35 Burst results for "Petri"

The Left's Woke Indoctrination of the Military With Nick Freitas

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:21 min | Last month

The Left's Woke Indoctrination of the Military With Nick Freitas

"It would be seriously remiss of me if I didn't ask you this question given your background. So my background, so I'm an immigrant, a legal immigrant. I naturalized in 2012, ended up in The White House working for president Trump. But for about the last decade, I had quite a close relationship with Bragg. I've been teaching as a guest instructor on the Q course, the 18 alpha officers course, and also warrant offices, the 18 alpha course as well. The one 81 80 alpha as well. And I love it. And I love those guys, especially when you're talking to warrants, you know, who've had 9, 9 tools in the sandbox. You're not teaching them anything. You're standing there with a card rate just listening to what they have to say. But given that association, what we've witnessed in the last 16 months, your well plugged in with your brotherhood back at bragging elsewhere. Your reaction, your comments, to what is politely turned, the work efficacy of the American military, what we've seen in terms of the pride flag being flown over the air force recruits in that recent Twitter ad, Mark milley saying, yes, we have I'm white and we have to understand white rage. How bad is it? What are you hearing and how concerned are you as a former operator? Well, people are people are very frustrated because they feel like I saw this tweet today and they were talking about the navy pushing for safe spaces. And like, you know, it used to be that the safe space, the military was responsible for was the United States and keeping it safe from foreign militaries and foreign threats. Now all of a sudden, the military is once again become a Petri dish for social engineering. For the left. And there's a lot of frustration because again, if you go into the military and I think especially certain careers in the military that you know are going to put you in a great deal of danger. There's a certain expectation that you're going to have a strong grip on reality because you don't get to play the games that we do in the sociology class at Cal Berkeley when it gets to the battlefield. Things like biology matters, reality matters. And when you start to ignore that, people die from that. That's not a, this is not the typical Elizabeth Warren where if you don't agree for every regulation she likes, you want people to die. No, we operate in an environment where people die when we don't recognize reality. If you deny reality that'll cost.

President Trump Mark Milley Bragg White House Air Force Twitter Cal Berkeley Navy United States Elizabeth Warren
Charlie Kirk on the Potential Bio-Labs in Ukraine

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:16 min | 5 months ago

Charlie Kirk on the Potential Bio-Labs in Ukraine

"Charlie, you're a friend. I want to talk to you about everything, but let's talk about something that I normally wouldn't talk about on this program, like bio labs. There are people listening to this program. Today's Monday who they haven't drilled down into this world. Can you sum it up and explain? Yeah, we did a whole hour on this and the short answer is we don't know the full extent of what is true and what is not. Here's what we do know is that Victoria Nuland did an entire Senate testimony where she said that there are biological laboratories in Ukraine and there really worried about them falling into the hands of the Russians. Okay, now what is biological laboratory? It could be anything. It could be a place where you develop biochemical weapons. It could be a place where you do gain of function research where you develop Chinese Corona type virus. In Ukraine. Potentially, we don't know. So then the State Department responds after Victoria Nuland kind of screws up this entire testimony. Can I guess? They said, absolutely not. This is false information. Close. Yeah, basically they said it's Russian propaganda. And they said, I'll get to that in a second. They think the constitution, the United States Constitution is Russian propaganda. Yeah, I mean, look, I don't think they'll stay had a big impact on James Madison. She wasn't alive yet, but anyway, so there are some good Russian Russian literature, mostly about depression and surviving imminent death. That's actually the great approach. That's great. The great contribution. But actually, look, when you say, when you say no kidding, okay? Because you live in this world, so it doesn't blow your mind the way it blows my mind. I haven't been doing satire. The idea that they would say that? Well, let me get to the whole, let me complete it really quick. There's a lot of details. So she says it, State Department says, okay, we admit there were Soviet era relics like they were Soviet era labs that used to exist and the Russians want to get their hands on them. So that doesn't make a lot of sense because no one was really worried about Chernobyl. Being taken over because when you say Soviet era, that is 30 years ago. Well, meaning that they're not denying that they're there, they're just saying that the Americans have no involvement. They're not of any geopolitical significance. Then you go to the Russian side of this, which the Russians are known liars are government is also known for lying, so take whatever it's worth. The head of their foreign minister comes out and says, we have come across active biochemical laboratories that the United States have been funding and have been involved in. Now, we would probably scoff at this if we didn't also have the last two years of experience. I was going to say of the Wuhan institute of virology and the National Institute of health and the fact that Anthony Fauci has now gone into the witness protection program. The moment that Vladimir Putin invades Ukraine, it's like Fauci has gone missing is he worried that there's going to be a revelation here? What were these laboratories doing innocent enough type of biochemical research, which I don't think can be done very innocently? Or was this another kind of a Petri dish, no pun intended of our State Department trying to play God and the farthest reaches of the corner of the world and was there gain of function research being done was Vladimir Putin worried that this could have made a pathogen that would then escape into Russia. These are all very valid questions. Our entire national security apparatus doesn't want us to ask these questions. Because they call it Russian

Victoria Nuland Ukraine State Department Charlie James Madison Senate United States Wuhan Institute Of Virology Depression Anthony Fauci Vladimir Putin National Institute Of Health Fauci Russia
Dr Michael Greger: The Power of Citrus

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Dr Michael Greger: The Power of Citrus

"To nutrition facts. I'm your host. Dr michael gregor. Today we discover the powerful properties of citrus title. Lemons limes citrons bitter orange grapefruit palmilla mandarin grapefruits on come klotz actually one of my favorite citrus fruits is the come quat because you can eat the whole fruit peel. And all which is ideal because the dna repairing enzyme boosting powers of citrus concentrated in the piel new data demonstrating dna. Protective agent was presently some fruits and vegetables found that it was heat sensitive and determined. It was not vitamin c confirmed in a study that tried vitamin c. Directly and found no effect on dna protection and repair of dna strand breaks the crinoid beta crypt azan. Thin found primarily citrus. Seems at least one candidate. If you expose cells to mutagenic chemical you can cause physical breaks in the strands of dna but in less than an hour. Our dna repair enzymes can weld most of our dna back together but if you add some of that citrus fido nutrient you can effectively double the speed at which dna is repaired but zoologist cells in a petri dish. What about in a person if you have people drink a glass of orange juice and draw their blood. Two hours later the dna damage you can induce with an oxidising chemical drops whereas if they just had like orange kool-aid didn't help so do people eat more fruit. Walk around with less dna damage. Yes particularly women. Does this actually translate into lower cancer rates. It appears so citrus alone associated with a ten percent reduction in odds of breast cancer

Dr Michael Gregor Klotz Cancer Breast Cancer
Why Composite Manufacturing Has a Material Impact on Future Innovation

The Restless Ones

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Why Composite Manufacturing Has a Material Impact on Future Innovation

"Riley. Thank you so much for joining us for the restless ones. It's a pleasure to have you on the show excited to be here. And i'm really excited to because i usually ask. Cto's how they. I got interested in tech. But you present to me a unique opportunity where i would like to know how you got interested in material science. Yeah it is a great question and a unique kind of feel in the world of engineering and so it was. the subject. Matter is kind of this amazing professor that i saw through him the ability to really think like an engineer so i was interested in studying working under him and ended up partnering with him on researching and kind of going deep in material science as i get deep into. Try to learn as much as i could from him. I completely agree. I'm the son of two teachers and had a big experience with teachers who were really passionate about their areas of expertise and we're great communicators. Who really encouraged that kind of love so talk to me a little bit about some of the challenges and material science that you find really interesting. Yeah sure you know the other kind of unconventional thing to in mitchell. Science a lot of people are trying to come up with new material and a lot of material sciences focused on the chemical or the physical side of development. You're working at sometimes. The atomic level sometimes the molecular level coming up with with with new formulations trying to push into a new material space or new new material combinations for me. It actually wasn't as much that kind of fundamental side but it was taking materials that already exists and it using them. In new ways you can get a radically different performance or functionality. And that's really kind of where. I fell in love actually with mutual science but also three printing so as during my research. They're building heart tissue scaffolds the challenge. Was you throw a ton of heart cells on a petri dish and they all go off like popcorn but you want them to all beat to the same rhythm so that they can actually function in the tissue so to get these cardio myocytes to talk to each other. You need to get something. That looks like the extra cellular matrix of cell which is kind of this network.

Riley Mitchell
The 7 Keys to Health & Longevity

Mind Pump

02:13 min | 1 year ago

The 7 Keys to Health & Longevity

"Back when i was You know in college. I actually went to usc to study study cells in petri jewish and there are you know i studied these lung cells. And there's two type along. Sales one is type. One cell that basically lines the long participates in gas exchange. Then there was the type to sell which like a stem cell that could turn into type one cells but it also helps secrete something called surfactant which keeps the lung moist. Well we studied how these cells behaved in a petri dish and we started to learn. Okay well when does this. One cell differentiate into another cell. How does this help behave well. When we started to change the nutrients in the medium. We started to behave different. We started to change the temperature. It's hard to shift its behavior. In terms of how rapidly divided which changed the light and it started to change so turns out what determines the behavior or the state of a cell is not actually the dna. But it's actually all the energetic environment that's around that terms how the cell behaves and that. Dna's constantly listening again moment to moment with all that energetic environment right and what controls that environment everything because you dna's constantly listening but to learn everything and there's an infant amount of things that affects ourselves is going to help you or me but there are actually seven main things. In the book sleep nutrition movement emotional stress mastery relationships in purpose our thoughts and mindset those seven things is the eighty twenty rule or the ninety ten rule as to whether or not you can be in the thrive state which gives you access to optimal health longevity performance. Or if your cells think you're in stress because you haven't mastered those seven things. They think that you're in actually stress dangerous state. That's when inflammation increases immunity decreases. That's when you have chronic symptoms. That's when you get chronic disease this totally supports the studies on jeopardy. Where they'll they'll notice that you know people in this particular part of the world live on average ten or fifteen or even twenty years longer than people in this part of the world. it must be the genetics. Then they'll do. They'll follow their offspring. That move to a different part of the world within one generation their life span matches the place that they live

USC
Will Republicans Ever Take Back California?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Will Republicans Ever Take Back California?

