17 Burst results for "Peter Sokolow"

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:32 min | 4 months ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Word of the day for december eleventh. Today's word is. Contraband spelled c. o. N. t. r. a. b. a. n. d. Contraband is a noun that means illegal or prohibited traffic in goods smuggling it can also mean goods or merchandise whose importation exportation or possession is forbidden. Also smuggled goods it can also mean a slave who during the american civil war escaped to or was brought within the union lines. Here's the word used in a sentence. The officers searched the car for weapons drugs and other contraband. Contraband first appeared in english in the early. Fifteen hundreds as a borrowing of the italian word concert obando. This italian word can be traced back to the medieval latin word contraband whom a combination of contra meaning against and home meaning decree bow. Neum is germanic in origin and is related to the old high german word banana meaning to command and also related to the middle english word. Bannon meaning to summon or to curse the source of the english verb ban which now means to prohibit but which once also meant to curse with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolow ski visit marian webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending look ups..

Bannon peter sokolow marian webster
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam Webster's word of the day four February eighteenth. Today's word is prestigious also pronounced prestigious and spelled P R E S T I G I O U S. Prestigious is an adjective that has an archaic meaning of relating to or marked by illusion conjuring or trickery. Prestigious can also mean having an illustrious name or reputation esteemed in general opinion. Here's the word used in a sentence. Karla was overjoyed to receive an acceptance letter from the prestigious university. You may be surprised to learn that the word prestigious had more to do with trickery than with respect when it was first used in the fifteen hundreds the earliest now archaic meaning of the word was of relating to or marked by illusion conjuring or trickery prestigious comes to us from the Latin word price. Stieg, yo cease meaning full of tricks or deceitful, the words prestige and prestigious are related, of course, though, not as directly as you might think they share a Latin ancestor, but they entered English by different routes prestige, which was borrowed from French in the seventeenth century, initially meant a conjurers trick. But in the nineteenth century, it developed an extended sense of blinding or dazzling influence that change in turn influenced prestigious, which now means simply illustrious or esteemed with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolow s-k-y. Is it Mary and Webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups.

