17 Burst results for "Peter Lindbergh"

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on History of the 90s

History of the 90s

06:38 min | 2 weeks ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on History of the 90s

"It's up for debate. But the term supermodel may have first been used by janice dickinson in the nineteen seventy s at least according to dickinson. Maybe you know her. From being the brutally honest judge on america's top model for four seasons but before that she was an incredibly successful model in the seventies and the renowned wild girl of the fashion and disco scene at club fifty four dickinson claims. Not only to be the first supermodel. But that she was also the first person to use the term in about nineteen seventy nine others have given credit for the term to clyde matthew essner the owner of a small model agency in the nineteen forties regardless of when the term was used first. By whom the concept of the supermodel as we know it today didn't really take hold until the late eighties setting the stage. For the iconic supermodel era of the ninety s when a group of beautiful young women transcended the runway and became full service celebrities before we look at the nineties and the supermodels that ruled the runways during that era. Let's go back a little further in fashion history in the nineteen thirties. Forty s and fifty s runway shows put on by designers were very exclusive and according to fashion journalist randy berkman as a result models were largely anonymous to the general public when trashing how who could tour houses were staging shows in the early days. Like in the thirties fifties the sixties even. They were really private affairs. They were just for clients and media. Not even really media like just very very very small. Obviously this is video. But otas were pretty nazi ver- comment and it was a really insular world. Of course there was the occasional model who broke through and became household names. Think twiggy in the nineteen sixties. But it really wasn't until the eighties that models began to infiltrate the mainstream in a noticeable way. And that's partly because of a major industry change. The mass marketing of fashion designer started licensing. Their names and manufacturing moderately priced lines that were affordable to more shoppers. It was no longer just the uber rich wearing the latest. Close from halston ralph lauren. Pierre cardin and calvin klein and with these new accessible lines came big marketing campaigns. Wanna know what comes between me. And my kevin's nothing. Calvin klein jeans this sexy and controversial. Nineteen eighty ad campaign for calvin klein jeans which featured fifteen-year-old brooke shields was banned by abc and cbs. For implying that the young model wasn't wearing any underwear. Calvin klein was the first high fashion designer to launch a separate affordable line called a diffusion line. His skin tight jeans featured a distinctive stitch line on the back along with calvin klein label that distinguished them as a designer status symbol not surprisingly all the controversy over the ads only brought more attention for the brand which sold over seventy million dollars worth of genes in the first year and brooke shields became a household name who pivoted her modelling career to acting. Soon after shields became more than an anonymous face hawking a product. She became a celebrity in her way came other celebrity models in the eighties. L. mcpherson iman jerry hall and christie brinkley and then in january nineteen ninety. The cover of british vogue changed everything you have on that cover stevie crawford prestige hurling team. Linda evangelists naomi campbell. Tatyana teats and you have me basically birth of the super model. That's writer rachel burchfield and she says the iconic cover is the first of three major moments in the evolution of the supermodel going to get to each of them but first let's spend some time looking back at the picture. Let's start at all. The black and white photo on the cover of the january. Nineteen ninety edition of british. Vogue was taken by legendary german photographer. Peter lindbergh lindberg who died in two thousand nineteen at the age of seventy four was known for untouched down images of glamorous leicester's you might be surprised to learn that before making history with that vote cover. Lindbergh captured a similar image for american vogue. That didn't have the same impact in one thousand nine hundred seven. Lindberg received a call from alexander lieberman the creative director of conde nast vogues parent company. He was curious why the photographer never wanted to work for the us version of the magazine. Lindbergh honestly explained that he simply couldn't relate to the images of the over styled women they featured in his words he preferred photos that depicted outspoken adventurous women in control of their own lives. Who weren't concerned about things like social status so lieberman ass lindbergh to show him what he meant in response. Lindbergh went to the beach in santa monica with a group of barely known models. Dressed simply in over-sized white button up shirts. Linda evangelista karen alexander christy. Chillington esta lefebre tatiana. Petites and rachel williams were captured by lindbergh laughing implying around on the beach. The simple images were the antithesis of the formal composition of fashion photography at the time. Those were mainly headshots of heavily made up models when the proofs of the beach shoot arrived at vogue new york office the magazine's editor grace mirabella refused to print the images. She put them in a drawer where they stayed until mirabella was replaced. Six months later by legendary vogue editor anna winter winter. Not only love the pictures. She commissioned lindbergh to shoot the cover for her debut issue with vogue and november nineteen eighty eight it featured israeli.

