35 Burst results for "PhD"

James West on invention and inclusion in science

Short Wave

09:04 min | 5 d ago

James West on invention and inclusion in science

"James west was born in nineteen thirty one and grew up in prince edward county virginia in before we dove into his research and work as a mentor. I wanted to know more about little kid. Jim and his relationship to science the desire to know how things work and why they were was my biggest motivator and i Completely forgot about this on purpose. But i took my grandfather's pocket watch support hundred and five pieces zenit. But i couldn't get it back together which resulted in rather severe punishment but it didn't tear my desire to know and understand how things work and so i was told that i could only take things apart that weren't working and that was the wrong thing. Say to me. Because if i could break it i did so i could get it. Why caesar now you're you're breaking stuff you're like look it doesn't work so right. Okay i mean were you. Were your parents. Supportive of your interest in in engineering and science absolutely not i was going to be the doctrine brother the data stove. I swear versa. They didn't care which would went. Only that it went in one of those two directions and When i told my father that i was changing my major from biology to physics He introduced me to two black men who have. Phd's and chemistry that were working in the post office score poem order on the railroad because the best job they could get was teaching at high school. And that didn't pay enough to support their families and he thought that i was well on the way to becoming one of them because You could be a preach at teacher lawyer doctor. But that was about it and terms of professions or black people and prince edward county virginia but in the face of all that jim stuck with it he graduated from temple university with a degree in physics and then went on to work at bell. Labs for more than forty years and his big invention with gearhart. The foil electric microphone didn't come from trying to solve one specific problem. I didn't. I don't think sat down and looks invent a better microphone. That was not the motivation at all. The motivation was why does nature behave in the way that it does. And and if i can understand that then how can i apply my knowledge to improving or to make things work better or lasts longer in this case. Oh to increase lifetime right okay. So so mu- because my understanding of this gym and you can. You can grade me. And i'm i'm worried about my grade but so basically this is really basic but microphone convert sound into an electrical signal right and it needs power to do that and you. Youtube found a material that you could basically be kind of permanently so you know basically permanently charge so instead of like necessarily needing an extra battery in there you know. You've you've got it without that. And that material that you found was essentially teflon foil urinate less. Okay okay. well now. That i've got my a plus in science. Let's let's talk. Let's talk more about bringing people new stem the thing. It's the thing that you're passionate about thinking that i'm passionate about so you know in your experience what works or if you feel like it's more importantly what doesn't when you're trying to bring people into snap well i think honesty is is The the very important role. It's not all roses so we get some thorns to nature. Doesn't always behaving the way that you you'd think it should. And and i think honesty's important because you want to succeed and and if you know that nature is not always going to work the way you'd think it works this gives you the fortitude to continue to your investigation will continue looking for a solution to a particular problem. In other words. There are two sides stored the glory side. And then there's the the grunge side but even more important science and technology got us to where we are and it's the only thing that's going get us further or out of whatever difficulty that we have a global warming all these problems. We need more diverse teen stem. diversity has been shown to be have an advantage. I used to worry about brainstorming sessions. Where all the white guys over here. And i was over ear but guess what solution west somewhere in between. And this is what. I learned that. Even though i taken same courses you know the same disciplines. I think differently as the black man than white males to yeah but this diversification is what makes this country great and what is very disturbing is that were not taking full advantage of our natural resources in human beings that can work and be productive in the field and this is the reason that i continue to push to make it available in. Jim's been pushing for a long time you can trace his efforts back to nineteen seventy at bell labs. Winning helped form the association of black laboratory employees all the way to jim's work today with his graduate students at johns hopkins university and nonprofit called the end genuity project. They offer math and science programs to students in baltimore public schools. Jim told me a story about joining their board of directors. Back in two thousand fourteen. When when i was asked if i would be interested in joining booed i wanted to know what the program's really all about and what i found. Was that the majority of students in the program mayhem and that. This did not represent the demographics of the city of ballroom. So i said looking. Put me on the board. But i'm going to make some changes. I am a change agent here because this does not represent city baltimore and not enough black people and women in the scrotum but today the program is eighty percent underrepresented naarden winning big shift. Not only that are the last time i looked two years ago. We graduated one hundred students all of them. Fellowships and scholarships seven were admitted to johns hopkins. And by the way these changes were made without ever touching the requirements for the permanent. Okay so what does this say to you. The says that they're talented people out there that we're not taking advantage if we can make that kind of change in the city of baltimore within a finite number of years with this is certainly an indication to me that there are underrepresented minority and women who are in love with science and really really look for opportunities to get in and and genuity project made that offer and they they took us up on it and i'm so glad they did. Okay so jim. I hope you don't mind me sharing this. You just tell me if you don't want it in the episode but by the time this interview comes out you will of turned ninety congrats birthday. Well thank you. So what's your advice for young scientists for young inventors who may be see themselves in you. What advice would you give them. Well there's so many things that i can think of. But i but more importantly is to follow your star you know. I'm pretty sure that whoever made me said make a scientist and a not fulfill that responsibility us. Oh i think that the happy people those people that are doing what they love to do. And if it science gray but in many cases you don't know whether it science not because you haven't had the exposure right that would tell you whether the something you think you would be interested in doing so Museums of books on and on and on learn. Learn as much as you can as early as you can. And the only major major advices learn all the math that you possibly can because it

Prince Edward County James West Virginia JIM Gearhart Temple University Association Of Black Laborator Baltimore Youtube Bell Labs Johns Hopkins University Genuity Johns Hopkins
Science FAIL! Why it's good to do

Science Friction

05:25 min | Last week

Science FAIL! Why it's good to do

"We've all made mistakes right. But sometimes i can make us fundamentally confront who we are and who we want to bay beck in twenty four eighteen neuroscientist. Dr been to has had a damn good reason to be excited. It was it was such a shalit's basically there was years of work at prestigious scientific journal current biology had just accepted a paper by humidity supervisors based on his phd project but not without rigorous peer review. I of course reviews as good and tough questions and lots of extra analyses. I did when finally the email arrived and said yes. The paper is accepted. it was just. It was a very happy moment. A piper in a high impact journal. That's a big deal for. Young scientist then investigates how we perceive the world visually. So as your brain stitches together sane in front of you what you see is rematch spatially. Onto a part of your cortex at wrinkly atalaya of brian. So if you think of the cortex is old crumbled up that if you would flatten it out like a sheet could see on this flat surface neighboring points on the critical surf representing neighboring points in the visual field in the scene in front of us then put people in an mariah scanner to see what happened to the map when he distracted them using different visual cues. He came up with a k. For design for study and think we scan a total of twenty seven people which was at the time by far the largest study using this type of method and the method was kind of knew. He said there was a lot to figure out. It was computational so there were some analyses that literally took weeks every weekend machine would run through that stuff when it crashed it would send me an email which is a dangerous thing to do because when you get an e mail on sunday saying oh your coaches crashed in your very tempted to go back to the office and start to fix it. That lots of careful data crunching and analysis lighter and he'd found something significant and surprising this aspect of the brain of the visual brain which part of the scene a given neuronal population of marin response to seem to be more malleable than we thought and it was surprising that it seemed to change with attention. Just through your attending a given power to seen more than an condition. There's a lot to this week but the shorter the long of it is. This was a robust finding worthy of journal. So fast four now to six years later it's june twenty twenty and bins running his lab and tame remotely in the middle of a pandemic lockdown in germany. He's home is three. Kids is a lot going on right and he gets an email. I received that email. And i have to say at i. If i'm honest i i. Wasn't that worried that something was wrong. Really wrong only been didn't understand what yet and he would have to make a career defining choice about what to do next today on science fiction. Something we can all relate to filing and why it's good to do especially in science but also wants wrapped up in a whole lot of stigma and shame again especially in science you know great successes are trumpeted and things. That are not successes. You don't want people to know about however failure is so normal to the day to day working of science we need to move towards a culture where we are actively embracing failure. We all know that air is human and assigned as you know we have to ask why and behalf to ask how and way we fe often leads to the next question we are asking and so does this theory much part of scientific process. It's very great suits of inspiration in many ways the into no signs. That's not the way it looks and sounds in science when a journal pulls or retracts a paper the stuff of nightmares for scientists. But he's angst about scientific integrity scandals scaring scientists away from talking more openly about making mistakes back to that email bend has received at the uselessly. Big university in giessen. It was from susanna stole. Who is doing pay at university college. London under the supervision of professor sam schwarzkopf. Now sam had been a post doc in the lab been had done his pitch in and susanna was building on original. Study when i first read and paper thought. The design. They've chosen was really beautiful and was impressed. Ben included a very extensive stepney mandatory material conducting analyses infect around thirty pages of supplementary data for just a two page paper. Susannah was impressed with half farah was but then she went to do her on experiments and she noticed something odd she was getting. The same results has been even with different experimental conditions. And that shouldn't be high s-. I really had no clue

Prestigious Scientific Journal High Impact Journal Shalit Beck DR Big University Giessen Germany Susanna Sam Schwarzkopf University College SAM London BEN Susannah Farah
I'll Peanut Jam Your Brain

Short Wave

04:52 min | Last week

I'll Peanut Jam Your Brain

"Okay so earlier. I did this thing. That probably sounded weird to you. Emily your sentence. It didn't make any sense but you know another day. Another dollar alright. Okay well well so when someone does something unexpected like that when they're talking to you or get this even when you're reading something that doesn't follow the standard conventions of the language. Something kind of cool happens in your brain l. So they can actually measure this right so when we studied brain one of the ways that we can study. Brain activity is by measuring electrical current. That is flowing through your cortex rates so the surface of your brain for the cells to talk to each other. They released electrical current. This is sarah phillips our expert i mentioned earlier. I am a rising fourth year. Phd student in the linguistics department at new york university and also a member of the neuro linguistic slab very cool. She studies bilingualism and code switching which we will touch on in a future episode because it is objectively but for today. She's helping me out as explain. These things called n. Four hundred and p six hundred. He's are measurable responses. That happen your brain as you process language okay so little electrical signals that your brain is always giving off right but these are different from your normal brain buzzing. That would happen. If you're listening to like a quote normal sentence got it basically these phenomena are your brain saying like hey hold up something weird happening here okay so like when i peanut jam your brain that an example of one that can spark some. You know chemistry for you. Oh yeah yeah. I felt wrong and a lot of ways so as i peanut. Jam your brain. That's a good one anyways. Yes in nineteen eighty two psychologists. Marta kunas and steven hilliard published a paper showing that among these electrical signals. There was this big response about four hundred milliseconds person. Reading a sentence came across a word that was like semantic league confusing or the meaning was wrong. Okay so it's like a linguistic oddball sentences thrown your way your brain will produce a end. Four hundred response four hundred milliseconds after you heard peanut gem in that benefits. I peanut jam. Your brain your brain was like whoa. What's that doesn't make any sense. Exactly yeah and your brain. Does this kwong in less than half a second. Which is wild. So sir philip's art linguist from earlier explained. It happens in other scenarios like garden path sentences. So you start to hear a sentence and you think you know what's going to happen next but then something goes wrong okay and so when something goes wrong your brain has to go wait what. I don't think i interpreted this how it was supposed to be. I've got a restart which sarah says can happen with the sentence as simple as he spread the warm bread with socks yummy. This is fun. I like this okay. So how does this compare to. The p six hundred you were mentioning earlier is different than and four hundred the big differences just that they go in opposite directions and they happen at different points so when she says opposite directions. She's talking about how they kind of show up on these science graphs. You've them sure one one shows up in the positive and the other shows up as negative and and okay but for me the easiest thing to hang onto is that they happen at different times so the four hundred happens four hundred milliseconds after the wuxi. The p six hundred. The brain gives off slightly later. That response peaks roughly six hundred milliseconds after the woopsie. That's really it and we're trying to understand when we see this type of fact. What could this affect represent. What is this affect characterizing. What's happening in the brain in. Initially researchers thought that the answers to these questions was that the end four hundred was happening because of semantic errors so involving the meaning of words right and that the p six hundred was showing up because of grammatical errors which not to brag. But i make all this and we've met you for that. Yeah yeah sure okay but but it turns out as research into all this has gone on these effects might be more generalized kind of than researchers previously thought it might just have to do with how your brain processes complex language and this just shows that when we think about language and how we process language. They're actually a lot of steps involved. Starting from recognizing that the sound that you hear is a sound of the language that you speak and how those sounds then combined to form some parts of words.

Sarah Phillips Marta Kunas Steven Hilliard Sir Philip New York University Emily Sarah
Building the Product Knowledge Graph At Amazon With Luna Dong

The TWIML AI Podcast

04:11 min | Last week

Building the Product Knowledge Graph At Amazon With Luna Dong

"Art. Everyone i'm here. With luna dong luna is a senior principal scientist with amazon working on product knowledge grass luna. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you nice to meet you. Sam is great to meet you. And i'm looking forward to our chat. Let's get started by having you introduce yourself to our audience. Sell us a little bit about your background and how you came to work in machine learning shire yeah so luna and i worked for amazon and the question regarding highlight came to machine learning. This is interesting question and that reminded me my. The weiser was a phd student at u. Dub i often hard him saying i'm wrong. The community and i came to database down the back door. And the now as you can imagine i got my phd from that database field and best viewed. Where i'm sort of active for a long time and now i'm coming to machine learning from the back door as well so my adviser and i we sort of make a circle so a little bit more about how i came to machine. Learning so my. Phd topic is about dating degration. Basically how we can seamlessly collect data from many many different data sources and integrating them together and then starting from twenty twelve. So that's the time. Google launched knowledge graph and starting from ben knowledge. Graph has been the very popular concept and big companies universities. They put a lot of efforts into it. And if you think about a knowledge graph you put all of the data from different sources and put it into this knowledge graph so saints that been working knowledge graph for the past about nine years for now. And why you'd be knowledge graph. You really need technology from all different fields. This includes natural language processing so you need to understand texts. this includes image processing. You also want to get knowledge found images this includes data mining. You want to mind the data from the text from the grass and also this includes database. You want to integrate the data. You want to clean up the data you want to have high quality data and in the sense to a great knowledge graph. You need all of the technologies. And that's how i came to machine learning field because machine learning is the core for all of these fields interesting interesting when you described the work. You're doing on european. Made me think of this challenge that we've been chasing after for the past ten twenty. Maybe even more years that i think of is like enterprise information immigration. We're going to create their some layer on top of all of the data to make it more easily accessible or some centralized thing that sits on top of all of the information within an organization. It's interesting to think of a knowledge graph as playing that role for many organizations. Tell us a little when you think of knowledge graphs and in particular product knowledge graphs. What are all of the things that go into. Making a robust knowledge graph. This is a great question. So knowledge graph is basic. Clay trying to mimic how human beings look at the real world before we are able to read and a write we already understand the real word and to the little kids. Those are mom. Daddy doggy my house my home. That's another house which is next to my house. And the before any of language thing. There are all of these entities and the relationships between the entities bass how human beings and the stand the real

Luna Dong Luna Amazon Weiser Luna SAM Saints Google Clay
How do we help hydrate our skin?

Allure: The Science of Beauty

04:09 min | Last week

How do we help hydrate our skin?

