're gonNA crank the Seattle Seattle gets burst. Go AT CORONA VIRUS VACCINE TESTING. And then of course. We know that we're being told forty five individuals. Here it is. The initial trial will need forty five healthy adults. Jackson said that no research participants will be given a placebo. What wait a minute? I thought we just heard Tony. Foul she saying to us the gold standard for approving a former student goal product in the drug trial. You know that they're doing. He said the gold standards of Placebo based trial yet with the vaccine. We're not gonNA use a placebo. You see normally they get away with this and this is what it led me when I was thinking about Paul and Peter Hotel. Has you see the problem they have? We are now all watching this because of the work that we've done with the informed consent action at work because so many of you are sharing the high wire with your friends. You're Al- alert to this. Now you say wait a minute. Why aren't they using placebo? Especially right now. Even if the study that we know that studies only GonNa last about four months. I've already pointed out. I don't know how you're going to establish safety in forty five people with a four month study. There'll be no look at long term side effects autoimmune immune disease future cancers or the fact that once these people if it actually ends up being like the animal trials or like the RSP trials. What happens if you give these people the vaccine they look perfectly good performance and then they walk out and they happened to run into somebody with Corona virus? They get it and they'd I their body supper Munin Hansman. They have an absolute you know meltdown aesthetic kind storm takes place in their body. Which is what this thing can cause and they drop dead then what happens and then I started thinking about the fact that do you realize that usually you know this stage. One type of trial takes place outta sight outta mind is happening inside of a pharmaceutical clinic. They happen all the time. Most of them fail mostly drugs and vaccines. Don't get out of those trials because really bad things down now think with hotels auditor thinking. This isn't going to be good for the program if People Watch what if one of these forty five people dis? What if Ted them get really sick? You know what if they all end up having massive upper respiratory problems? Then what are we GONNA do? How are we going to explain that? I mean we can use our use our usual antics and say well you know. We didn't have a Placebo Group. So it was natural that one of these people would die or you know people get upper respiratory cold going around people get the flu you know yes. They got the flu it happens. They'll try to explain the way but never before has the entire world been waiting with baited breath watching forty five people entering a stage one trial. I think that's what's got Paul off it and Peter Hotels really nervous. The pharmaceutical industry has never ever wanted to try and do something like this under a microscope. They liked being left alone. They like having time to figure out what they're talking points are are we gonNA know who these forty five people are in better yet. I think we really ought to talk about these individuals because in my mind they are making a gigantic sacrifice for us. Four for whatever. This corona virus is no matter how deadly it is or is not what we know is that attempts at this vaccine have been deadly in animal models have been deadly. You know we know that ours be killed children. We know that Dan gave axe killed children. We know that people die. And even though you're only testing this on perfectly healthy people right and so what are we going to even learn from that? I mean forty five healthy. We know that healthy people tend to not have any symptoms or very mild symptoms anyway. Why aren't we testing this on the elderly? This seemed to have really extreme reactions. Why aren't they the ones being tested on? Since they're the ones that need it most see all these questions should be asked but what we know is we're going to go and get forty five extremely healthy individuals and give them the theme that after animal trials there were massive warning saying be very very careful. Moving forward forward with human trials. You even heard to say that. It was so devastating. What happened with RSP that we bailed out of even attempting to create an RSP maxine. Well Bill Gates is working on one. Now let's make everybody happy that he's returning to the cause but they'd given up on it. Corona virus is not an easy vaccine corona virus as they have said with the common cold. There's no cure for the common cold. You have to assume they'd been attending for a very very very long time to make a corona virus vaccine and now suddenly they're going to rush into stage one trials..

Dr Peter Hotels Dr Paul Off RSP Us congress flu Gates Foundation CDC Bill Gates Kaiser Permanente Seattle Washington NIH Dr Houghton Placebo Group Kobe FDA Dan
"pharma" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"pharma" Discussed on The Journal.