dickinson clyde matthew essner calvin klein randy berkman janice dickinson brooke shields halston ralph lauren Calvin klein L. mcpherson iman jerry hall stevie crawford Pierre cardin Tatyana teats rachel burchfield Lindbergh Peter lindbergh lindberg christie brinkley american vogue alexander lieberman america
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Thought johanna shared with us. I mean i don't even know because it was just like one thing after another that she was pulling out of their drawers for us to see one of the things that i really really loved is actually one of their signature. Shapes one of their signature shapes is a balloon shape swiss with a little bit fuller and a little bit plumper than some other fans shapes and the examples that she pulled out had exquisitely hand painted little renderings of cat and dog faeces pets on the fans and those have become such a signature of the house that they actually offer kind of modern day twists on them and their contemporary line as well but the ones that really like were jaw. Dropping to me were a lot of their feather fans Including one which was a flamingo. Feather fan and yes. The feathers were white and pink. Another one where swan feathers and then and we. We also had kind of like within the group that i was with we. I did a little bit of a discussion about the use of feathers and fashion in the fashion trade. And of course we have already done an episode on that called murderous millenary about the use of feathers in millenary or hats but also at this time apply to fans as well and then johanna was telling us a little bit about how certain feathers when they can't be proven where they came from even if their feathers that were harvested far far far in the past that devil was still has in their possession still hasn't their archive they can't use them in their contemporary products. Because all these laws and ethical regulations surrounding the use of feathers in the fans that they still make today and one of the really cool things as she pulled out this box from separate shelf and inside the box for all of these thousands of tiny beautiful blue feathers that apparently were taken from blue jays but even though they have all these thousands of feathers in their possession it is illegal for them to use them in their products but but they still keep them there because it is part of the history of the house. Yeah absolutely on the history of fan making something that was super interesting was there was a fan that had like hundreds of feathers on it and she told us that the bird that supply. These feathers only had three each. So how many birds were killed just to create this one fan Yeah so if you haven't listened to her murder smell episode definitely check it out but of course. This is from the history of the house today. They're still creating wonderful fans and we of course went into their shops. Something that i wanted to say real quick before we talk about their contemporary line is that they created in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. These animal painted fans so apparently you could commission a fan of your favorite pet. And what's so lovely about these handpainted fans is they did the front and the back of the pet so like the face of a pet and the back of their head which i just found so incredibly charming and lovely. And they've done a version of this and their contemporary line they have hamsters. I think a dog. I want to say it's a sheba. No but i could wrong and then a cat. So a fan and i know a lot of the dress listeners. Who went shopping. Got got those fans because they were superfund. I've got a fan from their contemporary line. Has the is cut out so that you can kind of hold it in. You can hide behind the fan but still see out. Essentially i also got a peekaboo fan and mine is different style than yours. Mine is all black But has little dot cutouts cut are kind of like in this. Minimalistic geometric designs. You can again see through the fan if you're behind it but people can't necessarily see you this lovely gentleman who was running their storefront. He'd only been there. I think a month or two but he gave us the most wonderful tour of their contemporary line. Which i mean fan making is an art form. These fans are still being made by hand and they had they basically range from what we would call a ready to wear fan all the way up to haute couture level like there fans in there were like thousands of dollars and they were works of art. It was absolutely incredible. Yes yes yes so we did. Stop there on the first week of our tour because we actually did two separate trips since they were two groups of what week one and week two and unfortunately because it was august and many parisians go away. All calls are on vacation in august. We weren't able to visit the second week but what we did do on. The second week was equally cool. Yeah we actually went to the oldest haberdashery and paris which who knew so cool. We went to a super cool store. Called ultra mod. Actually has two different storefronts an originally opened as a hat shop in eighteen thirty two and then it expanded to become a haberdashery which is selling small sewing notions in nineteen twenties. So we gotta check out both of those shops april. I think you about some grow green ribbon. They had like vintage ribbon and more contemporary ribbon. It was just really cool experience yet and they were showing us some like really super rare hat making materials as well that were entirely. They look like textiles. They really really look like like. I mean i guess technically it is textiles but but what they were made of straw and you couldn't tell. They looked like they were made of linen or something but You know some of their back stock they have all these really rare and precious items that can be used them sewing or hat making that date back decades and decades and decades. So and it's massive if you need buttons that is your one. Stop shopping you have. We had so much fun and therefore shirt and then actually this is all in the same day. We actually went to the eliah foundation to see an exhibition april. Do you wanna talk about that. Yeah sure so I don't think we've ever really spoken about azzedine alaya too much on the show and we will rectify that hampshire finish my but as eliah basically. He was born in tunisia and nineteen thirty five. You studied art and sculpture growing up and it was very kind of fun story about him. Studying are one of his. Mother's friends was a huge faster niece. Sta and she was a little bit eccentric so in order to help him get into art school earlier than he was actually technically supposed to because there is an age limit. She helped him by lying about his age for him on his application for. But you know he really was this prodigy essentially so while he was studying art and sculpture. He was also working for a dressmaker. Who specialize in making mature copies. So that is ultimately how. He ended up becoming a fashion designer and and throughout his work. You can really see that that art sculpture training how it overlaps into his work. He moved to paris in the nineteen fifties. Initially he was hired for a very brief moment as a taylor for christian dior but then he went on to work under fashion designers gala. Roche and syria moog lower and it was really moog ler who even though he was working for him. He was like look. You need to do your own thing. You are so good and you have such this incredibly unique point of view and your skill you need to launch her own line so he really did that in the late nineteen seventies and just grew and grew and grew in prominence You know all across the eighties. So yeah i mean his. His work is amazing. Unfortunately he passed away in two thousand seventeen but you can go and check out his foundation at the foundation eliah in paris which is located in the marais. And it's in this incredibly beautiful building where it has like this really long. Kind of like atrium. Space and exhibition that we saw actually was pairing of garments and then there's photographic representation that had been shot as fashion photographs by his longtime collaborator. Peter lindbergh so the show is just absolutely beautiful and then they do these shows. There's not like a permanent exhibition or installation per se. There's always like a a new fresh show. That will be coming in.

johanna eliah foundation azzedine alaya paris moog ler tunisia hampshire christian dior Roche syria marais Peter lindbergh
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

06:14 min | Last month

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Getting older so i very tranquil. I grew up in a chaotic household. An ida very turn coexistence within the because any so much chaos. You can access when he caught here. I know when you hit your eighteen seventeen or something like that The i guess up until then also at some point Social anxiety anorexia becomes a part of your existence well-served layering on top of everything else. That you your served dealing with cool being a gun in the nineties. I don't know if any of us escaped without anxiety in some sort of eating disorder. Behavior mine was daphne extreme but not really more so than the other girls in my school. Everyone had a problem with eddie image though Next to go go to bring in a weighing scale every day and she would stand on it while eating lunch to see if not the dial will go up and that would stop her from overindulging. So you know i yes. I definitely struggled severely with anorexia but also really not in any way that stood out. I wasn't much thinner than the other. Gaza we all trying to have jutting hipbones in jutting rips because we were told that that was what was the only standard of beauty and the only standard of worthiness a woman was to to be a small and childlike in your frame as possible. Yeah i mean and also we're talking about the the. I guess late nineties here so that was the time in fashion. Were quote heroin. She comes from right which is out on reflecting on that. How does that become the standard. So s.'s like those and it was also a time while we were learning for the first time truly very publicly mainstream media about actual famine. That was going on in the world countries. So the idea that over in the west where we had access to abundant that we were trying to emulate the look of famine that was genuinely currently happening to tens of millions of people around the world. Is so mortifying when you think about it that it's hard to swallow. Yeah it's strange. The way that people can be influenced So powerful that. I mean which kind of fascinating about about what you're sharing to is at so Rigging bounce around a little bit towards last year you end up on the cover. British vogue with extensively. Sixteen women ashley fifteen women and that a little slot which is for mirror so the person looking at it feels that they have a space there to the photographer. That was chosen for that. Peter lindbergh whose legendary in the space and also legendary in an interesting way in that he always he was somebody who actually hated makeup on women. He absolutely hit. You wanted nothing to do with airbrushing back in the day or photoshop now and yet in the nineties he was also one of the people who was sorta like photographing a lot of the people who sort of set the standard for what was to be the pinnacle of beauty. Then i think so is everyone. He would have been in his twenties and that that will sanders. I mean twinkie. In a david bailey discovered twiggy. So we will have a slight bend. Pick a I think she's be to none of have felt but the well rounded her aesthetic as the only singular beauty standard. But i think young photographers back. Then we'll we'll just graphing what was in front of them and that was emaciated goals and what liked about working with peter is again. He wouldn't let me wearing makeup. Wouldn't brush it seven. Am because i jet lag at four am in my time. And i felt like i had testicles really underneath my eyes on he loved that and he was like great was bring out spring out those testicles and shot me in eight day brushing covering evoke nobody of And i loved it already liberating. And he got me to wear pajamas rather than anything kind of structured and fancy. And i will always remember him and his work fondly but yeah i mean. He was definitely part of Every at everyone in that time was complicit in a culture that they thought was acceptable and they thought it was beautiful. I mean we wouldn't. It becomes normalized on that level. It's just sort of like this is the way it's supposed to be across everybody and can imagine what it would take to really just stand out and say and say no effectively. You would have to be willing to walk away from your career. Which is which we now see a lot of people doing in on a different level or not. I didn't have a career because i was not a successful teen model. I didn't make it as a teenager. I started and i went costings and everything. But i was also trying to juggle school at the same time and south asian and there would just no south asian models at the time so it was definitely difficult to break through in that moment and then i got hit by a car pulled out the modeling industry. Thank god otherwise. I'd probably be dead now but On very very very very happy. That i was not successful during that time because like considering how badly. I've already messed up from my hooligans from eating disorder behavior during that time a Imagine what would have happened. If i was also smoking taking cocaine and and maintaining mac asian for as long as it would take to be successful modeling career. Yeah i knew you described the The car accident in in a weird way. Almost a blessing Something that ended up to a spinal cord injury and and pretty much took you out of being involved in people outside of your your home for better part of a year. maybe longer i was bed bound benches. It wasn't that bad. I had a really strong painkillers and cable tv so while i would never undermine the experiences someone else damaging that i actually found that to be quite a good year i had a morphine drip Of living my best life eating ice cream off my face watching frazier. So i have. I've terribly pull memories of that time by very vivid memories of that time..