"Hey everyone welcome to the science of beauty. a podcast from allure. I'm michelle lee. The editor in chief. And i'm jenny by executive beauty director. And on this podcast we're gonna be diving into the science behind beauty and the products that we are always talking about an testing at a lower. Today's episode is all about hydration. And because we're taking this deep dive into the world of k. Beauty hydration as possibly the most important topic. That's right michelle and in our previous episode on layering. You heard dermatologist. Marie jin talking about the importance of hydration and how layering can help lock in moisture. So how do we help. Hydrate our skin in the first place to answer that question and more with dr christine lee. A senior research and development manager with age see our partners in producing this episode. Christine can you introduce yourself and tell us a bit about your background and pristine lee on the senior. Rnd manager overseeing unilever space. care business. In north america. I received my phd in two thousand in physical chemistry from the university of florida. And then i joined. Unilever and of worked on the hd brown for about two years so christine agency is based in seoul south korea. And i know you work really closely there with researchers. What can you tell us about. What's trending beauty right now. So in asia a lotta. The skincare formulations can karan's really focused on achieving bright hydrated glowing skin in korea specifically hydrating formulas are really key to rejuvenating the skin so it looks and feels smooth and soft but in addition in asia consumers just are so familiar and comfortable with multi step routines really elaborate application techniques. Like they talk a lot about double cleansing deep massaging. They'll even talk about like rubbing product in with your knuckles. They talk a lot about slapping and patting and tapping. so they're you know they're just really familiar and comfortable with application techniques that we don't talk about in the us as much. The other thing too is really interesting. About the asian consumer is the way the words they use to describe the look and feel of their skin that they're looking for so they'll talk about or glassy or porcelain skin and that much of this is really foreign to the american woman but it just really shows kind of the level of involvement Asian women have in their skincare routine. It's like my perfect skin. Everything you're saying. I'm like yes. Yes yes more of that please. You mentioned hydration which is of course the topic of our episode today as basic as it seems. Can you just define hydration for us as it relates to skin. I mean short really. Hydration pretty much means increasing the skins water content really at the end of the day. Dry skin is more than just a lack of water. When your skin is dry or dehydrated it can start to appear flaky doll. It really starts to feel uncomfortable tight irradiated. It can start to feel like you're getting more sensitive. This really is indicating a much more fundamental breakdown in the Healthy biological processes that are intended to keep skin soft and supple and smooth skins normal renewal processes slow down in absence of sufficient hydration which then leads to further dryness than it starts to pull your skin into this downward spiral alright. I don't love where this is going. What happens in the downward spiral. Our skin's natural explanation processing slowed down which leads to an accumulation of skin cells on the surface and these kind of accumulated or aggregates of skin cells. Start to form flakes which are another indicator of dryness and drier skin surfaces also lead to increase surface texture roughness which traps light which causes the skin to lose translucence and appeared dull and lifeless whereas hydrogen scan on the other hand is smooth radiant feel softer more elastic. More comfortable touchable. So it's not religious the dry or white hydrated it's really kind of biologically related. Wait supposed to versus comfortable. Soft smith hydrogen.

Marie Jin Dr Christine Lee Unilever Michelle Lee Korea Asia Jenny University Of Florida Karan Michelle Christine Seoul North America LEE United States
Rachael Tatman PhD Linguist and Rasa Senior Developer Advocate - Voicebot Podcast Ep 194 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

01:39 min | Last week

Rachael Tatman PhD Linguist and Rasa Senior Developer Advocate - Voicebot Podcast Ep 194 - burst 07

"Yeah so if you have multiples of groups in a population right and you want to have. There's multiple ways to value system if you are using automated metric to train your system. Your system is going to do. The thing that gets at the best results made metric. Talk assuming you set everything else. Up well And if you have one metric that covers a diverse population that has multiple sub populations in end one of those populations is the majority of your your inputs and this is not be over anything. You're going to end up with a model that prioritizes what works well for that majority group. Because that's what make the number go up or down if it's you know error and that's really hard to pick apart and not built into any model unless you understand the population. You're working with understand the subgroups and are you know you have a way to Identify a rate by group and analysis. Analysis is your data in a more In a way that's accountable for the underlying data distribution It's harder and it is very possible if you have a single model as opposed to say a model that is broken down by. Let's say dialect region by increasing performance for some groups you decrease performance for the majority

Interview With Rachael Tatman PhD Linguist And Rasa Senior Developer Advocate

The Voicebot Podcast

04:31 min | Last week

Interview With Rachael Tatman PhD Linguist And Rasa Senior Developer Advocate

"Rachel tavern. Welcome to the voice about podcast. Thank you grabbing me. Well i'm very excited to have you on this. I feel like this is long overdue. So i've been running this podcast. It's two thousand seventeen not long after you. And i met at a conference off of union square san francisco. I cannot remember the name of the conference or the hotel. The park central hotel But you'd made a really interesting presentation there. I wish i still remember parts of it today. So that's four years later. So what about about four years. Bow for years. This this This week even maybe this month certainly And then we had a chance to catch up For a quick lunch and talk about some things. I found it very insightful. so lo and behold you wind up raza. You're sort of in the industry. It's just like a perfect timing but let me let me let you tell your story a little bit. So why don't we start there for the audience. Who might not be familiar with you. Why don't we start with. Why don't we start with your background a little bit. And i think probably the academic background is a start unless you want to start before that so i think it's a reasonable place to to start so i am a phd in linguistics for my for my crimes And i got into linguistics physically. Because i actually going back and reading like Application materials grad school while ago and They were specifically about how i wanted to help. People build language technology. That really worked for everybody in helped make the world. A better place idealist. I can. I had like a lot of ideas. About how hollywood technology would make the road better so which i still think i still hold another one. And at that point i was really into speech and speech perception production from a human standpoint. So how humans perceive speech how to humans understand things And i realized that. I was working on this sort of designed experiments with an eye towards informing automatic speech recognition systems that people who are working on an automatic speech recognition natural language processing automatic speech recognition. We're not going to conferences. And we're not really reading the papers. Don't resident to shift more and more and more into natural. Language processing into more computational approaches In my dissertation i had a big be role experimental component big valuation component. And then also. I built up machine. Learning model that tried to emulate some of the things that humans did and specifically these were all around The ways that you use social information in speech production sorry in speech perception understanding each the you here and as part of that debate evaluation of a bunch of sr systems and this was in two thousand sixteen so awhile ago Looking at the ways that they were able to handle linguistic variation like a regional dialects. Or on i looked at african english I looked at gender and how that affected performance and it turned out the performance was best. You know white people who spoke very standardized prestige dialect not so much people who had a variety of language associated war with regional identity in metric. Finish my phd. Starting my data science wasn't a field. Who could do the entity. It was so i went to haggle which is owned by google So we all may be familiar with it. it's a There's a competition component Where people compete to do supervised machine learning problems and whoever does best wins. And there's also a Posted coating environment that they have and data hosting and was working more on that sort of infrastructure side of things. And then i was talking about this. A little bitter You know it's a little bit by this startup. Bills open source framework for building conversational. Ai conversational assistance rosza. And that's where i am now so i am Moved back to more of the inoki space more humour language students of like dita science more generally. I'm that's been my path to hear

Rachel Tavern Park Central Hotel Raza San Francisco Hollywood Google
The History of BLW with its Founding Philosopher Gill Rapley, PhD

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

04:10 min | 2 weeks ago

The History of BLW with its Founding Philosopher Gill Rapley, PhD

"The baby led weaning book. That you co authored. It is a must read and without sounding dramatic. It's certainly considered to be like the bible of the baby led weaning movement. And i was wondering if you could tell us a little bit about the process of turning your research into a book a little bit more about what the environment in infant feeding was like back when you wrote the first edition. Well i guess the first thing to say is that really. My research was very minimal to that point. Eight pence how define research. I haven't done any formal research very small for my master's degree which was around the time. The six months kind of rule was coming in two thousand. And one two. And so on a qualify. My masters i think it was two thousand five but it was a very small caught that one handgun was accumulation of a lot of information and anecdotal stories and reports from parents and my observations of babies. But as you said the environment at the time was very much we would starting at four months and so we weren't thinking of Six months as being anything other than a step along the way and the book wasn't actually started things. It may appear that in context of the countries that was the case but actually it was already spreading in the uk and in fact in the netherlands. Interestingly from late two thousand and one and two thousand two onwards by word of mouth by internet and so on the book was actually something that came a bit later by that time had little parents emailing me with questions that i was on seraing individually. They were also telling me that they were struggling because what happened when the recommended age changed the guidelines to how to go about it didn't change accordingly so as long mom. Put it to me. I've been given this leaflet by my health visitor. Think aren't she said about. How solid food. But i swear they've just gone through it with search and wherever it sexual six months. They've changed it six months but most of what's written doesn't refer to my six months old. She doesn't want to be spoon fed. She's pushing aside. She wants to grab a food unsure. That seem to have been the case so there was this mismatch between the guidelines. Won't parents discovering if they went to six months which had never really been addressed before those six knots. It always been that as an option. Nobody had really looked at how things might be different. If you wanted to. The baby was that old is an actual six months that time and a half the age they are four months babies mature incredibly quickly as we all know so i was getting these questions and queries from parents on separate them was saying you should want to talk about this thought well maybe on a kandahar faulty to tempt with another collaborates i. I knew i couldn't do it on my then somebody actually me is spoke. Hi will so. I thought well probably better get on with it. Then then i had a phone call ounce of the blue from a journalist tracy market and she had learned about baby that waning while she was on maternity. Leave with horon baby. I thought it was absolutely the best thing and was dating. Pretty much evangelical about sharing information with other people the she don't. She stopped by pitching a choose independent. Joe is pitch piece to a magazine or newspaper about babyhood weaning and she thought she'd better interview the person at the heart of it. All which was me on she off me a book about this on my pulls it and third well and then there was a kind of felt like several seconds of silence. And then. I said you would want to book with me. Where'd you tracy. And she said well you know am. I am basically that was it. We'd never met. We didn't know each show that we've been met few times kinda of tentatively to sound each other out and kind of the rest is history. Amazing wanted just one of those moments that you grab as it's passing or it's calm and love that story. I've never heard it and love that you described tracy burqa as being evangelical about sharing the message that you started and i can completely identify with that like once. You have that confidence and you see or child doing what they were designed to do you just kind of want to shout it from the rooftops. So i'm so glad that she connected with you

Tracy Market The Netherlands UK Babyhood JOE Tracy Burqa Tracy
Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

Short Wave

09:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

"So lauren you sent me a picture of one of these century old title logbooks and it's so cool. It's really detailed. You can see where it says one. Am someone's written thirteen feet one fifteen. Am fourteen feet one inch in this. Really lovely old penmanship tracking tied. Did people really do this. Twenty four hours a day every day of the year they did. They had technology. That actually made it easier though In the late eighteen hundreds they developed an automatic system which had this float that rested on the surface of the water and then fed information to kind of a pen that recorded the movement so then people just had to read off the values and put them into the ledgers and this was done in other places to lake near hillary island. The port of liverpool also has a really long running title record. That makes sense because this was the era of ships rights. Watercraft was the way that people and things got around. Yeah exactly you had a lot of ships going in and out of port and so they were shipping companies. That had to keep track of the tide so it can be done safely two day. Some of those old records are archived at the permanent service for mean sea level which is an organization in the uk that gathers ocean data worldwide Andy matthews a data scientists. There told me the data are pretty reliable. You know most of the time. Those woman over on point is a little hand square school saying they. They sweet because the Tyja for was sick. You get little insights now with him. Everybody needs a sick day right. Of course andy says they're trying to organize a bigger effort to find these records. Because you know since kind of obscure they're hard to find yet but it can be anywhere these kind of things now in libraries from people that we all kaisei done coin. Doug well they are. Yeah this is quite the quest and an even bigger issue. I imagine is that when they find them. The data is still stuck on those pages. Yeah his colleagues scanned about sixteen thousand pages. But the numbers are on the page and they haven't been digitized so they're really not usable by scientists. They're trying to use computers to do it through character recognition. But i mean you saw that writing right. It's kind of like the script and the formats can be really hard to decipher so india's hoping that the public will help he recently put the images on zoom verse. A website and so volunteers can kind of in and and read the numbers. Type them up. I love this approach. I mean we're all bored at home looking for something to do this pandemic so why. Not some historical data as tree right. Yeah i mean data entry for a greater good seriously but to get into the nitty gritty of it. Why exactly is an important to look at data from the eighteen. Hundreds to understand sea level rise today an into the future right. What does that matter. Yeah right. I mean it has to do with how complex sea-level rise is because it's been caused by a number of different things. I mean i. You got glacier's melting temperatures causes them to shrink and that water runs off into the ocean and the same thing is happening in greenland and antarctica. Where there are these massive ice sheets on the land and there's so much is melting in gigi tons tapping increasingly fast. And i know that oceans are also rising because the water itself is warming up and hotter things expand so the water slick taking up more space. Yep you got it and actually. This is kind of cool. Sea level rise did slow down in the nineteen sixties and seventies because that was the era of dam building around the world. When you know when these big reservoirs were being constructed. They held back so much water. It was actually measurable. Ooh that is so strange and it really shows how we humans do impact the oceans. That's like a tangible detail of how quickly we can do that. It's a huge scale. But it's not really a factor anymore because you know dams aren't really being built at the same rate these days got it. Yeah anyway since one thousand nine hundred there's been about eight inches of sea level rise and by the end of this century. We couldn't be looking at three to six feet of sea level rise or even higher depending on how much carbon humans emits but. that's globally. The water is rising at a different pace depending on where you are. Yeah how exactly does that work. Because wouldn't the phil evenly kind of like when you fill a bathtub. And here's where it gets a little weird. The earth is slowly changing slowly getting a different shape lake. You know when you've been sitting on the couch while and you kind of get up and the cushion rebounds like morphs back into its old shape. Yeah not all couches but sure theoretically Well okay that same thing happens to the earth's crust During the last ice age Kind of started waning. Eleven thousand years ago. There was a lot of ice on canada and greenland super heavy and was pushing down the earth's crust since that melted the crust has been slowly rebounding. And that's actually not good for the east coast especially around the mid atlantic region. Because you know it's on the same tectonic plates as canada and greenland and when one side goes up. The other side goes down So what you're saying is where i live on. The east coast is on the lower end of the see-saw basically your thinking about that slowly. I mean the east coast is seen more sea level rise than other parts of the country. And then there's a whole bunch of other things that can cause that to you. Know ocean currencies big things that span hundreds of miles in the ocean. They cost the water on one side of them to be higher on the other side. You know so. Because of currents and gravity the oceans themselves are just kind of lumpy which is why sea level rises different everywhere. I am learning so much right now. You're basically saying is that sea level rise is local essentially and if cities want a plan for this and figure out what an who is at risk they'll need tailor-made information for their location. Yeah that's where these historical records come in. You know they reveal what these geologic processes and ocean conditions are doing in each place right right and i signed us refine their computer models. Which are those high powered ways that we get forecast about climate change. I spoke to scientists. Tomas friedrich's at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory about this and he said local records really matter. If we don't have that information for these see to be like a few feet off the local records of sea level so especially when we try to projects like high water levels of like extremes sea levels that's how we call them It's very difficult to to get an accurate picture of that but there is a big issue with a historical records. They already have almost all of the ones that have been digitized. Come from europe and north america So what you're saying is we gotta find more places. More hillary islands so to speak with historical sea level data all around the world. Yeah and this is a problem across many kinds of climate data. actually the southern hemisphere hasn't been covered as well with things like whether stations and other kind of data collection historically So there's just this big effort to find these historical records outside of europe and the us in argentina. They're working to digitize records from nineteen o five that were taken at the port of raise But to go back farther in some countries it means looking at the records of former colonial powers that took control because when countries like the uk and germany and france extracted. Huge amount of resources from colonies often through force. They did it largely through shipping colonialism stealing and keeping a record of it yeah pretty much so right now in france the national hydrographic service is digitizing these title records from dozens of their former colonies from madagascar vietnam Some of those records though aren't as long running you know they were gathered. As part of geographic mapping or you know to study an area where they were putting in port project. But i spoke to one person who is working with the french to stitch together a longer running record dating back through his country's colonial history marbella unika for seafood unique is from cameroon and he's a phd student in france right. Now he started in german archives. Because that was the colonial power in the late. Eighteen hundreds until france took control so he's gathered the french records as well and then he the cameroon records after it became independent in nineteen sixty. Yeah that's really interesting. Project and just a clear example of how the legacy of colonialism continues to impact science today. Yeah yeah i mean. It's digging through. His legacy is how he's kind of finding these records And there's really only one other long-term record in africa and that's from the car senegal so he knows cameroon could be crucial for improving global climate models But it could also be really helpful for cameroon itself. Nieto's just told me that. The country's largest city douala right on the atlantic coast and estuary and it's extremely vulnerable to flooding already. I'm just last year. There was a huge flood that displays thousands after really heavy rains. So when you add sea level rise to that it just makes the flooding issue worse. So he's hopeful that the historical records he's finding will lead to more detailed forecasts about just how fast the ocean is rising there because twala like other cities needs to start preparing now communities need to decide whether to move out of the way or build some kind of protection and