"This episode of the Journal is brought to you by verizon. Horizon Prides itself on being reliable as a phone company and as a business partner that means keeping businesses ready for the future with artificial intelligence security features and new technology like verizon five G. Ultra wideband. It's ready to change the way business. Operates digital transformation. Never stops verizon keeps businesses ready for what's next find out how at verizon dot com slash ready y. Welcome back trump because problems for Pharma even before he took office in Trump's first press conference after he's elected which is in January. Two thousand seventeen. He says it drug companies are getting away with murder with murder. Farm Form Has a lot of lobbies lobbyists a lot of power from a podium at trump tower or trump. The president elect echoed the remarks of trump the candidate almost verbatim with the largest Bhairab drugs in the world and yet we don't bid properly we're going to start bidding save billions of dollars over that really sent shockwaves through the drug industry. In fact the stock prices for many drugs plummeted after he said that. But then Pharma saw some reassuring signs weeks later pharmaceutical CEOS and the head of Pharma met with trump in the White House and the president backed off and said that trying to give Medicare negotiating power would be tantamount to price fixing everyone's sort of head-spinning but former thanks. Okay well maybe. That was One little mistake that he made in the press conference and roll back to being friends again. Uh-huh and our power still exists. Power still exists. Thinking things were returning to normal. Pharma went back to lobbying the way it always had and trump meanwhile named a former drug company executive to run the Department of Health and Human Services. It seemed like Pharma was back on top but it was about to learn that things in Washington had actually changed the first tangible sign of farmers loss and influence came in the budget. Bill of two thousand eighteen congress and trump or trying to put together a budget for the entire government. A very small part of this was the budget for Medicare when it came to Medicare congressional leaders were seven billion dollars short so to plug the gap. Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer Paul Ryan and Mitch. Mcconnell came up with a solution they could all live with through a complicated change to Medicare payments they stick drug companies with the seven billion dollar bill. The reason that Republican leadership was willing to do. This wasn't just because of the rising public animosity toward drug companies. It also had to do with the way the drug lobby had treated its Republican allies during the obamacare fight. The problem was in order. For Pharma to support Obamacare they had to ditch Republicans. Essentially Republicans are fighting tooth and nail against Obamacare and. Here's one of their longtime allies. The pharmaceutical industry who they've worked hand in glove with for decades ditching them and going and running and supporting obamacare. So they felt betrayed yet. And also I I should say like I'm not sure if a Lotta people know this recalled run around and really bemoan what Pharma did back then. It was more of a quiet. Seething sort of thing and I was talking to Republicans a lot of them. Kinda quietly said you know. Remember back in two thousand nine. They felt like they were betrayed by an ally in a war and so when the time came for congressional leaders to solve their twenty eighteen budget dilemma. Republicans didn't have a problem forcing farm at a pick up the tab it fell the Republican majority leader Paul Ryan and his team to tell Pharma about the change but they never did. They felt the only way could get in. The middle was to not tell farm. They were worried that they tell Pharma. Farmers GonNa run this big lobbying campaign and crush it and the reason they thought that is because that's what farm had done for the last ten years on other proposals so they added to the bill. The bill becomes public farmer finds out about it and obviously very upset. Pharma wasn't just upset because Congress hit the change from them. They're upset because Congress had screwed up. The math drug companies weren't on the hook for seven billion dollars. They were on the hook for eleven billion dollars. The group appealed to its Republican allies for help. But they didn't get it because it wasn't just trump in Paul Ryan who Pharma couldn't count on anymore. It was a whole lot of Republicans in Congress. Taking aim at drug companies was becoming a bipartisan sport. I WanNA welcome and thank our witnesses in February two thousand nineteen the Senate. Finance Committee called a hearing with CEOS of the seven largest drug companies. The topic was high drug prices. The hero packed. Republicans and Democratic members are all their predictably Democrats. Senator Ron wyden ripped into the CEOS. Drug prices are astronomically high. Because that's where pharmaceutical companies and their investors want them. We sort of expect at a hearing like this. The Democrats are going to criticize industry. Ceo's surprising here represent the real pivot. Point was the number of Republicans who stood up and leveled similar criticism. Thank you MR chairman. I WANNA focus on Humira. John Cornyn was one of those. Republicans the senator from Texas press the CEO of the Drug Company abbvie about the company's blockbuster drug Humira why he wanted to know did Humira need one hundred thirty six different patents. So it was it. Is it your company's position that it should have an exclusive monopoly on that medication for thirty one years. It was really important moment. I thought because John Cornyn is a very conservative Republican from Texas. He's not the type of person who would go after a drug company for something like that. It sounded like something that Ron Widen. The Democratic chairman would go after a drug company for when Republicans do it. It really shows that your political influence is changing. Pharma sites one off anecdotes about certain drugs. Exploding in price as part of the reason why sentiment has changed both on and off Capitol Hill it also blames an advertising blitz by Industry opponents but whatever the cause farmers power seems to be waning. Does this mean that there may actually be Drug PRICES LEGISLATION. That could get past. It certainly seems more likely than ever that something's going to happen. I don't know exactly what's going to happen. But WHAT WE HAVE IS DONALD TRUMP? The president saying we need to do something on drug prices. We've Nancy Pelosi the House Democratic leader saying we need to do something. I'm drug prices. A bunch of big leaders are all saying we need to do something. The question is. Can they reach a compromise? Find a single solution To get something done. The Senate is trying in the months after the finance. Committee's hearing Republican Chuck Grassley Democrat. Ron WYDEN TEAMED UP ON A BILL TO REGULATE drug prices John Cornyn the conservative from Texas teamed up with the Democrat on a bill to prevent drug companies from using patents to lock in monopolies. So far far has failed to kill either bill. What do you take away from this story about? Pharma's apparent waning influence as someone who is covered lobbying and influence and big business in Washington. I sort of see what's happened to farm as a symptom of a broader shift in power in Washington and that is that the corporations which have had increasing powers since the early nineteen seventy s are suddenly on their heels companies and trade associations and industries used to have incredible power in Washington with the Republican Party but also the Democratic Party and could really do what they want. They took down environmental groups. They took down. Labor unions took down consumer groups now. Something's changing because of the rise in populism in the Republican party because the rise of populism in the Democrat Party big industries across the board have seen their influence wane. The oil industry's had problems. Big Tech we've seen. He's come under the gun. Pharma is now under the gun. We don't know what's going to happen in two or four years. This could be a temporary blip. This could be a little speed bump or visit a radical realignment.

