17 Burst results for "Petra Mayer"

"petra mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:55 min | 9 months ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Welcome back, Karen. Hey, Linda, I am so happy to be here. Yeah. So NPR's books we love project used to be called the book concierge, but whatever you call it, it is a great way to find a book for any occasion any reader and any set of tastes and interests. It's a labor of love and literacy put together by a wonderful team and dedicated to our dear friend and colleague NPR books editor Petra Mayer, who died in November. And one of the tags that they use to help you find books is called identity and culture. I want to add, it's fair to say that lots and lots of books may be practically all books are about identity and culture in some way or another, but we're talking about some today that are particularly sharp or specific in their consideration of those themes. I want to dive right in, Karen, you picked several books from this category for books we love. Tell me about the first one. My first book is the love songs of WEB Dubois is by honore fanon Jeffers. There's a couple of categories of books that I really love and one of them is sprawling family epics and this is a sprawling family epic. It's a door stopper. Yeah, but that time just flew by. You know, you sort of look at it and go, oh, am I really gonna have time to read this? And then you get into the first chapter and all of a sudden you find yourself looking up going, oh shoot, it's time to go to bed. The heroine ailey pearl Garfield is the descendant of a long, proud line of people who have been in the United States since around the Revolutionary War. Because they've been here for so long and because they've been in the south for so long. One of the things on a ray talks about is the ethnic interconnectedness of this family. They are black and they are seen as black and they live as black, but they also have Native Americans, white Americans, and so this book goes back and forth in time to sort of weave together how everybody came together. It also shows sort of the insularity of the black middle class and a lot of cities. At the time, you know, we're talking about, you know, 50, 60, 70s. Right. The assumption sometimes is, oh, after integration, everybody wanted to be with everybody else. That's not necessarily the case, but what ailey's family shows is that they are very interested in sort of keeping the community in tech. There's a lot of family pride, a lot of hidden family history that Ali eventually unearths some trauma and it just all comes together in this terrific read. This is one of those books where if you're going to be snowed in for a week, find this book. For sure, for sure. So that is the love songs of WEB Dubois by honore fanon Jeffers. All right, Karen, give me a second pick. My next book is 7 days in June by Tia Williams..

Petra Mayer honore fanon Jeffers Karen NPR Linda Dubois Garfield United States ailey Ali Tia Williams
"petra mayer" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

NPR's Book of the Day

03:12 min | 11 months ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

"Indicate how irrelevant <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> all of the proceedings <Speech_Female> were or <Speech_Female> just downright wrong. <Silence> And <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> getting me <Speech_Female> to say multiple <Speech_Female> times, something that <Speech_Female> I had said in <Speech_Female> the past, which is <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> presidents get <Speech_Female> to name <Speech_Female> their own ambassadors, <Speech_Female> and they also get <Speech_Female> to remove ambassadors <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> for any reason <Speech_Female> at any time. <Speech_Female> But I also <Speech_Female> added that <Speech_Female> it's not <Speech_Female> necessary to <Speech_Female> drag me through the mud to <Speech_Female> do that. <SpeakerChange> Something <Silence> else was going on. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Speaking of <Speech_Male> how <Silence> you were treated. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> When I interviewed <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> your <Speech_Male> then boss, <Speech_Male> now former boss, <Speech_Female> former Secretary <Speech_Male> of State Mike Pompeo <Speech_Male> at the start of <Speech_Female> 2020, <Speech_Female> I asked <Speech_Female> if he owed <Speech_Male> you an apology, <Speech_Male> and we went <Speech_Male> around on that a bit <Speech_Male> until we <SpeakerChange> got <Speech_Male> to here. <Speech_Male> I'll say only this. <Speech_Male> I have defended <Speech_Male> every State Department <Speech_Male> official. <Speech_Male> We've built <SpeakerChange> a great <Speech_Male> team. The team <Speech_Male> that works here is <Speech_Male> amazing. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I've defended <Speech_Male> every single <Speech_Male> person on this team. <Speech_Male> I've done <SpeakerChange> what's right <Speech_Male> for every single <Speech_Male> person. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I've said all I'm <Silence> going to say today. <SpeakerChange> Thank you. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Maria bonovitch. <Speech_Male> I've always <Speech_Male> wondered, did Pompeo <Speech_Male> defend you? Did <Silence> he ever <SpeakerChange> apologize <Speech_Female> to you? <Speech_Female> He <Speech_Female> never apologized. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And according <Speech_Female> to deputy secretary <Speech_Female> Sullivan, he <Speech_Female> did defend <Speech_Female> me for a number <Speech_Female> of months <Speech_Female> until the <Speech_Female> president's <Speech_Female> insistence that I've been <Speech_Female> removed <Speech_Female> became <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> strong that Pompeo <Speech_Female> felt he had no other <Speech_Female> choice. But <Speech_Female> here's the thing. <Speech_Female> Pompeo, <Speech_Female> according to <Speech_Female> Sullivan, <Speech_Female> knew that I had <Speech_Female> done nothing wrong. <Speech_Female> And yet <Speech_Female> he allowed me <Speech_Female> to be removed, he <Speech_Female> allowed my reputation <Speech_Female> to be dragged <Speech_Female> through the mud. <Speech_Female> He abdicated <Silence> his leadership role. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> He went to West <Speech_Female> Point, <Speech_Female> he was in the army, <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> the first thing you do <Speech_Female> is you defend your <Speech_Female> troops. That is <Silence> a basic Tenet of <Speech_Female> leadership. <Speech_Female> And he failed. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> You retired <Speech_Female> from the State Department shortly <Speech_Music_Female> after that. <Speech_Music_Female> Yes. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> In January of 2020. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Marie yovanovitch, <Speech_Male> former U.S. ambassador <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> Ukraine, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> her memoir is titled <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> lessons from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the edge. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that's it for this week <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on NPR's book of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the day. Let us know what <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you think. You can <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> write to us at book of <Speech_Music_Male> the day at NPR <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot org. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Andrew limbong, <Speech_Male> the podcast is <Speech_Male> produced by Kelly wessinger <Speech_Music_Male> and edited by <Speech_Music_Male> Megan Sullivan and <Speech_Music_Male> Taylor Bernie, <Speech_Male> our founding editor <Speech_Male> is Petra Mayer. <Speech_Music_Male> The show elements for <Speech_Music_Male> this week were produced and <Speech_Music_Male> edited by Daniel <Speech_Male> hensel, Matthew <Speech_Male> shoreman, Conor Donovan, <Speech_Male> Sarah handel, <Speech_Male> Gabriel donata, <Speech_Music_Male> Ravenna Koenig, <Speech_Music_Male> Samantha balaban, <Speech_Male> Barry hardiman, <Speech_Male> Rebecca <Speech_Music_Male> hirscher, Suzanne <Speech_Music_Male> levy, cat lonsdorf, <Speech_Music_Male> and Courtney <Speech_Male> dorning. Beth Donovan <Speech_Male> is our managing <Speech_Music_Male> editor. <SpeakerChange> Thanks for <Speech_Music_Male> listening. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The U.S. and <Speech_Female> the EU are imposing <Speech_Female> harsh sanctions <Speech_Music_Female> on Russia because <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of its war in <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Ukraine. One of the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> main targets, Russia's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> banks. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> But Russia <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> has spent years <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> preparing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sanctions. How'd <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> they do it? <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Listen to the planet many <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> podcasts