Hillary Island Permanent Service For Mean Sea Andy Matthews Greenland East Coast Lauren Liverpool Tomas Friedrich Doug Antarctica Andy UK Mid Atlantic Canada India
TPA Open Source Software Security with Jennifer Fernick

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

08:34 min | 2 weeks ago

TPA Open Source Software Security with Jennifer Fernick

"Let's do a little background on you. Give us the thirty second overview of who you are and in what brings you here. Share name's stanford for nick. I'm the global head of research at nc secret which is a large cyber security consulting firm prior to this iran a security team at a large bank. I've been doing security for a very long time long before. I realized that it was an actual industry in profession and grew up through Do undergrad and my masters was in systems engineering. And then he's a phd student in cryptography. So my main focus area has historically been progress. But of course it's expanded to much more recently Currently i run a security team that has several hundred researchers at antique group. So you are in fact. One of those jokingly jobs and i always talk about in crypto. There's like five people the world qualified to talk about it. You probably one of those five hundred. If we're going to talk about post quantum crypto. Maybe i was really interested in. Public key crypto systems in how quantum computers could be used to break them. So that's specific staff of probably. Although less over time i guess as i've stepped into maybe a broader a broader role within. I need to get back on the show to talk about. Post quantum crypto kaz. Admittedly tell you. I have absolutely so little knowledge in that stays. It's not even funny all right so you we wanted to get this conversation. Getting kicked off around Around open source You've done some work in this in this area. Tell us a little bit about de get started their shirt so Of course at nc group we do like of security research and some of this is the more traditional vulnerability research so about a year and a half ago. Maybe there were a bunch of people that were getting very interested in figuring out. How do we better secure of open-source ecosystem because we know that there's been this sort of lacombe. Ole finding of random security bugs sometimes super inconsequential on super small projects. Sometimes absolutely massive about things like heart bleed so so like across time There's been there's been an uncovering in a very patchy way of vulnerabilities within open source software. So we were interested in really finding a way to coordinate impulse together and figure out what are some strategic steps forward in open source software security cool all right so look there. There has been so much raging debate And i use that word. Because it's almost like the windows versus lennox versus mac discussion. These days right turns into like a pseudo religious argument oval open source versus commercial software. Which one's better which one's more secure in insecurities Everyone goes and even if you had an app. Even for those of us have spurs one way or the other. You wait five minutes. And there's there's proof to the contrary so a you mentioned heart bleed right like then there's bash bog that forget the name of it but i mean if it had its own logo and i think we even made a theme song for crying out loud like it got it. It's gotten a little absurd. Yeah people are spending too much time marketing. Their bugs navy. But but you know we we open ourselves stuff was such a. I guess a revelation or wakeup call for a lot of us because there was this there was this belief that somehow open source. Stuff is you know. can infallible. Like all right. There's so many people looking at it and you know it's being reviewed in real time. It's the community. Always like their community has the opportunity to bug on either. We didn't or or there's something wrong with that argument. Yeah there's this tragedy of the comments thing that happens around open source software where we assume that just because someone can look at it. Someone has And we also assume that if someone's looking at it they are not an adversary and totally wanna do a responsible coordinated disclosure which is not often or not necessarily always the case so the i think hardly really opened our eyes to the impact that these bugs can have. I mean if you think about it. This was wet like spring. Twenty fourteen that this came out in public Showed us what the risk really looks like in practice you know. There was a single critical vulnerability found within an individual open source project that was maintained by only a few volunteers recall correctly. Like maybe one person was working on it. Fulltime and this was like the underlying infrastructure for like a non trivial portion of the entire internet yet and it compromises security of. I think it was like seventeen or somewhere. Unplug percent of all of the web servers on the internet. And it's like. I think this really shows us how like important. These software systems are and how many dependencies trace back to open source software. So when people are having this debate what is more secure open source or proprietary software. Obviously there's trade offs right. Proprietary can't necessarily have everyone look at the source but you're at least guaranteeing that someone probably is looking at the source an all of these other things but i mean it's it almost becomes a moot point to me because whether you make a case for proprietary software being more secure or open source software being more secure weather proprietary or open source. There's often dependencies upon core pieces of infrastructure that are open source so finding a way to secure these things matters and out of like what came with heart lead. The lennox foundation started like the core infrastructure initiative which put millions of dollars into helping secure open source software. So really open necessarily just kind of the next phase of of that work effort will be good excellent point because this is something that the scene repeatedly because a lot of the the foundations of nobody writes all their libraries right. I mean only the insane Scratch even when. I was the world's worst developer a million years ago. There would still be things you would include you do from other y- find something like okay. I need to know how to do. X y and z. Like i have no idea how to write. I'm gonna go find a l and include that. I can bring in pop that in want to use somebody else's optimized i don't have threat from scratch. Brilliant web apps are the greatest way to see this in action because there's just tons of frameworks plug ins and whatever and a lot of that stuff is open source maintained by the community and then we find out that there are a event julia every once in a while we find a massive bugs in in some of these things and then we gotta go hunting and got to realize that A lot of the commercial products out there have been source things inside them. That are vulnerable that it will like okay. So how do we fix this now. Yeah and like those transitive. Dependencies can often go many layers deep lake sometimes depending on something. That's depending on something. That's depending on open source library. Which itself is depending on some other open source component and often it can go many layers steve unlike just understanding those transitive dependencies where that risk comes into any product. Yet open source or commercial is very hard. It's something that Organizations don't necessarily do The organizations that rely upon these critical things don't always finds them or study them at the depth that you might expect that they would. So there's a definite need for folks that are interested in doing security research in working with open source maintainers to really come together and pull in the same direction. Otherwise we just have this infinite like finding of random bugs but if you think about. I don't know the statistics that ucla seve owner vulnerability databases. There's tens of thousands of vulnerabilities disclosed every year. That gets vs. There's way more than that that are being disclosed. That maybe don't tv's there's even more than that that are being found in not patched and there's probably even more than that being created input into existence so when we think about just the massive stale at which there exist 'vulnerability in sourcing beyond Clearly something needs to change in in the ways that we develop software in the ways that we secure software throat like this. Dlc in in what happens when we integrate these at risk components. So

Nc Group Nick Iran Lennox Foundation Navy Julia Steve Ucla
BTS #46 David (Dedi) Meiri PhD on Cannabis and Cancer, The Future of Cannabis Research - burst 05

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

04:24 min | 2 weeks ago

BTS #46 David (Dedi) Meiri PhD on Cannabis and Cancer, The Future of Cannabis Research - burst 05

"Suit. Today may not looking with thirty eight or centers every time that we are the change so having their kind of a big picture that they can in the federal candidate may influence levin affecting human body looking on the older to get first of all. Give me the tools to ask wished and then the question is are starting to emerging. Of course it's everything is that they did just chemistry and that still in then so having these abilities in these tools first of all change our been away. Many many many scientists physicians collaborations companies approach means. Just that the doing each experiment but they know nothing about the molecules using. Can i purify in with him. I don't know the those music In these open the door for me last year to enter to many different angles of different illnesses and diseases using candidates. You know the best thing. Neuro physician in the world approaching means today the doing this experiment. They need you with me. You're not saying you know this is this is all and we've you know so more and more and more may lab change the way you i researched talking to grow in. There was things so out there. Light with a patient. You know epilepsy or a sleep disorders or in two zero zero there on the on the patient instead just i want to do the understand now the reason. Why can't this effect in which compound how to improve so the roof from allow of six seven students to a level forty five plow which have different groups. I have a group of chemists doing analysis everything every group to doing cancer biology and we can talk about the perfume one every doing a research around neuro. Degenerative diseases like alzheimer's epilepsy. The order In every group. That's working how kennedy's affect the immune system few types of small small think about in small. But it's not be groups. It's individual the doing other things in the last five years in other big project that we did. We crane to big data database in israel on the patient. So in the last five years every cannabis in being bigness. Again there is you know there is a probes to be a small country despite for your board does day and but there is benefit that everybody knows everybody. And everybody's working together. So until last year we had just eight authorize globals just eight greenhouse is easier to work with them to follow up to every candidates. Be every a cannabis They ever product. The patient can get go through my lap. I analyzed all defeated candidates in a in there on the other side. We follow up on on the patient. How it's affecting so does it died improve. Sleep mainly kind of sign of and which i don't call it side effect. If you have a problem of saying oh slipping improving scooping. It's not your scientific. But we we measure that in which we started to to bring that to bed. Get into completed to try to match. Which type of cannabis in which profile of candidates affecting which illnesses in what

Levin Degenerative Diseases Alzheimer's Epilepsy Epilepsy Kennedy Cancer Israel
Leaderless Consensus

Data Skeptic

04:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Leaderless Consensus

"Minus biology. And i'm a student in the system. Softer research group virginia tech. I'm broadly interested in building distributed systems. And i've been doing that since my master's and my phd degrees or the past five years. Broadly i focus on building reliable and high-performance distributed systems very specifically i work on this topic of consensus and agreement protocol van idress different properties of them such as scale ability and resiliency to fox previously also worked on addressing the performance aspects of certain taxes of consensus call the leaderless consensus protocol. Which i believe is the topic of today's discussion. Yeah could you draw that distinction. We've talked a little bit about paxos on some episodes but had a very leader paxos biased to that. I guess what does it look like to leaderless. Paxos the main reason you would want a leader in paxos protocol is because you won't agreement among a collection of processes it could be notes that are spread around in a wide area network or it could be in the same local area network and important a problem. The leader saws is the type of conflicts because if you allow anybody to propose values than they might not reach agreement quickly in fewer communication on. That is critical. So that is why classically a paxos protocols have been proposed the leader so that you can have domination in fewer communication steps decision can be made in. Let's say to communication steps. However what differentiates leader less paxos is that you remove the requirement for leader and introduce a different mechanism so that even without a leader. These different notes can agree on a same set of values that the agree and execute as part of their statement. Do we have to give anything up to go. Leaderless we lose eventual consistency or. Yeah what's the cost of this consistency vice. We are still able to get leaner is ability. We don't lose anything per se. But however the protocol itself gets more complex and more nuanced and subtle paxos itself is a complex protocol to understand dissect however these littlest protocol because of more addition to the original access protocol can get more complicated. You'd mentioned scale. Ability is one of the interesting things to study in these consensus protocols. Most of the papers and research. I did learning these things. We'll give me examples of like you know quorums of five or seven nodes. Which of course are great right. That's the way to learn it but in reality it's internet and cloud scale. Maybe we'd like to have orders of magnitude more nodes. What are some of the scale. Ability challenges you bump into down that path you mean. In terms of leila's protocols are in just in terms of consensus. For god's will either way maybe we can stick to your precise work or if you think it's valuable to contrast it with the more generic case that works to terms scale ability in the crush fault tolerant space before i get deep into cash phone torrens. Let me specify a little bit on the fault models themselves. So typically people work in the crash fault donald space if they're building consensus for a single organization use case data center use case fair people deeply into databases and stuff like that and the assumption in the crash. Fault tolerant space is that the machines can simply crush but they cannot behave maliciously in the sense that when they reach agreement they don't behave in a way as to deviate the consistency of the values. That is being agreed on. This is in contrast to the byzantine fault tolerant agreement problem which addresses a different set of use cases like permission blockchain allegations that require much more scale obliterated then that is required in the trash falter spaced typical even people talk about the fda talk about scale ability to fifty or hundred or more than hundred up to thousands soft notes but in crush on space. People typically talk scale ability up to five or seven notes and that is for very specific reason. And that is that consensus protocols. In general they tend to be very expensive in coordination and the performance tend to get much worse as you scale to higher number of notes and for blockchain applications. If you look at the absolute numbers the performance of the f. d. protocols for blockchain applications are much lower than safety protocols. The reason we stick to a few notes in the safety protocol is because they're not other mechanisms that use like shotting and stuff like that in order to achieve scale ability in a data center sitting.

Virginia Tech FOX Leila Blockchain Donald Trump FDA
Power of Black Women Voters With Marcia Chatelain

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Power of Black Women Voters With Marcia Chatelain

"I recently wrote in forbes about how kamala harris may be able to heal the wounds between black women and white women but i defer to our terrific yesterday on these issues. I'd like you to meet dr. Marcia chatelaine a provost distinguished associate professor of history and african american studies at georgetown university here in washington dc. She's a scholar of american life and culture previously. She was an assistant professor of honors in african american studies at the university of oklahoma in norman. She earned her. Phd at brown university and her undergraduate studies at the university of missouri columbia in journalism and religious studies fellow aspiring journalists. They go. Marsha was a terrific expert featured in the recent pbs series. The vote on how women fought for and won the right to vote over an eighty year struggle or more welcomed green connections radio. Marcia thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Oh you're welcome. You're welcome so our start in the heart of this issue. As i said in my introduction i've understood the black and white women had a kind of love hate relationship if you will during the suffrage battles as i understand it. Black women wanted white women to include abolition in their struggle. But the white women leaders believe the combining the two would keep the legislation from. What is your take on it. Tell us the truth. Because you're the historian so the issue at hand between abolition and suffrage are deeply tied. And that's because a number of figures in the suffrage movement were first activists in the fight against slavery and i think the poignancy of the battle for women's suffrage was the fact that many of the white women who were at the lead of the suffrage movement were anti-slavery and they had supported. Abolitionist may have believed that there was a moral reason to end the system of slavery but when it came to suffrage they were divided over the issue of universal suffrage Some do not believe that black women white men should equally have the vote. Some did not believe that black men and black women should have the vote. So i think that the suffrage movement really exposes the limitations of racial solidarity even among people who were on the right side of history one issue were not able to transfer that sense of grace to the issue of suffrage. And that's where you see the fault lines. In the suffrage movement really emerged from it was the fact that they did not want include african american women visibly or prominently or ideologically in their fight for the right to vote because they believed that it would degrade the quality of the vote of degrade the preciousness of the right and a number of these women again. Even though they were morally opposed to slavery they would not immune from white supremacist ideas. Okay so there's so much to unpack in there. You said something really interesting you said and i paraphrase of course but the the the divisions over the vote represented larger divisions in the racial schisms. If you will Racial solidarity behind the vote. Yes so one of the things that i think. A lot of people don't understand from how they're taught history is that we often think of the issue of slavery as one in which people were either pro or anti and it's often presented as a matter of north versus south union versus confederacy. But if you look at the movement to end slavery and look at abolitionists. They all had very different ideas of what happens next. They knew that slavery is a scourge on the nation. But they didn't agree on. What would it mean for african americans to be elevated to the level of status rather the level of a citizen and what that status should mean and so there were people who were abolitionists but they were segregationists. There were abolitionists who believed that african americans should be repatriated to colonies in africa. They were people who believed in complete and total social equality in some people believed in some level of social quality but not marriage and so those debates among the abolitionist movement i think are very much mirrored in the debate among white selfridge's who should get the vote i who should be allowed to vote. And what measures should be taken in order to ensure their desired goals