"I don't think that california is ever going to be. Maybe a republican majority state at least in the in the foreseeable future. But there's so many. There's so many glimmers of hope that when we say take it back if we can get better than we are today. We're going to be creating a win and what's really great about what's happening in. Our state is that it sends a narrative across the country gavin. Newsom has been saying if you recall me. You're going gonna put democrats in a bad position in two thousand twenty four and you're gonna put a bad visit. You're gonna put them in a bad position in twenty twenty two and you know what he's right this. Why have been so supportive of the recall. I don't care who replaces him. I want to see the recall. Because it's going to say that in california. When you push the socialist policies we fight back. Where the petri dish of the nation to to float these policies develop them. Joe biden rolls them out and this recall creates a really hard thing to explain to democrats across the country. If we're able to pull this off even just the process of having the recall is already bad. Pr for them. But you're seeing glimmers of hope there. You're seeing school districts. Now fighting off critical race theory pasa. Robles was the most recent in central california. They outlawed critical race theory. It is a slow process but people are waking up parents or waking up because they push kids to go back home for school for a year and now parents are awake to the curriculum of the kids and they are pushing back in school districts across the state. They are pushing back in local offices. They are doing these recalls for the da. So do i see glimmers of hope. Yes do i think it's going to be run by republicans by next year. No but i do think incrementally we can start to take back the state and that starts in local government. It starts with the school districts. And i'm really encouraged by the fight that i'm seeing amongst california parents and it's not just republicans it is independence and democrats who were just saying thinkers in the state who are pulling and pushing back finally the boomerang went too

California Newsom Gavin Joe Biden Robles
Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Gottlieb Suggests We'll Be Through Delta in Few Weeks

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Gottlieb Suggests We'll Be Through Delta in Few Weeks

"And here he is on CNBC the other day, Cut three go, And if you live in a high prevalence area, The advice I've been giving people is that if you're taking care of young Children or other people who might be vulnerable, you should be mindful that even if you're vaccinated, if you're in contact with the virus, there is a risk that you can contract the virus and with a much more transmissible strain. Like Delta, where you develop high viral levels early in the course of the infection. There's probably also a risk that you could transmit the virus. So people just need to be mindful of that. If they're in contact with someone who can be vulnerable, whether or not that should then translate into general guidance for the entire population. That if you're vaccinated, you should wear a mask. I don't think that that's the case. I don't think that we're going to get enough bang for our buck. Telling vaccinate people they have to wear masks at all times to make it worth While. I think we're further into this dealt away, then we're picking up. I've been saying that for weeks. I think another two or three weeks will be through this. This new guidance will have a negligible impact on that. I think much more prudent guidance to people would be that if you're vaccinated, you're in a high prevalence area. You're in contact with the virus. You think you might have the virus because you have mild symptoms of it. Be prudent, get tested. Maybe wear a mask, especially if you're around a vulnerable person. That should be the bottom line. Guidance we give Now why? Why does he come up with that position? Why does he come up with that position? Because he sees what's going on in great Britain, Great Britain. Is the Petri dish right now. For some reason. That country in particular is sort of ahead of ours, and I don't mean that as a positive thing. When it comes to getting the virus. And now this variant the delta very in As I said near the opening of this program, what they have found in great Britain. Is that it spikes two or three weeks and now it's in decline. They have found. If you've been vaccinated and you get this variant It is not life threatening. It will not be

Cnbc Great Britain Britain
The U.S. Faces Another Pandemic Shortage

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:45 min | 1 year ago

The U.S. Faces Another Pandemic Shortage

"Science labs across. The country are running low on crucial equipment. Sally herships from the planet money team asked. Why is that monica. Thomas ups is a scientist in a research lab in pittsburgh she researches drugs to help rare genetic diseases and she uses all kind of fancy pie tech equipment even robots but right now one of her biggest stumbling blocks is from shortage of super basic lab supplies the shortages. So bad monica's lab. They protect what they do. Have we have a co worker. Who has what we refer to as the stash. Several boxes of different types of things that are underneath a lab bench that you have to actually crawl under to get like down on your hands in nedia. Monica stash is mostly full of those tubes. They're called pipe pets. They're basically straws and you can use them to pull liquid up out of one tube and put it into another. They come in different sizes and you need the right one otherwise it might be too skinny or they might be too short. Which means that. We can't reach the bottom of the thing that we're trying to get the liquid out of and scientists at labs across the country often use hundreds and hundreds a day. If you don't have the right size it can slow down your work or stop it entirely at monica's slab. The problem started last summer when pipette s- became really hard to find one of her coworkers requested a quote back in january. And they're not supposed to be in our lab until june but all kinds of plastic lab supplies or short now gloves petri dishes even the robots that use them can be backward for months. Prices are soaring so instead of spending your time science saying you're spending your time like online shopping. Yes

Sally Herships Thomas Ups Monica Nedia Monica Stash Pittsburgh
South Beach state of emergency extended to April following spring break crowds

Sean Hannity

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

South Beach state of emergency extended to April following spring break crowds

"Trying to avoid becoming a super spreader city. We simply can't be the place for people to go to. You can't have the kinds of crowds. We've had the kinds of gatherings we can have a spring break. The way it has happened. We cannot become a Petri Dutch for a very dangerous virus. Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gilbert explaining why he declared a state of emergency that includes an eight p.m. curfew for the entertainment district of South Beach for a large crowds, damaged restaurants and broke out in fights. The City Commission voted Sunday to keep the curfew through April.

Mayor Dan Gilbert Miami Beach South Beach City Commission
Family Helps Total Strangers Book Vaccine Appointments

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Family Helps Total Strangers Book Vaccine Appointments

"The short time Operation Center was at a diminished capacity there now investigating what caused some lines to go dark, and they'll share that information later. As older Americans struggle to secure covert vaccine appointments online volunteers known as vaccine hunters or stepping in to help CBS News correspondent Nancy Chen introduces us to a New York family that's already helped more than 750 older neighbors to get their shots for seniors like 81 year old Jeannie McDowell. They didn't have an iPhone. They don't have a computer. What were they supposed to do? Securing an appointment seems impossible until they reach out to Detroit to Castro. Okay, no problem. I can help you with that went for a cell phone to Mozza Pull laptops. Turn into a command center. Yes. In the kitchen to Castro in her family, a book vaccine appointments by the hundreds and their central New York community all for total strangers, and for free, we do it. Between lunch dinner. Pretty much all the time to Castro's often up until three in the morning, rapidly refreshing websites for any availabilities. And now my husband cause it. Welcome all you have to be quick because There's 10,000 other people doing probably the same thing. Her husband, Marco, delivering the printed confirmation tickets. She first realized the difficulties in getting an appointment while signing up. Her mother in law board got out fast. After the Castro started helping neighbors. I heard some seniors even say they would get on the computer. They might lose the site they put in Rome, New York and ended up in Rochester and my other dear friend. Got on the phone and the lady said call back at four. She called back and four and the tape said the office is closed to Castro got an appointment in just days for McDowell in her husband on Lee, two of the 25 the to Castro's book on average each day for anyone who asks, including the Petri family. Vicky was very stressed. By the time she got everything in Appointment is gone. Viki and Dave Petri reached out for their daughter, Jessica, who has down syndrome. After struggling on their own. She helped us she helped our neighbors She helped my brother and his wife. Get appointments. She just I don't know how she does it. De Castro's reach has now spanned four counties. People express their gratitude with cards and even home cooked dinners, but to Castro says she's just doing anything possible. To protect her community. I treat everyone as if they're my parents yesterday would have been soon enough for me. If it were my parents. When will you stop? When they

Castro Short Time Operation Center Nancy Chen Jeannie Mcdowell New York Cbs News Detroit Marco Dave Petri Rochester Mcdowell Rome Viki Vicky LEE Jessica De Castro
Unwinding Anxiety With Dr. Jud Brewer

