19 Burst results for "Peter Levin"

"peter levin" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:12 min | Last month

"peter levin" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Lot of times you'll see a lot of overlap with things like borderline and stuff like that so a quick note about dissociation Have you noticed that people that have a lot of associative experiences in childhood start to use dissociation as a defence strategy like kept like like every intense emotion trigger some sort of defense some sorta social strategy either. It's a somatoform dissociation. I can't really. I have alexa thiamine. I can't really feel my feelings or literally. I'm sort of checked out. In the moment. he can many different. Sort of protean manifestations right when one hundred percent a lot of my patients even will have told me they like it. They associated regular coping skills. Yeah and then some cut themselves to bring themselves back so they go out. They got to come back. Yeah yeah because we don't know other again. It's like going back to that resilience if we don't have a way to acknowledge what we're feeling ensues right again. It's self soothing. So key finding ways to kinda calmer system down. we don't have that knowledge or wherewithal. We find other ways in self injury is very calm. And that's one of my biggest frustrations with the. Dsm is because self injury falls only under the diagnosis of borderline and they do have in areas needing further study like non suicidal self injury. And i wish they would move that into an actual diagnosis because so often. I have patients especially with trauma in their past that. I don't believe meet all the criteria for borderline personality disorder because there's no attachment visual fear of abandonment. It's more just soothing And there's no diagnosis that really fits. It's almost oftentimes. I think of it almost cutting disorder much we have substance use disorders. Yeah i'm just using cutting example because the common thing although you seeing less cutting now i feel like i'm seeing a little less of it. It has some down. I wouldn't say it's necessarily gonna know notes dot com. But i feel like for whatever is not making a judgment or or even a construct. I've just noticed that as gender issues have gone up cutting has gone down and never thought of it in that direct correlation. But i would say that even online i hear less and less chatter about it which is usually a good indication of kind of what's happening. You know under under our thin veneer of what we think is going on like. I don't hear anybody talking about as much. I definitely saw like big surge of it. Maybe five years ago it comes in waves and then finally you see you mentioned. Ptsd complex ptsd in what we can do to treat it. Yes in the treatment. The thing that was kind of interesting speaking. I'm glad you brought up. Vander kokin body keeps. The score is a wonderful book cannot encourage people enough to read that book. It's super helpful. They talk about how when we're treating trauma the way. I was trained as actually talk therapy. That was like the golden standard. You put your trauma into a like trauma timeline. Meaning let's say we have repeated. traumas do remember. This happened at seven than i remember going to. I don't know changing schools. And this was this time. And you know you try to put it into kind of a time in what we call it. A narrative form like a story. And you talk it through and you're supposed to talk it through so many times that it doesn't have any emotional charge attached to it meaning. That doesn't cause us to dissociate or flashbacks or any of that. Were kind of quote unquote. Okay with it however we find for about sixty percent of people that's not enough and so in the book i dig into all the other treatment. Modalities everything from what we're talking about like peter levin and The somatic experiencing where we like move our body to release that stress response that energy that was tied up in the trauma. We do things to release that. There's also things like. Em dr which is stands for. I'm movement desensitization reprocessing which is just a fancy term for making is go left to right my sleep giving your brain another chance And then even digging into some of the newer in maybe talked about things like vegas nerve stimulation treatment has it's been beneficial really beneficial for one of my patients in particular who is struggling with trauma based symptoms while as intense suicide alley and then a newer one. But it's it's a treatment that's been out for a long time but not for trauma is stella ganglion block. That's interesting Well i know that we've been using stellar. A ganglion and other sympathetic ganglion blockades for hyper Madressas hands and there's a whole army of people out there with all kinds of funny symptoms afterwards so it doesn't surprise me. They would have some therapeutic value. Yeah they find that when it blocks that nerve that cluster of nerves rather it the flashbacks lesson and the hyper vigilance lessons interesting. It's really interesting. Yeah i i mean i'm not a neurologist so you know obviously if this is something you're interested in be assessed and treated by proper proper practitioner. But it's very fascinating to me because we do know our body brainer so closely linked to think that only talking it out is the only way to fix it is just you know it's not correct. And there's a burgeoning new area of hallucinogen research. Yes i have a friend in the silla. Sivan research sivan and then there were some very good published literature again. We interviewed The head of a maps now that one and just as he was about to publish the A and therapy and showed some results with Again complex cps pse from military action. Gary what numbers that habit again. The computer's not responding. It's rick dobelin. I'm just trying to pull up the number here for number okay quite a bit about blood. Sugar i'm not talking. Strictly about.