anorexia British vogue Peter lindbergh eddie Gaza david bailey twinkie ashley sanders peter spinal cord injury mac frazier
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:56 min | 3 months ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Your photography so much that he ended up buying threes dollars worth of photography of the brooklyn bridge during that meeting. Also like you know. They were older work. I've done in france in magazine but there was also like to pictures taken maino myself and some of them in new york and so this brooklyn bridge pitchers and they were doing an article in house and garden on the brooklyn bridge and i think it was for the sentinel or something like that at the time. I don't know exactly. I got to be for that. But i remember like this. Oh you gotta go see rochelle adele. She works at our garden. Let me give her a ring and you got to go to see her and show those pitches. So i went to see rochelle. She was at house and garden and she looked at the pictures and to say. Oh these are lovely. We can we keep them for the bit. Then it took like four or five pitches and then you. I get a phone call from saying like oh actually like the the pictures that they're going to be running a really. Yeah and they paid like three thousand dollars speaking. I couldn't believe so basically. That was my first experience as a photographer working for publication in america. And then when you went to self you also worked with richelieu dell. Is that correct. She also worked for the magazine. She became a little bit. Like a miniature alex lieberman. She was working. I think she had self magazine. I think she was also up at mademoiselle. She was kind of like like alex. Lieberman's right task and she would come in and look over all the pages and then liberman would come in and look at the pages and we have to make sure that everything was well organized like each picture was supposed to be from this side which was very small to a double page side. And then you would play. Was things had a really like my time. Magazine g. q. Working was mayor shanahan's director and matama self magazine really like couldn't wait for these moments. Where would show up and michelle would show up kind of like shuffling everything around some part of it probably just to shovel and part of it to make more sense of the stories to learn so much about like what you can do. It was a story like are you can was editing. Sizing was putting things one when and other. Why would that be better and that to me. Like tidied up so nicely. Was all the things that i learned from my dad about the journalistic side of our. You put something together. So it's complete so it makes sense so there's a logic to it but there's also an artist about it when i was there itself and you know it's not that self was fantastic magazine. That's when i really like said while. I'm really liking this this i can. I was eating it up like there was no tomorrow and i loved it. I loved it. And like when i ll expert. Come you know like some designers will put patriots together was smaller guy in the corner and i would think like. I wonder how lieberman's going to change that. Maybe he's going to do this but he's going to do that. Maybe he's gonna. It was really intriguing to seem calm and change everything around but in education. The boasts intriguing. Part was that every time it was right. It was right people were so you have no idea designers. Were like crying over like the not crying literally like you like so upset that the layouts change and everything i was thinking but he's right and we had arguments argument some of the staff. I remember but much better in makes sense. Now it makes sense the stories better and people get like really like attached to their own work. I guess yeah. What a magnificent thing to be able to witness and to learn and be part of alex g. q. And you mentioned that you worked with our director. Mary shanahan and i read that she. You've said that she helped you clearly. Understand how an image can function. And i'm wondering if we talk a little bit about what that means and what she taught. Well i think she was the one who appeared on top of the i by saying like pushing this idea of the point of view that everything comes down to point of view everything comes down to vision and to a to express that vision in a very simple manner and i think that i learned that from her and she was very a definite about that. I think like really felt like oh complete. The circle here like the understanding of like to pass information the proper way in a practical way for my father and being a journalist understood the artistry and shuffling. And what you can do as an image and now you can say something in this way if you make the image decides on this way if you make the mich this is a little bit like the complete approach to the build up of a magazine but then a learn from mary that oh this is great but what is it. That is inside image. And what is that point of view and now to pass on that information as an art director into the dog refer so that point of view is palatable relevant and on point and that i felt like ooh i can't be an auditor straits and then the left i know i know and then and then lieberman was really pissed so after a year and a half g q betty carter. The former editor of esquire and the newly minted editor of a brand new magazine called new york woman. Invited you to become the founding art director. And i remember when the magazine i came out i actually had a friend who worked there as a copy editor and there was so much excitement about the launch. And i read that. You had many epic battles over the tone of the magazine you wanted to be cool and clean and they wanted it to be warm and cozy which seemed very odd for a new york woman type magazine. How did you manage looking back on it. How would you describe that time. Well well yes. I remember you mentioning that. Yes that's true. Add a couple of Battles with some of the stuff but not was betsy really. Because i think betsy understood at you know like it was late. Eighty s late eighties. S new york. City come on like the time. The city was the coolest was the place was the center of the world. I mean if anything and anything that was happening was happening in new york. So of course. I wanted to best photographers. Of course i wanted you know like the thing to be the coolest thing possible. Yes there was. It was american express was doing the magazine. Show is big. Let's say and but we we went against that. I think ni- yes. We different wanted the magazine to be cool to be like you know quite fashiony. At the time i remember. If that's the first i worked. Peter lindbergh was that new york woman. And that's the first time actually. Peter lindbergh Worked in america and then other talk. I like patrick. Demarchelier work there. Like spiel mccall package you know cast for at the time that were working for forecasts at sani. They were working in europe. More actually european stock strangely enough because also like mr lebron was not up left communist. He had he said he had plans for me..

america Peter lindbergh new york Mary shanahan lebron europe Lieberman new york woman patrick richelieu dell michelle rochelle four france three thousand dollars each picture rochelle adele first experience five pitches Eighty s late eighties
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on WTVN