Merriam Webster Peter Sokolow Karla Stieg Mary
"peter sokolow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:35 min | 2 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This week thousands of passengers were grounded as police struggled to stop the drone or drones from flying into restricted airspace. Police have arrested two suspects in connection with the incident. NPR's Jeff Broomfield reports and why it's so hard to catch your drone. If you haven't been keeping up with drone technology while you're not alone. I had no idea how small they got him. I will draw in in my purse there's a drone in here. That's one of about a bazillion drone on boxing videos. You can find on YouTube. In addition to shrinking groans are also getting more powerful and they're flying for longer and further than ever. Is batteries will also give you about twenty seven minutes of flight time pretty long time. Actually, the authorities at Gatwick airport near London discovered all of this for themselves on Wednesday when a small drone shut down the airport again, and again it flew into restricted airspace around the runway police arrived a helicopter was called in and yet the drone or possibly several drugs. Police are sure it couldn't be stopped. Now. The solution might seem obvious why not shoot it down. Well, there's an answer for that also on YouTube. This is video of a bunch of guys at a gun range near so now trying to hit a drone. They get it eventually, but obviously we should that kind of firepower than airport in the London suburbs would be extremely dangerous developing technology to safely stop drones is becoming big business. Arthur Michelle is co director of the center for the study of the drone at Bard college. In New York, he says everyone from small startups to established military contractors are getting in the game with technologies to bring down. Drones. We've seen things like water cannons lights and lasers to dazzle the drums. Senses. Some companies are even developing other drones to crash into the trespassing drones. But Michelle says given all the different shapes and sizes that today's drones come in. There is no single technique for detecting drones. All fall, bringing them out of the sky that is going to be a one hundred percent effective against one hundred percent of drones in one hundred percent of cases. A Gatwick airport. The military eventually had to be called in. According to press reports they deployed and Israeli made system known as drone dome to jam the signal to the drone from its controller. So far, it seems to be working Jeff from feel NPR news. Merriam Webster dictionary publisher has released its annual list verge of the year based on searches of its website at the top of the list. Hold on. Now, we're gonna I turn to Peter Sokolow ski editor at large for marriam Webster. He joins us from W PR and Hartford Connecticut. Peter, thanks for being with us. It's great to be with you to delay the discovery just a bit. How do you come up with a list like this? Well, it is a quantitative measure of curiosity about language, and we recognize that the top most looked up words day in day out year in year out really don't change a lot. They tend to be abstract words often with classical roots? Their words like integrity, and democracy and pragmatic and love the word. Love is one of the top words. And I'm glad to hear that. And what we want to do is explain a little bit more about something about this year that was different from last year. And so we do a year over year comparison to find the top word looked up in the dictionary this year compared with last year, and that's our word of the year. Okay. Well, let's build up to a big crescendo. What's another word of the year? While we have a top ten list of words that spiked because of individual new stories so nationalism was a little bit higher this year overall, but it really spiked in late October when President Trump declared himself to be a nationalist. And that sent many people to the dictionary as the utterances of presidents often do and that word is really number two on the list. Let me ask about another one that a gathers on the list one of my favorites feckless, and you might have to be careful talking. Well, it's an interesting thing because you know, again, we're measuring the language were not really measuring the news. And in this case, the news about the language, and that was Samantha Abe's segment about the Trump administration's immigration policy of separating children, and she used very strong language, indeed. And she used feckless which means kind of worthless to modify another even stronger word, and that got a lot of attention all by itself. I don't want to delay. The mystery any longer. What is the most looked up word our word of the year for twenty eighteen is Justice. It was the top look up throughout the year. And how do you explain that? Well, what's interesting to us is that this was a word that was just below the radar in terms of our data. We usually look at the top twenty twenty-five words, this word was hovering more like at the thirty five position for almost every day of the year. And that's really because of all of the stories when you think about issues of racial, Justice, social Justice and criminal Justice that have been in the news. And of course, the Justice department itself and all of the stories that were tach to Jeff Sessions and to the Muller investigation. We had a particular spike on the term obstruction of Justice after President Trump tweeted his request to the attorney general to end the Mueller investigation. And of course, the where Justice is also a word that we use for judge or title for judge. And of course, the cavenaugh hearing exactly that was another point of interest. And so what we saw was. This was a word for many different reasons that was looked up frequently throughout the year. Peter I give you a word I should use in the coming year. One that we've maybe forgotten about or misused or overlooked. I always loved the word Sesikwe pavilion. That's in checked with sixty legs or something. What is it as one given to using long words? You know, I've been called that. I bet you have to. You know, I just love language. Yeah. Well, me too Petersburg lucky at barium Webster. Thanks so much for joining us. Peter happy happy new year. Happy new year to you in the coming year. May you use the word you really love? With Aaron Sorkin for a shutdown wrote a stage adaptation of the Harper Lee novel to kill a Mockingbird didn't go. Well, my first draft to kill a Mockingbird was terrible. Really the best thing that you could say about it was that it was harmless, which is not something that you wanna say about a play this from the man who made the west wing the newsroom and wrote a few good men in the social network. Now, he's taking on a classic that deals with race sexual violence the failures of the legal system and a man who has to navigate all of those. But what does it newer not harmless version of to kill Mockingbird have to say about those themes in two thousand eighteen NPR's? Andrew Limbaugh went to find out after Aaron Sorkin turned in his first draft that terrible harmless one he made a decision. I'm not going to swallow the novel in bubble wrap and gently transferred to a theater wasn't going to be no Marsh or an exercise in style. This is going to be a new play. Don robinson. Yes, I'm Atticus Finch. Yes. Like any adaptation stuff from the original source material gets tweaked slightly in the book. We never get to see Atticus Finch. Meet Tom Robinson. You won't be my lawyer. Very last thing. I won't be a lawyer right now negro man, what teenage girl I wouldn't be going in with a win and hands but compelled the defenders an officer of the court and in that capacity of taking a Sal to give him a best council, which is that you cannot and you must not lead guilty and go to jail for a crime that it did not could not commit quick recap to kill a Mockingbird takes place in nineteen thirties. Alabama. The book is a coming of age story about a little girl named scout witnessing her father Atticus Finch, try to defend a black, man. Tom Robinson, who is being falsely accused of raping a white woman in the book scout Caesar father, the weight any kid might see their dad. Heroic value perfect. The play takes a more measured view, many many years had gone by between the first time. I read the book and reading the book a number of times for this play. And I kept being disappointed inadequacies in the way. The character holds empathy for others above every. Anything else? I was having an easy time relating to. I should say recognizing advocates brand of liberalism, which is almost almost a narcissistic brand of liberalism that. I am going to be so tolerant that I'll tolerate intolerance. It's an idealized version of the world says Latina Richardson Jackson. She plays. Cal Purnea the maid and cook of the Finch house, and she had discussions with playwright Sorkin about the role of the black characters in Mockingbird and had to get their input in a story where the source material largely glosses over them. It is frustrating for cow Purnea that Atticus refuses to see that these people whom he keeps giving all of this credence to being good people are not good people. They just aren't a mob exodus of emotion. Absent facts, absent contemplation, mostly absent responsibility. What they get in return is anonymity. Conscience can be exhausting. It'll keep you up at night. Mob's a place where people go to take a break from the conscience. Here's how Jeff Daniels who plays Atticus sees it, not only Tom Robinson's fate on trial. But so is out of Casses belief in goodness belief and other people belief in generosity, believe indecency civility compassion doing. What's right? All of those things are on trial, and he has to fight for those beliefs to question. Those beliefs is a risky move considering people who love to kill a Mockingbird love to kill a Mockingbird. It won the Pulitzer prize in nineteen sixty one and earlier this year PBS held a nationwide viewers poll and to kill a Mockingbird was voted the most loved novel in American literature to even say that you don't like the book or you think we should teach other bugs, you would think that we have committed some cardinal sin. Kim Parker is an educator at the shady hill school in Cambridge Massachusetts. She's taught to kill a Mockingbird in class. And she's also the co founder of disrupt texts group that challenges educators to think about books in the assumed classroom cannon such as to kill a Mockingbird. There's such an astrologer around that book, it has meant something to my students. Parents when I was teaching white students. I'm and even some black parents also, and they don't wanna think about like, oh, maybe advocates isn't the best example of Justice because he could have done more. But he did it. And yet we still validate him. We hold him up as hero that the advocates of the play isn't completely perfect and righteous from beginning was one of the sticking points in the legal battle that face this production long story short Harper Lee gave permission to the play's producer Scott route into adapt to kill Mockingbird in. Her will Lee appointed Tanya Carter as our personal Representative after Lee died Carter saw draft of the script that she thought deviated too far from the original source material. Well, followed was a long. Back and forth of lawsuits and countersuits in Scott Rudin threatening to have the cast performed the play in the courtroom to prove that attract with the novel. They ended up settling but writer Aaron Sorkin did make some small concessions to his script. I had Atticus in moments of frustration and anger taking the Lord's name in vain. I agreed that Atticus wouldn't do that. I agree that Atticus wouldn't drink alcohol. And I agree that Atticus wouldn't have a shotgun in his closet at the end of the day. Atticus is still Atticus and sixty years later, Mockingbird still has something to teach us people. Don't change sad. But true trust Kostelic religion at Bergen Catholic high school in New Jersey. He took a group of students to see a preview of the show. He says it's worth it. Even though there's a book and a movie to see the lessons of Mockingbird come alive onstage after.