Pharma DONALD TRUMP John Cornyn trump tower president Paul Ryan verizon Texas Congress Senator Ron wyden Drug Company Republican Party Washington Medicare Ceo Senate chairman obamacare
"pharma" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"pharma" Discussed on The Journal.

"The lobbying group that for decades has represented drugmakers in Washington goes by an acronym P. H. R. N. A. Farmer yes. The pharmaceutical research and manufacturers of America which has been shortened for many many years to be Pharma and for Years Pharma the organization. We'll do the kind of clout in DC. That other industries could only dream about Barma has been a killer organization. People are afraid of them saying Washington you want to be there feared or respected they were respected and feared maybe their respective because they feared they had a reputation of going to lawmakers. And saying we need you to vote for us here or we're going to run campaign ads against you. Defeat you in your Congressional District Pharma. The budget to potentially unseat members of Congress and Congress. People knew it but just like Pharma could break politician's campaign could make it to. They had so much in fact that farmer would run ads for a member of Congress in their district and then after they won the election. Once there's nothing left at stake they often went back and ran ads thanking voters for voting for the member of Congress. Wow this is sort of add. Some Cherry on the top Pharma was able to exercise that power for years because it had two major things going for it money and friends in high places. The money came from the companies that farmer represents drugmakers like Eli Lilly and Pfizer. Pay Pharma annual dues to lobby for them on the hill. The friends came mostly from the Republican Party. And that's because they share the same ideological bent. Which is the government particularly the federal government. Should not get involved in the free market economy. So if you are Pharma your goal is to essentially just keep Republicans in your corner. Sort of a simple ideas. I get all of your allies in the Republican Party. Reach out to some Democrats and you're gonNA always have fifty one percent of the vote for decades. This strategy worked for Pharma for example in two thousand and three Republicans put forward a bill that would give seniors access to prescription drugs through Medicare for the first time for drugmakers. This was a huge opportunity. The government was about to start buying tons of drugs and the legislation stipulated that the government would have. To give up its negotiating. Power Medicare wouldn't directly negotiate with drug companies over drug prices because of that the vote was very contentious it dragged on and on as farmers. Republican allies tried to bring reluctant lawmakers on board in the super inside. Dc baseball world. It was actually an incredibly fascinating. Vote on the House floor. Off for Mister Dooley back in two thousand and three Tom. Delay of my remember him was in charge of this. Vote off. No on I for Mr Scott. Who Georgia votes in the House are normally fifteen minutes and fifty minutes. Bell goes off and everyone's votes are counted. Some boats recycle and they say who want her lost. This vote was held open for more than two hours. It was so close when so far down the movie consideration. I did thanks to your arm twisting. I'd suspend as to speak it. Took Republicans more than two hours to pass the bill? That's like a football game ending and waiting two hours while the game goes on with the clock stopped until the home team wins. The as are two twenty two naser to fifteen. The conference agree to objector. The most recent laid upon the table that day Pharma one big time. It was just a sign of their strength. I mean they got a huge huge new market. Medicare. There were not allowed to negotiate the prices. I mean there was like a double win for Pharma for Pharma. This wasn't just a win for drug companies bottom line but also for innovation the drug companies. Say That bigger profits means more money for research and development for new drugs Pharma dominated even when Democrats were in control. When obamacare came up for a vote in two thousand nine the lobby worked around. Its Republican allies made a deal with Democrats. Drug companies would support obamacare and eighty billion dollars to help fund it. If Democrats didn't mess with drug companies pricing that ended up being in my opinion. Incredibly savvy deal. It led to huge continuing prophets but while Pharma was dominating on the hill reputation among Americans especially when it came to drug prices was getting worse and worse. And no one embodies this problem better than a thirty something hedge fund manager named Martin Scroll. He's a CEO so despised that he's been labeled the most hated man in America. What IS PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY? Raise the price of an AIDS drug around