Mike Pompeo Maria bonovitch State Department Marie yovanovitch Pompeo Andrew limbong Kelly wessinger Megan Sullivan Taylor Bernie Petra Mayer Conor Donovan Sarah handel Gabriel donata Ravenna Koenig Ukraine Samantha balaban Barry hardiman army Beth Donovan NPR
"petra mayer" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

NPR's Book of the Day

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

"Of the 20th century learned to act. Thank you for going deep inside yourself on this interview. Thank you so much, yes. I'm going to go recover now. That's it for this week on NPR's book of the day. If you want more, you can sign up for our newsletter at NPR dot org slash newsletter slash books. I'm Andrew Limbaugh, the podcast is produced by Kelly wester and edited by Megan Sullivan and Taylor Bernie. Our founding editor is Petra Mayer, the show elements for this week were produced and edited by Barry Gordon, David west, Jan Johnson, Michael Radcliffe, Melissa gray, Samantha balaban, Ravenna Koenig, Conor Donovan, Allen biore, Justine kennan, Elena Burnett. Courtney dorning, Daniel hansel, and Matthew shoreman..

"petra mayer" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

NPR's Book of the Day

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on NPR's Book of the Day

"With water. And in the United States, into the 1960s, there were cases where when desegregation of the pools and of other facilities were to be enacted, there were many places, not just in the south. I should say all over the country that refused to integrate refuse to allow African Americans into these pools and actually poured concrete into the pool so that no one could use the pool rather than to allow African Americans into the water with white Americans. And that's the thing, right? Whenever we're tackling something, we're also, I mean, there's so much, usually that we have to sort of wade through to find the story and what we're going to keep in and what we're going to take out and all of that. And so I wonder when you were working on Cass and also warmth of other sons, how much interrogating that kind of central narrative that you were presenting, how do you sort of reckon with that? Well, I mean, I focus in on getting as much as I can from wherever I can get it. For this book, I was ordering books from all over the world. I mean, their books coming in from India, what's coming in from that I ordered from the UK, reading as much as I could to get the understand the history, particularly the works of the era, the goal was to get the books that have been written in the 1930s books that have been written in the 1890s out of the UK if I could get my hands on them. So there was that whole effort of just doing the research. And then there was the meeting with and hearing the stories hearing the testimony, the bearing witness of the people who had experienced some aspect of cast that I was attempting to convey somehow. I mean, listening, you know, very deeply to the testimony of people that I might have been seeking out or might have come across in the process of working on this. Or even before I began actively working on it. And then the effort to with reluctance to think about what were the examples that might be helpful to readers from my own experience to show in some ways the irony that even as you're working on something, you yourself are experiencing the phenomenon yourself. And so those were the many things that I was managing and juggling as I was putting this together. But the main goal is to amass and to pull together as much as I possibly can. I try not to worry so much about making the decisions in the moment of amassing the information. And then I start to get into the writing and when you can get into the flow, you recognize what is necessary. I mean, one of the things about it is I really wanted it to be very concise, but the more that I got into it, the more I was discovering and it grew much bigger than I had anticipated, but it became necessary in order to create a comprehensive framework for understanding this phenomenon and how it manifests throughout whatever caste system one might be looking at. You know, there's been a lot of criticism of historical storytelling that seems to feed like basically using history to feed a particular perspective or narrative, the author is trying to tell and that kind of what some people call cherry picking of history can be dangerous because it doesn't give a kind of a fuller broader perspective, as you know, this has been one of the critiques of the 1619 Project. What do you think of that critique? Do you think there is real legitimacy in the danger of perhaps cherry picking a story and is such a way that just tries to make an ideological point? Well, I think that so much of the history that we have received as Americans has been from a singular perspective. And we are only now beginning to hear the voices of people who have been in the shadows not seen not heard and that means that we have not had the full history. We have not had the full experience of knowing what the complete picture is of our country. And I think that we are beginning only beginning to be able to hear from the voices of people who had not been heard before. I can only obviously speak for the work that I'm doing and I would say that the goal is for the warmth of the science, for example, was a chance finally for people who had survived the Jim Crow caste system to be able to speak for themselves about their experience. There are many, many things that have been written about that era by others. And this was a chance to be able to hear from the people who had lived it before it was too late. And many of the people who, in the process of even doing that book, they actually passed away in the process. So this was a, you know, the clock was ticking every day and every week that I was working on it. So this is an effort to allow people's voices to be heard. And I think that we can only benefit from hearing multiple experiences from people who haven't been heard before. This has been amazing. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you. Thank you for writing this book. Thank you. Take care. And that's it for this week on NPR's book the day. If you want more, you can sign up for our newsletter at NPR dad work slash newsletter slash books. I'm Andrew Limbaugh, the podcast is produced by Kelly wessinger and edited by Megan Sullivan and Taylor Bernie. Big shout out to our intern fi O'Reilly, who helped with research, our founding editor is Petra Mayer. The show elements this week were produced and edited by Gemma waters, prompting Arab Louie, run Abdel Fattah, Jamie York, Lawrence Wu, lane Kaplan Levinson, Julie keen, Kia meakan attis, and Natalie Barton. Bath Donovan is.

UK Cass wade United States India Jim Crow NPR Andrew Limbaugh Kelly wessinger Megan Sullivan Taylor Bernie Petra Mayer Gemma waters Reilly Arab Louie Abdel Fattah Jamie York Lawrence Wu lane Kaplan Levinson Julie keen
"petra mayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Over 300 of their favorite picks from the whole year Here to tell us about it is arts and culture editor roast Friedman Hey rose Hey David The headline this year let's start I mean you've changed the name Yes it's now called books we love but you know we've been doing this since 2013 when it was called the book's concierge And if you know it and love it it's got the same structure It's a grid of about 370 books They were all chosen by NPR staff and outside critics And then we have ways to filter and sort through them so it's easy to find something for whatever you're taste is And I should say it's on NPR's homepage but you can also find it at NPR or slash books we love Okay news you can use what's in there this year Okay well tons But since I knew that I'd be talking to you about it and because we're Friends I thought I'd look for something that you would like So there's this whole system of different tags like book club ideas or historical fiction but I know that you're a curious person So I clicked on eye opening reads And then I added nonfiction And then just for fun I hit tales from around the world that gave me a list of about 15 books So hit me Any I might like Okay so the one I thought you'd get a kick out of is called a most remarkable creature the hidden life and epic journey of the world's smartest Birds of Prey So this is kind of delightfully written by a rock musician named Jonathan meiburg And he gets obsessed with this bird that's only found in the Falkland Islands or the malvinas islands off the coast of Argentina And it's just full of these fun weird facts about this bird It likes to steal things like hats and shoes from humans And because they're so smart they can do things like start a fire and then eat all the animals who run away from the fire Apparently Darwin wrote about them but since then my Berg seems to be kind of the first person to really do a deep dive So the point is that anyone can go in and click on a combination of tags and find something fun to read All right so that's great What are some of the other tags in there Well the most popular tag by far is always staff picks And this year we got a little glimpse into what kind of year the NPR staff was having You know we sent out the call in the organization to participate and 9 different people recommended the same romance It's called people we meet on vacation It's a retelling of when Harry met Sally You know in the end we can only let one person do the write up for each book that was producer Anjali sastry But you know just a fun totally non scientific study of what and Pierre staffers were up to in a year when I think everybody needed a love story So obviously as we said you don't really use the word best now but come on Are these the best books of the year So the answer to that question has to do with a beloved and important colleague who we just lost at NPR Petra Mayer was our books editor and she died suddenly about two weeks ago and we all just desperately miss her And she was really the person who made sure that NPR covered all kinds of books especially science fiction fantasy and romance She loved genre fiction and she took it really seriously Petra would always say that there is no best book There are great books for each reader And whatever you like to read is what NPR should be helping you find So she was really involved in this year's books we love She worked on it every year and it's kind of in the spirit of Petra that we don't do best We do the greatest books for you whatever you want to read In the spirit of a woman who loved books I've been talking to NPR arts and culture editor.