The Rich Roll Podcast

10:55 min | 1 year ago

Unwinding Anxiety With Dr. Jud Brewer

"So maybe the best way to launch into this. Is i just define our terms when we're talking about anxiety what are we talking about specifically and how does that differ from other kind of kindred emotions like fear and worry and and the like. Yeah i think that's a great place to start so if you look at i think the dictionary definition of anxiety goes something like feeling of worried nervousness or unease about an imminent event or something with an uncertain outcome It's interesting in that definition. Worry is an interesting word because it can be a noun like this feeling of unease but it can also be a verb. Where i am worrying so i think. Let's bookmark that. And come back to that. Because i think that's a really critical distinction That in both of those can actually the now and can lead to the verb which can feed back to the noun of worrying but looking at it from a scientific standpoint. I think a lot of people. It's exiled was something that's kind of necessary needed for survival. You know especially right now. And that's something that i dove into a lot of my book because i've been really interested with this idea. You know there's this whole idea of performance and i actually haven't found any evidence to support it so let's bookmark that as well and talk about some of these origins here So think of fear as a survival mechanism okay. We've talked before about habits and setting up habits for survival right to remember where food is and to remember where dangerous so these learning mechanisms go way back. You know that could serve the sea slug like this is the oldest learning mechanism known in science positive and negative reinforcement. So if you zoom in on fear as a negatively reinforced behavior fear helps us survive fray think of our ancient ancestors album savannah they are forging for food right. But they don't know if it's dangerous so they're moving from their safe zone their cave out into more of an uncertain space the satnam so their brain naturally goes on high alert to tart. Start to learn things like. Oh there's food go there again. There's danger don't go there again okay. So fear helps us learn where things are safe and where things aren't safe so we can avoid the unsafe places that fear mechanism is is part of the brain and then layered on top of it is a thinking and planning part of the brain neo cortex prefrontal cortex in particular and this is interesting because it helps us survive in a different way. It helps us survive through thinking planning yet. It needs information and preferably accurate information so in this day is a lot of misinformation which gets in the but it also is helpful for it. They have precedent. So when it's going into unchartered territory. It's really hard to think and plan you know like. Oh let's let's go explore saturn. Well we've never done that before so so we've got you got you got to think of a bunch of things and try to approximate. But it'd be much easier if somebody else had explored saturday and wrote a book about it. So do this. Don't do that okay. So the prefrontal cortex think of fear. Help survive the prefrontal cortex survive. But if you pair fear with a lack of certainty right which is what. The prefrontal cortex is trying to help us do is trying to help predict the future based on past experiences if there is no precedent if there's a lack of certainty that fear plus uncertainty leads to anxiety and people think oh anxiety. It's going to help me survive. No right there is no evidence for helping us survive. It makes our thinking and planning bring go off line. And if you think of the extreme form of anxiety panic right which is wildly unthinking behavior. That's that far end of the spectrum of anxiety right. it's an interesting but subtle an important distinction in that it is the uncertainty. That's driving the irrationality right. You can be afraid when you have a certain set of predictable parameters to deal with but when you don't know what you're venturing into that's what provokes anxiety so it kind of extend that what's fascinating about that is. It's not the dire consequence that creates the anxiety. It's the lack of certainty around whether that consequence is going to be dire or not so dire. Yeah absolutely and just to be super clear for your listeners. It's not that fear is a problem right. Fear helps us learn in new situations in particular But fear doesn't have the same neuro chemical Reaction in the brain anxiety like how nero chemically like. How do these two things distinguish themselves. Yeah i don't think all of the industry's been worked out. But i think one way to think about this on a temporal scale so if you look at the timescales you could actually differentiate them pretty well as an example of. Let's say stepping out into the street. So let's say in this day and age when everybody is distracted by their cornell. Well say are weapons of mass distraction. You know everybody's looking at their phone so somebody steps out in the street. It doesn't see the bus coming bearing down on them. They instinctively jump back onto the safety of the sidewalk and say instinctively because this is much faster than our thinking brain. Imagine you look up the bus and go. Is that really going fast enough you know. Is it going to veer splat. Credo no time for that so we jump back onto the safety of the sidewalk and then we have a fear response. All of our our basically our fight or flight response cakes in and says well that was crazy and i to be more precise that fight or flight response is where we get these catecholamines. We get all these basically adrenaline surge. That says hey you gotta you gotta run if you need to if you're not if you're not safe at this point okay but that also helps us have this fear response that says wow. You could have almost gotten killed. You should learn from this. Look both ways relearn what you learned as a kid. The problem is so that's think of that as super rapid. Is that instinctual response. The rapid response is that fear response. But then ideally that drains out of our system and we move on when we've learned right so this is what differentiates eighty is with the anxiety. Maybe we keep replaying it in our head. Oh i could have gotten killed. I'm an idiot. I shouldn't have done that. That is just kind of keeping that fear. Response going chronically naked. Happen for hours days weeks years you know and this is where people you know. It's not like we need a lifetime of psychotherapy for fear response right but what we do. What we do need is the ability to see the difference between a helpful fierce bonds and us literally getting spun out of control because our minds going out of control making us continue to think about it right. And i think we're all experiencing some very ation on those two things over the past you know year whether it's fear or unhealthy anxiety you know amidst a global pandemic and you know our weapons of of mass distraction that are feeding us conflicting about x y and z. I would suspect that you know. This is created an unbelievably robust. Petri dish. For you to really you know immerse yourself in the subject matter in which you are an expert and i know that you know early in the pandemic like last may you were writing pretty extensively about anxiety and how we were you know grappling with how to manage this this crazy shift in all of our lifestyles but here we are almost a year later It would seem to follow that. There's less uncertainty now. Perhaps the same amount of fear but have you seen any kind of differentiation in how your patients or or the population at large is kind of coping with Cova i so i would say there are two main things that i'm noticing both in my clinic and then just at march one is that there is that big spike of while. This is crazy this is really going to be a pandemic as it. Wow this really is a pandemic and then how dangerous is this. How infectious is this. All of that that uncertainty has gone down a little bit and the death rate has gone down when people figured out things like using steroids. To help you know severely ill patients so that part has helped yet. We've seen continual spikes and these are intermittent once we don't know when they're going to happen. With other forms of uncertainty like the variants o of this variant popped up. And now there's and then those things feed a whole 'nother level of uncertainty. We've also seen things that really haven't changed that much. In terms of the uncertainty you know small businesses for example the economy for example. This is totally unprecedented. So everybody is kind of feeling their way through this whether it's a poor small business owner i've seen so many who've just like put their life savings in like just one more just one more month right and then they crash and burn or the. You know the feds are trying to figure out how to prop up the economy without you know throwing us into whatever wild inflation or whatever. That's not my lane. So i don't know but the other piece that i've seen on top of this is how people are coping coping with air quotes. Because you know you've probably heard of a quarantine fifteen and where people have gained weights and people are turning to these short-term coping strategies because they are immediate and you feel good in the moment whether it's drinking drinking has gone up. Actually it's interesting. Drinking has gone up a significant part of the population and some people have just basically cut out there drinking. Probably due to lack of social resources in the usual places that they do so drinking's gone up netflix's had quite a ride. You know social media all these things have gone up as coping mechanisms. That are probably gonna get laid down even harder as negative habits. That people are gonna have. That's gonna give this pandemic along tail and then you know. I think the anxiety piece is going to have an even longer tail summer describing this as the coming. You know epidemic of anxiety

Anxiety Panic Cova Netflix Anxiety
What to know about COVID-19 variants' potential spread, impact on vaccines

Morning Edition

04:15 min | 1 year ago

What to know about COVID-19 variants' potential spread, impact on vaccines

"And I'm No well, King. Good morning. Ah, virus that spreads a lot has many chances to mutate and covert 19 is doing both in this country. Researchers in the U. S now say they have found at least seven new variants here now. Other countries, the U. K South Africa and Brazil. They've all reported variants to with some big questions like Are they more dangerous? Still outstanding. MPR's health correspondent Rob Stein has been following This one. Hi, Rob. Good morning. Well, what have you learned about the U. S variance? So the first of these various was spotted by researchers in Louisiana. But it turns out the same kind of mutation looks like it also emerged completely independently at least seven times in this country. No, That's it awful large because it suggests the virus is doing something called convergent evolution. That's when an organism evolved in a way that gives them some kind of superior power. Here's what Jeremy Camille of Louisiana State University says about what the virus is doing. He spotted the mutation. It's infected millions of humans around the world now and it's probably just, you know, getting Into a more intimate relationship with our species. The question is, What is that more intimate relationship mean? Exactly Does it make it spread more easily from one person to another doesn't make it more contagious. Do do. Researchers know the answers to that? Yeah, well, no one knows yet it looks like it's spreading quickly in the places where it's been spotted, but it's not at all clear. That's because of the mutation. No viruses mutate all the time. Sometimes there are big problems, but a lot of times not so much, and there are other mutants that had been previously spotted in this country. Like you know, one that took over in Southern California Scientists are still trying to figure out whether it's more contagious or, you know, just got lucky. Now this newly identified mutation occurred on a key protein that sticks out from the surface of the virus called the spike Protein. It's how the virus infects cells. That's also the target of drugs and vaccines. So any change could be really important. I talked about this with Andrew Peco Shit. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. We should keep an eye on it. I myself have already passed this on to the people in my laboratory, and we're looking to see if we can find viruses with this mutation because if we can, we're going to bring it into the laboratory and try to study it to see what's actually happening here. Now, you know to be clear. Pecos means he passed on the details about the new various Those colleagues Yes, so they can determine you know whether they're more contagious or not Now, no one thinks there's any reason to panic. You know, far from it, actually. And we already know that there are those other various circulating in this country that we know we should be worried about. And what about the non US variants, some of which were identified before ours. How are they evolve? It Yes. So you know, more than 1100 cases of the one first flag in the UK have been confirmed. At least 40 states and British scientists just released more data than makes them even more worried than ever that, in addition to spreading faster, it may also make people sicker. You know, and the first one spotted in South Africa has not been detected in at least eight states and the one originally seen in Brazil is in at least two states. But the reality is they're probably already way more common than that. The U. S just isn't sequencing the genetic code of the virus enough to really know how widespread they are. And the spot any new variants fast. I talked about this with saucy of pop sq at George Mason University. We're flying blind right now, when it comes to mutations, and how prevalent they might be on the community already, so we really need to ramp it up. The CDC says. It's trying to wrap it up. But the country still has a ways to go. And what about the vaccines that we currently have? Will they help against the new variants? Yes. So the vaccines maybe someone that's effective against some of these various, but so far they seem to work pretty well. But the most important thing is to keep these viruses from spreading as much as we can to prevent any more dangerous ones from occurring. You know, the virus is still spreading like crazy in this country, which makes the U. S essentially a giant Petri dish that could easily produce even

Rob Stein U. Jeremy Camille MPR Andrew Peco Brazil Louisiana State University South Africa Louisiana ROB Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School King Southern California Pecos George Mason University UK United States CDC
China Bars Entry to 2 Members of W.H.O. Team Investigating Covid in Wuhan

Jim Bohannon

01:47 min | 1 year ago

China Bars Entry to 2 Members of W.H.O. Team Investigating Covid in Wuhan

"Scientific investigators from the World Health Organization have finally been given permission by the Chinese government to search for the origins of the Wuhan coronavirus. Here's Jim Rupe. It was last week that wh o Director general, Dr Ted Rose and not Gabriel ASIS expressed his frustration at China for reversing his permission for investigators to hit the ground in Wuhan. I'm very disappointed with this news, given that two members had already begun their journeys and others were not able to travel at the last minute. But Thursday after a call from Dr Ted Rose, Chinese officials granted permission for the team to enter Wuhan. Life in Wuhan, we're told is relatively back to normal, the north of the country. There is a resurgence of the virus. China has assisted for months that just because Wuhan is where the first cluster of cases were discovered, does not necessarily mean Wuhan is ground zero for the outbreak. The suspicion is by scientists, however. That the virus that has killed nearly two million people worldwide at this point since 2019 jump from a bad to an animal to human somewhere in the country, Southwest Chinese officials maintain the virus most likely came from abroad, perhaps an infected seafood. Tho. Scientists reject that. The team includes scientists and virus experts from the US, the UK, Australia, Germany, Japan, Russia, the Netherlands, guitar and Vietnam, all anxious to get their hands microscopes, probes and Petri dishes in defining the root cause the host animal, the animal that caught the virus from the bed and, in turn infected the human And where that happened. The mission is a priority for W. Joe and the international team. It's kind of on hold. However, the team has to quarantine for two weeks before even a rubber glove can be put on. I'm