Atticus Finch Aaron Sorkin Peter Sokolow Tom Robinson YouTube Mockingbird Gatwick airport Harper Lee London President Trump NPR Arthur Michelle Jeff Broomfield Merriam Webster dictionary Justice New York Scott Rudin
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Mariam Webster's board of the day for November third. Today's word is sin. You spelled S. I N E W sinew is a noun that means tendon, especially one dressed for use as a cord or thread. It can also mean solid resilient strength or power sin. You can also mean the chief supporting force or mainstay when used in the plural as seen us. Here's the word used in a sentence from Cook's country, this roast from the shoulder was beefy and juicy a thin line of sinew was the only unpleasant distraction. Many parts of the body have come to have figurative meanings in English. One can have an eye for interior design, for example, or lack the stomach for horror films muscle, of course, can mean strength, and so can send you a word for the tissue. That ties muscle to bone. More commonly known as a tendon for awhile you and nerve were used in a synonymous manner for both tendons and nerves but the use of sinew in the use of nerve is now obsolete and nerve in the sense of sinew or tendon is now primarily found only in certain phrases such as strain every nerve which implies making every possible effort the use of sinew to mean, the chief supporting force ties into its anatomical function as a stabilizing unit sinew derives via middle English. From the old English words Sono it's also related to the old high German word Sanal lot, meaning sinew and the. Sanskrit word CIT. Meaning he binds with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolow sqi. Visit Mary Webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word cups.