Marcia Chatelaine University Of Missouri Columbi Kamala Harris University Of Oklahoma Georgetown University Brown University Marsha Marcia PBS Norman DC Washington South Union White Selfridge Africa
Fisher Vs. Keynes: Investing Tragedy And Triumph

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:20 min | 3 weeks ago

Fisher Vs. Keynes: Investing Tragedy And Triumph

"Irving fisher was born in eighteen sixty seven in the town of saugerties. New york got his phd economics from yale in eighteen ninety one and for most of his adult life he enjoyed this almost unparalleled streak of success. Yeah not just as a great economist but also as an entrepreneur and investor. Tim harford is the author of the data detective. A new book that includes a chapter about irving fisher. He was the basically the inventor of what we now call the rolodex card filing system. That made him a multimillionaire. He was a diet and fitness expert. He published a book called how to live which was the freakonomics of its day. Only sold five hundred thousand copies. He set up the life extension institute. He was a campaigner on prohibition. He was a vegetarian. Assist an astonishing a prolific campaigner and thinker and he made a lot of money in the markets for a while as the stock market in the nineteen twenties was going up and up fisher was investing more and more money into it in fact even though he was already investing a ton of his own money he was also borrowing even more money to invest in stocks so that he could boost his returns fisher was just supremely confident about his forecast that the market would keep going up confident both in his own intelligence and also in the possibility of using data and statistics to predict the future. So that's where irving fisher was right before the crash of nineteen twenty. Nine john maynard. Keynes the other. Great economists of the era got there a little differently. Canes was definitely already considered one of the great economic minds of the time and just like irving fischer canes knew. He was the smartest guy in every room. He walked into same. Yeah me too something. We all share with gains right. But unlike irving fisher john maynard. Keynes had gotten some things wrong. By that point he had been humbled by the market before he had an early investment fund immediately after the first world war that just went went bankrupt and it was fine canes raise more money went back into the market. Got everyone's cashback. Everyone lived happily ever after but he had that experience going. Oh yeah. I thought i was smart on the market. Maybe i'm not smart on the market when the crash of one thousand nine hundred nine arrive. The stock market collapsed more than twenty percent in two days and within three years it had fallen more than eighty nine percent from where it was before the crash. Both and john maynard. Keynes lost a lot of money on their investments in the crash but there is a huge difference in how they responded so after the crash fisher kept doubling down on the same investments. He even kept borrowing money to invest in the same. Losing stocks for example fisher owned stock in a company called remington rand and right before the crash remington rand stock was at fifty eight dollars share but after the crash of two three months it was twenty eight dollars. A share and fisher was borrowing money and buying more shares at twenty eight dollars for years into the crash. It was one dollars a share. That is how to be a millionaire. Lose everything maybe fisher believed that his precious data just could not be wrong or that he could not be wrong or that. His self worth was tied up in this idea that he was right. Whatever the case he couldn't change his mind and he lost everything. Canes was different kane street at his failures as a chance to learn a chance to improve his process up to the crash he'd been investing based on his ability to predict the ups and downs of the whole economy. But after the crash he decided that that was just too hard to unknowable so he changed his strategy to investing in companies that he believed had good management and he thought would go up over time no matter what the overall economy was doing. Canes made a fortune for himself and for the endowment of king's college us money he was managing one of the things he said when he was trying to raise money from his own father was win or lose. This high stakes gaming amuses me. That's that's just an amazing linked to say when you're trying to persuade someone to give you money and yet in the end it helps because he just didn't take it so personally for the past few decades. A psychologist named philip tat. Lock has studied the behaviors that lead to better forecasting being very precise predictions constantly. Checking to see if your forecasts or proving true and updating your forecast if they are not true all of these make you a better forecaster. But tim says if he had to summarize. All of this research on a bumper sticker. Full cost is better when they recognized. They might be wrong and they are asking themselves. What am i missing. What perspective having tie considered. Who haven't i talked to that sort of almost paranoid suspicion that you might have messed up. And the willingness to change your mind that leads to much better forecasting you know it sounds so obvious. Just be able to change your mind and yet in practice. People really struggle to change their minds especially about their deeply held beliefs. That irving fisher could not change his mind and john maynard. Keynes could ended up making all the difference in how they lived the rest of their lives a few months after the second world war at fissuring canes both died fisher was alone and nearly bankrupt hitting bailed out by his millionaire sister-in-law and he'd completely lost his reputation as a result of his failed forecast. It's such a tragic end to a great career. Canes died a millionaire the most famous and celebrated economists on the planet and there is a quote that sometimes gets attributed to canes that. Tim also likes to remember him by. He probably never said it but he lifted which is when the facts change. I change my

Irving Fisher John Maynard Fisher Keynes Tim Harford Saugerties Remington Rand New York Philip Tat TIM
Sam Sommers On How Context Shapes Our Behavior And Our Decisions

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

06:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Sam Sommers On How Context Shapes Our Behavior And Our Decisions

"Sam. Welcome to the unstoppable creative. Thanks for taking the time to join us. Of course thanks for having me. Yeah it is my pleasure to have you here. So i as i was saying here before we hit record stumbled on your book on amazon situations battle which was all about context and i think part of the that must've showed up as i was writing a lot about context and how often it is overlooked by so many of us in almost every decision we make But before we get into the content of the book the worst rescue. What did your parents do for work. And how did that end up. Shaping the choices you've made throughout your life in your career. What are my parents do for work. I just did the thing where i repeated the question right so i can give myself a chance. To think of the most articulate into this. it's not a question. i get often so My father when i was growing up with a english professor at a community college and so he taught freshman composition and creative writing. My mother was critical care nurse and when i was in high school she actually went back to graduate. School and Finished her phd and Became a researcher doing clinical research in the field of nursing. So what influence did that end up having on you. Did they give you any particular advice in terms of career past to follow. Did they suggest things. You shouldn't do with your life. I think that for both of them doing what you were passionate about. And thought was important was the emphasis that it was not. I was not growing up in a household where it was. You must do professions x y and z. Because you must make a certain income in order to be considered a success. it was very much What are you passionate about. And i think for my father is passionate was teaching and working with students and helping them develop their writing and that's and doing his own writing and i think that that's what he was passionate about. And that's what he pursued. And i don't think he ever sat down and told me that but i watched that happen and i saw him in the basement of the old school. You know analog tape recorder recording verbal comments on students freshman composition papers so they could revise them for their portfolios from my. My mother was working with people who needed her assistance and care and and comfort and treatment and then pursuing that later in life with three kids and juggling everything that was going on our house on deciding to to get her phd so that she could do. Research on the clinical interventions related to a alcohol related trauma car accidents and and diagnostic tools for better assessing victims of sexual assault. And doing that work Because she thought it was important because it was easy. And i think i more observed that rather than had anyone in struck me that that's what i should do. What in the world lead you down the path where you would actually eat a write a book about something like context because it's such a subtle nuance subject. That plays such a huge role in our lives Because you know this is to me. Almost every guest have is not something that the high school guidance counselor says. Yeah here's a potentially good career option for you. Yeah i found myself as a college freshman going to a liberal arts college to major in english or spanish or something like that. And and i found myself in an interest psych course because it was just sort of the thing you did people were taking it. My friends were taking it. And i thought why not what that course did for me was opened my eyes to the idea that a lot of the conversations that i have an had had in my life with my friends at the mall food court or with my brothers around the dinner table or just in whatever context about why people are acting the way they were in just human nature more. Generally if there was a way to approach that through a scientific lens and that became my career path. I became what i wanted to do. I took courses more courses in psychology and behavioral sciences. More generally and found my niche within social psychology. A field that really has as its underlying credo this idea that situations matter that that very small seemingly small aspects of our ordinary environments and circumstances can have a huge effect that how we think and feel and act and that was my path. I started to conduct research and i and i started teach mike Courses in this field and and the book really grew out of add this desire to to share with the more general audience. This this power. The context has to shape human nature. Yeah well speaking of context. Why do you think it is that somebody like. You could recognize that early in your life that. Hey wow. there's something here that. I clearly have an interest in a passion for versus gio. I went to berkeley for years. And i can tell you. I can't really tell you much about any classes that i think had enough of an impact to say. Oh this is going to shape and influence. Where i do. You know where. I go with my career. Lock some of its lock right. Some of it is finding yourself in the right spots. And i'm sure that your experiences and in college but also before and after have had an how it through countless influences in shaping who you are in the way you think today even if it's some of it is to reject a certain class or experience viewpoint and say that's not for me and so forth i at some level perhaps i was just fortuitous and lucky to find myself in these classes in a small liberal arts setting where i can really go in depth into them and and it it sparked something in me that i think already been there and some of the classes. I take it in high school in books. I was reading in movies. I was into. And i think we all as goes without saying You know take our own pads and that that intersection of of what's always captivated us with the the the environment which we find ourselves. That interaction plays out differently for different people and and and for me it was relatively early on was in college. I sort of had that spark of this is what i wanna do. And fortunately luckily twenty twenty five years later. I'm still doing that. Teaching the kinds of courses. That at that point i was in We all take different paths and that intersection of who you are as people in the environments in which we find ourselves that. That's a curious and unpredictable. Intersection

SAM Amazon Mike Courses Berkeley
Interview With Megan Kang

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:31 min | Last month

Interview With Megan Kang

"I guess today is making king and she is a doctoral student at princeton in sociology. And she first came to my attention because as i was scrolling through my morning news feed this headline jumped up at me about how this person had embittered themselves among stop the steel trump supporters and wanted to really understand. Just not only what they thought. Because i think a lot of us know what they think. But it's more like what's behind that. Why do they keep thinking what they think. So i immediately reached out to megan. And i said man i would love to have this conversation. I think. Our country after the inauguration of president biden and vice president harris and we're right in the midst of this impeachment trial as recording this. We're still hugely terribly divided as a country. And i just wanna thank you for your willingness. Come on talk about this. We don't expect you to have any more definitive answers than anybody else out there. But i think your experience of spending a month of weekends at an intersection in florida is priceless. And so welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for having me can so you kind of come from this approach from what i could glean from your article that you're not just looking at data you want to imbed yourself because you said either walking in the shoes or at least near the shoes of the people that you're studying is very different than just looking at raw data is that is that accurate. Yeah that is accurate. So i guess one thing. I should point out about the word in bed. I that that was a huffpost like editorial decision more nefarious than what. I think i was doing. You know like a click bait thing. Sounds very intriguing but really got me. Click we get the impression that you went deep undercover. You know it it was. I think i would say more naive in that. You know i. I saw this group of people that had been standing on a corner where i had been doing grocery shopping over winter break. I happen to be in florida staying in my partners family's house kind of on accident actually. I need to go home to southern california. Where i know you're from kobe. Rates had gotten so bad. And so i decided to just stay put in florida where things a little bit better. So we saw them there for a few weekends. I learned from the the grocer that this group had actually been out there for the past six months and it had transformed from from pro trump rallies to part election to stop the steel rallies. Right after who does the same group of people consistently there. Every saturday morning. I think like many americans like you said had been had been having a hard time grasping this divide that we've been seeing our country and feeling like i was missing perspective. And so like you say. I think the the method that i i am drawn to is just going up and talking to people and asking them and that's something that i'm i'm getting trained to do as a sociology. Phd student and particularly a method called goofy and we prioritize personal experience and getting close to the issues and trying to understand people who are living those issues experience making sense of them. I'm just trying to imagine that as you almost use the word infiltrate as you associated as you kind of dropped in on these weekends at this intersection. I'm imagining that. There weren't a lot of people that looked like you already. They're like the regulars weren't anywhere close to people of color sets to say that's right. yes. I'm a twenty eight year old korean-american woman who was raised in california and has lived in berkeley oakland chicago detroit and princeton. So that just gives you a glimpse of my political. Leanings have influenced my thinking. This is in south florida. Florida's a quintessential purple state. it voted marginally for trump. in the past two elections. I was in one of the blue counties but only marginally blue and so very different political environment than the ones that i've used to and the group of people that were there. I had seen them before. They were primarily middle aged white and hispanic floridians decked out fully and trump gear. And we're definitely looked very different and clearly have different perspectives than anyone. That i'm around

Princeton In Sociology President Biden Florida Megan Harris Southern California Berkeley Princeton Oakland Detroit South Florida Chicago California
Interview With Robert Livingston

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | Last month

Interview With Robert Livingston

"How you doing. I'm doing good doctor livingston. Are you bummed. That if you google your name you're going to get one of the fathers of the constitution right or one of these early founding fathers taking all the real estate yes yeah this ranch of being named dax. There's just not a bunch out there right now your christian name it is. It is yeah. My mom and dad had read a book in the lead character's name was dax. And let's go for it where you from originally. So i was born in lexington kentucky and that's where i spent most of my time but i've lived in six states in four foreign countries. So do you have a favorite my favorite place to visit his turkey. Eastern bowl is my favorite city in the world really has the oslo balance of chaos and order if you will oh okay good. I need you to drill down on the order. Because when i look at it looks very bright. Very frenetic very exciting. And i'm a little bit like that's seems maybe too chaotic. There's a method to the madness because there are places. I've been that are chaotic. They're just chaos deal with it but turkey just seems chaotic like this. Is it comparable to any other form or european country or is it its own thing and that's why you love it. It's its own thing. But i would say it's most comparable to spain. I don't know if you've been disowned ensuring people go out to eat restaurants. Don't open before nine o'clock in the party starts at one. Am and it goes to eight in the morning and spain has a different rhythm. And i think that's the most similar country to turkey and its mediterranean so similarities in the cuisine fish a lot of oil you know and then a crazy history. One of the most historical places you could visit. And that's what i like about it too. So you just hit the number one criteria for whether i like cities or don't and that is rhythm so i'll be places and i'm like yeah it's beautiful. That's a big tall building. That's got all the accoutrements of a great city. But there's just no rhythm happening here and then conversely you go down to austin texas. They don't have a ton to look at. And i'm like oh i can feel the rhythm all around me exactly now. How did you end up at harvard. Like most things in life. It had something to do with my network. So i was in england at the time because i had accepted a position because again our wanderers case. You can't tell i. Don't mind packing up and going to some exotic place. And i got an offer to take over as head of organizational behavior department at the university of sussex and i had my own center and when i was there at the center i discovered my real passion. I like to say. I transitioned from being a gardener to being a florist. When i was just a straight researcher i had my hands in the dirt. Cultivating blooms if you will. And then. when. I was head of the centre. I interacted with metropolitan police. The nhl the national healthcare service all these organizations to sort of give away my flowers if you will and so. I got into the florist business. Like how do you arrange these flowers into the perfect bouquet to give it to people at weddings. Because what's the point staying in a greenhouse if no one ever sees the beauty of your flowers and so you know when i was in england i discovered the passion of sort of giving away the science and then harvard. You know i was giving a talk. And they said well. You know we're holding company of entrepreneurs will let you come here and do whatever you wanna do if you don't want publish anymore will let you be a practitioner. But an academic at the same time and i was like really because most places aren't set up you know. Harvard makes its own rules. So i sort of took on this position to be an academic practitioner which led to this book that we're going to talk about which is sort of trying to distill. The science synthesize it assembly like a bouquet into something that people can digest and use to make profound sustainable change around racism. So that's like my purpose in life. Now where did you get your doctor. Degree because lexington kentucky and then ending up england emceeing already. You're privy to to dramatically different racial structures. And i wonder where you went to college if you maybe even a third and that somehow helps you on your journey just to have witnessed all this stuff firsthand. I went from coast to coast to coast and into the mid west. So basically i started my undergrad tulane university in. I did a study abroad in spain. Which is how. I came to know. Spain fell in love with spain. And i majored in spanish. That was one of my things. And then i went to. Ucla started at the gulf of mexico. Coast number one went to california. Ucla that was number two. And i was getting a phd in romance language and linguistics. So something completely unrelated. But i was looking at themes of oppression in latin american literature and colonialism. So i always been interested in that. In undergrad i did the thesis on a comparative study of racism in brazil and the united states but long story short i was hiking in joshua tree. And there was a psychology student. Who said you know you're doing really cool research. Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity.