Wuhan Dr Ted Rose Chinese Government Jim Rupe Gabriel Asis World Health Organization China The Netherlands Russia Vietnam Germany W. Joe Japan Australia UK United States
Chicken in a Petri Dish: Singapore First to Allow Lab-Grown Meat Sales

Business Wars Daily

03:30 min | 1 year ago

Chicken in a Petri Dish: Singapore First to Allow Lab-Grown Meat Sales

"It may look like chicken and tastes like chicken. But that doesn't mean it's actually chicken. Take eat just for example. The company cell cultured chicken also known as lab grown meat just got approval to be sold in singapore. It's the first time a country is given regulatory approval to sell lab grown meat other companies are working on lab grown beef poultry pork and seafood. What is lab grown meat. You ask good question. Well for starters. It is grown on a farm technologists. Take a sample of muscle tissue from an animal. Then they typically put the cells into a liquid or gelatinous substance housed in a bio reactor one of those sci-fi movie containers that grow organisms. Most of the lab created meet. Looks like ground beef or small nuggets. No one's growing sirloin steaks in a lab just yet scientific american reports that one cow tissue sample can yield enough meat to make eighty thousand quarter pounders without slaughtering a single cow. Singapore's approval may lead to a quote revolution. In-kind kind clean meet one analysis in the guardian claimed. And that's a big part of its appeal. Livestock production is routinely plagued with stories of inhumane treatment of animals. A university of oxford study says the lab grown meat would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by ninety six percent and use just one percent of the land currently used for commercial livestock production would also slash water use and contamination. By bacterial waste. Electricity use would likely be higher to create meet in a lab however while the singapore approval may seem like a sign of things to come the. Us is not anywhere close to approving lab grown meat but would be manufacturers like just eat and competitor mosa meet got one step closer last year the department of agriculture and the food and drug administration formed an agreement to regulate the sector jointly that regulatory framework shows that the us takes innovation seriously and may help us manufacturers attract more funding box. Report says aside from overseeing safety the joint regulators will also decide issues like whether manufacturers will be able to simply label their product. Meet without disclosing. The grown in a lab part mostly is planning to seek its initial regulatory approval in europe first food dye reports beyond regulatory concerns cost is another barrier to mass production several years ago when mosa meet unveiled its hamburger patties. They cost roughly three hundred thousand dollars. Each costs have come down as techniques for growing the meat have improved now just eat says it can bring in its products at roughly the price of premium chickens nbc reports and investors smell opportunity. Mosa landed another fifty five million dollars in september and eat just which also makes plant based egg products is valued at a whopping two billion dollars while more than half of the population is the concept of lab grown products for in ten. Call them scary and say they won't be putting them in the meal rotation anytime soon. According to dive alleviating those concerns will require manufacturers to devote more time to educating the public about their products but even with the promise lab created need for the environment and animal welfare and eating consumers may not by

Singapore Nuggets University Of Oxford Department Of Agriculture Food And Drug Administration Mosa United States Europe NBC
Aviation Safety: Masks, Covid-19, and Airplanes

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:38 min | 1 year ago

Aviation Safety: Masks, Covid-19, and Airplanes

"You mentioned quarantining sometimes. Pretty stringent requirements. There's interesting article in from NPR. Do Masks on plane flights really cut your risk of catching covid nineteen and they tell the story of Hong Kong which apparently. Tests arriving passengers than requires that they quarantine for fourteen days and then test them again. And they've been looking at some data from the different airlines in what the results of the testing, the quarantining the re-testing have been. And they mentioned Emirates has particularly strict. Mask requirements that are enforced, and so they looked at while in one case over a three week period emmers had five flights. With, a total of fifty eight. Passengers. Who tested positive for corona virus. But none of the other passengers picked up the virus and there are some other examples like that as well and. What we're starting to see is some some data about the the safety of catching the virus on board aircraft and some of these these results are tending to point towards. You know it doesn't seem to be the Petri dish that you know some people were initially thinking and that was all the air changes and the the way the air is changed being pulled up and not blown across all of these things so that there's a lot of examples coming up where you know the indication is that it's It's pretty safe. So that's encouraging and I did my most recent airline Flight about ten days ago, which was the trip where I wasn't able to join you folks last week and you know my conclusion is that in general, it's not the the flight itself in the airline. That's the the problem. Especially, if you're diligent, you know with a mask, the problem to me appears to be terminals at hubs where you may be wall-to-wall especially for your. There on a Friday or something like that which is odd because some terminals you get to our empty others are quite crowded but I think even more than that. It's the you know having to go out and get food you know the restaurants. So I I think the you know when I'm on a trip I'm most concerned about going into a restaurant, which is why I only do take out and I don't have a problem with that. And so I've I've actually just decided that since it does look like there's a a a new wave that says spiking here in the US that I'm just going to postpone any further airline trips here for a couple of months because you know some of the rates and other other states are now significantly higher on a per capita basis in California and I'm just. Feeling like I'm gonNA stick a little closer to home now over the next couple of months. My comment was the flight is in communicates the airport I really think that that's what the studies are starting to show that you know I. Mean if wearing a mask yes. It's really important on the airplane, but it's even more important when you're in a confined space like an airport and as the weather gets colder here up north you know it's going to be tighter and. It wouldn't surprise me if they start closing down the restaurants in the airports the way I mean, I'm that'll be one of the first things to go will be the restaurants and you know it's just for everyone's safety and the air blinds aren't serving food anymore. So questioning about what you know what the infrastructure at the airports could look like you know it, it's going to be difficult well, and of course, some people are still refusing to wear masks on. Well daily on board but in the waiting area things like that, and of course, we know we've talked about the airlines have. Policies about requiring requiring masks and so forth. But some people are still refusing but max sounds like some airlines, IRV or or making lists and checking them twice. They are you don't want to be on the on the naughty list in I. Think a lot of people just think well, if I don't wear my mask, the worst that's going to happen as I get kicked off this flight and you know I'll just catch the next flight. Well, airlines are putting people on a no fly lists. Now, they haven't really said for how long you'll be on that list, but my guess is. Maybe through of the pandemic, which could be a year or more.

NPR Emirates Hong Kong Max Sounds California United States
1 million new cases of coronavirus in the last 3 weeks

NBC Nightly News

02:27 min | 1 year ago

1 million new cases of coronavirus in the last 3 weeks

"At the center of this campaign is the corona pandemic, a million new cases and just three weeks. Some states hitting numbers not seen even at the start of the outbreak we get more now from Gallagher Almaguer. The signs of strain or most daunted hospitals in states like Wisconsin where the daily number of deaths have more than tripled some issues are at ninety percent capacity at least a dozen states soaring to all time highs for covert hospitalizations Florida with the highest number of deaths in twenty four hours. UNCONSCIOUS FOR ABOUT Two and a half months. Deanna hair left a Michigan. Yesterday after a one, hundred, ninety, six day battle with covy. Our lives. Changed forever with no region spared as we fall deeper into crisis, the growing tidal wave of new infections is climbing by the million almost every month with spikes in the summer, and now another million in just the last three weeks. After scenes like these across the country, the Mayor of Boston vows to crack down on house parties. It's a perfect scenario, a petri dish for the spread of the virus but small gatherings are also fueling the rise the governor of Rhode Island ordering businesses to close all break rooms in Georgia thirteen workers inside an election prep center tested positive I think that as we enter the fall the winter, every part of the nation's going to be lit up by infection with some. Towns prepared to reinstate restrictions today cities like Denver requiring masks outdoors in limiting gatherings to five people states like Texas, though have given the all-clear for bars to open at reduced capacity across the nation more than thirty six, thousand people are hospitalized with Kobe officials worry that number is poised to balloon. especially, fatigue grows overtaking precautions Gail Brousseau a beloved grandmother in school bus driver took every safety measure she could. But today her family holds her funeral and for she separate last. Tell the she loves. Somebody else. Coca Brousseau is now one of the two hundred nineteen thousand Americans die of Covid the heartbreak felt by her family certain to be shared by so many more

Coca Brousseau Gail Brousseau Gallagher Almaguer Deanna Hair Rhode Island Wisconsin Kobe Boston Covy Michigan Denver Florida Texas Georgia
Pampering Your Skin and Clove