"Andy field in Washington in the eighties and nineties he worked with the likes of Naomi Campbell Cindy Crawford in their fellow supermodels word that renowned fashion photographer Peter Lindbergh has died at the age of seventy four this is ABC news doors are being slammed in your face and bad credit is holding you back from buying a house car even getting a credit card ninety nine dollars can put your credit back to a seven twenty or higher thank you up see tax liens judgments in even late pays can be removed from credit reports by calling the giving days foundation eight hundred five four three fifty seven seventy two tell miss this great free credit repair just be one of the first ten callers eight hundred five four three fifty seven seventy two I'm Richard can't to ABC news. gone are the days of spending hours in a dealership check out the express store at eastern dot com eastern's automotive group now empowers you to start the process from home for whatever's convenient to your schedule you can even buy your next vehicle one hundred percent online you already know eastern's automotive group has a tremendous legacy where there's always thousands of vehicles to choose from plus eastern served over one hundred fifty thousand customers in this community over the past thirty years they have been named a dealer of the year by dealer raider dot com three years in a row and their eight plus a credit is on B. B. B. and they treat their people right the service was just named a top place to work in DC by The Washington Post every eastern spherical goes through a rigorous multi point inspection process their standards are high and it shows they've got over twenty five thousand reviews averaging four point nine stars every vehicle also includes seven day return policy and a complimentary thirty day warranty visit eastern's dot com just her shopping today at eastern dot com. she. she. she. well..

Andy field Washington Cindy Crawford Peter Lindbergh Richard ABC news. The Washington Post Naomi Campbell ABC ninety nine dollars one hundred percent thirty years three years thirty day seven day
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Andy field in Washington in the eighties and nineties he worked with the likes of Naomi Campbell Cindy Crawford in their fellow supermodels word that renowned fashion photographer Peter Lindbergh has died at the age of seventy four this is ABC news doors are being slammed in your face and bad credit is holding you back from buying a house car even getting a credit card ninety nine dollars can put your credit back to a seven twenty or higher thank you up see tax liens judgments in even late pays can be removed from credit reports by calling the giving days foundation eight hundred five four three fifty seven seventy two tell miss this great free credit repair just be one of the first ten callers eight hundred five four three fifty seven seventy two I'm Richard can't to ABC news. keep your toys running as the weather changes good a battery exchange dot com to find a store near you. so we're going to audition a brand new news site that gives you both sides of every argument and see how we like it maybe we can recommend to fantastic world means that Armstrong and getting in the morning he acts on I heart radio don't miss the trading group show Saturdays at noon on eleven ninety K. E. X. thirty you can earn a full time income as a short term trader that's the training group show Saturdays at noon the question line is eight eight eight nine five nine four zero zero four. and now que to whether to buy standard TV and appliance we're expected season changes in our forecast kind.

Andy field Washington Cindy Crawford Peter Lindbergh Richard Armstrong Naomi Campbell ABC ninety nine dollars eleven ninety K
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"By beaver lake road and ninety Fifth Avenue also have a crash on highway five westbound near the airport right around four ninety four and thirty fourth Avenue your five I witness news weather forecast mostly clear skies tonight fifty seven year low partly cloudy eighty two tomorrow right now the my talk studios seventy one and sunny. turning to entertain you. this is. everything you need to know from the world of entertainment and pop culture heard at the top of every hour on my top one oh seven one seven and what have you learned to learning a martial is leading the celebrity tributes to famed photographer Peter Lindbergh who died yesterday at the age of seventy four in a post on her official Sussex royal Instagram account Megan shared a photograph of herself with Lindbergh and she hand picked the photographer for her fifteen women that she named forces of change for the September issue of British vogue cover which Markel guest edited and this guy just died he just died at the age of seventy four yesterday we don't know the cause of his death but if you look around the fashion world today on social media a lot of tributes are going around for Peter Lindbergh if you saw one of his photographs you would totally know black and white really natural low I love to talk. this this British vogue yes you did okay. and maybe because it be age nine oh to one oh has been kind of a hit this summer it seems that mark Paul Gosselaar Mario Lopez Elizabeth Berkley are reportedly in talks to participate in some kind of saved by the bell revival so well aid I can't be as clever is B. H. nine NO two right now they already have the handle on that I love that show it's only like a six episode though but it's just such an upside down let you have it show I mean at the inside making this show it's like an entourage or episodes but not quite at that level.

Peter Lindbergh Megan Markel Paul Gosselaar Mario Lopez Eli beaver lake official Sussex B. H. fifty seven year ninety Fifth
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"A bit more where did you work, and what was your experience there? My my first working experience when I left the London college fashion was on on the industry bible Drapers record. I stayed there for about eighteen months. I had a very brief so to freelance period, then in my life where I did the Daily Mirror woman's journal, which I'd be no longer exists anymore and a very brief stint on miss London magazine, which used to be given away at the stations. I was then head hunted onto the Daily Mail, and I actually spent fourteen years there, an twenty six I became their fashion editor, and I stayed for another decade are than decided to take a very different path, and I wanted to be free, Lance. So I I had to contract working on Tatler magazine, which was a huge change enroll the wonderful, very different from the immediacy of newspapers. But I think people think that you have all the time in the world magazines to put them together. Actually, you don't you spend weeks and weeks and weeks trying to get hold of a celebrity to photograph. And you actually work on collecting information about a feature that you'll do. So I did that. And I also had. A contract with Acadia as an adviser to them for about six or seven years, which was fascinating. And then I've been freelance ever since mazing wouldn't what an experience what about you? My first job was at British vogue. And I worked there for two or three is firstly for the executive fashion editor of whom I was absolutely in all day. I started someone straight into the office, and she fix them with the Gimblett stare and said dotting, I love that song her jacket and I- quake in my Jan thought how on earth can she identify salary jacket without having looked at the label. Anyway, after you know, if you weeks months, I was got up to speed, and I see what the characteristics of the wide Lebel and everything and then is incredibly fortunate to be working for the late editor in chief Elizabeth Tilberis the time that she was approached to go to New York. Unreal. Chopper's bazaar, which is the oldest fashion magazine in the world. And that was the beginning of the nineteen ninety s and so I had the opportunity to go to new what with her and that was super exciting because we had more or less a clean slate. And we forged associations with incredible photographers. Peter Lindbergh patch Masha llah, and that was a very exciting period and on my return to London fees later, I to what. And then went back to British vogue where I spent quite a long time as executive editor. And then off the birth of my daughter, I took a step back, and I've been doing very freelance project since then gale Ralph and Anna cry talking to finance and Vogel central's hills and voca central's lingerie are out now published by Coronado Tebus. And that's it for this week's show. My thanks, of course to produce. If no no shake. Oh. And editors Kenya. Scarlet Sarah miles and Nora who come in so queries. Suggestions are. Welcome jumping out to finance on f p at Monaco dot com. And I've got to join us at the same time next week before we go a little song for you. Mulkey mo- remember him. The current Mark Wahlberg was only cover of interview magazine way back in nineteen Ninety-two peak Calvin Klein time, if you're a member here he is with his band Machi mock the funky bunch. This is good vibrations. Thanks for listening. Swearing.