NPR Jonathan meiburg malvinas islands Falkland Islands Anjali sastry David Berg Argentina Darwin Petra Mayer Sally Pierre Harry Petra
"petra mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"And I do feel like the kind of loud, angry, entitled, fan reaction tends to come from dudes. Maybe I'm opening myself up to an Internet beat down now. But fan fiction, which I think of as a much more constructive way to engage with a property, like the fix it fick is a pretty standard trope or like you don't like something about personally I'm a Doctor Who fan, we all know this. I hate the fact that Donna was mind wiped at the end of her season. So there's a million fix out there where somebody writes her recovering from the mind wipe and going off to be a time lord with the time lord half of her brain intact, right? That's awesome. We want that to happen. And I feel like that's the Providence of non male fans. This more constructive engagement rather than screaming for the creator to change something, you say, I'm just going to do this myself. Yeah, yeah. What you don't want to be gender essentialist here, but there is something also queer about taking a narrative and distorting it and making it reflect you or it tends to come from people who frequently don't see themselves in those narratives. She was so smart. So smart. And I don't think that you can talk about Petra's pop culture loves without talking a little bit about great British bake off. A lot of people loved great British bake off, not a lot of people taught themselves how to make a Charlotte Royale, which is that slimy dome thing that looks like a brain with the jelly roll slices on the outside. Exactly. Watch that. Petra learned how to make a lot of things they made on great British bake off. She made the queen aman, those really elaborate muffy looking croissant Y looking things. Didn't she make a meat pie? I think she made a great many things that were featured on bake off here. She's talking a little bit about her love of bake off. Bake off is so gentle and comforting compared to American reality. I love hell's kitchen. Don't get me wrong, but there's a lot more yelling. With bake off, I feel like these people are my Friends. And I want to just go spend time with them. And the way that they interact and they help each other and they sit there with their mugs of tea and if one person needs help sliding their enormous three tiered cheesecake onto the cake stand, they'll gather around and help them, and it's just. It's like a prisoner happy for those for those who can't see us right now. Petra kind of put her hands together under her chin and kind of slightly gazed heavenward and just twinkled. She did. It's just like a big fluffy blanket that I want to wrap around myself. That's true. And it's also inspired people to bake. I made a Charlotte Royale. Just the greatest Glenn talked a little bit about what stage you're in. We've all talked about trying to find our way through this particular mix of personal grief and professional loss and sometimes you find after people are gone that they have left help for you on how to cope. We actually spoke to Petra at one point about pop culture and grief. And she shared some thoughts about her sources of comfort and it's a pretty remarkable clip I want to play it for you..

Charlotte Royale Petra fick Donna Providence Glenn
"petra mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Were both really into nail polish and I remember at one point being like, God, I just can't paint my right hand. And she was like, who cares? Just enjoy the way it looks as it is. Yeah. And I was like, I was like, Petra. And that was very much like, do you like this color on your fingernails? Put it on? Which is how she was about books. Are you interested in the dragon romance with the policeman? Enjoy. So we had just a lot of these things that were very much, you know, where we really intersected, even though we didn't actually work directly together all the time. And you know, I have to say, you know, way before, again, either of us were in books. We sort of looked out for each other in that way, and I have such a fond memory of when I was on maternity leave with my first baby. I sleep trained him while reading Game of Thrones. This was before the series. I think you mean a song of ocean fire, Barry. Exactly. That's exactly what I mean. before dance with dragons. I remember, you know, we were emailing one day and I was still at home and not back at the office, and I was like, I don't know what I'm going to do. I got to sit in that room and I got to stay up all night and I'm at the end of ice and fire and I need something and she got me and it was really hard to get the galley because it was such a big situation. And she sent it home with a friend of mine who showed up and said, this is from and as she held up the book to me. I was like, oh, it's from Petra. She really looked out for other people's loves and interests and what they needed. And she was just sort of a caretaker of your loves. Yeah. You know? Yeah, Steven, she was a caretaker of some of your loves I know. Gosh, yeah. I mean Glenn, I think really touched on this, how hard it is to parse out my personal grief with my grief on behalf of the network. And what a loss it is for NPR, but for me, in terms of what stage of grief I'm in, I'm still really swimming in just the personal loss. This was my good friend. This is my neighbor. This is my colleague. This is my Pokémon go friend. We did raids together. She baked a cake shaped like a chicken and brought it to my Super Bowl party, which is also a fried chicken eating contest. Yeah, she did. Absolutely amazing baker..