thirteen dollars a pill to seven hundred fifty dollars a pill overnight. In two thousand fifteen he became a symbol of corporate greed. His nickname Pharma Bro. Headlines like these fed a perception that drug companies were out for profit not patients wellbeing something that Pharma Disputes But at Twenty Nineteen poll would find that seventy two percent of Americans felt drug companies had too much power in Washington. Seventy nine percent would say that. Drug prices were unreasonable. In two thousand ten Americans paid about eight hundred dollars per year on average for prescription drugs by two thousand seventeen. That number had risen by about two hundred dollars to a little over a thousand dollars. That's a twenty five percent increase but for many people. It feels even worse than that. A lot of health. Insurance plans have created high deductible plans with a high deductible plan consumers pay more of the drug prices up front as it used to be a certain prescription drugs that you got from your doctor through your healthcare plan. You never paid for it all now. Under these higher deductible plans you pay them right away so there is a perception. That drug prices are really skyrocketing. This perception became a political issue in the two thousand sixteen presidential election both nominees Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton criticized drug prices. Clinton call drug companies price gougers and trump at a campaign rally in New Hampshire in two thousand sixteen. You know what's happening with the drugs right. Took aim at precisely. The thing Pharma had fought so hard for back in two thousand and three Medicare's inability to negotiate on drug prices. Because we're not allowed for some reason. I don't know what the reason is. I do know what the reason is but I don't know how they can sell it. We're not allowed to negotiate drug prices. Can you believe it so still when trump eventually won the presidency? Pharma was relieved even though trump had campaigned a bit complaining about drug prices correct. I think they thought that maybe that's just campaign rhetoric and at the end the day. He's a Republican. Remember at the time. Republicans were their friends. Republicans are people who believe fundamentally the government should not be involved in the private sector economy. I think Pharma hoped that trump was a traditional conservative Republican. But it wouldn't take long for Pharma to realize just how wrong they were. That's after the break..

Pharma Congressional District Pharma Years Pharma Medicare day Pharma Donald Trump Congress Republican Party Washington America P. H. R. N. A. Farmer Barma Eli Lilly obamacare baseball Pfizer AIDS Hillary Clinton
"pharma" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"pharma" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Pharma the maker of oxycontin some say this action is long overdue because you want to treat patients that we want to help people heal to walk into a building every day after a family that is doing the opposite it's been really hard to do in a statement top says it is clear that the Sackler name with its link to the current health crisis runs counter to the school's mission Sackler family attorney says the name removal is based on unproven allegations adding we will be seeking to have this improper decision reversed and are currently reviewing all options available to us the Sackler family brought in fifteen million dollars to the university spanning over nearly forty year relationship well it's something that hasn't happened in many years and your report says prescription drug prices have gone up I'm Gary non prices are lower but not by March one percent still the decline in prescription drug prices is the first in forty five years according to the federal centers for Medicare and Medicaid services the main reason for the down take his reliance on generics prices are slightly higher from any brand name drugs the drop does not include medications administered in hospitals and doctors offices overall spending on prescription drugs rose two and a half percent last year Gary none CBS news for the very first time the state's marijuana dispensaries are being linked to possible vaping related lung injury six of the probable vaping related long illness patients got their products from a license state marijuana dispensary according to new data from state health officials the findings would run contrary to studies that have found the large majority of illnesses come from black market vape oil with additives like vitamin a acetate health officials specified the products reportedly used by the patients they've interviewed so far but they didn't give information on the legal dispensaries because of this some cannabis advocates are saying the state should publish that information the governor Baker's ban on vaping products is set to end next Wednesday the cannabis control commission has a ban on T. H. C..