British vogue executive editor London London magazine Daily Mirror Tatler magazine editor editor in chief Mark Wahlberg Kenya Peter Lindbergh Elizabeth Tilberis Acadia Calvin Klein Chopper Monaco dot Sarah miles Lance executive Coronado Tebus
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Art of Failure

Art of Failure

07:46 min | 2 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Art of Failure

"And. Yeah. I think it wasn't so much high school was challenging I think just that period in my life was challenging so early. Eighteen nineteen people are paying you to do small gigs. Or is it is it just skyrocket from the beginning. Well. It was skyrocket from the beginning. I mean, I was blessed. I met the right people. We clicked it was off to the racist from them, and I was making money quickly. So when people before you started modeling said, you know, you've got this great low key shit. You could do this. How did you feel about your physical appearance before modeling started? It's funny. I would look at magazines and see Christy Turlington. I would compare myself and say I I could do that. But I was too frayed. Interesting. So it it fell into my lap kind of because my stepdad had connections. And so I just kind of said, yes. And then it turned out I seek it. Yeah. Yeah. So would you say that you had a good healthy image of your appearance? I don't think it's changed much from now to then. What is that? What is kidding kidding? I've grown and I've got more confident and accepting of myself. And I think then I was. Young. I just I just keep relating to filling young. I mean seventeen eighteen you're so young you really having done like the major comparing yourself to others yet. You might miss started. You haven't done like the my waist, isn't that small my late my thighs? It's fat my profile my, but is a bubble. I need a flat. But I need bigger boobs. I need whatever I say these things every morning, by the way. As a kid seventeen. I knew I wasn't like this bony girl, but it didn't affect me as much as maybe it would have like you're my twenties and thirties when I really wanted to change like when I wanted to change, but I couldn't because this is the body that God gave me. So it's like do the work to accept the body and treat it the best. You can like an athlete. Train's model is the same. I would always look at it. Like that. Like, it's my business. Just like an athlete trains for the race. I need to train for my business. Pure say started to get a healthier view toward it and also just an accepting view too. Because you can only go so far all this early success as a model skyrocketed, and but there's some early failures to can you talk about some of those of sure I mean, I was at the height of my career and. I was. So a lot of my life revolves around recovery from drugs and alcohol or good. And I mean, I was at the height of my career. And I was my life was being run by the substances. Not by my choices. I was not showing up for the third day of DKNY campaign with Peter Lindbergh. Well, I did show up my agent had to come get me. Duck my head and ice. Like, you definitely feel like a failure. When you're walking out at nine AM, new your apartment with your sunglasses on everyone's going to work and the kids are going to school to hear them, and you're going to get more drugs. Yeah. Yeah. That's that's definitely a failure. Walk. Walk for sure. Or, you know, some of the disgraceful things that we do under substance abuse that you know, we wouldn't do otherwise. 'cause we we didn't have choices if we're true addicts alcoholics. But even even DKNY thing the third you do make your Asia calls. They get buried to the set they get her and they dunker head on the ice. You go home that night, you probably still involved with substance. But there's no feeling of Morris or I I gotta get my shit together. Or I screwed up a fifteen thousand dollar shoot or whatever. Well, I mean, I've done that before where I've cancelled the day before and had to pay for the studio rental maybe a few of the people's day rates some of the props that's happened before. And what is what does that feel like? Believe it or not so weird. I I'm not connected to because like my agents would just take care of it. Of course, it was my money, but they would just take care of it. I mean, it's really that classic story of being enabled. And I was making money. It's not like I had a lot of time to sit and wallow. It's like shut so much to home with the substances you shut so much down. But I've had plenty of time to reflect back and say, I wonder what things would have been like if I was not actively using alcohol and drugs, but if it were meant to be that way, I believe in God. So I believe that somehow, someway, the powers that be sort of like knew that that's not what I could handle at that time. And I also believe that the story's not over the story is not over, you know, I mean, we're this is part of writing all of our stories sitting here at this table right now if you go back and you connect the track me and soon after the track meet you start to with the substances and living a little bit wild. And then it sort of gets you. It gets you to this twenty years of recovery, which is remarkable. And it's definitely a freedom. But what you get is this big full life from that from that failure. And if the end game is to help other people being sober is definitely. The pathway to to be conscious to do that. So just it just a little deeper dive on one or two actual failures that you can think of you didn't get a cover or you've got kicked out of thing or you're not the girl anymore failure in relationships. I'm single I'm forty seven. I could get all caught up about that. And that's a failure. But I'm not going to do that. I choose not to do that. Right. I mean learn from it are things that failed. It you're saying it's a choice. You choose not to choose not to go there. And I think that's a hard thing for young people to when the failure happens. Proceed failure happens. There's no choice. I can't believe this thing happened to me. And that there's a choice that you have at that moment. Yeah. I mean, there's the time when due to Michael hall behavior, I was a cover try for big magazine, and I showed up and I did the job. But. I'm ninety nine percent. Sure. That I was not chosen for the cover because of the state that I arrived in upsetting. But again gonna like hang on that. No. I think I'm gonna keep it moving. Do you think there are people who get information like that? And don't recover from that. I think if they do if they have a propensity to sway to the negative. I think they have to work really hard at it. Right. A lot of work to to come back and keep keep moving. Don't let it define us. You need to read a book. Thank you ever told you that before I my whole career. I've been told this too seriously, my whole career, let's take a moment. Here message from our sponsor for today's episode. Do you suffer from foam? Oh, now, there's new mo- foam. Oh, mo- foam. Oh, help you channel your anger for the failure of missing out Momo has two layers. The first layer helps you feel the anger and the second layer helps you gently forget the event you missed by using time release mini epinephrine bloggers called Nanno AP's. Do not driver operate heavy machinery with Momo such as backhoes clam-diggers and firehoses. Don't take nursing or pregnant or if

Momo Christy Turlington Peter Lindbergh epinephrine Asia Morris Michael hall big magazine fifteen thousand dollar ninety nine percent twenty years
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Art of Failure