Mariam Webster Mary Webster Peter Sokolow Cook
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam Webster word of the day for October twenty eighth. Today's word is multitudinous spelled M U L T IT UD. I n o s multitudinous is an adjective that means including a multitude of individuals. It's a synonym of the word populace. It can also mean existing in a great multitude or existing in or consisting of innumerable elements or aspects. Here's the word used in a sentence from the Oregonian by Jamie hail. First and foremost are the hiking trails, which while multitudinous and beautiful are remarkably hard to navigate. The word multitudinous is one of many in English that make use of the combining form multi from the Latin tooth meaning much or many multicolor multifunction in multimillionaire, just a few of the others multitudinous is the kind of highly expressive word that you can rely upon when you want something a little more emphatic than plain old numerous among its synonyms. Are the words multiple and multiple old two more members of the multi family with your word of the day? I'm Peter Sokolow s-k-y. Visit Marian Webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups.

merriam Webster Marian Webster Peter Sokolow Jamie hail
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam Webster of the day for April first. Today's word is Kuku also pronounced cuckoo and spelled C U C K O cuckoo is an adjective that means of relating to or resembling the cuckoo. It can also mean deficient incense or intelligence silly. Here's the word used in a sentence. One of the kids had some cuckoo theory about the house being demolished because of evidence of UFO landing visible in the tiles of its roof. The cuckoo bird is so named for its one note song, which in middle English was represented as Kuku. See, you see, see you in imitation, figurative use of the word cuckoo, which exists as an adjective, meaning crazy or week, and intellect, or common sense. And as a now for a person who can be described as such may be an allusion to the birds eponymous and monotonous call. But it may also be inspired by a peculiar habit exhibited by some species in which a female will lay her eggs in the nest of another bird to be hatched by that bird in old French, the name of the bird puke you see, you see, you also refers to a husband whose wife is unfaithful, that sense is believed to come from the female cuckoo birds habit in some species of changing mates or to the same egg laying habit that influenced English. Figurative use compute is also the source of the English word cuckold with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolow s-k-y. Visit Marian Webster dot com. Today for definitions, wordplay and trending word, look ups.

merriam Webster Kuku Marian Webster Peter Sokolow
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam Webster's or of the day for March nineteen. Today's word is hasher spelled H A C H U R E has sure is a verb that means to denote surfaces in relief as on map by shading with short lines drawn in the direction of slope. Here's the word in a sentence from National Geographic by Greg Miller typographic surveys were done for the first time with compasses and map makers developed new methods for depicting terrain. One method called has shirring used lines to indicate the direction and steepness of slope has shirring is an old map drawing technique that was largely replaced in later years by the use of contour lines or lines that connect points of similar elevation. The word has sure which can also be a noun referring to. One of the short lines used in has shoring comes from the. French ashamed meaning to chop off bore to hash this French word is also the source of the verbs hash, which can mean to chop foods such as meat and potatoes into small pieces among other meanings. And hatch H A T C H meaning to inlay with narrow bands of distinguishable material and to Mark something such as a drawing or engraving with fine closely spaced lines with your word of the day, I'm Peter Sokolow ski. Visit MAry Webster dot com. Today for definitions, wordplay and trending word, look ups.

Merriam Webster Greg Miller Peter Sokolow Mark
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mariam webster's board of the day four february four today's word is blanche spelled b l e n c h blanche's a verb that means to draw back or turn aside from lack of courage to flinch here's the word used in a sentence from the daily telegraph by allison pearson i blanched when my son first introduced me to the initials i r l meaning in real life as opposed to the online world where he and his generation spend so much of their time if a stranger approaches you in a dark alley it might cause you to blend ch do flinch or turn white actually you could do both and both would be considered blend ching because there are two separate verbs spelled b l e n c h in english the blanched that means to flinch derives from blend can and old english word meaning to deceive the blend meaning to turn white is an alteration of blanche b l a and c h from the french adjective blaul meaning white clues to which meaning is intended can often be found in context the flinch used for example is strictly in transitive and often followed by from or at as in blanched from the side of blood or didn't blanche at the sound of thunder the whiten use meanwhile can be in transit if as in his skin blanched with terror or transitive the cold blanched her lips with your word of the day peter sokolow cki visit marion webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word lookouts.