attorney Gary marijuana Baker cannabis control commission Sackler Medicare CBS cannabis fifteen million dollars forty five years one percent forty year
"pharma" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

14:59 min | 1 year ago

"pharma" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Purdue Pharma Company that made billions of dollars selling the prescription Painkiller oxycontin filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection earlier this week. The move came days after the company reached a tentative settlement with numerous state and local governments over the impact opioids have had in recent years some states have rejected the settlement settlement and are continuing legal proceedings against the sackler family who owns purdue. Pharma various reports say the settlement is between ten and twelve billion dollars with three billion billion coming from the sackler themselves but some feel that the sackler whose net worth Forbes estimates to be thirteen billion dollars back in two thousand sixteen. Maybe getting off easy more than forty seven thousand deaths were attributed to opioids in each of the last two years according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and had it remains a top crisis for many communities with more on this. We're joined on the phone by Jonathan Lipson who's holds the cone share and his professor at the Beasley School of law a Temple University and also joining US Lindsey Simon Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia Law School Jonathan Lindsey. Thank you both for your time today. Okay thank you. Thank you thank you so Jonathan. I guess kind of lay out some of the groundwork here as to what we will probably see with that chapter eleven being filed sure well the first thing I think that is top of mind for almost everybody who's focused on all. All of these cases is the effect of the automatic. Stay when Purdue Pharma a file for bankruptcy eleven twenty two on Sunday evening a an injunction a nationwide injunction went into effect halting all litigation against the company at least in theory for the non settling plaintiffs the state attorneys general and others who are suing Purdue Pharma that's obviously a problem because they would like to continue their lawsuits outside of bankruptcy against purdue and presumably the Sackler of course the company's view is that I think they they shouldn't be permitted to do this that they should come back into. They should be forced to come into the bankruptcy estate so they're going to fight about the the application application of the stay to these government actors and they're going to be about the application of the stay to WHO to protect the sackler who themselves are not debtors in bankruptcy so presumptively are not entitled to the same protection that the company is Lindsay. What do you see as the as the impact of this yourself of of all of this occurring at this point and the chapter eleven. I think it's long been in the news that a chapter eleven was at least part of the potential plan for resolving pretty farmers issues. I think the fact that it's happened now. quite near an upcoming trial is a again and not a surprise anybody but I think the fact that we are in chapter. Eleven changes the momentum. It changes the incentive structure. It shifts a lot of power in to produce these court because again the veteran bankruptcy is the master of their case and while there's a lot of approval that has to happen for things to go forward. They control the narrative at this point and so you know. I I agree the issue surrounding the automatic. Stay whether parallel litigation. We'll be joined is a threshold issue. That's very important but all the while in the backdrop. It's an ongoing negotiation. Obviously they're settling parties in their non-settling parties but the terms of the settlement is going to continue to shift over the course of the bankruptcy and that's a feature of the bankruptcy process not that's by design that that will continue to occur and Lindsey. I've read a couple of reports that say and the twelve billion dollar number that has been thrown out there in terms of the settlement. There's also been some reporting that that number may even have the opportunity to go lower than that twelve billion dollars and I think that's a concern for for a lot of people that are that are watching this from the outside well. I'll say I think based on what I've seen reported. Obviously none of us have seen the terms of the settlement and that's probably because it's still still being adjusted and negotiated behind the scenes. I don't think anyone expects it to be twelve billion dollars in cash. I think the a lot of evaluations it's been reported comes from the public goodwill value of giving away drugs and not to say that that's not valuable but the new company is going to still have to pay the manufacture those drugs so numbers and evaluations are going to drop significantly in terms of actual dollars in the bank to be distributed Java yeah I any part of what's interesting about this case is that I think Davis Polk lawyers for the for the debtor for the company are doing their best to try to make this look like a garden variety variety mass tort bankruptcy and there have been many of those really since Manville H. Robbins created the template for using chapter eleven to try to manage edge mass tort liability companies have been funding trusts or other mechanisms with their shares in order to satisfy hi creditors claims as and when they are determined in amount and that is I think at at heart the structure of what purdue is going to try try to do here. what's different of course is that you have state actors governmental actors in there's plaintiffs and they are at least going to take the position that they should be treated differently front end of the case and so for example. They're not settling now and they will undoubtedly totally say that. They're not obligated settle because the there's an exception under the bankruptcy code from this day folks governmental entities that are enforcing using their police are regulatory powers. not sure who wins that argument. I suspect they ultimately will come into the process. I think they will be forced in one way or the other and then the question action will be what happens in the plan. you know certainly there will be lots and lots of negotiation and right now. I think everybody is simply jockeying for a position and trying to exert as much leverage as they possibly can for the non-settling creditors. Staying out of bankruptcy is is probably the best strategy that they can employ Lindsey. I think also also a lot of people are