Spain Harvard Lexington Kentucky Livingston England Oslo University Of Sussex Mediterranean Metropolitan Police Google Ucla Turkey Austin NHL Texas Tulane University Assembly Gulf Of Mexico Princeton Yale
It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

Recovery Happy Hour

05:46 min | 2 months ago

It's a Wonderful Life With Gigi

"All right. Today's interview is released. Special gee-gee langer has been sober for thirty. Four years used a twelve step program but what is so wonderful about. Her story is all of the other resources that she's used to do. Even deeper healing. We talk about energy work. Inner child healing topping Rural linguistic reprogramming. Meditation cranial sacred healing and outta jillian really incredible books to read all of which are linked in the show notes. This is proof that healing goes on forever and that your recovery won't look the same forever. Either she is the author of the book fifty ways to worry less now and is retired in florida with her husband. It was an absolute joy to get to know her. Here's digi langer hygiene. How are you. I am great. I'm so glad to be here. And yeah i'm so excited to be having recovery. Happy hour with you today. Thank you for taking the time to to share your story of recovery. I'm going to start this interview. The same way i start every interview and that is what is your name and your sobriety date and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker when you were drinking langer smy name and my sobriety date is february. Eleventh nineteen eighty six. And i was still a high functioning. I except in the area of romance in the area romance. I was extremely low functioning. I mean are we ever high functioning their love and logic those two things. Just don't mix well well. Why don't we just say that to other people. It looked like i was high functioning dairy cow. Mary go. I think i'll i think all of the above is super relatable before we get into your story. Tell me real quick just about what you're doing right now where you live. How old you are what you do for a living family hobbies anything like that. I'm retired. And i'm a little over seventy and i live in southwest florida. I grew up outside of chicago area and then travelled all over in my rambunctious years twenties and thirties. And most of my time. I've lived in michigan for the last several years just this summer. My husband and i moved down to florida. We have a little condo here. We have our kitty with us. And i don't have any children. Because i couldn't stay married long enough and snow grandchildren. So yeah life is good. I don't know what else you asked me. I think that hobbies. What do you like to do for fun right now. In south florida. Play a little golf You know. I have a blog and a lot of service work and a a nonprofit. I'm on that helps. Connect women in sobriety and i do a newsletter and i'm working on another a workbook for how to worry less and my husband and i play we. We just have a good time yeah. I'm very grateful that is fantastic. We'll let's get into your story and in five ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drink. Tell us how long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. It really wasn't a problem for a long time in high school. I got drunk really drunk once and got deathly ill and had a blackout and everybody said how fun. I was a couple of times in college. I got drunk and did not stupid things. And and then i got married and started a teaching career and and he didn't really drink so i drank very little toward the end of that that it. It's kind of a long story about that marriage. But anyway i was very desperate at the end and i discovered marijuana so in my you know. Twenty three or so. I discovered that marijuana killed the emotional pain that i was going through. I really preferred marijuana. I could drink about six. Or seven beers. You know and i got through grad school by getting high and at night to ease the stress and it was really when i was around thirty four years. Old let's see. I had already been divorced twice. I was finishing my doctorate. I had gotten through that with the aid of drugs and alcohol just to calm anxiety and And i lived with two other guys long term. And so i met this guy who was different from all the other guys and i thought. Oh this is. The john and i moved to michigan and we got married very fast and within nine months of marrying him. I went to a bar picked up a stranger and he had marijuana and i started having this affair. You know with this guy. And and i went out to bars a couple of more times when my husband was traveling. My third house but my new you know went home with strangers. Finally i went running to a psychologist. I said what is wrong. With this problem. I have a brand new phd from stanford. And i have this private cd life and my professional life is looking better and better in my private life was worse and worse

Gee Langer Florida Jillian Michigan South Florida Mary Chicago Golf John Stanford
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

04:40 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Well, I was talking a lot about networking in this in this episode. So let's Network. So I'll be disappointed. If I don't get any new invitations only 10 after this. I just feel like I didn't really my pedagogic skills were very low if I didn't get any invitations. So guys, like if you want to connect with me just to it. I'll be very happy to get new contacts and not get to meet you and I can confirm that Natalia is very responsive. So, so if you if some some of what Natalia shared during this interview resonated with you. Raised questions just hit you know hit her up. She's going to respond and and you know, and and she's she's really fun to talk to Natalya. Thank you so much for having accepted an invitation for having been on on poppy seeds. It's been really great pleasure. Thank you so much. Thank you so much again and always pleasure to talk to you and I hope we meet soon found some other occasion. Actually Papa PhD was also a guest at the welcome Solutions Channel recently. So if you actually curious so I can see that he's not very wage vocal about his own story here at this podcast. So if you curious about his career, and he's very interesting career path so far then please take a look at our YouTube channel and take a look at this episode. Very interesting one so I can totally recommend checking that that is true. But Natalia on Papa p h c it's all about you, but Well, thanks. Thanks for the shout-out in dimension. And and yeah, if you're curious about my story, I had a great conversation with Natalia on on her channel. So just just look for my face and how long you'll be able to hear it. So yeah, thanks again and and all the best for your projects. Thank you so much. And now for the weekly podcast Discovery segment, I present you with trailers from two shows. You might find interesting jolly green scientists and curiosity cake. Give them a listen and say hi for me roll the tape. Hi, my name is are van with Texas A&M agrilife extension and I'm they're grown with Texas Tech University, and we are the jolly green scientists bringing you information from scientific literature and popular science articles related to the green industry straight into your ear. Dome each week will take one or two papers that we found interesting and shared with each other and we'll discuss them in terms that anyone can understand and even though we'll do it every week wage only going to share with you bi-weekly. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I was always one of those curious kids. I had the chemistry set a microscope or telescope. I would take my toys apart to see how they worked. And now that I'm a grown up. I still have that huge sense out of curiosity. If you too are an adult who was a curious kid, then curiosity. Kick is made for you. I'm your host immediately any join me as I talked to the best Minds from Academia and elsewhere may bring you accessible and engage in conversations across a wide range of topics with no prior knowledge required..

Natalia Papa PhD YouTube Texas Texas Tech University Natalya
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:45 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"And once you take the plunge into the job market wage, what factors end up determining where you end up? These are the types of questions. This week's guest Natalia Belichick is interested in and likes to reflect upon In our conversation, we talked about her academic journey and discuss this whole question of navigating the job market as a PhD. Don't try to think about jobs for phds as a separate category of jobs job market is one like oh system in an in this ecosystem. Every one of us has some role to play. It's a bit like a loss of Faith. There are certain rules that govern why certain salaries are higher than others, which is all based on how your value and value of your work is perceived by the rest of the society. I'm just trying to understand how the job market shapes how it evolved. What are the rules and I think this is a more actually the problem of navigation in the job market is a more General problem is not only a problem of phds. Welcome to Papa PhD with David Mendez the podcast where we explore careers and life after grad school with guests who have walked The Road Less Traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules. Get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of pop a PhD. Welcome to this week's episode of Papa PhD this week. I'm really happy to have with me in Italia Belichick. Natalia is an entrepreneur researcher author and philanthropists home. She graduated from the College of inter faculty individual studies in mathematics and Natural Sciences at the University of Warsaw Poland with a Triple M S Title in physics mathematics and psychology wage there after she obtained a PhD in computational neuroscience at the doctor's Institute for brain cognition and behavior in name. Again, the Netherlands in 2018. She launched a public Foundation stick thing. So low is under joke and on trickling aiming to help early career researchers find new careers in Industry. She also owns welcome Solutions a company developing new tools and practices to help Professionals in navigating on the job market and finding or creating their dream jobs..

Natalia Belichick Papa PhD welcome Solutions Natalia the Netherlands David Mendez College of inter doctor's Institute University of Warsaw Poland Natural Sciences
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:18 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"If you want. Medical Writer. Clearly. Listener out. There is looking for medical writer also, I didn't think of that. Vera. We're almost at the end of the interview. and. One of the things that I still wanted to talk about although it does not have to do with your career per se but it's something that you're doing. Now you're putting energy into and annoying and created putting content content out there for for PhD's is you have a youtube channel can you talk a little bit about it? What it's called and what type of? A feeling of reflection lead you to start that to start on that mission. Thank you for letting me talk about my youtube channel. Yes. So the I fiqh PhD student on Youtube because I felt like. The most on this opinion about a PhD. Study can is hard to come from the real actual he student because of time we're learning by doing and I mean, even people put fluoxetine stuff. But like you know if you want to the most honest experience and help full ones, you have to ask from someone who has struggled and seen everything in reach And talk about how my previous career could be like a voice ex-boyfriend and people some people don't like to talk about ex-boyfriend. Talking about your past and knowing what you have done and how far are you have come from there it gives you the consolidation to move onto the next chapter and I also am a big fan of put paying it forward because I mean all by mentors and everyone who helped me he s g they don't need anything from me most of the time I think it would be a word to them if I can help. Other people that are coming along later in the journey to to be successful scientists. So that was my mission and I forgot to say the Channel Name, his PhD coffee time that was inspired by the French poetry of coffee. Breaks. Because we had to is mandated breaks. Enough that it's like a very. Religious at eighty in France, they are not religious anymore like the the French coffee break is everyone's religion in a day like the. So, yes. So I felt like if we could highness this type of social activity PhD because I felt incredibly helpless and isolated when I time I really along when I was doing postal PhD and I wonder if they better way because I mean sometimes I, it's not that I don't have friends but I know if I talked to a friend, it took another two hours and I have problems stopping from conversation. So I wonder if there is a way to have a virtual social feeling that people feel like they have someone to talk to. They also learn something you know that's how the best coffee place like people give you a the two cents and to is the two cents for is valuable advice and maybe solving a whole week of problems so. That was the. Intention is. I want to pay it forward and I wanted to make better use of my time during this seemingly harsh and unproductive time of. Career is a career break and recruit can look down on a why can you explain why you have nothing and no employer wants you I feel like instead look blaming the system and how visas can hold me back from getting the job. I am I'm in control on every aspect that I can't control which I mean nobody can stop me from putting a video on Youtube. And helping other people and I am a strong believer that if you are willing to put yourself out there and help the others I think naturally the universe with do something back and help you as well and I think also it helps me to know that I'm helpful like if makes sense. Totally makes sense basically the reason why I started. The same. I might be hd was done years ago and I had the same feeling I want to give back to that community and to I want to help you help you know a handful of people not fall into the same mistakes that I did. It'll be mission accomplished for me and I think I think you probably have the same feeling? Yeah Yeah and I think a lot of. Alumni, they only vocal when they made it to professors like. Don't make it to become a professor. They become this pilot. Themselves may be feeling like I failed in mission of trying to be professor and I have nothing valuable to share but that's really not because they those other nineteen ninety percent of the population that is out there and there are ninety nine percent of all of these PhD that doesn't lend on. Professor job that once that advice maybe before they become depressed or having issues and I felt like having being okay to talk about unemployment and like why I'm showing up to date I, it's not like I I have you know I am I am not embarrassed about by unemployment I mean I'm a little embarrassed but like his I think I also. Of let me rephrase that it's not like I am not embarrassed about being unemployed but I felt like it is more important to have someone opened talking about an employment during this time is then hiding it nukes which by the way depending on when the listener you're listening are listening to this episode this is being recorded. Just you know we're Cova distill around and it's impacting hiring left and right and so there's there's. Many. Other reasons and I I agree with you. You shouldn't. You shouldn't feel bad about that and you're definitely taking action towards not staying in that situation for too long. So so Kudos to you for that Vero, we've reached the end of the interview. Thing I'd ask you is to share to tell the listeners how and where they can. They can find you online and and maybe yet shared the the your your Youtube Channel You are l., or your twitter handle twitter handle. WHICHEVER PLATFORMS, Iran So my PhD copy time Youtube is just by YouTube dot com slash PhD coffee Italian. I'm also on Instagram at coffee time apparently a Lotta PhD student now. Love Instagram. So I have to get back on that I'm also on twitter on person no name Vera s Chen. So, you could find me there on twitter. So unlinked in swell if your recruiter and interested in hiring marine science transitioning medical writer. Thank you. Excellent. You mentioned Lincoln Yam. Linked in is also VP as Chen. I. Didn't realize what be as means until I come to America and that's my initial. So I couldn't change so. Well. No. No you started watching your videos the know you're not vera. Thank you so much for having come to to. This zoom interview. Thank you so much for sharing all these. Experiences that you've had in what you're going through right now then I'm like I said I, you're taking all the right actions to eventually land a job that you like that will fulfill you and. Let's keep. Let's keep talking and and maybe we'll have an update interview sometime. So thank you so much for for being you to the young pope. Peachy. Thank you. It means a word to be on this show and.

Youtube twitter Medical Writer professor PhD Vera s Chen fluoxetine France Lincoln Yam Vero America VP Iran
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:33 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"About conversion rates. Videos and I know exactly. Thousand. People Click on the video maybe only ten of them subscribe. Always, a conversion rate in life and yeah and I think to be making to make normalize and celebrated success. I think is the most important in this journey who so? I. DON'T WANNA GET Too much of a clean break here and I do WanNa talk about your Youtube Channel and we will talk about it soon. But. We started talking about Lincoln. Talking about skills and skills that you were trying. To tally up what you had accrued throughout your journey but. Excuse me. But. What I what I was wanting to ask now is. So, once you did this introspection once you looked at, okay. What can I put on linked in this this this this. I imagine you found gaps what what did you do What were what what initiates initiatives that you take to then fill out some gaps that you found that you that you thought okay. You know this I can I can get this extra skill I can. Do this extra networking etcetera etcetera. What and I imagine that you. In the middle of this process. Now, right that that you're looking for a position and again thinking about listeners and listens to who might be in the same situation, what strategies have been winning strategies for you. Well. I was a winning strategy could be overstatement since I come I myself. I got the job yet but I do have a strategy is i. Read People's Profile. And other times I analyzed how they structure the words and Watson those they use and it may be a right. The Iran might may not be anything right to wrong but I I would be. Giving a score in my head like where does it reads? Maybe some people use like coffee symbol or some people use like an Arrow Ha I need to change my actually but like the ongoing process and there's no one and done do for in. But I think keep breathing what people put their and knowing this gives the valued like maybe that that specific species name that I have worked on not it's rather than thinking. Maybe they value the skews of like searching for genes on NCBI platform and blast know like those could be the key word and you never know so I think taking good time backward to look at what you have and don't lie about what you don't overstate it. But like also to see what how people frame it, and what are these people especially those who has already you know they probably have a lane profile that's working so. Dot to take note and learn. And about. 'CAUSE here we're talking about how to kind of format and and we're talking. About creating a nice. Nice Very well tailored profile link in. But what about you know in in day-to-day life? Skills that you that you. That you. Feel that you were lacking in. In these last few months. What have you been doing kind of to fill up those gaps in black I'm glad you asked this question because I did. Take a lot of initiatives during my free time when I am officially unemployed well, I would tell my previous boss. I was do writing a manuscript for her like it's ongoing. But like I also had taken a lot of self improvement time first of all I started. Thinking that you know I can't have this negative moment of my life be a training woman and I need some food for by praying that is nutritious for me to do meaningful things. I turned to books that are helpful like the like Basically Shea Book Rich Dad Poor Dad. But I think is really good rate because it talks about being rich and being poor is the state that what is decided or what what you do it right now decide whether you're rich poor is not whether your bank has money or not and I. think that means a word to me at this moment because I understood that if I m taking myself as a leader and if I am training and improving myself as if I were working in that big pharmaceutical company and what I would do as their employees in the future, maybe I will end up in one you know. It's important to to make that I commitment to to be a rich mind person and I I mean financially. But like I think maybe financial come a long after. So and also Walk Rich Dad Poor Dad has taught me Tako message was we may be one skill away from the job. Being very successful, and in my case, I think it resonates with PhD we are trained and tunnel vision to one particular. Discipline. One tool but sometime, we may just need one skills like law accounting but computer coding like for me. I have taken a few online courses on Pizon and a little bit of machine learning I also took have taken clinical research pharmacology classes. Those two were offered by Nih and I did the certification after that. So updated those on my lenten profile and also was. Both enough to write a post about it. So people saw that I I was committing my time to improve and got the skills and knowledge of clinical research because I'm a biologist which I say basic science research. But I was surprised by how similar we are. Because by statistics like it's The p value is the same meta-analysis, the same like hypothesis testing. I use her US human. Difference and I think that's that's an important thing to convey, and if I haven't learned and heaven taken a look from the other perspective through those courses because I felt like you can't invent your skills from nothing, you have to take a perspective from the other and then creates that list of what is desirable. So after that car, I actually got the phone calls from recruiters. Ask about my background. because. So you building something and then you're you're leveraging your Lincoln profile to kind of show what you're what you're doing, and again show that you're open for business A. Blueprint and I just just tell you the all the people. I know that are working in regulatory or medical writing beach freelance or or not they all come they. The they studied birds the studied And now they're they're working in Pharma. So I totally agree that the so many transferable skills and that it's you know. Once, you acquired these specific skills that you are that you've been talking that you talked about let's say from the. H.. You become a really really great candidate and I think again, listeners out there great blueprint follow. Comment.