alexa thiamine Vander kokin trauma peter levin stella ganglion vegas Sivan sivan rick dobelin Gary
"peter levin" Discussed on Therapist Uncensored Podcast

Therapist Uncensored Podcast

04:18 min | 4 months ago

"peter levin" Discussed on Therapist Uncensored Podcast

"And then i what i'm short-circuiting and telling of this is i spent a lotta time tracking what's going on in the body so that they start to have memory on a physical level of that right brain muscular sensory pattern and let peter levin and somatic experiencing always tracking neither motor or sensory in the body. Because that's where the trauma get stored in that language of ptsd trauma but in bioenergetics. I also wanna know that they can be more attuned to the variations. So then what i do is i put her in the position where her chest forward doesn't like it so i take a step towards her first time. I was three feet away the second time i was fifteen feet away. She said stop and so then. She began to describe. How horrible would be to be like this and have someone like me. Come and see her this way so we just spent the rest of the session processing bat. I can feel the vulnerability right. I can work off of that so we process that and it could have come up in regular therapy and i'm sure it would have over time. A good psycho dynamic therapist would have picked up that. There's some kind of conflict about getting close to a male and they might have been able to understand it and interpreted. But i needed to get it online somatic -ly because it's really different when you have something that you experience rather than you understand so one of the issues of psychoanalysis is. They're working towards the experience. They're taking a long time because their cortisol they're talking about but rather than experiencing in the body if she's only processing is like of course why wouldn't i want to in a confident position and you know like absolutely. There's this way that she can actually feel her vulnerability in that position and can feel not only of course anyone in that kind of position feels more vulnerable. It sounds like she got in touch with its deeper level of fear of it because as you put her in it and i was kind of imagining being her the whole time that you're talking about an i imagined and it's why said i could feel. Her vulnerability is just that she can physically feel vulnerability. She could relate that physiological experienced a different experiences in her world. Currently remember we started with there was blocked aggression and when she's put in a position of that vulnerability by accident or circumstances that there's protector in there. There's a reaction in their aggression..

fifteen feet peter levin three feet first time second time one
"peter levin" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