are are wondering what is going to be the status of Purdue Pharma itself of the company steelers the CEO the currency. Yeo said that the best way to battle the OPIOID crisis is for the company to stay open and again. I've seen the debtor in his pleadings. We'll suggest that all of the assets and basically the core purdue Pharma is going to be created into this new entity that is serving a purpose rather than a for profit purpose. We haven't seen the contours scores of that because the plan is an affiliate but assuming the company exists in that structure. There's some intuitive appeal to the fact that alive the company continues chew bringing proceeds that can continue to fund the various initiatives of trust that being said. I think it's very clear that part of the concern with this company continuing to do Business Nisa that profiting off of continuing opiate sales is going to help pay off the previous harm so this hearkens to the tobacco cases where continuing tobacco sales helped pay. Hey for the settling amounts to tobacco Clayton so if I if I can jump in here I think I could be wrong but I believe that purdue has said that there are not going to continue to manufacture opioid and in fact I think they're seeking an injunction from judge drain in New York sort of imposing on themselves you know the the restraint the of an injunction prohibiting them from doing that and I think so so whatever they're going to be selling I think we'll be something else and I don't know enough enough about the businesses because they're private to know exactly what they would plan to do in the future but I think the idea is that you know like Manville and you know every asbestos company you know in history. They're going to continue operations in order to fund whatever path there are right and and I think Lindsay going off of a point. You were mentioning a second ago. Whatever trust would be set up. I think the expectation of of a lot of the the attorneys general that are involved in this and probably a lot of people that have been impacted this is that whatever benefit there comes from the trust each should be put back into some form of treating reading the the crisis that is that is across America right now and I think I think especially as evidence that the first day hearing yesterday as carefully we put out an all the pleadings the debtors representatives. They're making very clear that that's the approach here. They are doing everything at least at this point from public facing perspective perspective to show that that's the goal so that you know again. Everyone said well. Let's let's not focus on the past. Let's focus on the other hand. Let's focus on what we're doing today to move forward and make things right and whether you believe that that's the right approach or not. I think everything we've seen so far is consistent with trying to make sure the prophets do Goto. Hugh funds those things so Jonathan. How do we distinguish the role in this of purdue Pharma in comparison with the sackler family and the profits fits that they have taken out of the company and put into into various locations around the world. let me let me. I'm happy to answer that in conjunction with responding there's something that Lindsey just said I think she has said well. You Know Council and other representatives for the company they are trying to you know act in the the public interest and that in fact is the goal of the settlement and the goal of the chapter eleven reorganization process maybe right. I think that is certainly possible however her I think it is well worth considering the fact that the sack lers themselves are probably going to view themselves as being beneficiaries of this process if it takes form in certain ways and so so you know for example extending the state of protects them from Litigation Gatien would be an enormous benefit and it's going to be a difficult question for judge drain to answer in this case because the sackler is are not like the ordinary third parties who get the benefit of a stay for a bunch of reasons including the fact that typically when we do that we do it because the you know the the the beneficiaries raise our managers directors officers responsible for reorganizing the company here the Santa Claus said were out and so while it is true. They're putting three billion dollars in or whatever we don't know exactly what they're putting in you know it's also true that the states that are not settling may think that they have have the ability to recover for more than that through a litigated process outside of bankruptcy from this actors and if that's the case then you know obviously the sackler it is very important to protecting this actors in addition to advancing whatever public schools on the company may not have in mind as is you both mentioned we still have the. Ohio case kind of looming at this point. Lindsey and I think a lot of people are wondering how all of this could have some impact patch on on what's going on or what will be going on out in Ohio in courtroom. I think the fact that purdue has now filed and has settled with is my understanding the plaintiffs in the NBA oh I think it removes purdue from that conversation separate apart from whether they're already ongoing several issues but I mean the other defendants winced these defendants in the opioid how they are settling leading up to his trial date. I think that's what judge pollster had in mind. I don't know perhaps this removes one more a big player from the table until everyone's still remaining in that trial will be looking around and evaluating their options as well yeah. I think I think that's right. I think that there are a a couple of of of twists here though think about the first is that Oklahoma just got you know half a billion dollars at trial before a judge uh-huh right and so if I am the Attorney General of say Pennsylvania Right I'm might find it difficult to capitulate to the settlement that is on the table because you know when I run next for reelection people are going to ask her why did you why did you not go under you know Oklahoma's just gotten and a half million dollars these are elected officials and they are sensitive to that stuff and of course I think they are dealing with a massive public health crisis so so it's GonNa be she's going to be tough for for them to stay out and you know I don't know anything in particular about the Sacco's but certainly in the media they are not portrayed as the world's most sympathetic defendants defendants and you know having transfer two billion dollars. Apparently you know about ten years ago to a Swiss bank accounts. You know it may or may not be recoverable