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

04:42 min | 2 years ago

Pampering Your Skin and Clove

"Samantha. Thank you so much for being here with us again this month. This is a topic that I am so excited to talk about. Thanks for having me. This is one of my favorite topics. So I think one of the biggest questions around this topic is, can I actually put essential oils on my face? I think that is I. Mean. That's a massive question that a lot of people ask me actually. because. A lot of people are you know maybe a little timid little frightened and not sure how they can use them safely and I want to dive into all of that because like I mentioned this. My personal favorite, this is my favorite topic to talk about is as skincare and applying essential oils to your face and really utilizing all the benefits. Like I mentioned safety is something that super important to follow. Here we talk about safety with internal using air matic used topically, US is very important to it's very important to pay attention to the essential label and the usage online. So when you go to dot com on each product page, you'll see these little icons it there. You'll see a couple of different ones. There's N. for need ask for sensitive defoe dilute. It will also say if it's safe to use a aromatic re topically or internally. So. Pay attention to that because we do carry some oils that are considered hot wheels, and those are usually marked with a dilute which means you want to be cautious and careful using those. topically I personally avoid using any of the dilute Wales topically just because I am very sensitive skin and any of the S or sensitive oils I always direct with the carrier. Oil and then with some of the oils, I even have I with them as well on my skin because it's a little more sensitive. So keep in mind your own personal sensitivity everyone else around you as you're using oils on your kids on her family members and you know just play around with different carrier oils on different spots, the skin on lots of your face. So, with that, what are some of the oils that you recommend as using as part of my skin care routine? Like I mentioned, each person's skin has its own individual needs insensitivities like you might have more normal dry skin, and so you could play around with Yara Palm or even rose rose meant to help balance moisture levels in your skin. So if you have more normal dry skin rose could be a good fun. Some. Quick additions for normal to oily skin could be geranium tea tree even hd. Clear. So we have our are skincare blends, right? HD clear 'EM mortell. Those are specifically created for certain people. Skin types of HD. Clears from problematic uneven skin texture and immortalized for aging skin. It also can be used on the skin to help decrease signs of aging one thing I like to do as well as look at the ingredients and blends or skin care products I know in love and identifying essential oil that I think might be advantageous to my current skin concerns. I love that looking at what you already use and what works for you then going from there. I think that's a wonderful idea. So how do I go about incorporating essential oils into my routine at what point and my applying the essential oils? That's a great question, and again, that kind of changes from person to person once you've identified essential oil. And think about how it will benefit your skin. I try to use it consistently for at least a couple of weeks within this timeframe for me. I. Often can tell if the oil will benefit my skin or not. William China nail down the win of SCAP location like you mentioned it can depend on the benefit looking for is a spot treatment at moisture like we talked about or even skin cleansing. So each of these can be applied at different times you're looking for skin causing benefits may be petri into your skin cleanser in you know used twice a day at the beginning at the rebate or a spot treatment take some turmeric and apply that I like spot treatments personally at the end of the day or you're gonna bad because then you'll have to smell like oils all day if you don't want to. that it also, you're not worried about maybe flying over top of them or walking around with essential oil who face. So spot treatments I would sit of the day skin cleansing throughout the day whenever you can skin added moisture could be added to your moisturizer at the beginning of the day or at the end of the day depending on how strong of an additional moisturizing effect you're looking

Oily Skin Dry Skin Samantha. Defoe Wales William China Yara Palm
AstraZeneca Phase 3 Trials Paused Due To Safety Concerns

Daily Coronavirus Update

06:18 min | 2 years ago

AstraZeneca Phase 3 Trials Paused Due To Safety Concerns

"As to Astra, Zeneca trials for the covid nineteen vaccine hit a snag. The debate resumes as to whether the guard rails and safety protocols worked as intended or it's proof that we're moving too fast in a quest to return to normalcy prior to the pandemic Liz Aibo senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News will update us on the status of the trials and what any setback may mean joining us now, with Liz Zibo senior correspondent. At Kaiser Health News. Thank you for coming on today. Liz thanks for having me. The National Institutes of Health has launched an investigation into the case of a patient who suffered spinal cord damage after AstraZeneca's Kovic Nineteen vaccine trial depending on what I read. It's either proof that the testing process is working as designed or that is evidence of moving too fast and the general public at risk start this out for me if you can. I'd say this is the first example I'd say this is the process working there actually several variety of safety valves that are built into the clinical trial process. So this is one in which a potential side effect was picked up, and we don't know yet if this side effect which is supposed to be a spinal problem if that really was related to the vaccine or not that's why the NIH and others are investigating. More is a comparison going back to h one n one and the vaccine which was developed and implemented very early in the Obama Administration politics aside is there any legitimate comparison as to the vaccine trials of? In one back in two thousand and nine and Kobe nineteen today. The process of getting a vaccine will be longer for Kovin because with H one, N one scientists already had a flu shot and other needed to do was to substitute the h one n one flu sequence for other flu sequences that we've used in the past sue scientists were familiar with the Vaccine Day. Knew how that SORTA vaccine worked the big delay was that the flu vaccine is grown in chicken eggs it's a virus so it's going to chicken eggs and not take some time. So there was a little. Bit of a delay some manufacturing delays with the H One n one vaccine this is very different because this corona viruses very new. We've never licensed vaccine against a corona virus before and the technologies that companies are using to create this vaccine are Ulsan new and most of them have never been used to make a vaccine before big picture. Can you describe the process as far as where we are in the progression as far as phase three trials I keep hearing face three what does that mean for the layperson? Any drug that's going to be used in humans goes through a set period of study and set sequence of trials. So I may be tested enough cell in Petri dish ABC dish they might tested on mice for this kind of vaccine. It's being tested in primates than the first type of trial is a phase one trial, and that's just to try to set the correct dose of the of the vaccine or drug, and to find out any early signs about safety. These are small trials just a few dozen people because these are first in human studies they keep them small to. Make sure that no one's hurt. Then we go to face to trial. Their doctors are looking also for safety and some early signs of efficacy and the big really definitive study is the phase three trial and for a vaccine, these are being given in the United States to thirty thousand people for each trial. So there are two trials that are ongoing right now in the united. States one from Pfizer and one from journal they both are going to enroll at least three thousand people in fact, Pfizer? Just announced a couple days ago they're upping that to forty, four, thousand people and. The reason that those trials need to be so big as they wanNA look for rare side effects, they might be able to find out earlier if the vaccine is effective with fewer people but sometimes, they're rare side effects and this spinal problem that patient apparently had with the Astra Zeneca drug called transverse That's really really rare. So you're not gonNA see really rare but serious side effects until you test them in huge numbers of people. So right now we've got two trials that are in face three, their ongoing the Astra Zeneca trial had just started that was also supposed to. Be a thirty thousand person trial that's been paused because of this potential side effect at the end of it. All best case scenario at least in terms of the Astra Zeneca propose vaccine would it be an annual shot like we get the flu shot or is it something which we may take one time and we're done like maybe the chicken pox virus that's a great question, and in some ways this going to resemble the childhood vaccinations. If anyone out there has kids, we know that they don't just get one shot they'll get a series like measles shots you'll get to what the Yeah, that's right. You'll. You'll get one when the child's around maybe a year or eighteen months, and then they get another one before they enter school. So with this one, people don't yet know how many shots were going to need. Now, the first two vaccines that are closest to making it to approval right now in the US, the Pfizer shot, and also the journey shot those right now to dose vaccines. So you get your first dose which primes your immune system, it sort of. The immune system and prepares it, and then with the Maderna's shot, you get your second shot four weeks later, and that really sets off the immune system to be ready to prepare for this virus and ready to respond with the Pfizer. It's slightly different. It's two shots three weeks apart. But one thing people should know is that let's say you get your first shot for weeks. Later, you get a second shot it takes your immune system, a good two weeks to develop those antibodies. So from the day, you get your first inoculation. Until you may be protected would be six weeks. We don't know yet if we're going to need annual boosters like with the flu shot or even a booster sooner than that, we just don't know but that's a really important question. She is Liz Sabo senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News. Thank you so much for coming on today. Thanks for having me.

Flu Vaccine Astrazeneca Pfizer FLU Kaiser Health News NIH United States Zeneca Astra Liz Aibo LIZ Liz Zibo Kovin Liz Sabo ABC Obama Administration Kobe
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"How deal monetize say? The same thing also with the with the creators, the Games themselves will become stars. It's basically law entry para to come to the field. So how you become a successful there it's it's really competitive. And obviously to see modell. So I think there's a lot of things recollect. The BBC startups can learn from from the gaming and these wealth like. Saying that he was. Looking. The band rock bands, metallica. You know how they actually chain seats they business model. Off the LP's and cassettes and CDs. That morale was basically killed and they need to do some live events and touring start to build communities around fence Monica stats an even between the tools. What are all the means you're GONNA ENGAGE IN A. Community on and build. Build A. Excitement experiences together with people. If that's not a community water. So he doesn't a lot of exciting things happening in in this decade. We may not even need to meet physically at all. Yeah. I I think gaming, an game development is There's a reason why it's like forerunner in many things and why different industries seem to like replicate some of the things that gaming has done or at the unit has done before I. Think. I, think there's two reasons for that. One is the game development itself combines so many different. Expertise that you have to combine in order to create the great game combines like programming from graphics to server side gone by mathematics combines are bus music, business marketing, and all of these feeling failing as well and storytelling. Storylines. Exactly and these. Like have to work to greater like beautifully that's something that. A lot of companies definitely get inspired from an electronic to understand how these organizations are built and holiday work together on why actually worked to get her and the second thing why I think game development that gaming is a good test. Bet For many things. We're GONNA see into future from from from the field as well as you.

BBC
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"Them. and. They're also out competing other entrepreneurs buying resources from other parts of the economy. So those resources are directed towards. Those houses that people haven't actually said that they want. So it's. SORTA cluster of entrepreneurial errors caused by this new money. Makes it seem like there is an opportunity, but there's not really I mean. You can still make money off of it before the burst, but. It will burst because there is no actual demand for those things. And using resources for building houses has should be used and would have been available in other types of production. So they can't all be conclude, you can't finish all those production processes. So this the civil start going bankrupt and that calls causes ripple effects, too. Because when one business goes bankrupt defects, of course, their suppliers, who will long get paid and it affects. Competitors to and so forth right so everything in the concert. connected. So, all of these huge changes. Create structural problems. So. Austrian business cycle theories. Is a theory of full cycle, whereas most other so-called business cycle theories are serious about the crash on. So. An Australian would start with the same well. There's an artificial boom that leads to the crash. The crash is guest correction going back to actual real. The boom is sort of imaginary artificial. So the way of of Avoiding business cycles in all the problems with recessions, and so forth would be first to not cause. Can still have economic growth. He can have sustainable economic growth and can have been pretty fast economic growth. It should be directed by what consumers are likely to buy nuts. So artificial profit opportunities created by. By by new money. But if you look at other theories, they just study the crash. And they will just assume the boom this great. We need more booms because of economic growth. And then why did why do we have a burst? Why do we have this?.