The Addicted Mind Podcast

08:24 min | 5 months ago

"peter levin" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

"I had the same experience as he did. When consciousness split off from it selfish. Say in i began to the nowhere of a witness started be cultivated. Now i had left my my company job. I was in woods because the outside environment was stimulating for me and i was practicing stillness. I was meditating. I was reflecting. I was i was away from all the other stimulus right. I left my job. I left some of my friends. I went inward and in the process. I had a mystical experience. In what i mean by that. Is it to be on conceptualization. It was a profound spiritual experience bat. Really real stated in. Change everything within me. I believe a cellular level in my body. Begin to heal. But i i had to engage in the shift of my own consciousness. Which is what we need to do here and with addiction and has gabon says the pure to addiction is consciousness harshest justness freedom. Yes definitely it is like an experienced too. I think like you said you can't put to it it because it is visceral experience of of a shift that as we i guess nurtured the impartial observer if we look at like dialectical behavior therapy and be able to see ourselves beyond ourselves. That sounds so weird but i. i don't know how to describe it. Because i understand what you're saying when you have deep trauma and you shift that there is that kind of shifting consciousness for sure and he talks about how trauma is a gateway to perform ships and consciousness or my mentor with. You've after pathak doctor. He was teaching people that mindfulness in consciousness has the ability to heal your body. Now why is that will. Let's say you're suffering from the repetition compulsion of of stress every day it causes you to get an ulcer in your belly but then you begin to cultivate presence in mind from this to this stress. Now you have a choice on how you respond before you know it. You're in the relaxation response. Is your now driving the boston. Common your body down by breathing then the oceans get better than you begin to heal so shipping. Consciousness is so very important. And i the the body wants us to heal in its state of relaxation. Doesn't seem like the right word to use. But in in that state of calmness the body wants to repair itself at wants to heal. It wants to move forward and grow absolutely. And that's the that's the beauty of some of the work. I do been out of somatic experiencing our training with the worker peter levin and that works specifically allows the person in need when you're guiding them through the somatic experience and allow magic create times so just giving themselves some time giving themselves some space and support. The nervous system naturally knows how moves through the cycle in discharge the trauma in fact domestic animals and humans are really the ones that get traumatize animals in the wild really get traumatized because they naturally know how to discharge the energy now. You might be thinking. Well how to animals in the wild traumatize while when wolf is chasing her bison bisons flynn for life you bet. He's experiencing a traumatic event rape via. He's it's light and if he escapes you bet that energy is still in his nervous system in. He has induced charge that in a way. So he's not worried about all the of the wolves for the rest of his life. Now animals deer coyotes when when they run from one and they get away. They're not sit there and think about that coyote of ton but humans will think about that event that happened to us ten years ago. Are we were hurt or whatever the case may be in. We'll continue that that cycle reinforcing that energy in the fi so when we do these processes of going to the viney with healing trauma the body like you said drain innately knows how to process in discharge. Absolutely the other question. I wanna ask is as we kinda. He'll this trauma and we move through life and we're doing some of this work. Is there a point where we're done or is this something that we keep doing to be at the. I don't know good because the more and more journey into the deep unconscious for me the more interim more things revealed yes. Oh i don't know if we're ever really done for saying that's kind of where i'm at as well because as as i've done this work and a lot of this comes from my own personal experience with my own traumas through through my life is that i i find that. Sometimes some of these traumas still as do some somatic work. Like somatic experiencing work or somatic. Some of these older traumas may come up in a new way. They seem to be a little more subtle. They're not quite as powerful. But it's interesting that some of them still show up even ten years later. Yeah for sure. I can totally relate to that. And i think there's a point where you begin to luscious say remove some of boulders out of your nervous system and when you remove some of the boulders out of your nervous system and you have the capacity in inner sense of agency and resilience t. You can begin to hold other things that show off in in a way where they're just kind of flowing through you but in the beginning for me my doors had to get blown off so i i had to really move the big baller big chunks and it opened me up to once again develop that awareness that could hold experience in the present moment and you said as i do more work now. There's this inner capacity from me to be with. Wouldn't even initiates the more of more of a healing along my journey. So i really agree with you. Yeah you you start to build that resiliency. it can feel in the beginning of this journey really overwhelming. It's like all the trauma just wants to get out or it feels like if it does get out it's going to blow you up. Yeah and you're not gonna be able to survive it but as you build. I think what you said as you build resilience some of this becomes easier and you jump into it faster. It's not quite as frightening for me when stress has come up because life is hard you know we got covid. And there's all kinds of stresses there and all kinds of things come up but we're able to jump in faster quicker and move through it smoother. Yeah i agree and if we app support in the process it's that's essential really because trauma happens because of lack of support so when we're in recovery or whatever the case may be this message is applicable to people that aren't as well by need support and some of them to help navigate us and.

peter levin ten years ago gabon ten years later boston
"peter levin" Discussed on Wait What Really OK with Loren Weisman