in bankruptcy probably it's not but who knows but you know like. I don't want to be a defendant. If I'm the Sackler I very much want the bankruptcy process process to protect me if I can well and even the Oklahoma case I think becomes important as you said for for some of the other states attorney general or state attorneys general excuse me because there's an estimation that that half a billion dollars may have been less than what they probably should have gotten in that settlement settlement because of how vast this this problem is around the country. This crisis is and not only just how much money and finance has been lost by people and and by companies up to this point but how much more is going to have to be paid out to be able to correct a lot of these problems right which raises two other other issues. I is that bankruptcy see you know is certainly an invitation to negotiation as Senator Warren says Anwr casebook but it also process for very rapidly determining the amount of UN- you know on liquidated claims right so all these you know plaintiffs right now the states they a. We don't know how much they're owed. That's why they're going to trial. They may not be anything but bankruptcy would significantly expedite that and it's not at all difficult to imagine and purdue creating trying to create proceedings procedures that might you know not favor the the states. It's in determining the amount that they're actually oh so. I think that the you know when Lindsay says that the debtor-in-possession remains you know has a lot of power that's true and this is one of the reasons I think the other thing that's in I'm sure in the minds of of all of the observers here especially the state attorneys general whatever happens here right is going to set a certain kind of president and so others with Pharma exposure opioid exposure.

purdue Purdue Pharma Jonathan Lindsey Purdue Pharma Company Lindsay Jonathan Ohio US Centers for Disease Control Oklahoma Lindsey Simon Assistant Profes Jonathan Lipson Forbes University of Georgia Law Scho Beasley School of law professor Senator Warren steelers Yeo America
"pharma" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"pharma" Discussed on KCRW

"Pharma are facing more legal trouble Purdue manufacturers that powerful opioid Oxycontin. And now in a sweeping lawsuit. New York state attorney general says eight individual members of the Sackler family are personally to blame for much of the country's deadly opioid epidemic. North country. Public radio's Brian man tracks opioid litigation for NPR, and he joins me now. Hey, hey, Elsa. So you, and I have already talked this week about how Purdue pharma has been sued more than a thousand times around the country for its aggressive marketing of Oxycontin. How is this lawsuit different? I would say that New York's attorney general just made this personal. I mean, these opioid lawsuits tend to be corporate affairs that targets are usually companies like Purdue or Johnson Johnson or CVS that Letitia James says this one group of individuals is responsible for tens of thousands of opioid death. But let us not forget the masterminds the family enterprise behind this crisis, the family that literally profited off of the suffering. The death countless New Yorkers the Sackler family, the owners of Purdue. So she named today. These eight members of the Sackler family is defendants along with Purdue and a whole bunch of family trusts and other legal entities. And why named the Sackler personally? I mean, why doesn't New York state to go. After the companies. I think this is interesting this lawsuit in documents filed recently as part of civil suits in Oklahoma in Massachusetts have revealed. A lot of new details about how the Sackler is ran Purdue and the claim is that they personally pushed for the aggressive sale of these opioid. Even as evidence grew that people were dying, and what's alleged here in this New York lawsuit goes even a step further. New York claims the family began squeezing produced pharma draining billions of dollars as rapidly as possible, here's Letitia James again produced so more and more opioids the Sackler family, transferred, more and more and more wealth to their personal accounts. And as the lawsuits have piled up against the Sackler family and Purdue for their roles in this crisis. They continue to move funds into trust. And yes off shore accounts to be out of the reach of any potential recovery. So in this lawsuit New York is now saying they're going after the Sackler vast private wealth seeking damages and penalties that could run into the hundreds of millions of dollars. And how has this family responded to this latest lawsuit? The sent NPR a statement saying they strongly denied these allegations and defend against them. They say drugs like Oxy. Gotten provide life changing relief for millions of pain patients who need it. And they added this, quote, they say we have always acted properly, and I should say that in addition to singly out members of the Sackler family this lawsuit in New York does go further at names other companies that made and sold and distributed opioid around the country and around New York. So state officials are highlighting the Sackler is. But they say there is plenty of blame to go around. That's Brian man, if north country public radio, thank you, Brian. Thank you. The Sackler family has donated millions of dollars from its pharmaceutical prophets to arts institutions in the US and Europe the families alleged role in the opioid crisis has led the some of those institutions to distance themselves from Sackler money including London's national portrait gallery and Tate museums as well as the Guggenheim in New York NPR's, Andrew Limbaugh has more even before today's news to separate gift-giving arms of the sacra family in the United Kingdom announced. They're going to pause all new donations in light of the recent attention, NAN Goldin is not impressed. It's like you can't fire me. I quit. They did it to save face. Golden is a famous artist and photographer who's been at the center of a campaign aimed at getting these Sacramento off of museum, walls and Sackler money out of museum coffers. She's an open about her own struggles with opioid addiction which started with a prescription for cotton manufactured by the Sackler own Purdue pharma, she was getting cleaned. She read an article about the opioid cry. Crisis by journalists Margaret Talbot and in it. She says we're the activists like act up act up being the eighties protest group responding to the aids crisis. And that was my call to arms she formed a group called pain prescription addiction intervention now. And.