mariam webster allison pearson peter sokolow
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mariam webster's board of the day before december 20th today's word is were combat spelled r e c u m b e n t recumbent is an adjective that means suggestive of repose leaning resting it can also mean lying down recumbent also means representing a person lying down when used of a bicycle recumbent means having the seat positioned so that the riders legs are extended horizontally forward to the pedals and the body is reclined here's the word used in a sentence from the knoxville news sentinel by amy mccreary the exhibit includes a limestone statue of a reconvened lyon carved between three hundred five and thirty b c e if your ready to take your vocabulary lying down you want to be familiar with the synonyms recumbent prone supine and prostrate all of which mean lying down recumbent which derives from the latin prefix ray and the verb koumbouare meaning to lie down focuses on the posture or position native to sleeping or resting prone describe someone who is lying face down as in for example doing pushups supine flips it over suggesting the position of someone lying inert on the back while prostrate implies a fullscale physical collapse or submission regardless of the exact position of the defeated body were combined dating from the 17th century is the newest of the four words the others all entered english before the 16th century with your word of the day on peter sokolow cki visit marion wednesday dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look out.

mariam webster knoxville amy mccreary peter sokolow
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mariam webster's ward of the day for december nineteen today's word is stultify spelled s t u l t i f y stultify is a verb that means to caused to appear or be stupid foolish or absurdly illogical it can also mean to impair invalidate or make ineffective to negate or to have a dulling or inhibiting effect on here's the word used in a sentence what started out as a promising plan to redesign the town square ended up being stultified by bureaucracy and too many conflicting special interests stupid or absurd behaviour can be almost laughable at times that's the kind of situation depicted in an 18 seventy one london daily news article describing how a witness stultified himself by admitting that he was too far off to hear what he had claimed to have heard but there is nothing especially funny the now archaic original usage of stultify the word was first used in the mid seventeen hundreds in legal contexts where if you start to find yourself you claimed to be of unsound mind and thus not responsible for your acts nor is there humor in the most common meaning of stultify today that of rendering some one or something useless or ineffective with your word of the day i'm peter sokolow sky is it marion wednesday dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word lookouts.

mariam webster london daily news peter sokolow
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mary webster's ward of the day for december eighteen today's word is permeable spell p e r m e a b l e permeable is an adjective that means capable of being permeated penetrable especially having pours or openings that permit liquids or gases to pass through here's the word used in a sentence from forbes by troy mcmullan more rigid less permeable foam insulation lines the homes walls to block wind and water from breaching its facade the synonyms permeable and pervious both make good use of the latin prefix per p e r meaning through permeable traces back to a combination of pera p e r and the latin verb may ira meaning to go or to pass whereas the history of pervious calls upon the latin via meaning way both permeable and it's more common relative the verb permeate still retain the original latin idea of passing through pervious also has the connotation of penetrating through but it is also used to describe a susceptible mind as in those said in his ways the professor was pervious to reason the prefix per p e are also gave english pervade meaning to become diffused throughout every part of mary also has other english descendants including cone j c o n g with an accent a rising to the right in acute accent the word came from french which can mean a formal permission to depart or ihreimi a bull i r r e m e a b l e e meaning offering no possibility of return with your word of the day i'm peter sokolow sky.

mary webster troy mcmullan professor peter sokolow
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mary lifters word of the day four october 30th today's word is described by spelled d e s c r y described is a verb that means to catch sight of it can also mean to find out or discover here's the word used in a sentence in their research the psychologists descried an association between violent crime and hot weather with the word described and the more common word decry d e c r y meaning to express strong disapproval of we have a case of linguistic doubledipping that is english borrowed from the same french route twice both words ultimately come from the old french verb decree meaning to proclaim or to decry englishspeakers borrowed the term as described in the fourteenth century and used it to mean to proclaim or to spy out from a distance as a watchman might and eventually simply to catch sight of or to discover meanwhile in french dick the a itself developed into the modern french word meaning to disparage or to decry englishspeakers borrowed this word as decry in the 17th century be careful not to confuse described end decry they may be close relatives but in modern english they do have distinct meanings with your word of the day i'm peter sokolow sky visit marion wednesday dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look out.

englishspeakers marion peter sokolow
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"His mariel posters word of the day for october 25th today's word is overwhelm spelled o v e r w h e l m overwhelm is a verb that means to upset or overthrow it can also mean to cover over completely to submerge or to overcome by superior force or numbers or overwhelmed can mean to overpower in thought or feeling here's the word used in a sentence from traveler by sophie roberts the ships are small enough to maneuver into tricky anchorages and light enough on passengers to not overwhelmed the wildlife or fragile communities they access you could say that the introduction of the word overwhelmed to the english language was a bit redundant the word which originally meant to overturn or upset was formed in middle english by combining the prefix over with the verb wellman which also meant to overturn wellman has survived an english as wellm w h e l m a verb which is largely synonymous with overwhelm since their appearance in the fourteenth century however overwhelm has won over englishspeakers who have come to largely prefer to wellm despite the latter's brevity perhaps the emphatic redundancy of overwhelm makes it seem like the more fitting word for describing the experience of being overcome by powerful forces or feelings with your word of the day i'm peter sokolow cki is it marion wednesday dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending would look at.