Wait What Really OK with Loren Weisman

05:57 min | 8 months ago

"peter levin" Discussed on Wait What Really OK with Loren Weisman

"This is when this is the brand messaging podcast. Wait what really okay today. I'm here with todd. Peter levin he happens to not be a serial killer. Actually we can make it four words. It could be a doctor. Todd peter levin Like would you like fava beans with that. Now we're now we're really going. Its silence of the. Todd's thing in all seriousness. Though because we we are going to start joking. Not todd for a while. I didn't talk to him for a while. But dr todd. Peter levin is here with me today again. This is loren wise and the title of today's episode is exploring in engaging autism with dr todd. Peter levin todd tatas is. We're not doing this. Dr stuff are we know. Please don't please call todd. Thank thanks so much for having me. No i go by todd all over the place professionally and personally so i appreciate that. That's cool and it's a little bit more laid back okay. So we met. Let's just breaking the ice or breaking back the history here. We met nine thousand nine hundred eighty five correct. That can't camp frank a day in west. Brookfield massachusetts in a yeah. It was. That was the summer that we both turned. Eleven that we're both i. Would i remember it myself. Because i can't speak for you. Awkward lanky looking for socialization may be interested in girls and Stumbling miserably over ourselves but a great place to do that. I thought you know camping canoeing. Linda cabin it was awesome. I look back. And i found one of those photos that my wife saw it was like bothers is really short shorts. Unlike not only was it. An awkward timing was nineteen eighty five. Yeah and don't forget. Don't forget the tall socks socks pulled up to your knees with stripes. You know along the top part of it. That was a big move for me. Absolutely now i before we dig into him and and he's here for autism. He is a doctor. We're going to talk about the otherness. Podcast his podcast. It's in the process of production. But were you there and this is not a rumor. A boat blew up one summer. I was there when it happened. I didn't see it but lightning struck the lake and struck the boat and there was an explosion. Was that we in the same camp that year was that a year before a year later. Do you remember that it might know because that is definitely something i remember and my because you were there a few summers before me. And then i what happened was are overlapping. Ear was the first year. I was there in the last year. You were there. So there wasn't a boat explosion but was something almost as exciting. The you know the the fireworks on the fourth of july someone you know had a roman candle you know the the the basically the two that shoots balls at out and nailed someone in the face. Where the counselors. And i have no idea. Yeah that was. That was the excitement of eighty five. I think maybe was. I don't know if it was summer. But that was the most explosive in terms of flames. And and that sort of thing. I do remember. I hadn't picked up the drums at that point but there was a cabin. I think two or one up from ours and it was a guy with the way i remember. It was a white drum set and a whole bunch of us were inside and he was drumming. And i don't know again a month necessarily gonna say it was camp david. I remember just being in awe of this. This guy in this drum said and loud and rock and roll and i don't know maybe it was that summer camp and start for me. Yeah no i do remember it. It was yeah two cabins down. I guess it was empty and the guy had a drum set and he reminded me of sort of every eighties rocker. You would have any developing eighties rocker. I remember long blonde hair. You know terminator sunglasses. Some sort of cutoff t shirt. And he's a good guy too. So yeah i remember standing watching him and or hearing from like you know two hundred yards away or more because it was loud of course so and here's a little bit more of the irony. I'm always the one in most of my podcasts. When i talk to people about podcast say you know what dig in. Don't go into crazy stories too often. Don't talk about things that people can't necessarily relate to you. But i rarely have guests much less guests that i haven't really seen and the better part of thirty five years so i'm breaking my own rule here but the leading a little bit forward here we you added me on facebook and i guess i just accepted and didn't even put two and two together a little back before we connected in the fall right so that was going back a few years. I remember the name loren wiseman and you know as as we caught up you sort of picked up. I do remember quite a few things over the years. So i remembered hearing the name. See well reading the name seeing the photo in. Of course i wasn't gonna put two and two together and say that was definitely the kid i went to camp with but i said hey in the spirit of connectedness let's do it and then what transpired from there was reading about your work in authentic messaging brand messaging and sort of putting important things out there in ways that are about the about the authenticity authority. Not about kind of gone with the fads and stuff too. So that moment. are those your post. Plus my transition in life from where i was living in rhode island to cenex were important. Wants to and as podcast idea came to me with a group of friends from college a few months earlier i reached out and the results were

today Peter levin nine thousand todd one both Todd peter levin Eleven nineteen eighty five loren Todd nine hundred eighty five dr four words frank Linda cabin Brookfield massachusetts one summer day
Exploring And engaging autism With Doctor Todd Peter Levine.

Wait What Really OK with Loren Weisman

05:57 min | 8 months ago

Exploring And engaging autism With Doctor Todd Peter Levine.