Petra Barry Steven Glenn NPR swimming baker
"petra mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"NPR music, hi Steven. Hey, Linda. Also, with us, is Glenn Weldon of NPR's culture desk high Glenn. Hey, Linda. Also joining us is our friend Barry Hardman, senior editor at NPR investigations. Thanks for being here, very high. So we are sharing some very sad news today. We're so sorry to have to share with you that our panelists and our friend Petra mayor, who was an NPR books editor and a treasured fourth chair for us died suddenly on Saturday of what's believed to be a pulmonary embolism. On today's episode of NPR's pop culture, happy hour, we wanted to take some time to remember Petra. Petra was 46, she had been at NPR for more than 20 years. She had most recently been working on the culture desk, but she also directed and produced for NPR radio shows. She's one of those people who's had half the jobs at NPR. If you followed the wonderful growth of NPR books in recent years a lot of that was Petra, she worked on the summer reader polls, which are one of those massive projects that everybody loves that you can't always see all the enormous amount of work that go into them. She was instrumental in developing the book concierge, which is so beloved, which same thing. She edited book reviews, she brought in new critics and she was also I think the main voice of NPR books on social media. Boy, she had a ton of passions, romance fiction, science fiction, Doctor Who, the great British bake off, her cats, her friends, her family. It is a lousy and awful loss. Glenn you and I have talked about how instrumental Petra's interest in genre fiction was to the way NPR coverage evolved. Yeah, absolutely. And first up I want to say, I think Stephen will touch on this, but I am so grateful to this show that so many people had the chance to get a sense of the Petra that for sure. We all knew here, so smart so funny, so passionate..

NPR Petra Glenn Weldon Barry Hardman Petra mayor Linda NPR radio Glenn pulmonary embolism Steven Stephen
"petra mayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Celeste Hedley. I'm Peter O Dowd. I'm Scott Tong. It's here and now, alright. Brief break from the overwhelming news cycle. The talk a little about books. August can usually be a slow time for new releases. Not this year. We have Petra Mayer of NPR books here to tell us about a few of them. Hey, Petra, Hi. It's always fun to be here with you guys. And what's up with this August? Why the new releases now? You know, I can only say it's maybe that time has no meaning right now, and we're all just stuck inside the endless Whatever. What month is it? I don't know. August is usually pretty dead. But there are a lot of really great releases this month. Interesting. Well, okay onto your selections. First up, we have the book against white feminism. It's by Rafia Zakaria. That's a provocative title. It sure is. That's going to get the hackles up on your inner Karen. But, you know, just sit down, Take a breath and deal with it. All right. Because sure mainstream Western feminism has as refuse. Ikaria is reminding us here it has always been for and about white women are concerns. Our agendas have always have been taken as universal. We have been sidelining and talking over black and brown women for as long as feminism has existed, and that is messed up, and it's done terrible damage in the world, and it needs to be torn down. And Zakaria pretty much lays it out in these eight essays showing how the kind of white feminism that we have today has evolved. And then you know, Zakaria shows us how to break that all down and to rebuild a feminism that includes everyone. That isn't just this default. Women versus men structure that assumes that all the pieces on the border white. It's not a comfortable book. But who needs to be comfortable But a book for the moment? Armaments? Exactly. You also have a memoir seeing ghosts by Kat Chow. An exploration of grief and the lives of several generations in her Chinese family. I actually this is a topic I know about. I've written a book about this as well. Why does this appeal to you? I have to say this is NPR's own cat Chow. Um, I have to disclose my own personal interest because I love cat. She's a wonderful person and are really great writer. Yeah, I kind of can't wait to see what you think of this book. You know, I was a show producer for a long time on NPR. And all those years I couldn't listen to public radio because it was like To close. But I think that you will love this book, because, actually, it's cats experience. I think in radio that makes it so lovely to read. She puts you in the scene so directly. I mean, this is a story about coming to terms with, you know her grief for her mother's death and will been through it. Is the story of her mother's life and her marriage, and this could be a heavy story. But it's got this marvelous mixture of poetry and dry humor. You know, it's like it starts with this story about. She's a little kid, and they're in Maine on vacation. And they're at l. L bean and she gets scared by the taxidermy bear that's at the L. L. Bean in Maine and her mom is like you know what? I die? Well, you stuff me. Oh, and then she sort of has this idea about like being a grown up and like drinking orange juice in her kitchen with her taxidermy them all. Yeah, but it's also beautifully evocative, right like and coming back to this idea of being a radio writer, radio writers put you in the scene and reading her book. You can taste that orange juice. You can hear the newspaper Russell. You can Feel the living room carpet under your hand. This is just a lovely, lovely book. Yeah, well, all right, So you and I will gather to talk after I read this. And share our our thoughts. Okay, Let's turn a fiction here on your list. You have my heart is a chainsaw by Stephen Graham Jones. Okay. What a title. Yeah. Even if you don't like horror, which I super do not you should still make time for Stephen Graham Jones book. And this one is great. It's about a girl named jade and living in a small rural lake town. She's half Native American. Her father is an abuse of jerk. Her mom is gone. She's kind of an outcast, and all she cares about in life is slasher movies. They're like the frame that she sees her whole life through and she like, narrates her whole life as a slasher movie. Right? So you know that. Of course, there's actually going to be a murder, you know, and it's going to hit like the rich people that live in the gentrified end of her town, and she's seen so many slasher movies that she like immediately assumes that something Terrible is going on beyond just a murder, and she figures out what's actually going to happen, and Stephen Graham Jones does something that's super genius here, which is that like if you haven't seen any horror movies, it doesn't matter because jade Is always like recognizing and calling out the troops that she sees happening. I love stuff, right if you don't have the narrative arc, she gives it to right. Yeah, Yeah, yeah, I still don't like horror movies, though. I mean, I'm awards. They give me nightmares, but I'll read a Stephen Graham Jones book any day. Yeah, I'm with you on yesterday book and no to the film's Okay, Now I understand you're a fan of sci fi fantasy. You betcha. In your next pick by Jordan. If Lecco falls into that basket, what stands out here? Okay, So I have to cop to the fact that they're only halfway through this book because I wanna tell it's only on the radio. Yeah, because I love the main character carry size so much, and I'm at that part of any fantasy sequel where everything is going wrong, and it looks bad and it's so stressful and I can't bear it. Had to put the book down and go do something else. But the reviewer that I have assigned to this book just emailed me, and they said they're going to file their peace soon and they loved the book. So I'm feeling encouraged. I'm going to go back to it soon. Yeah. What's going to make you get back to it? What is going to allow you back in? Ray bearer, which is the first book came out last summer. It was one of those occasional books that fall through the cracks. And when I discovered it weeks after everyone else did I wanted to kick myself because it's this brilliant, fresh young adult fantasy from a Nigerian American author. It's about a girl. Whose mysterious mother sends her to kill the crown prince of their country, And instead she discovers her own powers, and she ends up becoming the empress alongside him. And that's where we find her in the second book. Only now, Of course, she's having to actually rule and she's dealing with this dangerous treaty that she made in the first book and Angry spirits and her friends are all getting weird, And that's kind of where I know it out. So, like stressful like, please be okay, Terrace. I please be okay. Well, you know, it's so much easier to take power. Yeah, right now you have to deal with it. Now you're in charge. Yeah, but I'm going to come back to it because I know that this character is so Interesting and complex and well rounded underneath it all smart and competent that I know she can do it, so I'll come back to watch her handle things on the topic of sci fi and fantasy..