Art of Failure

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Art of Failure

"They can. Part of failure. I'm your host Steve Friedman. Thanks for tuning in. Yes. This is art of failure the podcast that explores what it means to fail as a human person. We all try so hard not to fail on a daily basis. And we also forget on a daily basis that failure is part of life, and that we can use failure as a catalyst for growth and movement towards bigger. And better things guys today, we have one of those awesome supermodels from the nineteen nineties berry Smith, very started modeling shoes. Seventeen and was sent to Paris where success follow she worked with fashion icons, such as Bruce Weber her Brits, Arthur Elgort, Michael Thompson. Steven Klein, Peter Lindbergh, and many more barriers appeared on the covers of and workman, countless magazines, including American British talian and French vogue as well as L Laurie. Claire glamour and caused. Politics in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight buried appeared in her first Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, two thousand twelve appeared on E television, scouted mentoring young models, and she continues to mentor young folks getting into the fashion industry today. She is a working model, and she spoke to me about that career growing older and how she shot herself in the foot again. And again, listen up. It's so good to see you. Thank you so much doing this. Thanks for having me. Awesome. To have you here. How are you? I'm amazing realty grateful. That's the admiring the name of this podcast, especially our of failure. Because I just think that that's a powerful phrase Arte failure. I think there is art in it. I think there's art in the recovery from it. It's interesting is positive, and I think to use the word art, I think there's art in lots of things, and I was sort of brought up. No art is art art is Moller or Van Gogh or dealiest or Shakespeare. But nothing else is art that I fell in love with all these other things like sports, and the and all these other things and found art in them. So I think that there is art in failure. And the people that I'm talking to and you included successful people. How do we use failure? As a catalyst. How do we use failure to come back from get over? Deal with allow it to be there the duality of it. So anyway, Where'd you? Grow up, you grew up civic north west northwest. Beautiful. What was that like great? I was in the suburbs. Head grass. I you know, I had a great childhood. I mean, you know, a little bit of disruption when the divorce happened. All ten early failures for you like, do you? Remember some early things. Maybe maybe your parents. My mom considered getting pregnant eighteen not necessarily fell yer, but it wasn't spoken about their failures. And I don't remember hearing a lot about especially not for my dad. Okay. But yeah, I mean, every family has failures dark skeletons in the closet. Yeah. For sure. I would say, you know, what when I was twelve thirteen. I was big track are very into long jump and high jump, and and excelled, and I qualified for the national the national meat, and I went, and I did my poorest performance ever because of nerves I was super super nervous. And I gave my the worst jump ever placed thirteenth now at the end of your career. Not quite it's winding down because I became more interested in extracurricular activities, right? The teen different. Gotta Hijau different. Kinda high jump pie. Yeah. That happens at that age to to a lot of people. Yeah. Okay. And in a very young age, you were tapped to go to Paris and get the modeling can just talk a little bit about that the beginning of your modeling career. And what your feelings were about all that stuff as a kid. So yes, fifteen I was seventeen seventy so after high school I finished high school kind of tumultuous path of high school made it through and then all through my life people. It said you're so photogenic you should model. I had no academic ambition. So I just wanted to travel really wanted to see the world. So I said, you know, let me get this modeling shop. So I went to agency. And they said sure you could work agency in the Pacific actually well in Oregon. Yeah, they have agencies all these small cities looking for local girl next door. Well, there's local work to those local department stores as nineteen eighty nine different. But they still exist and these smaller markets, and so I started working, and then they. They said do you want to go to Paris? I have a scout this interested in new scout meaning agency there that's interested in you. And I went and I got out of Salem through modeling. Seventeen seventy to graduate high school. What was tumultuous about high school? Well, I other than the normal things that high school is go through right? Yeah. Yeah. Growing up is challenging sometimes you know, I'd like to drink like to experimental lot. So I took that path. And I I wrote it real hard long time and.

Claire glamour Paris Steve Friedman berry Smith Peter Lindbergh L Laurie Steven Klein Salem Oregon Moller Arthur Elgort Pacific Bruce Weber Michael Thompson Shakespeare Van Gogh
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Behind The Screen

Behind The Screen

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Behind The Screen

"So everybody was kind of into with what we were doing and what the important. Sense of giving the actors not just lady Gaga, and Bradley, but everyone, you know, Sam Andrew all of them had had to have a safe space. You know? So they could be the characters they're meant to be. And then they could explore you know, we had to do two takes or Fred to do ten takes. There was no negativity. And I think that comes from the top it comes from Bradley sort of attitude towards, you know, how you approach is trying to shoot a scene is the same way he approaches China craft the performance, it's like, that's awesome. But about this way, or you know, something's wrong. What is it? What is it? What is and not being rushed by time. Even though we were rushed by time. He never succumb to it. It's nice to have that leadership even as cinema Taga for Yosso used to maintaining pace as much as I was technically trying to make it a safe space for the actors. He was actually making a safe space for me. Now there there's one scene during which lady Gaga character. Allie goes to photo shoot. And there you are as photographer. Yeah. How stretch how did you get that role? I asked one day. I said we're talking about the scene. I said who's playing the photographer because I thought it would bring a ringer somebody. You know, we'd seen Peter Lindbergh onset shooting who's a legend absolute legend, influenced me, and I I figured we'd get some, you know, heavyweight photographer curious who might be the in Bradley said you. Are you serious? And then I thought about it. You know, I I had hosted the AFC awards three years in a row and the first year in the first year, I did it. It was kind of a rush actually, you know, sort of exercising different muscles and doing something different. But this was altogether different than that. When I do the AFC awards, I host its I I look at the audience, and I know that I know everybody out there. But there's something different to being in front of a camera. And if you over think it, you know, so he just said be yourself. Just be you. You know, you're not playing anybody but yourself so that may be filled easier. I even found the Cameron once you know, 'cause I knew the blocking anyway, so I myself accordingly. Was that the first time he did a cameo? Yeah. It is. Although there was a written line for me. I didn't remember it. So I just sort of just improvised. No Anderson there actually, a number of crew members that had cameos in this movie who some of the others. I think the only one I remember in the film that's still in we shut numerous cameos from our crew, but our property master, Mike Sexton was the doctor who injects Bradley as he had some, you know, a bag of pills or a prescription. Let's say he was in. We had our script. Supervisor Lynn who was also in the film. But I think that part got cut out, and then our first AD Shelly Ziegler was also in the film in an section. She might be in at the tail end around the time that Gaga played in the form. She's a stage manager so everybody had to play a role, but it was within our zone. Favorite scene in the film? You know, I've been asked that I gravitate towards the exterior parking lot at the beginning of the film because the whole secrets from the time he asks her out at the club that she's performing at to going to the cop bar, and sort of having that sort of get to know you chat, and then the supermarket, and then it culminates kind of in the parking lot where she sing shallow for the first time to me. That's exemplifies what it feels like to go on that magical first date. Right in this psalm Lee of the day..

lady Gaga Bradley Fred Cameron AFC Shelly Ziegler Sam Andrew Peter Lindbergh Yosso Allie Mike Sexton Supervisor Lynn China Lee Anderson three years one day
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Oprah’s Master Class: The Podcast

Oprah’s Master Class: The Podcast

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Oprah’s Master Class: The Podcast