New York Sackler Purdue Purdue pharma North country Letitia James Brian man NPR NAN Goldin attorney Margaret Talbot Oklahoma Johnson Johnson Sacramento US Europe Massachusetts United Kingdom
"pharma" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"pharma" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Wherever you listen to podcasts. This is on point Meghna Chalker bardy. We're talking this hour about what's re- been. Revealed in the fully unredacted complaint. That's been filed by the Massachusetts attorney general against Oxycontin maker Purdue pharma, an individual members of the family that founded in owns the company the Sackler family. I'm joined today by Barry Meyer. He's a former New York Times reporter who has covered produced farmers since two thousand one he's also author of painkiller an empire of deceit and the origin of America's opioid epidemic. Christine Wilmsen also joins us. She senior investigative editor. And reporter here at our home station of WB, you are and a little bit later this hour, we're expecting the Massachusetts attorney general to join us directly. And I want want to once again mention that we did invite Purdue pharma to join us as well. And they declined so Christine pick up on the thought that you had you're sharing with us before the break here that there are some very revealing numbers about the the breath and the extent to which Purdue pharma may direct contact with physicians in Massachusetts. And and I presume that it was a pattern. That they also used elsewhere in other states here tells more about those numbers, and why are they significant? Well, a lot of times they develop these programs or tactics to increase sales. So one of them was called region zero and region zero was Purdue pharma started seeing some other sales slipping a bit not as much as they wanted. So they created this project or region zero in which they focused on the highest pain doctors, the ones that were giving them the most prescriptions, and they doubled down with them so sales reps increased their visits to the doctors that already potentially were abusing the drug is I over prescribing it so that was one of the tactics in that really paid off for them will so regarding region zero the complaint alleges that that Purdue pharma no-one had more information than Purdue pharma itself, but who may be over prescribing Oxycontin, right? And there's an example here they have in two thousand nine the complaint alleges that have produced sales manager had emailed, then see. EEO that a certain doctor might have been running what amounted to quote, an organized drug ring a pill mill, but that they did not the company didn't report the information to the DA or state authorities for more than two years until after that doctor had been arrested. Yeah, there's several examples like that in the complaint. There's also one where a sales rep reports that he or she believes that this physician might be over prescribing because there was lawn chairs around the street corner with people in line getting the Oxycontin. But a lot of times these warnings were never reported, which they're required by law. They were never reported. And so these doctors kept prescribing and the complaint alleges some of those prescriptions led to the death of people in Massachusetts. Yes. Oh, berry Meyer in terms of the aggressiveness that pretty pharma sales reps of visited doctors here. I'm seeing you know parts of the report saying that, for example, a Purdue sales rep visited a doctor particular, doc. Massachusetts more than six hundred times. The rep was in his office almost every workday. They'd meet on Monday to discuss patients who would be coming in that day. And then on Tuesday, the sales rep would go back to confirm that the doctor had those patients on Purdue opioids. This story. The the aggressive marketing of Oxycontin, the aggressive marketing of Oxycontin to doctors who were over prescribers or running pill mills goes back to the early two thousands. It was going on. I took trips to South Carolina Georgia there were pill mills operating there. There were doctors there that were being serviced by Purdue pharma representatives who subsequently went to prison. I think it's instructive to know that this system of knowing what doctors prescribed it's called the IMF system where we're prescription information is captured was developed by Arthur Sackler, one of the three Sackler brothers who founded Purdue Frederick the forerunner to do pharma. So they were masters at this. They were mastered drug marketers mastered, drug advertisers..

Purdue pharma Massachusetts Barry Meyer Purdue Christine Wilmsen Purdue Frederick Meghna Chalker bardy Arthur Sackler Sackler family sales manager attorney New York Times EEO berry Meyer IMF editor South Carolina America Georgia two years