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"A way of. Implicitly. Sort of secretly taxing people. To. Print a whole lot more money than I mean prince figuratively bill so lot more because everything is so digitalized now. But I mean the the reason we don't see. Falling prices is because we are or the central banks. Are Creating a lot of money all the time so that there is more money than goods. And then that affects the price. And it's more than the official inflation rates, and we can talk about how how much they change how measuring inflation? But. They're they're talking about the price level at the same types of goods. Had level of trice. And if that level prize goes up, you have inflation. If that level price goes down your deflation. The natural order of things with the deflation because prices will fall. And official inflation rate is how much it increases from measured price level. While the real inflation in price would be between the new lower price would have gotten. And Higher Prosecution got the difference between. They're just much higher than the officially inflation rate. The difference is because were pumping out new money. Always Benefiting Wabi doing. Well! Why are we doing it? Both simple answer is a Keynesian economic thought. It's also the economy's catching all the money. You start what you're saying. Well there's at least providing a theory to prop up that system. So. We spanking the money. While many, but The banking sector and the government to for starters. WAY IT works. Unfortunately economic serious adopted this view money neutral. Effect much. Thanks is basically just a numerator with your trading, but it has no effect on things. Austrians believe differently and Sony classical condoms before. So when you're creating new money enters the economy certain place it's. It's not the case that we all get. Half a percent, more cash overnight. Sunday print more money. But it enter somewhere ended enters typically through the banking sector so. One way, it's done him us. Is that whenever you get a mortgage to buy a house? That's not the money that the bank has. But you apply for the loan. And if they think that the how Schwartz enough end that you will be able to pay the interest rate on what? They just hit a couple of buttons on their keyboard. And they create the new money in the bank account. Of the of the house, so that is new money. Well, that is how. Entered somewhere in this case seller bank account. Well that doesn't affect prices because more money is big shot, but that means that he is richer than he was before. and. It doesn't really change a whole lot more. In this case, you have someone buying the House who has? A debt, but that doesn't. Affect them. Yet is really new money being created so when the Fed quantitative easing as they had done out since the WHO does not mean actually just in. Bananas and apples..

official Schwartz Fed Sony
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"Thousands late nine days, Steve Chops was doing something he was unbundling. So you could. Buy You know songs, ninety nine cents, but bee's. So. You basically combine things, so he loves to St No from the sort of of of having the full album type of subscription or is molly told really subscription book. You know sort of package deal. You just want to hit song the rest. And that makes sense I very often. Why would you buy a whole album when there's only one good song on its very few albums have lots of good songs. But also basic lack of micro payments, not exactly. Like still now you're. Wise everything getting so expensive. Yeah. That's a deeper question than. Most people might realize. A. Something that I did discuss quite a bit this issue with inflation and deflation. And I think if you ask people, they would say that. Of course things get most expensive all the time this. Always been like things. Prices Albans Rice. Hasek's own. As far as we can remember it individuals right. So. You'll last week. Yeah. You got a point there but I mean for decades away in at least since nineteen seventy-one. It's been decades. And probably longer than nineteen forty Around there to those social cutoff point, but I mean if you. It's interesting us if you then. You. Push back a little bit and say well. With competition wouldn't expect prices to fall. Yeah, okay. With innovation and productivity increases should expect costs to falls. Distances can lower the price of more to sound more yeah. Okay so, why are prices rising? In. Understanding the economy in an Austrian, but understand this as a every process or you discover more and better ways to serve consumers. And produce more value at lower cost. Things should always fall in the price might so prices should always go down much like they have in in computers and so forth. Where computer today are. Dirt cheap compared to computers a couple a decade or two ago. And the computers now are better to the. Why is that? Bombings because there are. A whole lot more money In the economy that before so..

Steve Chops Albans Rice molly Hasek
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"Put to sheets of paper around with some tape hoping that they will not. At the post office split will not. Destroy the PIN Weiland delivery Otherwise. The PIN would be a whole lot more, but I think we. Must be almost twenty years ago so. I think they paid themselves off. Talking about the memory lane as well wrote a thesis called micro payments on the internet criteria for micro payments. Sue Stems. Saying that do now cast. Change, in all those funny things metal things in your pockets, you know. Those Anita eight fall the media. You know basically just having micro payments for purchasing you know articles and stuff. You know. Has Anything changed in August twenty years? Surprisingly little you know, and you're talking about my master's, thesis informatics. And actually actually won a prize for thesis in systems, science or something like that year. and. My Co author. We tried to figure out how how would have a system for micro payments on the Internet. Work what what would be required for? Both feasible technologically speaking and economically said people who actually adopted us because that's. That's back when everybody was talking about in the future, everybody will pay her article. Websites, newspapers and things like that would pay force what! added picture things like that right. So you would have to find a way to charge one penny or two pennies or something like that for each thing, the. Would make it, up. In. Cover all your costs no-one figured out how to do it. and. That's still the case. After that pay, pal sort of come and gone and. Now we have all these crypto currencies. I guess they could work, but. The only the only solution I guess is that people nowadays are not afraid to enter subscription services like the used to be I thought. A millennial and younger generations stayed on mind subscribing to stop whereas. I was very reluctant to sign up for stuff like spotify for instance with everyone to own my music so I. would rather buy a CD and Ribbit and have the MP threes and my hard drive, the pay a monthly fee and set up. Listen things like that. 'CAUSE I lose them as soon as I. Chose a different service than I love myself. In? But now subscriptions have become so. Ubiquitous in so common that people sign up for paying a monthly fee for pretty much effort saying so in that sense. It's we. Micro payments are not as necessary, but I think we still need some kind of system for that, but it's. It's amazing. How he wrote defended that in early nineteen ninety nine..

PIN Weiland Anita Sue spotify
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"In Ninety, nine and I was Hung Lulu Ninety, six, ninety seven. So during those couple of years I was trying to figure out. How. A society based off all my. Fundamental principle of liberty. Of Individual Liberty how that could possibly work because I know. How that would work. But then he took the plunge. Or I forced myself in the sense because I found the solution. To how to do this in ninety eight, and then I started the website anarchism dot net, ninety nine where I started. A posting stuff was sort of early days of the web. For politics in this kinds of movement so. intention was to post a lot of the books. that. People could read them in Serbia. Librarian sense in a gathering place for people who read with interest radical liberty. And read. The old thinkers learn from that stuff. And there was also a discussion forum. where? People were hanging out. WHITELAW PEOPLE A. Lot of Titi and bathing ideas. Assuming says the same Miss I. Use twitter for now, but in this case it was ideology, so it was more for discussion and figuring out arguments, pro and con different issues, figuring out the best way of expressing yourself and things like that. That's what. Website did for many years. It was leading. From the beginning locker capitalist. I developed my own political thinking. It's turned into a Gore ISM and into. General Anarchists on concerns. Publish? Books whatever I could find. and. PUT THEM ON. Many of them are still there we can. Read them, or of course nowadays, no one reads. Books in the browser anymore so. I guess it's not. That interesting but What are you GonNa? Steal donate money and all this at least three. Pin You can also purchase as well I'd spent website on its lopsided amount with the paintball actually works. Putnam to. Does I actually got an order for a pin. whilst months ago now we ordered a hundreds and hundreds of pins and I still have a few. You can order them. I should probably take that down because there's a lot of hassle. Filling those orders, but A Ballgame Devil Sir. Oh, even the shipping was included packaging shipping. Three Bucks Right, and this is worldwide shipping, and but I mean Fed exed. No not at all, not even. It's not enough money to put it in padded envelope, so basically put in a regular envelope and then..

Serbia Putnam
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"Turning point happened. That was like okay. Now a days. I think I was I. Mean He provided the arguments? He's a very good teacher, so. Whatever you say, he's taking a takes the opposite view. and. He presented several different views as ever differed different types of answers to all questions so. I think I think he just supplied me with arguments from both sides and. Those seemed much more accurate to meet on the other ones. And he I remember very clearly one lecture where. where I dave wasn't turning point, but it was one where I stood out. and. There was one where he was comparing schools. He was presenting different schools of macroeconomic thought. And and he put on the board. and. I've learned. Now after. Many years after that he put Austrian monetarist Keynesian Marxist schools. They're just some basic ideas they. Stood for. I then he asked us. Classic many people who've been in different countries, so he asked where people thought their countries fits in terms of economic policy are the Australian monitoring. Marxist and there were several other Swedes in the class. This university! Over four hundred Swedish students. Tells you a little bit about people's choices when someone else? Why Did you speak any English those just basically like just another converse weeds. Well. Actually I I. I decided early on that I was not going to spend time with under sweets there they're going to be. Learning! From Americans and from others. So, not speak. Swedish was the goal. I met some of them, but I didn't hang around with Go that partisan things like that, but funny thing is I. Actually shared an apartment with two Finnish guys. Yeah so I ended up in a hotel room. As soon as I got there, the university arranged for new international students. And they paired me with a guy from Helsinki. And, then he met another finished guy in. That month expired. We found the, department. By the By the mountains and outside of just outside of. Lulu. Where we shared an apartment for that full year, they stuck around gun degrees there. I think but I don't one year. I mean. I guess they could speak Swedish in the sense that people can't speak Swedish. Very reluctant words. On after some. Well Yeah right exactly or in London. So it, we we spoke English most of the time. We probably a good thing. When during the US During, that lecture the other suites they they raise their hands when when? This professor mentioned Keynesian public policy. A Nice Several similarities with Marxists policy. I raised my hand when he said Marxism. which made all the other sweets? Look at me like Alice, some not. I think they will probably more accurate. That Swedish policy was more. Were Keynesian, than Marxist. definitely the case that there were a Marxist. Influences on on Swedish policy, especially having grown up in the seventies and eighties. It was. Plenty of it makes Marxist rhetoric Sweden. I'm not sure they actually implemented a whole lot of it, but. But the rhetoric was definitely Marxist, but that's sort of one of those things that I remember from. Studying in Honolulu where? I, I, am obviously a little more radical in my view, so things than I thought. Then you put together a website? or You doing already some web development as well. Right. Yeah I did so as soon as I graduated in ninety nine I graduated with a Master's in informatics, suspicious systems development with a business orientation..