Celeste Hedley Petra Mayer Peter O Dowd Kat Chow Scott Tong Petra Zakaria Maine Karen Stephen Graham Jones Jordan Rafia Zakaria Ikaria Lecco second book NPR August first book First last summer
"petra mayer" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on WBUR

"I'm Celeste Hedley. I'm Peter O Dowd. I'm Scott Tong. It's here and now, alright, brief break from the overwhelming news cycle to talk A little about books. August can usually be a slow time for new releases. But not this year. We have Petra Mayer of NPR books here to tell us about a few of them. Hey, Petra, Hi. It's always fun to be here with you guys. And what's up with this? Saugus? Why the new releases now? You know, I can only say it's maybe that time has no meaning right now, and we're all just stuck inside the endless Whatever. What month is it? I don't know. August is usually pretty dead. But there are a lot of really great releases this month. Interesting. Well, okay onto your selections. First up, we have the book against white feminism. It's by Rafia Zakaria er, That's a provocative title. It sure is. That's going to get the hackles up on your inner Karen. But, you know, just sit down, Take a breath and deal with it. All right. I mean, because short, mainstream Western feminism has as refuse Ikaria is reminding us here it has always been for and about white women are concerns or agendas have always have been taken as universal. We have been sidelining and talking over black and brown women for as long as feminism has existed, and That is messed up, and it's done terrible damage in the world, and it needs to be torn down. And Zakaria pretty much lays it out in these eight essays showing how the kind of white feminism that we have today has evolved. And then you know, Zakaria shows us how to break that all down and to rebuild a feminism that includes everyone that isn't just this default, women versus men structure that assumes that all the pieces on the border white. It's not a comfortable book, but who needs to be comfortable but a book for the moment. Yes, exactly. You also have a memoir, Seeing ghosts by Kat Chow, an exploration of grief and the lives of several generations in her Chinese family. I have to tell you, this is Topic I know about. I've written a book about this as well. Why does this appeal to you? I have to say this is NPR's own cat Chow. I have to disclose my own personal interest because I love cat. She's a wonderful person. And a really great writer. Yeah, I kind of can't wait to see what you think of this book. You know, I was a show producer for a long time on NPR. And all those years I couldn't listen to public radio because it was like To close. But I think that you will love this book, because, actually, it's cats experience. I think in radio that makes it so lovely to read. She puts you in the scene so directly. I mean first, this is a story about coming to terms with, you know her grief for her mother's death and woven through it. Is the story of her mother's life and her marriage, and this could be a heavy story. But it's got this marvelous mixture of poetry and dry humor. You know, it's like it starts with this story about she's a little kid, and they're in Maine on vacation. And they're at l. L bean and she gets scared by the taxidermy bear. That's at the L L bean. Me. Her mom is like you know what? I die? Well, you stuff me. Oh, and then she sort of has this idea about like being a grown up and like drinking orange juice in her kitchen with her taxidermy mom. Yeah, but it's also beautifully evocative, right? Like And coming back to this idea of being a radio writer. Radio writers put you in the scene and reading her book. You can Taste that orange juice. You can hear the newspaper Russell. You can feel the living room carpet under your hand. This is Just a lovely, lovely book. Yeah, well, all right, So you and I will gather to talk after I read this, uh and share our thoughts. Okay, Let's turn a fiction here on your list You have my heart is a chainsaw by Stephen Graham Jones. Okay. What a title. Yeah, even if you don't like horror, which I super do not. You should still make time for Stephen Graham Jones book And this one is great. It's about a girl named jade and living in a small rural lake town as she is half native American. Her father is an abusive jerk. Her mom is gone. She's kind of an outcast, and all she cares about in life is slasher movies. They're like the frame that she sees her whole life through. And she like narrates her whole life as a slasher movie. Right. So you know the Of course, there's actually going to be a murder, you know, and it's going to hit like the rich people that live in the gentrified end of her town, and she's seen so many slasher movies that she like immediately assumes that something Terrible is going on beyond just a murder, and she figures out what's actually going to happen? And Stephen Graham Jones does something that's super genius here, which is that like if you haven't seen any horror movies, it doesn't matter because Jade is always like recognizing and calling out the troops that she sees happening. I love stuff like Yeah, right. If you don't have the narrative arc, she gives it to you, right? Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, I still don't like horror movies, though. I mean, I'm a once they give me nightmares, but I'll read a Stephen Graham Jones book any day. Yeah, I'm with you on yesterday book and no to the film's Okay, Now I understand you're a fan of sci fi fantasy. You betcha. In your next pick by Jordan. If Lecco falls into that basket, what stands out here? Okay, So, um, I have to cop to the fact that they're only halfway through this book because I won't tell. It's only on the radio. Yeah, because I love the main character tarry size so much, and I'm at that part of any fantasy sequel where everything is going wrong, and it looks bad and it's so stressful and I can't bear it and had to put the book down and go do something else. But the reviewer that I have assigned to this book just emailed me, and they said they're going to file their peace soon and they loved the book. So I'm feeling encouraged me to go back to it soon. Yeah. What's going to make you get back to it? What is gonna well back in Ray bearer, which is the first book came out last summer. It was one of those occasional books that fall through the cracks..