sophie roberts wellman peter sokolow cki
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mary webs word of the day for october 14th today's word is palliate spelled p a l l i a t e palliate is a verb that means to reduce the violence of a disease it can also mean to ease symptoms without curing the underlying disease palliate also means to cover by excuses and apologies or to moderate the intensity of here's the word used in a sentence from commentary by matthew continuity he had an ability to describe and champion technological innovation and global integration in a rhetoric that palliative fears of change long ago the ancient romans had a name for the cloak like garb that was worn by the greeks distinguishing it from their own toga the name was paul hume in the fifteen thcentury english speakers modified the late latin word palliatives which derives from pal eu m to form palliate our term used initially as both an adjective and a verb never had the littoral latin cents referring to the cloak you wear but it took on the figurative cloak of protection specifically the verb palliate meant and can still mean to lessen the intensity of a disease the related adjective palliative describes medical care that focuses on relieving pain or discomfort rather than administering a cure with your word of the day on peter sokolow ski visit marion wednesday dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word lookouts.

paul hume medical care matthew peter sokolow
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mariam webster word of the day for october ten today's word is gregarious spelled g r e g a r i o u s gregarious is an adjective that means tending to associate with others of one's kind social it can also mean marked by our indicating a liking for companionship sociable or of or relating to a social group when used of a plant it can mean growing in a cluster or colony and finally gregarious can mean living in contiguous nests but not forming a true money when used especially of wasps and bs here's the word used in a sentence the documentary is filmed inside the boroughs of the gregarious prairie dogs using hitech equipment when you're one of the heard it's tough to avoid being social the eta mogae of the word gregarious reflects the social nature of the flock in fact the word grew out of the latin noun graphics meaning heard or flock when it first began appearing in english texts in the 17th century gregarious was applied mainly to animals but by the eighteenth century it was used for social human beings as well by the way brex gave english a whole flock of other words too including egregious aggregate congregate and segregate with your word of the day on peter sokolow sky visit mariam wednesday dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look at.

mariam webster peter sokolow
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mariam webster's award of the day for october six today's word is bombard spelled b o m b a r d bombard is a verb that means to attack especially with artillery or bombers it can also mean to assail vigorously or persistently as with questions or two subject to the impact of rapidly moving particles such as electrons here's the word used in a sentence after running an editorial supporting the towns controversial plan the newspaper was bombarded with letters and email from residents wishing to voice their opposition in the late middle ages a bombard was a canon used to hurl large stones at enemy fortifications its name which first appeared in english in the fourteen hundreds comes from the middle french word bomba which in turn was probably a combination of the onomatopoeia bomb and the suffix alveda the equivalent to the english a r d the verb bombard blasted onto the english seen in the 17th century with an original meaning of to attack especially with artillery as weapons and technology improved throughout the centuries such artillery came to include things like automatic rifles and bomber aircraft nowadays one can be bombarded figuratively in any number of ways such as by omnipresent advertising messages or persistent phone calls with your word of the day i'm peter sokolow sky is it marion wednesday dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending would look at.

mariam webster peter sokolow
"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolow" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mary of webster's ward of the day for october fifth today's word is vital to berate spelled v i t u b e r a t e vita parade is a verb that means to criticise or censure severely or abusively it can also mean to use harsh condemnatory language here's the word used in a sentence from the national review by j nordlinger hang on let me tell you a story years ago i had a coworker who knew i enjoyed golf and who decided that he would vie to parade golf it's so boring it's such a waste of time who in his right mind would want to play golf fi to parade has several close synonyms including berate and revile berate usually refers to scolding that has drawn out and abusive revile means to attack or criticise in a way prompted by anger or hatred fi to break can be used as a transitive or in transitive verb and adds to the meaning of revile by stressing and attack that is particularly harsh or unrelenting it first appeared in english in the mid 16th century and can be traced back to to latin words the noun vtm meaning fault and the verb parreira a meaning to make or prepare with your word of the day on peter sokolow cki visit marion wednesday dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending would look at.

webster golf peter sokolow