Youtube Lincoln Nih NCBI Watson Iran Dot US PhD
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:32 min | 4 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to another episode of Papa Peachy. This week on the show we're going to talk about uncertainty. Particular employment uncertainty in academia and outside of it in the current pandemic context. Now in between jobs after her third post doc. My guest will share her journey up to today and we'll talk about how confinement led her to take on new projects, teach herself new skills and double down on her investment in networking. And Remember, I have to new podcast discovery trailers share with you this week. So be sure to stick around with US until the end. Last year I have doubled to my linked in connection. I think in the past I had the mental barrier thinking I shouldn't ask anyone who I've never met. My lengthy profile should be statement like facebook page friendship like only know this people in real life and I only connect with these people and I have taken a long way to break that mental barrier that I could. Make friends with pimple that I haven't met yet in real life. But guess what these people ended up like maybe I would say five to ten percent of them had actually given a phone call and tell me about the stories become relationships that you're. Welcome, to Papa PhD with David Mundus the podcast where we explore careers and life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules..

US Papa Peachy Papa PhD facebook Grad school David Mundus
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:51 min | 5 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Know and and all places in and outside of the academy. So pretty much they have three main functions. They have a recruitment function. So we recruit from these four for our clients. And we also do in-house research on PhD competencies. So we've developed our own competency framework of competencies that you would expect to be helped during the doctoral program. And lastly. We also do workshops. So we use that research to inform workshops on how to develop specific skills or how to approach your career Pursuits and I came across this job actually because it's an important piece of advice through my network. So it was a friend who had started working with them who was taking a mentor Navy leave that said. Hey, this is perfect for you because you already do things like this. So I'd want to just call it. Look there's a part of it that also, you know, it's it's always the advice like this morning. We had a transatlantic webinar a series that we usually host once a month and we give you know, it's a little tips and advice and open it up for questions and I talked about networking this morning that consistently in the research that we do and I mean, I see it study and study again wage that most phds are finding their jobs through their Network. So this is is really important and this is actually how I came in contact with that Doug. So not just making your network but helping them understand what it is that you do what you can bring what you're interested in. So my friend reached out to me on this because she knew I was already writing about professional development and grad school for blogs at Mcgill and things like that. Hm. Yeah, so it has to do with the conversations. You have to write it's it's not only the person who who's your next your next desk neighbor, but it's also the net that kind of craving Network that the people who you exchange with and and with who you talked about with whom you talk about your plans or your ideas for sure. So you heard about this position wage this imagine you sent your CV and were called in for for interviews. Was it the classic experience? It was pretty classic. So I sent a resume as opposed to a CV here in I find sometimes the language gets a bit mixed up. But I'm you know for if you're applying for positions that are not academic you you want to cut your CV down into a resume. That's no more than two pages long. So I had sent out and I had interviewed with them and that was was I mean that was more just of a conversation of me explaining what I like to do and obviously I was very interested in what they were doing. So that was a very a nice kind of process for me at that at that. So you did your research on what they were and what they were doing a few you went on the internet. Yeah, cuz that's that's what they forget is. If you are in an interview and know the company or or the organization quite well, people will feel that and it'll it'll make a difference in your interview to walk. I'll sure I mean I didn't even think to say that but yeah, I mean anytime I go into an interview even an informational interview because I know we talked about this in part one. I don't just ask somebody I look at them who they are what they're doing where they work. What sector do they work in? What kind of challenges are that? Is that sector facing like what can I bring to the table that's going to meet their needs a bath. So, yeah for sure before you interview anywhere you want to definitely read up on what you know, what the company does who works there what they're working on what their backgrounds are be a researcher. Yeah. Exactly. And again, that's something that that we do research find information understand it and and make sense out of it. And in this case prepared then, you know interact or exchange. Someone showing that hey I've done my homework. I'm generally interested and and we can have a really interesting conversation because there's a you know, there's a basis upon which we're going to work on. I'm just going to I'm not going to start asking you questions from scratch. Like who are you? What do you do? Right. That's it's it's a loss of your time and if there's two in often these people are busy. So it's it's even just a signal sign of respect to to to have taken the time to do that homework and in my point of view, of course, so yeah, the next question then is what was this position. Did you remember the well, is it still the same title that that that you that you have today? The one that the one that way when you got hired? Yes, so it's only been since September I've been with that dog. And that's a contract actually. So what specifically I can tell you what what I've done in the past almost year. I've worked on their page detectives project which is a a national study that the adult can walk across Canada phds and looking at their skills that they develop during the doctor their doctoral research as well as their employment outcomes, you know, so we look at life like where do they work? They work in R&D do they work outside of R&D? You know, what's their salary like or they happy things like this? But the thing that I really love about what I ducked off in their research is that they also talk to employers so they really are A bridge between the academic and the and the non-academic and there's so much, you know value that that brings into entering that conversation because you know, we see so much and not just in Canada, but I'll speak to that because we're in Canada right now, you know, even at the government level they're looking at home trying to connect phds with meaningful employment that can contribute back into the economy and The Innovation and you know things that that we want to do and just with the academy it's doesn't really work that easily, you know, it's not a one-way street. So I love it. You know, we engage with employers we do research with employers also employers who hire phds what is their experience like, you know, what are their strengths? What can they work on our and you know, where where can we take this? It's it's really interesting and last December. I was in Palm. Let invited by my alma mater and talk to talk about careers to the current students in my Ph.D program. And one of the things talking with the professors wage that they had difficulty was finding this bridge because it's there to kind of hermetically sealed world's Academia and Industry and it's really interesting to have this entity that really dead is in conversation with both sides and can make a bridge with the two. I totally totally agree. It's so important because there are misperceptions on both sides and Thursday we do this work. From both sides to try and alleviate some of those misperceptions and make that connection easier. I remember one person who was there who who gave a.

Canada R&D Navy Mcgill Doug Palm researcher
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:43 min | 5 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Today on Papa PhD we have Rebecca. Mammen, Rebecca joined a doctor talent management in 2019 as a research officer and recruitment consultant where she contributes to in-house research projects focused on the skills of phds and how they can foster Innovation within and outside the academy. She also provides skills and career development workshops for phds and acts as a recruitment Consultants to help Innovative companies find highly qualified talent that matches their needs Rebecca holds a PhD in educational psychology from McGill University Montreal over the past ten years. She has developed and contributed to projects in graduate skills wage and employment stress and social support during transition periods motivation engagement and human behavior. Welcome to Papa Pete's see, Rebecca. Thank you so much and thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to talk with you today. Well, it's my pleasure and I'm really really happy to have you here on Papa PhD found well, as always we're going to start with your story. But what you do today is really really interesting to me. And I think it's going to be really interesting to the the listeners out there who are thinking about careers after graduate school. And so yeah, really excited to hear your story and to hear what you have to share. So to start by the beginning as always I would like to ask you to just talk a little bit about your journey and and your academic Journey how you you came to do a PhD, you know, maybe don't go back to high school. But how how you had you know, you you got into this journey how maybe you chose to your you decided to do a PhD and then log Actually in part to we'll talk about what came after but yeah to begin. What was your journey like sure well, so to start I am I think I can start that. I had a break after my bachelor's and I was living and working in the United States and I was working in a social services position that I did not enjoy it very much but there was quite challenging if I can say so I had that moment where I was like I need to go back to school. Hm. I really like school. I was always good at it and thought I think my career aspirations just I wanted to do more so I had moved to Montreal to do my Master's and PhD at McGill University. And at that point that was there was kind of an understanding where you know, if you enter the master's program you're going to continue to do a PhD And as much as my advice to everyone is always to please think about what you're going to do with the Ph.D. Before you start it. You know, I hadn't really had a clear path. I knew that I liked to learn I was passionate about education and I wanted to eventually be in a leadership position. And you know, I just thought that that was the way to get there. So I'm about halfway through my Ph.D. I was realizing I don't think I want to continue with an academic career. I know that I have options out there. I just need to I need to figure out what those are, you know, and I had just started taking the time to to explore and you know, eventually that led me to worry I'm now but I did do a number of years of research in motivation and Social Psychology research and research in stress and social support and helping people within the higher education Community make Transitions and support them. Being mhm. And so you can transfer real and it's through here. It does the system of starting a master's and then kind of transitioning into a PhD. I think that's what you were you were gaining too. But my question to you is so when you started your Masters, did you imagine or were you for seeing that you eventually you'd be a professor was that was that kind of the that's typically that that's typically the you know, what what people imagine and I think also it's it's it's easy to project yourself in something that you're very used to wear familiar with right. So when we spend years in the academy, it's it's quite easy to project yourself at in that position. So young originally I was thinking like I love education. I like teaching. I like research this I could do that, but then, you know as the years pass and you kind of see what that's worth. Like sometimes I like to call like not call it but say that doing a PhD is like the longest informational interview ever being a professor and off, you know, so it gives you a chance to learn really about what that what that profession is like and the pros and cons. So for me, I just started realizing early on that. I wanted to go a different route. And so clearly this was this was this was evident or this was clear to you within your own self within your planning within you know, your your mind, but what about the environment? How was did you talk to someone about it? Once this idea of or this concept? Thought I'm going to do something outside Academia started burgeoning. What conversations did you have? And with whom and how did that go and I'm thinking of maybe your your supervisor UTC supervisor, maybe family maybe colleagues was that some authors easy step to take to kind of, you know fully fully decide that okay. I'm going to finish this but and then going to do something else but I mean just speaking for myself. I was fortunate to have the support. So, you know something about the Ph.D is is that it's a very varied experience. It can really depend a lot on who you're working with and where and and so on so, you know for sure I talked with colleagues friends in my program about it because there was actually a number of people who are feeling the same way. So there's a group of friends. I have a worry about four women and we need every few weeks and we're friends but we also talked I mean most of the talk is professional and you know, we still need to talk about those things and you know doing that job None of us really helpful and sharing resources and talking to each other before job interviews and and things like that. So I was lucky to have built kind of that have that that Network at the pure level, you know, when I brought it up to my adviser. I don't think it was very surprised. Okay. I think I I I was hesitant to bring it up in the beginning God because I wasn't really sure what the expectations were and I kind of knew that there were more generally expectations around continuing than academic path, you know at the agency level so long I did bring it up later. But my personal experience was that I had a lot of support for that at that level and also at the University level there were a lot of workshops and things offered. When Rebecca mentioned having a support group that discussed professional progression in shared resources. My ears perked up here is one of the most healthy and helpful strategies can try and Implement in graduate school a.

Rebecca Papa PhD Papa Pete Social Psychology professor McGill University Montreal Montreal recruitment Consultants United States McGill University research officer Mammen Academia supervisor consultant
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:40 min | 5 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to another great episode of Papa PhD this week. I'm bringing you a conversation with someone who has recently made the transition from her PhD to the non-academic job market has done so into the PHD Career Development and recruitment domain during our conversation Rebecca mammen, not only recounted her experience exploring career Avenues during her PhD and not getting that transition, but she also shared valuable insights based on her research and on her recruiting experience working in an organization that focuses exclusively on phds off and remember stay tuned until the end for the podcast Discovery segment where I'll be presenting you to new podcasts play anthropology and dear grad student. Enjoy the show off. Really, you know the interview is just to find out about you, right? They already see your skills on your CV. So I am in the habit of preparing about four or five different Source stories and just making notes of what those stories are and my notebook before I start the interview and sometimes the question might be different. It might be like a challenge or they might say like, you know, what is a time when you had a disagreement like the question might change but usually the themes are pretty similar so they want to know the way that you act in certain situations. So having you know, I prepare those ahead of time and they're super helpful and interviews. Welcome to Papa.

Papa PhD PHD Career Development Rebecca mammen
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:35 min | 5 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Sometimes also we rent. You can read our stuff on plants and pets dot com also for plants and for pets in your favorite podcast. APP. Floods of events, we talked plant science. Working in research trained to do the best science you can. You A team leader, a Research Assistant Post Doc, PhD student, or any other type of scientists are you looking for a place where you can sit relax and listen to inspiring people? Well. We have good news for you. You've just found what you're looking. Hi Everybody May name is GonNa Pool and I am Jonathan. Whites? Welcome to the. Helping scientists..