Celeste Hedley Peter O Dowd Petra Mayer Kat Chow Scott Tong Petra Zakaria Maine Lecco Karen Ikaria Rafia Zakaria Jordan Stephen Graham Jones NPR this year August Jade yesterday First
"petra mayer" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"And I'm Peter O doubt we take a look at the evolution of Americans views on drug addiction. What really changed was the opioid epidemic that began to affect people across all races and especially white people, especially people in rural communities. And we get some cool summer read picks from NPR's Petra Mayer. That's next time on here. Now. That's this afternoon at two o'clock right after fresh air on W B E Z Chicago Going to be a rainy afternoon with a high near 83 degrees. Today. We're expecting heavy rainfall tonight and it will continue into Friday and Friday night. This is 91.5 W B E Z. This is fresh air. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead has a review of the two final albums from bassist Mario Provan, who died May 15th. He was 80 over his career. Pavane work with diverse leaders, including Paul Blake, Bill Dixon, Anthony Braxton and Thomas Shaping. Besides recording over two dozen records of his own Kevin says Pavane connected with many excellent musicians and his last albums run true to form. Last winter. Knowing his time on Earth was growing short basis. Mario Pavan resolved to.

Paul Blake Bill Dixon Anthony Braxton Mario Provan Thomas Shaping Kevin Whitehead Mario Pavan Petra Mayer Kevin May 15th Friday Pavane Today 80 Friday night tonight NPR two final albums Earth Last winter
"petra mayer" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Bring me away down there by That is such a good movie. That's it. That is a movie too much over and over. OK, so that's the thing about the bio pics like coal Miner's daughter. You can watch him. They don't they don't they don't expire. You don't expect they don't explain why we love him. We love them. Okay, so we were just talking about Anthony Pellicano. Okay. So just the Daily Mail said he's already deep in with several movie executives doing his thing suppressing gossip. Well, it's already happened with the cover of writing Kill Silver Paid Ron Meyers M. E. Y. E. R. Petra Mayer as $1.7 million dead at a Las Vegas casino. And if you remember Ron Meyer resigned his head of NBC Universal in all this for sex scandal and also and also all this death stuff, and he started see a agency, which is big agency. But didn't I talent scandal about Ron Meyers is gambling. Yes, and his daughter married Tobey Maguire. Yep. And they had the big gambling thing. Molly's game, press them, And that is a hot movie to watch to a Netflix If you want to watch a great movie, but Anyhoo so and power, he's involved in this story. Laurie already so he's working for Silver. Okay, so Joel Silver's trying to make it the basically He's He's almost busted with using company money to pay off a gambling thing for a foreign exec went all the people that work there have probably taking pay cuts and 41 14 2014, so he paid off. Right had of our bait and NBC's who gambling Dad because he had a distribution deal with them, and he used the front money from the movie nonstop, stirring Liam Neeson. It's so juicy. This is good. This is good, juicy stuff the he should be fired for it. All of that, just that kind of financial, big, rich money shenanigans. I hate that I had and I really do. It's so rotten to the core, though. You know what I mean? Is anyone march 2 had to handle on Netflix. Have you heard about that show? Laurie? No, but that's my nickname. That's gonna be her shirt for the fair that everyone's gonna go to her side to someone about it last night. They said the clouds are gonna be all right. Just like they might have to cap daily people that even get to go to the fair next year. Yeah, and and I said, Well, you know, Now you're gonna have two shirts. Those the front will say. You are to handle in the back will say only head crabs once right. It's a claim to fame. Let me ask Draco quick. What's your favorite bio pic movie? I'd have to think about, though that is a good one. Laurie. I mean, you can have, like a top three or something. But like for me is right away Coal Miner's daughter when I even seen that one since it came out whenever lied. I know you love that 10. It's epic, you know. See space You love that one. You know that adds these basics. Dad is live on hell. From you know the band. He plays her dad. Yeah, I do like there's one called. I'm not there about Bob and I'm a big Bob Dylan guy. That's kind of fun. Yeah, which it's kind of a weird one, right where people different people play Bob in different areas of his life, and it's pretty weird. What's that good? I like it a lot. I don't think it's for everybody. But Did you land the bomba? Great. I'm going to go out. And Laurie, I love La Bamba. And I watched that whenever it done I think that movie is great. I like the dirt. The motley crew. That was pretty good. That was so good. I liked Amadeus. That's quite a bio pic from I'm gonna give you my because they represent Bohemian Rhapsody. There you go. That's a band and the one and Elton John Rocket man That was so good, so good. Really. I love that. I love a good one, You know, by bio pic. Did you like you like? Get on up. Lori Chadwick Boseman is amazing as um James Brown, James Brown and be good. You have like such First of all, like that would be a good movie to see Just because I mean how he grew up and the racism in the horrible you know, and he was like, I don't know. He must have been a boy in the thirties. I mean, just It's really hey is an unbelievable story and Chadwick Boseman. If you think about it, he In such a short acting career. Really? He played glad he got nominated for the golden robes and everything with for two. So, Forman so this is kind of interesting, so I just pulled up top. 50 bio pics. Number one is rocket man. Number two's The buddy Holly story. Now. Does anyone remember round