"But when I go to buy the magazine when I show up at the job, I'm just Cindy, it's like a team that gets you to be Cindy Crawford. And I guess that that kind of thing reminds you of that. There was this group of models myself, and Christy Turlington, Linda Evangelista Naomi Campbell. Claudia Schiffer we we looked good together. But we didn't we weren't like, all blond hair blue. I we all had our own kind of look in her own thing going, and there was kind of all this hype about models. But then there was this one moment in time where there'd been a British vogue cover that Peter Lindbergh had shot and George Michael saw that. And he's like, I want those girls in my next video then Johnny for Saatchi took most of the same girls and had in his show with George Michael in the audience with that song playing and it was just like this moment. It was like. Wow. This to me that was like the biggest supermodel moment of my career, fashion and music for the first time together in a way that was being viewed by the masses. It was like, okay. That's that's like the arrival of the supermodel. When I started becoming famous as a model and people knew my name that was something that I noticed that. My dad really liked again is because of family name wasn't gonna end with my brother like, okay, you're still Crawford in nineteen Ninety-one. Cindy Crawford married. Richard Gere when they met Richard had been a famous movie star and celebrity for years and Cindy was a supermodel on the rise. The spotlight on their relationship was to say, the least intense the marriage only lasted for years, but Cindy says what she learned during that time helped her in so many ways including preparing her for the wonderful marriage. She has today with her husband Randy when I was probably at the height of my career, you're so busy just doing it every day that you don't kind of feel what's going on in the outside world. It was before, you know, Twitter and Facebook, you didn't really know how many fans you had you measured it by. Like old fashioned fan letters that came in the mail, my friend, her Brits. Who's also an amazing photographer was having a barbecue. And I went to his house, and there was a lot of really cool people there. I was like, wow, Jack Nicholson, and that's you know, it was like I was still most twenty one. It was still all new to me. But I met Richard Gere. There we pretty much started dating right away. And when I was with him. That's when I was becoming well known as well. And when I would see how he was with fans when they approached him a lot of times, you know, wouldn't be a good moment to sign an autograph or shake a hand or take a picture. But I got to look to him to see how he created boundaries for himself. That felt good being a nice girl from the midwest. My inclination is always to give and say, yes because I want people to like me. But then I saw Richard do no way. It was like, you know, what? Sorry, I'm not doing that. But I see you. He felt that really is just about. Making that connection looking someone in the eyes and making sure that they felt seen and that was it like you didn't have to do the picture. You don't have to do the autograph. But to take that moment just to make a human connection. I think a lot of what happened with Richard. I was I was still twenty two and at twenty two as a young woman. I was kind of still figuring out who I was in what I wanted to be. And you know, he was already thirty seven. So in some ways, he knew that I was still growing in changing. I didn't wanna hear it from him. Because at twenty two you think, you know, everything, and you think you're already formed, and then you realize ten years later, you're like, oh my gosh. They were totally right. I think you're twenties for women is such a time where you're starting to come into your own and feel your own power and connect to your inner strength, and it's hard to do that..

Richard Gere Cindy Crawford Claudia Schiffer Jack Nicholson George Michael Linda Evangelista Naomi Campbe Peter Lindbergh Christy Turlington Cindy Twitter Saatchi Richard Facebook Johnny Randy ten years
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

"And who would book you every single time like ralph lauren well when i first started modeling i was a catalog model in i just like made that cash and it was just i and i always was booked again and then i did the guest campaigns i did seven guests campaigns and i worked for vs couple times sports illustrated dist is ellen von north still shoot all of the guests not all of them i worked with yusei and and ellen right she's amazing i mean jonah oh my god to the new i hate to say it but like the new status of like scuba what's gavrilo ellen von worth is that status yeah and so have you worked with peter lindbergh yes i have i did one david yurman with him wow yeah and what about patrick dementia all i haven't worked seat reiko no sammy patrick demarchelier yeah okay okay it's my favorite thing to your patchett demolishing when i ran looked down when i don't know something i'm like it's like john charleston casa job the only person earthy nuts have say that i'm sorry john i know i know who you're talking guy so who are your favorites have you done stephen my yes i did stephen myself i did eric invoke with him and italian vote i love working with mario testino favorite bruce weber yes he knows how to make anyone look they're absolute bass by doing very minimal he's just incredible you know steven meisel has not been photographed in public in like twenty six years.

yusei peter lindbergh david yurman reiko bruce weber steven meisel ralph lauren ellen jonah sammy patrick john charleston stephen eric mario testino twenty six years
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"And david being who he was when completely the other the other way so his whole ream it was to do an anti an anti pretty picture so he would use louvred lighting awkward louvred lighting costing light on the background all these kinds of tropes of what it was to be a bit nath a bit tacky a bit off a bit weird and push it into your face and and therefore creating something completely new and hadn't been seen and he's most wellknown of an amazing effort calvin klein images later and of course kate moss as rise them i mean an obsession at an off he shot the obsession note under that that was a but that was marisa relative that our image as yet add straight image of from kevin claim that air is due to him no or an s exactly what happened was that this group of photographers changed fashion overnight forever and the power of that was such that it couldn't be denied now we're very powerful creative directors of the day namely far beyond baron who was the creative director of help his bizarre the great bastion of american fashion the home of avidan and all those guys back in the days in the fifties and sixties and he took this new generation and scold them if you like in commercial fashion photography so he took the rawness he took the the the creative boundary pushing and his philosophy was the magazine could have a couple of stalwarts at the time i believe it was patrick demange clearing is now a controversial figure of course and peter lindbergh seed have to save pairs of hands but at the top of what they were doing and then you'd give three or four of the young guns the opportunity to grow and to make it freshen exciting and he did so with help is bizarre.

marisa director david kate moss kevin patrick demange peter lindbergh
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"It was she was a little girl from croydon south london suburb very working class toy tore lie that and obviously they had so much in common how they grew up where they grow up a resonating beautifully absolutely and that's that that was the power that was demonstrated in that story she so one photo editorial completely made everything that came before that the the glamour of the supermodel short by herberich the idealized perfection this kind of greek goddess notion of beauty or even the peter lindbergh a beautiful woman in the in in a city scape gone this gu free gorky blow legeard funny tooth's nadal tooth working class girl made everything but came before it look tired look oldfashioned look irrelevant a and everyone hated it and was it when it hit the newsstands as they say was a immediately recognized there was immediately derided by the fashion establishment it was sitas ugly and it was seen as a matter it was seen as just not russian so there was a a little story of how shoots got done in those days with cornyn and fell because the art director she took some pictures into the office and fill didn't like them or light some and not the others so there was an argument about imagery about the editing essentially but everyone was so passionate it was it became life or death live or die and incurring actually threatened and did so she went into the toilet and was going to flush the negatives down the toilet if fell didn't acquiesced to choice so these would times where people care that much and so there was an awkward very awkward transition for carin because ninety july ninety eight was the third summer of love that we're talking about the editorial.

peter lindbergh cornyn director carin croydon south london
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on Movie Crush