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:48 min | 5 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Find interesting in the conscious I've had a at universities is i. feel that even universities now are. Getting the message that that. They need to prepare the students for this reality of not everyone can become a professor and it's it's as simple as that not not everyone apart from not everyone just a small percentage of people have and I think even now with with all this, the the the problem with covert and and with the pandemic, the closing up of of universities all of that is even getting more access to those positions is getting even more more difficult. At this time. Yes. So I mean, typically the UK something. Like fifty percent if PhD's Austin academia three and a half years after they graduate and so yeah. With a bit of a split of. some some deeper obviously doing research work still. Stuck some people are doing teaching lecturing, but probably half of will pay. Something, somewhere in administrative positions. Awful pasties will be working outside of academia. When you tell that to especially like first and second year Steve's they, they can't believe it. It's mind blowing and. Even even when I talk to people about. People and they introduce myself southbound PhD or something, and they say, what? What are you working Oxford Cambridge you've got to pay. That must be what you should help in doing and it's it's. It's it's interesting this powerful expectation, but it's trying to educate people really about. coolest. Sometimes, like career consciousness developing conscious beyond just just wha- who's around you. But actually this whiter this way to picture when you tell people the statistics I think. That that is real sort of netter them. Because the important thing and. Busting the time but is this doesn't mean? Stop. And go do something else doing up she is something that's going to this to a lot of value to your to you as a person. To you as a contributor to society later on just don't. Just expect that. It's not a given that you're going to end up being professor but like you said, you can say India all act college, right? The alternative academic career paths that are out there. There's a lot of things you can do in around the university but then. The. The job market out there needs sometimes the in I. It's funny. I'd love I'd love to have your input on that maybe another conversation. Industry doesn't know they need pc's but they do and when the interview these people they're like okay. Oh, this is actually a very good candidate I'm going to take them. GonNa take them in. It is interesting because PhD's like we need. We need like a branding agency got something. Totally. I think in some ways, what I've been trying to do with jobs on taste really is elevate is like how do you? How do you rebrand the PhD? Some the? Different to the people who are doing it, and so people outside I think it's very hard. It's very hard. Job Employers it's kind of it's going to. It's kind of impossible but I think we have done a good job and I say things in the media now, which I would never have seen about about as being light multi skilled and flexible knowledge workers who can kind of what we were saying they switch from project to project. What we are capabilities very much fit the kind of. The the job market of today I think as long as we can. We've. PhD's can make the. League employers can also drop center that prejudice is a as well definitely the the. Love imaginative leap because. You picture yourself in that position, allow yourself to picture yourself in that position and then go talk to the people. The things you said he didn't didn't do per se but but go go. Find people around you who know someone who does that job that interests you they'll be happy to and know especially if they have a PhD to, it'll be happy to take time to take coffee to have lunch with you share their story and maybe point point you towards something that might interest you. Chris Yeah, we really have reached the end of our time. If. People want to want to reach out to you want to You know a C-, whatever you you've been writing lately. How where can I reach you? Why can they reach you online? What's the best way to to be up to date with the with with what you've? Up to The faces to go to jobs on toast DOT COM. Nastase. My my website were probably published an article every every two months but Yeah you can say I'm on twitter so that's just Job On toast So yeah, I'm. Trying, keep up a putting out content on twitter by sharing content, but it was sharing some of the best. Stuff. RAPE HD careers. As well, so yeah, there's places where you can where you can find the excellent Chris. Thank you so much for for having a to come to the microphone and chat with me a definitely I would have talked. A full other our. Because this we know there's so much talk about. Who knows if we can if you can have another conversation maybe on a specific theme I, I'd love to but thank you I i. it's really an inspiring path the to the to have a an inspiring journey that you've had and to me it's especially inspiring that you you take time. To apart from your professional life family life, keep trying to bring this message to people in graduate school out there that there's A. Whole Universe of things out there that they can do after graduating and that they will be fulfilled at doing and and you intellectually stimulated and part of. A productive part of society and? I think that's very precious and it's very noble. My statement weren't enjoyed talking to you. Thanks for inviting me on. High again. I, hope you enjoyed the conversation and that you took at least one take home message from it. If you did make sure to subscribe on your podcast APP and to share Papa Peachy with your friends. I'm sure they are asking themselves the same questions in that they will enjoy it too. Before, ending the road, let me introduce you to podcasts that you might also enjoy. Plants by pets a podcast about plants in about the research around them. And the lonely pipette. Sounds like we have a team going this week. The brand podcast aiming to help scientists do better science and roll the tape. Delay Plan. Like really really likes them. Do you wish you could get a glimpse at how they work on the inside, how a growth flower avoid problems like rotting meat and how they defend themselves against the tax. Too. That's why we applied to pets explore the fascinating to know workings of Balaji in our podcast and on our blog. Know that bumblebees can control the flowering time of by gently watching on them or that soap bubbles are grateful plant pollination. We are Teagan and your to plant scientists with allowed bring you the hot near reset without all the scientific jog. Lost, we talk about topics, diversity and equality academic system. And Brings Fun Science Bachelor last week, and we talk about cuts and.

PhD Chris Yeah professor twitter UK Austin Oxford Cambridge Steve Balaji RAPE pc Papa Peachy India
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:46 min | 5 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"University I never really knew much about it but you a change as Kinda cliche changes the constant now but when you look at rate of change the pace of change in our society. And who is who is the he was with the people managing those changes that project managers, and it could be like the could be the Olympics or it could be. Election candidate or it could be the upgrade on your phone every time something changes or was a big event or something project managers have to sit down with a blank sheet of paper and work out and it's it's it's really to me to feel part of that that community. Project managers and see I guess eventually that's how my professional identity is solidified whereas it was originally. So it's like a research. Will maybe he know what kind of? Education learning specialists have been tech companies but really might. Might federal agencies solidified around and project manager or even now it called sort of chain manages because is becoming less the case. Okay. Change Managers Yeah because the case that. There's a distinction between light run run the bank change the bank is you can talk about with banks. So in the old days, banks mainly run the bank most of the banking was the same, and then maybe some department introduced some new thing every so often but the now the. Road is still important power what banks do obviously running day to day operations but. There's so much change any time you know anything about banking on your phone. And all these sorts of services that th the changed the bank functions is become much bigger. It's not an occasional thing happens every so often, but it's a constant. Yeah. All the time you know and you you you can't stop like we think about your phone you can you com- you can't stop having updates. which my phone would just stand still willingness doesn't it? It keeps it keeps changing and that's really what's exciting to me is when is When is how do you manage continuous? How do you manage continuous change? Yeah. It's interesting and it's really we notice it on on your phone banking is definitely one of them and now imagine with crypto currencies getting more and more importance I. Anyway. I don't think we're going to go into that but. I find it very interesting from what from what you said, the used the term solidify my my professional identity solidified around this this activity that I developed but. What one thing I find interesting interesting is don't be afraid of. Not Knowing what you're going to become when you when you leave because that's going to materialize with time and again because you you probably want, you may be lucky and have very good networking and start right away with the job that you adore and that you're going to stick. With life, but it's not it's not a given. So I think that's that's a very, very interesting interesting thing and he goes what I said before. Give yourself time to slowly get to where you WANNA get right. But yeah. One thing. We're reaching the end I am kind of annoyed that. We're we're my time is almost ending for this. For the interview but so. Along with all of the at a certain point, you decided in two thousand twelve to start something to give back to the community you had come from in a way, the students the PGA soon as the Masters Students, which is jobs on toast and. You know you've spent all these years kind of. The mission that I have kind of taken for myself of helping people out there who are doing their master's were doing their PC or post stock. And who are in doubt about what is my future? What's my professional future? Let's just like to talk a couple of minutes about jobs on those about what your experience has been maybe changes you've seen in the in the in the in the latest years because things are changing. The. Ender. Maybe finish by sharing two or three pieces of advice for people out there who may be anxious about not really knowing what they're professional future will look like if or when they. Ended up leaving academia. Yeah I mean I guess. Is Interesting John came about like. Deputies. Way. I was invited by my dissertation advisor to go up to your thousand nine to give it a little seminar on the on the topic I was invited. It was like how to market yourself careers outside of academia pick and. Jeremy asked to go up and could you dislike took on this subject for narrow so we'd be pleased to how you never really thought about it. So I went to do that and gave that talk and. You know it was just really it without sort of blame trumpet as such. The impact it made on the people here in not room and the change in. Demeanor and how these spoke to me and they spoke afterwards was. It just like it just showed to me that there was there was a need I never really thought of our densify that this information was really helpful beyond in the room. But so I just thought, well, how could this information get to a wider audience because really at that time it was not anything else and I, think that's toll PhD may have being around and. So but then I really determined how could I get some of this information what I've just said? The Internet, you know if I could just make a website disseminates it. and. Maybe. Go Talk other universities so that's when I It took me a long time because it took me until two thousand twelve actually to figure out blogging and how to make a website and I was busy with my job and my family and everything. was always a project. Yeah. But I Lord Scienc- thousand twelve and just really kind of built up tried to have an ambition of light. Once every two months rising something. Going trying to give talks and then reflecting on my experiences of that and writing about that so. Yes in the beginning it was really trying to find the way and it was linking up with some other people as well like like Jenn poke I'm from from Canada and the other days from PhD to life just trying to find other people Hainkel from cheeky scientists on the same kind of mission and so yeah that's like in different countries but it was but he was very, it was very early days but. I mean it's interesting now because I, kind of feel like their staff loss of people who who joined in from different countries. Yeah. Like yourself David just really it's really exciting to me that. What will I started over a couple of started off is really great into a bit more of a movement and. Also to see the impact on universities that is not son. Often thought you know really that, hey, maybe one year we should think about talking to the PhD's about other careers but actually some universities a building into their actual graduate training careers, advice and careers outside of academia. That's what excites me is that. In ten years, we've actually built with into A. INTO THAT It is a, it is changing and. Some. A lot of the people you mentioned are still. There in in helping a lot of people the things that have changed lately. In terms of. Spreading the message our twitter. Social, in general podcasting for sure is is is something that that has brought a different. Reach. Andrea but but. What.

PhD project manager Olympics twitter Masters Students Andrea advisor Lord Scienc Jeremy John David Jenn Canada Hainkel
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:19 min | 5 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Really happy to have you here <hes> especially given the years of experience you have helping people with masters and Ph ds like just mentioned finding their path and I think a word. . That I think is really important is in the abundant number of career opportunities that are out there I think this one key thing that that people are going to. . Wealth people need to understand to kind of break this this feeling that they may be failing at life or at least at the their professional life if the. . End Up leaving academia after after graduate. . School. . Yeah it is. . It is. . So hard to describe when you see the light bulb come on somebody's head in new. . People people just say. . It. . Yeah. . And it. . It is. . What always of joys me on like just when somebody says down they felt or how lost or how they didn't know what to do, , and then they say that you I when you're okay now I just. . Found the way forward or hope or something you know you just why would why would have stopped? ? Doing what I'm doing I mean because that's the greatest thing you can do. . Even if you change one person's mind or sometimes I talk to one hundred people you know I think if I could. . Difference that many people but not like yourself day job what you're doing on your the more that can do it that more intense. . We can have and we can reach more people in our own countries or in different languages. . <hes> or different backgrounds. So . yeah, it's , it's cool to fail that there's more there's more of us than. . Doing this doing this thing. . You don't just listen think about being a PhD that just you just have this unique. . Bonding Experience With With with anybody else like I just met you but you know it just. . It's strange. . We everyone knows what they went through, , and then just you can just click with people and. . It's powerful as powerful stuff. . So as I mentioned, , we talked before about Chris's PhD and you can find our full one hour and a half conversation on the Papaya she youtube channel. . We eventually also talked about what led up to his post doc. . Chris. . Was Now considering after his post doc <hes>, , and after the his after applying to some lecturing positions and not having the materialize thinking. . Okay. . What am I going to do an end looking at the non-academic landscape and seeing where he was going to fit? ? How did you go about that? ? Were there appears around you who were also having that reflection. . How. . Was that process? ? How easy was that process or not easy? ? I was that that. . Exploration. Let's . say. . He is kind of mixed because I think on the one hand. . As I kept getting rejections from the academic jobs, , Kinda go to feeling of. . Like feeling of running out of time or this is this isn't going well. . If I could just get academic job everything would be. . Okay. . So that was like a downside to it but on the other hand you know. . I was really excited by the things that I was saying around me like like the Internet was something that was just really taking off in the late ninety s and I was just fascinated by the internet and this whole and. . I mean I. . I say Democratic Dissemination of information which is. . Not. . <hes> Disney triple the time easily, , but the way. . To access to information or study or learning the United. . States can be quite elitist or privileged or and causal money and time, , but just like the idea that. . The anybody can just access any type of information videos and things as well. . It was coming along time and could learn anything. . They had the Internet connection did just Exchange. . My view of the world and so excited me as an educator and as a scholar, , this potential and always really enthused by that and could see this trans transformative potential of it and so that's when I kind of thought. . Well, , this could be an area where. . You I would be happy and excited to work in, , and then I had to try and figure out. . Well, , how do I get to that from medieval studies? ? kind of like the opposite. . Of this new of this new techy technological thing. . But then I figured out. . There was this area of e e learning with a training where people were taking courses that which <unk>. . Clause three more even vote on a CD. . You know we're not making it to the web and I just thought is dies <unk>. . That's what I'm GONNA do. . I really had to look. . For jobs and companies. . looked. . Learning companies read white papers and things are. . Looking googling jobs, , you know learning jobs based training and I saw that they were these jobs out Aaron. . Didn't necessarily know how to do them. . I felt confident that if I applied job I reckon I could I could do that and so that was my plan B. Really that. . Stuff didn't work out then come at the end of my funding. . This was going to be. .

Chris Papa PhD UK Kris Humphry David University of Southampton Bob University of York Disney Guardian Mendez project manager Huchon DOT UK youtube program manager Austin
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

08:15 min | 5 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"And who will be recounting how he navigated his transition and how he got to the position. He's in today. But before we go into the interview I, want to quickly share with you what new features you'll be noticing starting today on Papa PhD. The first big change is that the interviews are now going to be shorter around forty minutes and they'll will be published as a single episode on Thursdays. Second you see that I'll be spending more time discussing what my guests do today and what advice they have for you and you'll see. The more we go into the interview, the more value find. So be sure to stick around till the end. And finally, every episode I will have short section at the end where I'll be sharing trails of podcasts I. Think you'll enjoy and that are friends of the show. I hope you enjoy the new format. So without further ADO, here's episode one of the Second Season of Papa. Peachy. Took in the UK. Fifty percent of PhD's Austin and academia three and a half years after they graduate. Busy doing research woke still post some people are doing teaching lecturing and some some are in positions awful. Pitch Dis will be working outside of academia. When you tell that especially like first and second year PhD's they couldn't believe it. It's like mind blowing. You know even when I talk to people and they introduce myself have got PhD and they say. Working oxford-cambridge paged that must be what should have been doing. Welcome to Papa PhD with David. Mendez the podcast where we explore careers in life after Grad, school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in world of constantly evolving rules. Get ready to go off the beaten path and Huchon for an exciting new episode of the PhD. So today on Bob. Peachy I, have with me. Dr, Kris, Humphry. Kris Humphry is a project manager and careers consultant and the founder of the popular careers website jobs on toast. He holds a B A in English studies and an MA in culture and social change both from the University of Southampton. He completed his PhD in Medieval Studies at the University of York in Nineteen Ninety seven and held a postdoctoral fellowship until two thousand. Since, leaving academia Chris has worked as a project and program manager in the private sector specializing in technology transport, financial services, and sustainability. Today he works as a team leader and project manager for a leading European, sustainable. Bank. Chris is passionate about helping people with their careers and Personal Development He has given numerous career stocks at universities in the UK, Ireland Australia and the US. and has taken part in life. Events on the Guardian's website and for jobs dot CO DOT UK amongst numerous other contributions. In Twenty, twelve, Chris founded the website jobs on toast as a way to help masters, students, doctoral graduates, access the abundant opportunities available outside of. Higher. Education. In our long conversation Chris shared his academic journey all the way to the Post Doc. In today's episode I'm sharing with you what came after how and why he started his career outside academia. Welcome to Peachy Chris. Well thank you. David, for inviting me for having me on. I'm really happy to have you here especially given the years of experience you have helping people with masters and Ph ds like just mentioned finding their path and I think a word. That I think is really important is in the abundant number of career opportunities that are out there I think this one key thing that that people are going to. Wealth people need to understand to kind of break this this feeling that they may be failing at life or at least at the their professional life if the. End Up leaving academia after after graduate. School. Yeah it is. It is. So hard to describe when you see the light bulb come on somebody's head in new. People people just say. It. Yeah. And it. It is. What always of joys me on like just when somebody says down they felt or how lost or how they didn't know what to do, and then they say that you I when you're okay now I just. Found the way forward or hope or something you know you just why would why would have stopped? Doing what I'm doing I mean because that's the greatest thing you can do. Even if you change one person's mind or sometimes I talk to one hundred people you know I think if I could. Difference that many people but not like yourself day job what you're doing on your the more that can do it that more intense. We can have and we can reach more people in our own countries or in different languages. or different backgrounds. So yeah, it's it's cool to fail that there's more there's more of us than. Doing this doing this thing. You don't just listen think about being a PhD that just you just have this unique. Bonding Experience With With with anybody else like I just met you but you know it just. It's strange. We everyone knows what they went through, and then just you can just click with people and. It's powerful as powerful stuff. So as I mentioned, we talked before about Chris's PhD and you can find our full one hour and a half conversation on the Papaya she youtube channel. We eventually also talked about what led up to his post doc. Chris. Was Now considering after his post doc and after the his after applying to some lecturing positions and not having the materialize thinking. Okay. What am I going to do an end looking at the non-academic landscape and seeing where he was going to fit? How did you go about that? Were there appears around you who were also having that reflection. How. Was that process? How easy was that process or not easy? I was that that. Exploration. Let's say. He is kind of mixed because I think on the one hand. As I kept getting rejections from the academic jobs, Kinda go to feeling of. Like feeling of running out of time or this is this isn't going well. If I could just get academic job everything would be. Okay. So that was like a downside to it but on the other hand you know. I was really excited by the things that I was saying around me like like the Internet was something that was just really taking off in the late ninety s and I was just fascinated by the internet and this whole and. I mean I. I say Democratic Dissemination of information which is. Not. Disney triple the time easily, but the way. To access to information or study or learning the United. States can be quite elitist or privileged or and causal money and time, but just like the idea that. The anybody can just access any type of information videos and things as well. It was coming along time and could learn anything. They had the Internet connection did just Exchange. My view of the world and so excited me as an educator and as a scholar, this potential and always really enthused by that and could see this trans transformative potential of it and so that's when I kind of thought. Well, this could be an area where. You I would be happy and excited to work in, and then I had to try and figure out. Well, how do I get to that from medieval studies? kind of like the opposite. Of this new of this new techy technological thing..