midnight? Second jazz one, right? Yeah. And then Amadeus from 1990. Right now, that was so good. That was because we'd never really even thought about motor No in a modern like Vic as a human being. Besides Harpsichord in the piano. No, really. It was kind of that. What's love Got to do with it. Angela Bassett, Lord Laurence Fishburne, Bob Oscar that you're behind the candle candelabra comes up. Oh, that was great. Are you kidding me? Rob Lowe is the plastic surgeon and Michael Douglas Michael Douglas, his liberal Richie that was epic. Matt David, you as lover Straight out of Compton. That's good. That was good going to sit in Nancy Gary Oldman played him. Lori that's hold. I mean, that's from 1986. I thought about doing a vintage scandal on them because they're just where they found another. Like there is just another story about another clue in that whole mystery. Then they died of a heroin overdose. Yes, but I mean, it's very Shrouded lots of Mystery gossiping and pain. There was a murder. Yes, exactly. Cash. Some of these will call minor daughters is number 23 Walk the line and the line of court and the one where, you know, Um What's your name? Jessica. Oh, the place back to class. Yes. Sweet dreams. We dream that grade I was gonna say,.

Laurie Lori Chadwick Boseman Joel Silver Netflix Bob Anthony Pellicano Ron Meyer Ron Meyers Tobey Maguire Ron Meyers M. E. Y. E. R. Petr NBC NBC Universal Bob Dylan Liam Neeson James Brown Las Vegas Nancy Gary Oldman heroin Elton John Rocket murder
"petra mayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"San Carlos 43 in San Francisco. Right now, it's 46 degrees. This is KQED public radio. The time is 8 46. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Layla fold in and I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public Domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway in The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's and it, Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say Hey, my high school kids, an amazing musician. And guess what, In another Rhapsody in Blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involved lots of lawsuits. And I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait..

Nick That Michael Ferris Smith Jennifer Jenkins Gatsby YouTube NPR News Steve Inskeep KQED NPR San Carlos Flashman Glenn Fleishman Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway San Francisco Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran Carraway
"petra mayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on KCRW

"Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public Domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway in The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's and Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School, she says a lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say Hey, why high school kids, an amazing musician, and guess what, you know now that Rhapsody in Blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Pro. Off it, Jenkins says. The works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more? Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits, and I think it makes people worry Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait. Months.

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins YouTube Nick That Nick Carraway Glenn Fleishman Inskeep. Khalil Gibran Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway NPR Congress Duke Law School Flashman director
"petra mayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of KQED. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Layla fold in and I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public Domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway in The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say, Hey, my high school kids, an amazing musician. And guess what, you know now that Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involved lots of lawsuits. And I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait..

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That NPR News Steve Inskeep Nick Carraway KQED NPR YouTube Flashman Glenn Fleishman Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director
"petra mayer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on KCRW

"And I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year. Among other things. January 1st is public domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago, so everybody is free to rewrite. Remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years, it didn't happen. 1998 Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway and The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Farris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say, Hey, my high school kids, an amazing musician. And guess what, you know now that Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits. And I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait. Months.

Nick Michael Farris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That Steve Inskeep Nick Carraway YouTube Flashman NPR Glenn Fleishman Petra Mayer Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director
"petra mayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"petra mayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Possible. Rita Chatterjee. NPR news, among other things. January 1st is public domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago. So everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway and The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say Hey, why high school kids, an amazing musician, and guess what. Another Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits and I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait..

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That NPR Nick Carraway Rita Chatterjee YouTube Flashman Petra Mayer Glenn Fleishman Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director