"We on the people mover and then suddenly you would be on the game grid in the hung as were common almost squash you and then you'd go inside the light cycle maize again and you know in the prison in the erc breakdowns i did i was in his own here fulltime so those are all like very there vera deep embedded childhood memory that's owning and but but it there's nothing about the movie now when i watch it it it means every bit as much to me is no there are plenty of movies i loved that i can't i can sort of go what does it hold up the i'm not able to see if it doesn't hold up play utilize asia for the first time so your experience is your experience and i totally respect that but i k it's i mean i've brainwash myself i've still watching thea god this is ahead of its time god this yard it's so good well was ahead of its time because it was in a little research today it is bit was one of the very first movies to use computer enemy at all yeah and this guy alone m who's the director the director is heard your early even liz burger oh email it early early rows age peter lindbergh i think your john yes john landsberg from they might be giant stephen lewis burger and he uh it was kind of a not kind of it was a passion project for him like he thought of this world and was ahead of his time and couldn't get any one to make it ten like sunk his own money until like a test shots in with took it around the studios and was like look at what i have looked at this amazing thing there was like man i don't know about that and finally disney took a flyer in said all right we'll give you like 10 million bucks or whatever which was huge because he wasn't in the disney clan right he was an outsider and he said he always felt that way too which is kind of satin but um it was way ahead of its time and noone knew what they were seeing yeah like now for someone like me to watch it has never seen it before.

asia director liz burger john landsberg disney erc peter lindbergh stephen lewis burger
"peter lindbergh" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

American Fashion Podcast

06:55 min | 5 years ago

"peter lindbergh" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

"And so things have changed for people coming up in the biz. Business before we leave the topic entirely. I wanna since you brought it up. I wanna give a shout out to the well what's known in the business or the actual businesses. Lord. Because you're both mentioned what our Lord theaters spamming Guthrie are both league regional theaters and just for the audience out there, if you live in even a small metropolis, there's probably a regional theater company fairly close by and they definitely should be supported because they birth people. Like, the people we have in the studio today, or you know, you think of the Steppenwolf in Chicago what they've managed to accomplish. Or, you know, so always look around your your immediate surroundings for regional theater companies and comedy troupes, and all of that and independent film elephants. It's all they're all they're not always I'm from very rural south Mississippi. Okay. So maybe sometimes perhaps there would drive to New Orleans and the phantom of the opera as so it's true. Even if there's not a Lord theater, there's always. It's America you've got into car and you're somewhere. Yeah. We have pretty spoiled here. So when when you're not here in your kid in that in that part of the world, how does that feel and what did that do to you? And how did that shape you as nor to I've always told my daughter who's a an aspiring artist? I think that one of the greatest things to inspire any artist is longing. Real almost painful longing. But longing, you know, just just you see feel and you're not there yet. And it said sort of gap between where you are. And where the thing is that you're dreaming of was that very poignant for you as a kid. Well, we grew up in sort of a low to middle class family and south Mississippi. And so I was naturally drawn to the arts. So my parents, and my family would take the extra time in the money to go to New Orleans, and and get tickets with venom of the opera things like that was a big event in our family. And it just always seemed like I wanted to go somewhere else. I didn't really have this pining longing. Really until I was like in my teenage years because I had a really healthy like happy childhood have had a really big family a very close knit family. We all lived in the same town. So it was I was ready to go to college. When I did. And I was happy that I was leaving an only subsequent trips to Mississippi. Did I realized that didn't really want to live there? Go back there often. It was kind of it wasn't like I was growing up longing to Mississippi. But I think that I had a family that really supported what I needed to do. And it seemed like the next thing to do was to come to New York or a good art school. These sort of step to take you from just out of curiosity where you from anywhere near Natchitoches. No, I'm from the very southern part of the state. Okay. Slow way below that like near Kentucky on the Puerto down that for. Oh, no, I'm from the southern part of the state, so almost to the Gulf of Mexico. Yeah. Very New Orleans. Yeah. Andrew can you talk to me a little bit about how you function? In creating the sets for a fashion photo shoot who brings you in how you interact with the Tigers and the stylist and the producers and all that what's the whole system that goes on what's your role in that from the beginning to the end. Well, it's very different depending on who the photographer is. And who the client is I have some photographers or clients who just say we have fifteen pages, and this magazine, what are we what are we interested in? Now, what have you seen? What are you making? What are you sketching? And then we have some clients NAS market in everything has been determined and discussed and redesigned reconfigured by adage, and so there then you just get a book a bible of what colors what shapes and everything that sort of trending the season. So. God burn it. It really takes. It takes both really if I just did every vogue Paris job that came away. I would never make any money at all. And if I did every target at I would like crying tears of. Yeah. Tears of secondary colors. That's sort of how I felt at a certain point, you know, commercials pay great. But you know, you can start to feel your soul Ming suck. Dada. Your body. You know, if I ever if I have to do one more soap commercial, and where you know. It's a great idea. Let's do let's put the mom in a in a light blue denim shirt. And a pair of khakis. Okay. No. It's not that. There's anything wrong with that. I think it's and I did a lot of really creative commercials. I've I've feel very grateful for the opportunities. I had to do creative commercials. I still have a real of them on a half inch tape. Because some cause some fashion designers, and like I've been working with Vivienne Westwood, and she someone that's very connected to performance in the art world. And so she and her team really responds to that aspect of my work, much more. So than any of my work, my commercial book, I would never even show them book, a book of my work or a real of mine, you know, it's more of like, here's my art. And how can we how can we work together in some collaborative fashion? Takes a different. It takes it all really who've been your favorite people to work within the business in fashion. Yeah. Short-list took. We didn't ask you lease famous which would mainframe. Well, you know, like I had I had a long run. With Phillip Lim. I did maybe fifteen fashion shows with him. And it was a really fascinating time. I was just getting started as I said that was the first fashion show I ever made was with Philip, and he was defining his brand at the time. So I wasn't just like hired onto fashion show. I was really integrated into the brand development and just sort of like, what is it mean to start a business and to develop the static priorities of a business. So it was a pretty interesting thing for me to be a part of I was sort of wrapped into all this very quickly. So I didn't really realize I was even working with these people, my first fashion shoot was with Peter Lindbergh for Harper's bazaar, and I had never heard of Lindberg and I had agent. Tell me how to spell it on the phone. Remember? Peter was amazing to work with just totally the best. So sweet. And so kind Vivienne Westwood is. Also, great someone like really sees me as an artist and brings me on when it's appropriate to bring me on. She wouldn't bring me onto a book that should bring me onto like art director retrospective things like that.

New Orleans Lord theater Vivienne Westwood Mississippi Peter Lindbergh Chicago Tigers Mexico Guthrie New York America Phillip Lim Paris Natchitoches director Philip Kentucky Andrew Dada