Chris Papa PhD UK Kris Humphry David University of Southampton Bob University of York Disney Guardian Mendez project manager Huchon DOT UK youtube program manager Austin
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:02 min | 6 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"The University of Haifa. The second part than his talks about her life outside her research. During this conversation, we had a great exchange about working versus volunteering and about the importance of non research activities in terms of networking for your academic and professional life. I in a way learns that academia is about rejection you will have to face rejection, but the thing about its end, what I learned about it is that that's okay. You just need to find a way for yourself to deal with stats do not stay off that personally like you're not getting a scholarship you getting into conference or your article being dismissed doesn't mean that you're failure it doesn't mean anything about you as a person and that's what we're saying beats the is a lifestyle, but it isn't the only thing in your life you need to find these other things that are important to you. Welcome to Papa PhD with David Mendez The podcast where we explore careers and life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules. Get. Ready to go off the beaten path and hop on an exciting new episode of Papa. PhD. So Welcome to part two of my interview with Danny. Harris and in part one we had just Finished by by talking about what are they today? As Beach, D researcher was in her domain. But in part to I'd really want Danny to focus on. What's your projects have been you know and? One of them we already mentioned and is quite evident but. Other projects you've been developing besides just your PhD research and the idea is also to see if we can take out of that, how that enriched your experience as a PhD student and how listeners out there could maybe take some some example of that too. Also wherever they are You know find a group of like minded people and also enrich their experience and make it a a richer one and A. How to make their PhD a more diverse experience than just doing their research? That's where I wanted to say. I've been to a lot of different things and this is something my supervisor has warned me for so. Now, a bit more cautious at I'm trying to do it a bit less, but I've been slowed down by the whole situation with corona. Anyway. So I just want that to be a little bit of a warning when I start talking about all the fun things that I did because you definitely have to keep in mind how much a person can do without burning out. By As let me start with w about my love for conferences, especially if they're paid for and abroad. in a way, it allowed me to keep traveling, which is so much love. In, my first year Beastie, I managed to spend three weeks in. Australia where never been before somewhere in the mountains beautiful place. at the form. And there are. A huge conference on different topics with two hundred. Students, not only be as there were just a few these most of them were in. From all over the world is shared my flats with someone from Pakistan right as an Israeli. F from the Philippines ends from South Korea and we went to arts events and I a events conferences about politics about health. All kinds of fields bunket, Moon spoke there prisons of Australia's spoke there I was invited as far as Israel delegation do very fancy dinner with people who worked at important banks and things like that. So this was like the big thing that I was very excited about enemies I might give per station about my research about a Mike Proposal and I got some really useful feedback from people from the field. So this was absolutely great. So in a way, it was a lot of fun at for me. It was free, but it was also different work because I got that feedback that I needed. Has to continue to projects, and then I've also spent some time in Brazil. which was the first time that was really great and I gave myself a few extra days in Rio. also about migration on a learned a lot about migration in the Global South 'cause, I focus very much Europe. And then I've done my trips to Germany for research. So this way, I get to travel been to Cairo in January for sight that have seen a beer minutes. For a conference of the. National Organization for Migration that's connected to the UN. And I presented my research on the bow dare. which was pretty cool and there will so policymakers there which is something I'm very much interested in going into after. Doing. The interesting. So also some networking definitely. And just to see how day spoke about similar topics outside of academia. So these are things that I love doing that definitely projects because you have to apply for these things especially if they involve money right and they need to plan all of your trip started dime and only Gives you a flight ticket place stay but doesn't say anything about the preparation of your actual doc or bolster at the conference. And then there you're also working 'cause you're networking is about your topic trying to get out be volts. Things like that. But for me, it was very motivating. It's It's everything I ever wanted to travel for work right. And besides that, I've always works next to my degrees I am getting scholarship, but it's not enough to survive off. So I'm working also for the center where I study. And they're responsible for organs of guest lectures like getting the guest lecturers in also from countries to speak to our students in English we also have trips for students plans, for example, to embassies here in Israel. So they can see what their options are after the grief. And also conferences and Colloquia. So this way I, really got to learn how to organize the these events and be working on something that's not so much research, but still helps with the network. So that's what I did besides that..

PhD Danny Israel Australia Papa PhD University of Haifa Grad school National Organization for Migr Pakistan supervisor Harris David Mendez Germany corona Beastie Philippines Beach UN Europe
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

06:07 min | 7 months ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Domain that interests you. You'll see you'll find advice you can use to start building plan for yourself. Now. A lot was stalled during season one about transferable skills but a lot was also told about the blind spots, the things you don't naturally come out of graduate school knowing and being prepared for. One of the main ones has to do with preparing your CV and preparing to interview in a non. Academic Setting. If you listen back to the interviews where we spoke about job hunting and interviewing outside of academia. The main advice that came up again, and again was to tailor your CV to each potential employer and specifically to give emphasis to the soft skills you have accrued while performing research and keeping to a minimum. One guests even said to a single line anything to do with your publications, presentations or academic awards. He need to take a point I approach where the person reading your CV. Will know right away that you are a good candidate for the position. The second aspect has to do with interviewing. You may have done a bunch of oral presentations poster presentations, even elevator pitches to do with your research. And the performance skills you developed we'll definitely serve you in an interview setting. The difference is that when interviewing for a position industry, for example. Rather than listing your skills, the techniques you master the tools you can use. The actual goal of the exercise is for the interviewer to assess whether you are a good match for the position and for the team. So there will be a component of body language showing knowledge of the organization's mission in structure and having a good story to tell about how you came to be sitting in front of them for this interview. This is something you don't learn graduate school, but it's something you can prepare for one of the points. My guests stressed as being key in your career exploration and in preparing for interviews is doing your homework about the organization offering the position and ideally reaching out to people in similar positions and asking them for informational interviews around coffee or these days on video conference. Asking someone who has followed the same path that you want to embark on pointed questions about the reality of the job about remuneration about company culture is the best way to get to know what interviewers might be looking for in a candidate. In. Parallel with this, especially, if this is your first time interviewing. The other technique that was mentioned in recommended was rehearsing. In front of a mirror with friend. Preparing to deliver your story in the best way possible and to make it clear point of why you're the right candidate for the position. If you know that type of questions commonly asked even better prepare and rehearse your answers for them to. This way on the day of the interview, you'll be able to focus on the human interaction rather than on the content and show yourself in the best possible. In this first season, we also talked a lot about life balance and mental health. Stress is a part of our modern life and life as a researcher has a few particular flavors of stress. But my guests were clear about three components that can help you strike a balance and have a healthy journey. Physical Exercise Move Econo- team sport. Stay fit. Having a community outside the lab. Team sports do this too, but you can get into a club started student group. And finally including me time in your weekly schedule. This. said it is possible that other factors you have no control of our affecting your inner balance. If this is the case find professional help and take the necessary steps to heal. This may or may not lead to resuming your research and it's fine. What is important above all is that you stay healthy. With this note on mental health and on finding a healthy balance during graduate studies I'm going to wish you a great week a lot of success in your life and career exploration, and thank you again for being a listener of the show. But before I go I want to officially announced that next week we'll be the season finale special. To make sure that you don't run out of. PODCASTS. Listen this summer I've teamed up with the what are you going to do with that podcast and we've done a twin episode. Next Thursday the last interview of both our seasons he's going to air at the same time. I will be on their show and then he says there host will be on Papa. PhD. So, be sure to tune in and witness this academic podcast Collab- I'll be expecting you. And if you want to help the podcast, there are two simple things you can do. Number One Sharon episode that you really like with a friend or colleague. That's a great way to help and to spread the word. Number two if you're on an APP that allows rating or commenting, do that leave a star rating and leave a comment? That will help other people out there find the podcast enjoying the adventure. And it also gives me a chance to open a dialogue with all of you which I really enjoy. So, thank you again. Happy Listening and see you next week. And now for a short message. If, you're preparing to launch a podcast. You may be asking yourself what hosting platform to use. I launched puppies de on blueberry because I wanted to professional service that would interface with my wordpress website. That would robustly broadcast Papa PhD to all platforms. And that would allow me to grow my podcast in years to come. If you're starting a serious podcast project, do consider one of the first podcasting hosts out there offering state of the art services.

Papa PhD Physical Exercise PhD researcher
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"We always want to project into the future as the best possible version of ourselves that we often fall into the trap of setting our goals based on what we've been told we should aim for or what we see our neighbors aiming for big part of enjoying our time in graduate. School depends Benzon beaming tune with our personal values are strengths. And we'd what makes us tick this week. FELICIA party shares. How all she came into science and how she transitioned from the beach team your science to an all tech position doing what she loves most the old school way of thinking is that got a? PhD Is Training for an academic job. And if you don't do it it means you weren't good enough. I think that's also coming from time where there were a lot less ask people doing. It was less accessible. So the percentage of people going from PhD into academic research career was extremely high. But at this point that's not the case at all there's a lot of people pursuing PhD's because they're passionate about the research and they want to know more about that particular killer topic. They want to contribute to the knowledge or treatments are policy in.

PhD Benzon
"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"phd" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to episode Twenty Six popper PhD being the last episode of Twenty Nine Thousand Nine hundred instead of an interview and this week. I'm bringing your collection of inspiring full of wisdom the guests of shared so far. I hope you enjoyed them. Having sneak a happy sharing welcome to papa. PhD With David Mendez. The podcast where we explore careers in life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of Papa PhD. I'd really love you the audience to play an active role in the show. So if there's a theme you'd like to see covered on the show or if there's a guest did you like me to interview head over to anchor dot. FM FOR SLASH CAPUCCI and drop us a voice message to be featured on a future episode on the PG see website you can also subscribe to our newsletter and get our resource sheet at the bottom of every page and you can also leave us a written message contacts page. Welcome to the show on episode one. The new Murchison shared about the importance of allowing self to think big when thinking of career opportunities. I think the the first biggest thing would be To to think big about what the possibilities are you know Well I think you know things like like this project. You're working on you know things it's like this podcast really help people to to realize there are a lot of opportunities to raise the go in addition to just you know continuing on academia right. So you know. Don't be scared to kind of be a little bit audacious about what what kind of direction you might be able to go into And to really think about what. What's what's GonNa work for you when it's going to resonate for you And then you know to you know work figuring out how you're gonNA spend yourself how you're going to and how you're GonNa get all personal brand how you're GonNa you know how you're GonNa spin it so that you're the right person to do that. Ah On episode. Two Joel. mccower talked about the importance of staying curious. I you still learning stuff. Yeah I thought I've got a PhD. I'm an intelligent person But when I was doing my MBA. I realized that If you're not not studying something quite rigorously you know. You don't feel union in especially of course I was in my late forties doing my mba as well but You don't Your mind does begin to stagnate so keep leading cause after a year of my MBA. I felt I was twenty years younger mentally again. My agility amd back and that was great you know is a great feeling To I would say just keep letting no matter what it it is do Of course you know Learn about extraterrestrial life. You know If physicals search for extraterrestrial life or learn about anything I think that's really important again. Every opportunity increases you'll network on episode three Mark Roberts shares. Why should never feel like you're stuck professionally? The key mindset is just to keep reminding yourself that if what you're doing say that new job outside Academian started if it doesn't live up to your expectations that doesn't mean that you made the wrong and that somehow failed so you really should have just stayed in academia. Now that's not that you can always leave. That new job can find another the job either in the same field perhaps discovered that field just isn't for you so if something brand new again you're really never stuck in this. You convince yourself you're stuck and so What what I would really recommend is that everybody is their own pep squad? So when things aren't aren't working out just keep telling yourself that things will turn around you one way or another on episode four Rob Hutchison talks about why it's important to identify your strong suits. I I would say to identify what you are good at and what you enjoy doing so they may not not necessarily be the same thing but hopefully future job would contain elements of both and next. I would say start working on your brand early so so this would mean developing your CV and your Lincoln page but also putting together your elevator pitch to summarize your profile. This is something that you should have prepared to recite someone on its opportunities arises and then third I would say. Don't be afraid to take a leap to try new things and do things that scare you like. I mentioned before some people might like the idea of just doing the same old repetitive tasks and over and over again. But if you want to progress in your career keep things interesting and do more meaningful work and makes a real difference whether it be for your clients or for anyone else that I think they need to take risks and put yourself out there. On episode six Fiona Robinson Talks about the importance of finding your passion. If you're doing research I think that the two top things you're at are transferable from that are your critical critical thinking skills and your ability to take a big project rated into pieces analyze those. Get those done tied back together and bring her back to the whole. I think you can do that pretty much. Anyone doing research is being back. Then you can do anything you can. You can take on any kind of challenge. So then it's finding where do you want to put your allergies. What are you passionate about? I know they say you know do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life. Whatever you still have to work? It's not always fun and not everybody gets to work doing what they. But there's gotta be something but you're doing or that you wish you in that that draws on episode seven Philippa Kereta Bauza talks about. Why you deserve to be where your today? Life is really really stressful nowadays in every field so you really stressful but if you are doing winging it is because it deserves and love your child as it's been hard in win nowadays the working. Where'd you live science will? Is Everything Itar and so rest. This will take all these days on episode eight. Emily Blue Roberts tells us what's important to have a side hustle during your PhD. Start doing actual work outside of your role role as a graduate student OR POST DOC By work I don't necessarily mean paid work. Although that is preferable it could be volunteer work but anything just just to gain any kind of experiences outside of your primary one as a researcher As a student as a trainee because working saying if it's a side hustle or a volunteer position or an internship or whatever it is gives you again those additional perspectives That you might be seeking at this this time and you know usually something you can put on your CV. Because a lot of the the fear I think at this stage is around I don't have any work experience. I don't have any reason working experience. All employers are looking for the PhD plus two years. He's Mary's as an entry level position. Well of course we know. That's negotiable right But something you can do while at the same time you're finishing her PhD. You can start that work experience clock even on a part time basis just by reaching out and having some of these other Arab experiences in episode nine killer look shows advice on finding a fulfilling career. Yeah so that is A. It's obviously a huge task to that transition and to even begin to understand what you want to do and I think one of the main things is needs to do. Your research find vocation that is profitable fulfilling but also can provide value to your audience and make you feel like you're making a valuable contribution And that's not always the easiest thing to do but if you do that research in you you have a decent idea that something's actually going to earn your money and filling. That's ninety.

Papa PhD David Mendez Grad school Rob Hutchison Fiona Robinson dot Philippa Kereta Bauza Murchison Mark Roberts Academian Joel. mccower Emily Blue Roberts Mary Lincoln graduate student researcher trainee