Sweden Honolulu Helsinki US Alice professor London
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"It. Gives you a headache in some sense, Your brain wants to get rid of it. Soon need to find a way of of bridging the two ideas or finding principle where where you can find a solution to both. And based off. It's similar to Australian Economic Syrian sense that there's one basic principle. Then all the conclusions derived from the principle. It's just. Deducted thinking really. And then having done, I was sort of. Standard, the conservative. Teenager I suppose. was somewhat free market ideas. And then I happen to be exposed to more of those ideas. So. In College, Shining Nafta for. On Lulu and studied there for a whole year. First choice to put the Swedish taxpayers money and could use, Santos the go surfing. In a sense it. was. A very serious student. Studying at the International Business School. In. Sweden. and. Days took this international party seriously, so they want her all students to spend one semester abroad. And switch welfare-state, being very generous, offered funding for tuition, and so forth, and even traveled back and forth a semester and insurance. Along with it the Really Could Dale. Yeah. They paid you as well. They pay you to study Sweden. And they Yeah, they pay you the same amount to a new study abroad, but they suggested for A. Standard of living and stuff like that so. So it was a really good deal in I. I got the the opportunity I applied immediately for few universities in Australia California Hawaii. So I have to get to the sun and the ocean I suppose. That was Private University in downtown Honolulu Hawaii Pacific University on the responded right away, as soon as I submitted my attention. This sent me a Fedex package. With? Information and things like that so. I applied in my left. And What was a great year? Of course. And I, happened to send up for to economics courses the first semester. and. I. Was there late I? Had No idea how the American hierarchy system works in the. You're supposed to put together your own. Your own weekly schedule with lectures on things like that. much like high school is in Sweden. With the choice of which courses to take? Courses were were not available anymore because I was late. And I did find economics courses where I could take two courses by this in professor. So I figured that might be good idea. So I signed up to those, and I had no idea who he was of course, but t ended up pushing me over the edge sense in sort of free market, thinking evening to Austin the incident, though I had no clue those were. So. He pushed me over the edge. In terms of the economy helped me see. The Communists organization seeing that there is a water to it in harmony, too. that is. Easily, can, wreck if we're not careful. Do Remember. What sort of Fundamental Momento you know. Some sort of.

Sweden Australia California Hawaii Hawaii Pacific University Santos International Business School Honolulu professor Sweden. Private University Austin
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"It doesn't tell us anything at all. About how much people will prefer. Potatoes need to the different time or different people so. They will make different valuations depending on the situation. They're in, so you can't really use math and statistics explain what is actually going on in terms of the theorizing on the economy. It has to be deducted from first principles so you. A system of understanding economy logically based off of this recognition of subjective value S A. Determinant in sense of action. And then. Based off of this Australian. See the economy as you mentioned before. The market, a process and not as a system where a machine that is just. Running. A process that has evolved over time end. There's more discoveries and. It pivots to it's suddenly goes in different directions, and no one could really have foreseen this. But entrepreneurs are creating consistently. On the the other view would be. To say that no math and statistics. That's the way to go, and we just need better measurements and better more refined instruments to figure out exactly. How people prefer things, and and what to produce, and so forth, and that's what mainstream economics has sort of done. That's also why they have. Excluded the entrepreneur from their theories. So if you studied economics. If anyone ever mentioned the entrepreneur. Is? What they mean is basically the creation of new small businesses. And don't mean imagining new products in the disruption that Amine. Creation. Because everything is just production. The meeting of Supply and demand and Maximizing the system, and and so forth so. Alternate comics is is pretty influential in the study of entrepreneurship. And also in management. For that reason that these economists dynamic process at. It falls overtime and changes and reflects. Consumers, valuations in consumers once and entrepreneurship, competing with each other trying to figure out how best serve consumers. So it's. It's a very different view of the. Economy overall delays. They're similar in some sense to how it was viewed before canes to. Reconnect to that discussion. So it sort of the. In a sense, it has survived kings in avalanche, but barely so Of Views, the economists this. Almost harmonious system. At least an order to it that is not planned from above an order that comes out of people interacting and trading for to benefit themselves. But they can only do that in a market setting by. Producing game for other people so specifically with entrepreneurs do. Fundamentally right. They produce goods that they think will be of benefit to consumers, and if they right there actually benefiting consumers. They can a profit from doing that, too. There's no wrong contradiction there. Bit, like, Adam Smith's invisible hand a at the core of of the of the market process. So all you're saying that say Mazzarella choice for a entrepreneur mind. Pose STEWS building things on. Doing something by oneself, and not being bought of become messy Nari. If you like building things on the system failed. That's Australian economics, is you? I think so I mean it makes -perience entrepreneurs had many with experience. They have from how the economy works in. How damn hard it is to figure out what people want to buy, and especially what people will buy, mean they innocence. They discover Austrian economic..

Adam Smith
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"So it's, it's not a matter of. Of. How much how many eggs are bought and for how much money in total? But how much! An egg is worst to universe. The first one is worth more than the second one and so forth the more ex you have the. Lesser the value of Losing one. And by by analyzing everything on the margin. That opened up a lot of new. Types of questions that could be answered an types Oh. You could answer questions that have been asked before confined answers to. So Austrian economics was one of the three. I started at University of Vienna through a book by Carl, anger. Professor at the University of the Amish the Harvard back then. He wrote principles of Economics. Starting with subjective value on talking about how how we value things.

University of Vienna University of Carl Professor
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"I ride a lot of of columns and articles and things like that for different websites, and I've been doing that for a long time and. When I writes those I, think about the very differently when I'm writing them. Something unnoticed myself, but when I write them as. Something as a tweet this much more of an argument it's it's intended to be much more punchy in some sense is more to the point. And have to explain things in very few words where essay or blog post I can take a full paragraph, but A full paragraph on twitter. So. I. I've been fortunate enough to. Be Associated with Mrs They be published. Several my tweet storms as articles. basically let's take the tweets They edit them little bit, and they post them at an article on the website. And, it's a very interesting when I read those and those other articles that I've written ass articles for the same website and I see them basically side by side. How different they are in tone and how? I'm expressing things, so it's it's obviously doing something different, but I have no clue what I'm doing different. Are you also discovering sort of developing your ideas and finding new things you know? Is it helping in your in your work? Absolutely. Yeah, otherwise I probably wouldn't be able to. Continue doing this, but that's that's really how I use writing general. How I use teaching in the classroom. People would probably. Assume, that S A professor entrepreneurship with a PhD in all this stuff. you, would. Enter the classroom in. You would talk to students and they would. Open, their their brains for the information that I throw at them and they would. Learn it regurgitate on Ammon. That's it. That's education but I. USE IT I. I teach more sort discussion format. and. Of course, it's about teaching them. What I know that they do not yet. Because otherwise. What's the point of education? But it's also I..

twitter professor
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"One tweet a time. You'RE GONNA make the world a better place and educate the masses. Well. I hope that the the effect has. I'm not sure twitter. is the right means for that, but that is how I use twitter. so I mean I'm dedicating my account to. Commentary that S-. Aims at. Spelling! Economic illiteracy, because I think there is a fundamental economic literacy. A. People in general, have it. But I don't think a complaint. People in general law that much because if you don't have. Don't have the interest and you don't have the education and you've never sought to really understand something then. You can't really blame them for not understanding it. is also that those who have education and have? Attempted to understand it, they're using. The wrong tools and they're. They're going about it the wrong way so. In that sense on. Twitter is is doing exactly the same thing as I'm doing in my research of my teaching is just aimed at a different audience you could say. What is the one idea you found that you know it really takes off in Toledo. You remember maybe something from the past years. Slight while I'm probably did something here. He's funny because he's actually the fundamental. Theoretical assumptions that seem to take off and. Before I started tweeting twitter, I understood as this really fast paced, short commentary enemy back then one hundred forty characters. And to start. But I signed up very early. But I didn't do anything with it because I couldn't figure out why. I would just basically spew out my emotions as the only thing, you can do one hundred forty characters. You could tell someone that stupid or I love you, but that's basically what you can do in the was not really a platform for discussion. But then. After. Meddling with a little bit in well probably years, but Figuring stuff out. I noticed that I think was indecent. Who started the the founder of? Netscape browser. A. Venture capitalist now. Sued, advising. Right exactly I think he coined. An started the tweet storm. Concept to are you start you right? Basically, it's an argument or A. Narrative or information in several tweets following each other. So I started doing that too, and those seem to be taking off so when it's. It's a great way of teaching. I guess is what I tweet. Something that I think is super clever, and it's one. That usually does not take off at all, but then I I write down what I know about. Value were pricing like we talked about how how you should be about pricing something. And it turns out to tweets swarm of twenty five thirty tweets, and it's really it's really economic theory. Really dry sort of boring, that usually takes off. So, it's much easier apparently at least for me. To write a theoretical mini treatise on twitter, and have people react to it at retweeted Jerry everywhere, but it is for me to be clever about what I'm writing. So, basically what you're saying? Is that if you have an idea, use. Know previously the threat. An article. I think that's what Marc Andreessen did as well. He was putting people to talk about. You know he's doing posts. He had a block before on then he started to veto on a tweet storms so night. US basically chopped the article in you know sentences only dispose them for the. Attention Span, of five seconds people I'm. Go. I guess that is pretty much it. I think. A major difference is that when I do it in in the form of tweets, I'd ride it differently than if I a a a longer texts right so..

Twitter Marc Andreessen twitter. Netscape Toledo founder Jerry A. Venture
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"Production proceeds consumption and the. Demand is constituted by supply so basically a market setting. I can't demand which means that I am willing and able to to pay for a good. And buy at a certain price because I have already supplied something to the economy, so I have purchasing power because I already worked and earned the wage, or because have already promised to. Work, for someone else in MBA's paid in advance or something like that, but I have to earn like the volatile exchange. We were talking about me to go exactly. I provide you something I'm you prologue me something? So we actually contributing both on that enables us to do something exactly and in the market setting. It's very decentralized. Right so what I'm producing probably stuff that I never ever used myself, but since I'm producing it I earn income that you can use to buy stuff that others produce so I can even though I, I'm really selling entrepreneurship, research and lectures education, which I'm not much of a consumer of another. No more away. That means I I. EARN production at a purchasing power so that I can buy food and and a car and things like that. Other people are better at producing. But Canes phrased this into supply creates its own demand, which of course. is a little bit silly because if you think of the words than. Simply producing something doesn't mean that. People demanded and any altered knows that this is ridiculous, right? That predominantly sounds like a lot like a Marxist the. Labor theory of value. About you. Yeah. It wouldn't surprise me if it if there is some connection there, too. And? I mean it's easier to to make fun of that statement. Supply creates its own demand. Because, it's so ridiculous. but it's close enough to have to supply in order to demand. And the of course also means that whatever I can demand is. Equivalent to the value I have contributed through my supply, so there's A..

MBA Canes
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"The only one came from out of nowhere and yes changed everything. There was always a struggle, but but for whatever reason we we talk about a Keynesian avalanche just changed everything, and it came to buried basically the old way of obscene economy. And something. Made his work a tipping point and there's always a struggle between. Seeing the economy as sort of an assistant itself. People back in the day. They even talk about the economic organism. So that's how they saw. Something that works all the parts are part of a whole, and there are some their balances in their some kind of harmony in order to the whole saying by itself. That's that. They were. a majority and most influential in economics until canes pretty much. They weren't of free-market radicals or anything like that. But. They still saw that their fares to society in one economic spare. The other is the political. And the political. Effects the economy too much. We're GONNA see a very. Bad results detrimental results. So, I've actually saying that the. Future doesn't always mean that we're going full what you know. It's progress so in a way. We being going back since the nineteen thirties in economics. Yes absolutely. Development, along maniacs right so. Of course we have become whole lot. More. Advanced and sophisticated in terms of mathematical modeling and statistical analyses and things like that, but in terms of economic thinking sure I think we've taken. Great steps backwards. Have you running the theories? All maybe have your own hypotheses why the mainstream filed why the mainstream economists sort of you know. flicked to the minority almost like honest. Sure I mean there's so many things that happened in. This was. During the depression. Between two World Wars. That was A. I guess a a backlash against. The enormous. creation of wealth through industrialization, following the lighten though so many things. At once. It's I. Think it's a very interesting case. It completely changed how people perceive what they're studying. Over the course of Just a decade or two. I'm reading a book now by Steven cates. Who has done a lot of work on trying to interpret? Canes and figure out what? Do Wing. Is focused. Is this shift? His focus on on say's law and different perceptions. Of what? Science? Well. That's that's part of the story that the cates tells. At one of the things that were caned sort of produce a straw man that is close enough to what people believe that the accepted it, but with the Straw man. He was able to undo it. Sort of ridiculous. So. Say's law was actually never called say's law until the nineteen hundreds. A, but it was the law of markets where. Economists understood that..

Steven cates Canes
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"Can't really make this much better through simple means and just signing a law. into effect and then look at that they created a better future. It's not that easy right and they really want to When you have a business cycle Francis, we have a recession. Save people, and of course people are better off in the in the in the short term to so they want to spend a lot of money for instance. And thereby in the sense they're. They're buying their votes to because they're more likely to get reelected. Give people a check or to than if they don't, they say well, things will work itself out by if they do something whatever it is, they do. It doesn't really matter, but then they're more likely to get reelected in were likely to get glory and fame, and so forth and canes in the sense produced a series. That facilitated politics, so he turned everything on its head by saying simply that in the long run. We're all dead. Resort famous quote, the older economists they were looking at the long run. Seeing that will cost in the long run. That! That doesn't make gains in the short-run, because it costs can be so big if you affect the whole system. West to canes. It was more more like well. We don't really need care all that much about the long run. Because what matters is the pain in the moment right now? So even if we costs more problems down the road, we can solve those when we get to them in with war, short-term action of course that speaks. To any anyone who wants to change society right? If, you think about the politicians you know. They are elected on a few years, so that's like the perfect solution. Exactly so so I mean whether he intended to. Provide politicians with power, or if that was just what happened happens to be the outcome of. Sign up the guy. was what he did in. Of course, he had a lot of. Supporters Right away. Those who wanted wanted to use government to shape society in his fourth. They of course find. Those ideas attractive. I think that's. Sort of in the air fall probably optional for decades already, and that was probably the gloomy nationals a theme. They've already the Federal Reserve a sporting blace load of other steps. Short? Absolutely I mean they have not saying canes..

Francis Federal Reserve
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"My big eight right now is to correct the field of entrepreneurship and put them on the right track again. I think we have basically everything to be grateful to entrepreneurs for everything that we have and everything that we will have a without them. We would at best just repeat Booker Doing but I think we will probably lose a lot along the way, and then based off of that this added markup to cover their profits, and then that would be the price, and then they go to the market and tried to sell. This is a great way of failing is golden does how you should do it. The reason we don't see falling prices is because we are or the central banks are creating a lot of money all the time so that there is more money than goods, and then that affects the price, and it's more than the official inflation rates. Typos doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me on glad to have you. Do Professors do the summer well? Most people would probably guessed that we don't do anything at all. In the we just hang out and. Enjoy, time off but. If. You're in a research university a way. You're probably working to catch up on research and trying to get your papers published in finalize the papers that are half finished, and so forth so I would say research. That's summer. What topics on your mind at the moment increase votes? Well having to theory and I do entrepreneurship theory primarily looking into what? Do. What their function is in the market economy, and so forth so I am. I am doing a lot of this sort of boring pseudo bureaucratic stuff, which means I'm rewriting papers and restructuring papers and. I'm just going through. The texts and making sure that their. Precise enough. That they're all. Aligned to conclusions with our no tangents that I'm going out on. No additional topics I'm not covering any ground that is not necessary for the conclusions on things like that, so it's it's really sort of boring stuff..

Booker official
"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

10:37 min | 2 years ago

"petri" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"Up going to Italy for a while to some traveling and then At one point I got got. This thought that okay. I've been sewing since I was a kid. I really liked design and I can't even remember why didn't go to our school. I think Anyway I ended up going to vocational school Halfway through my academic leave and so I went and started studying tailoring and that was the beginning of my designer career and so I I studied tailoring and half a year later it was time to you know choose if I was going to go back to school or not and that was when I went to the Dean's office and said Okay I'm GonNa under from medical school and I'm GonNa continue with my Education GonNa do another type of stitches? He exactly the type of stages and That was that was it. That was me being done with the medicine. Like I still kept Like I got a lot of contacts in those Very into science. I kept reading on my own and You know trying to stimulate my mind some other way but I really enjoyed working with my hands making clothes and doing the other kind of stitching and after that I thought okay you have to get like a university degree as well and So I started going and then I went again to Engine to do an entrance exam into art school but then at that time I did entrance exam to Estonian Academy of Arts and then I also tried out for another design school in Denmark and And then I didn't get into the Estonian Academy of Arts but I did get into the To do this said design school in Denmark. So you moved to Denmark next. I did not seem both exactly so on. Actually that was again the time when money became an issue and I was like I cannot afford to live in Denmark so and I didn't get into the Academy of arts either. So okay. What was there to do. I wanted to get a higher education like actual bachelor's degree. Did you finish the tailoring? I guess it would be like an associate's degree or something some ridiculous. You've finished at one. So you're like a certify Taylor in some sense yes yes that's correct But I ended up going to the applied the University of Applied Sciences stone and Yes that's in Estonia Day Resource Management of clothing textiles And halfway through that I became so bored because the biggest use our take now. I got bored because it was so easy and I don't know I didn't like that school at all. It was just like I felt like I wasn't really getting too much out of it so I I mean I did finish it like I graduated in everything but I wanted to do now. You have to decrease If you count the vocational one that and now I'm about to get my third one do steel hobby You don't have your door open to Domecq school anymore. You close to Dole to how I think about it every every July every June July when various you know they're doing enrollments to universities only. I should go back out. Try that again so some stacey sauce still eating are yeah. It wasn't miss it like I miss being smart. I guess against yeah. Yeah about to finalize the all decree. Yeah so it was actually funny story because I when I was like two and half years a into the Applied Sciences University. I got an internship at Baltika and explained to the audience for this So as well one of the biggest Fashion houses in the Baltics and They at that time they had five five brands that they operated also the Baltics and across across Europe while some parts of Europe and I was doing an internship like a design internship and then after that I got I got a job offer to become an assistant buyer. For the menswear Brent both men and then after a while there was some restructuring going on and I went from being an assistant buyer becoming an assistant Designer and And then yeah and then I thought okay so. This is my last year in the University of Applied Sciences. I have a job. But Why am I still board? Why am I still feeling unfulfilled and and I? I figured out that I am really. I really really really need to get this art degree that I've been yearning for since two thousand and nine and I was like okay. I'm going to try it again. I'm going to go to a tiger into the to get into the Academy of Arts and and so I did I was accepted and there was a period in my life where I was doing to universities and a fulltime job which was Pretty Pretty Fun. And yes and then I graduated The Appliances University and just continue with my job and the Academy of Arts and Studied fashion design there. And now I am about to graduate. I've been in in the academy for now five years. I took a gap year Like where I did an internship in New York but I guess what the moral of this story is that when somehow life will direct you to the thing that you're meant to be doing. I was always into sewing in and As creative type and I let myself be pulled into this like. Don't get me wrong. I do love Science Medical School but I I let myself go into more elitist if you will because I thought like I have to be perfect to Get my parents to be super proud of me. You know because no one in my family has a higher education and I was like a have to like have to have to be making them show proud but then in the end I still thought no. I can't do something. Pulled me into the arts back into the arts and towards fashion and and here I am actually quarter many times because MC knocking on those doors quite a many institutions and universities and you want sometimes who accepted atmosphere. We're not really like knocking and then going back to the to the Matt Son. Do the stem. Persistence is key. I guess and then somehow found your yourself in New York did found myself in New York. What is your favorite word at least favorite word? Why don't you on? Creatively spiritually emotionally intelligence. And Ted Talks. While don't you off neediness? What is your favorite curse word? Damn what sound or noise to Ilab purring. What sound or noise to you hate snoring. What process other than your own? Would you like to attempt first lady? What professor would you not like to do? Social Media Marketing Manager if could be a CO founder of any star. A any era with would choose instagram. Any final words you want to say I feel like I explored a lot of during this This talk has so Thank you for that. You really gave me something more to think about and Yeah I enjoyed it very much..

Academy of arts Estonian Academy of Arts Denmark University of Applied Sciences New York assistant buyer assistant Designer and And Baltics Applied Sciences University Europe Science Medical School Dean Italy Baltika Domecq Dole stacey professor Media Marketing Manager Taylor