"This is when this is the brand messaging podcast. Wait what really okay today. I'm here with todd. Peter levin he happens to not be a serial killer. Actually we can make it four words. It could be a doctor. Todd peter levin Like would you like fava beans with that. Now we're now we're really going. Its silence of the. Todd's thing in all seriousness. Though because we we are going to start joking. Not todd for a while. I didn't talk to him for a while. But dr todd. Peter levin is here with me today again. This is loren wise and the title of today's episode is exploring in engaging autism with dr todd. Peter levin todd tatas is. We're not doing this. Dr stuff are we know. Please don't please call todd. Thank thanks so much for having me. No i go by todd all over the place professionally and personally so i appreciate that. That's cool and it's a little bit more laid back okay. So we met. Let's just breaking the ice or breaking back the history here. We met nine thousand nine hundred eighty five correct. That can't camp frank a day in west. Brookfield massachusetts in a yeah. It was. That was the summer that we both turned. Eleven that we're both i. Would i remember it myself. Because i can't speak for you. Awkward lanky looking for socialization may be interested in girls and Stumbling miserably over ourselves but a great place to do that. I thought you know camping canoeing. Linda cabin it was awesome. I look back. And i found one of those photos that my wife saw it was like bothers is really short shorts. Unlike not only was it. An awkward timing was nineteen eighty five. Yeah and don't forget. Don't forget the tall socks socks pulled up to your knees with stripes. You know along the top part of it. That was a big move for me. Absolutely now i before we dig into him and and he's here for autism. He is a doctor. We're going to talk about the otherness. Podcast his podcast. It's in the process of production. But were you there and this is not a rumor. A boat blew up one summer. I was there when it happened. I didn't see it but lightning struck the lake and struck the boat and there was an explosion. Was that we in the same camp that year was that a year before a year later. Do you remember that it might know because that is definitely something i remember and my because you were there a few summers before me. And then i what happened was are overlapping. Ear was the first year. I was there in the last year. You were there. So there wasn't a boat explosion but was something almost as exciting. The you know the the fireworks on the fourth of july someone you know had a roman candle you know the the the basically the two that shoots balls at out and nailed someone in the face. Where the counselors. And i have no idea. Yeah that was. That was the excitement of eighty five. I think maybe was. I don't know if it was summer. But that was the most explosive in terms of flames. And and that sort of thing. I do remember. I hadn't picked up the drums at that point but there was a cabin. I think two or one up from ours and it was a guy with the way i remember. It was a white drum set and a whole bunch of us were inside and he was drumming. And i don't know again a month necessarily gonna say it was camp david. I remember just being in awe of this. This guy in this drum said and loud and rock and roll and i don't know maybe it was that summer camp and start for me. Yeah no i do remember it. It was yeah two cabins down. I guess it was empty and the guy had a drum set and he reminded me of sort of every eighties rocker. You would have any developing eighties rocker. I remember long blonde hair. You know terminator sunglasses. Some sort of cutoff t shirt. And he's a good guy too. So yeah i remember standing watching him and or hearing from like you know two hundred yards away or more because it was loud of course so and here's a little bit more of the irony. I'm always the one in most of my podcasts. When i talk to people about podcast say you know what dig in. Don't go into crazy stories too often. Don't talk about things that people can't necessarily relate to you. But i rarely have guests much less guests that i haven't really seen and the better part of thirty five years so i'm breaking my own rule here but the leading a little bit forward here we you added me on facebook and i guess i just accepted and didn't even put two and two together a little back before we connected in the fall right so that was going back a few years. I remember the name loren wiseman and you know as as we caught up you sort of picked up. I do remember quite a few things over the years. So i remembered hearing the name. See well reading the name seeing the photo in. Of course i wasn't gonna put two and two together and say that was definitely the kid i went to camp with but i said hey in the spirit of connectedness let's do it and then what transpired from there was reading about your work in authentic messaging brand messaging and sort of putting important things out there in ways that are about the about the authenticity authority. Not about kind of gone with the fads and stuff too. So that moment. are those your post. Plus my transition in life from where i was living in rhode island to cenex were important. Wants to and as podcast idea came to me with a group of friends from college a few months earlier i reached out and the results were

Peter Levin Dr Todd Todd Todd Peter Levin Loren Wise Todd Tatas Linda Cabin Autism Brookfield Massachusetts Frank Loren Wiseman David Facebook Rhode Island
"peter levin" Discussed on Birthful

Birthful

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"peter levin" Discussed on Birthful

"Thank you as always for all the love you give the show welcome Leslie. It is so wonderful to have you on the show I Julia. Thanks so much for inviting him. Really excited to be here Oh so good who I don't you tell us a bit about yourself. I know I'm GonNa Scare. Canadian. That's who I am. Cool I'm good with that. I have been a a Dula in Montreal for about well over twenty six years actually. And I am a body worker and current me getting certification and by dynamic cranial sake role therapy. I'm an interest spiritual minister and I'm doing a trainer. So I really liked to draw from a lot of narratives from different wisdom traditions when looking at birth and teaching about how to build resilience in birth not many religious just in narrative way how do we compare our nervous systems for birth in all of its mystery and craziness to land on us in a way that we can navigate as safely as possible so much that we don't know. And it shows up in every person. So differently, that's why when you know we do things timing contractions and things that that I actually seems Kinda strange to me because that assumes that everybody's body working in the same way and has to meet the same powder and is just so not like that step back and really have a look and so however, we do navigate the birth even though it's not a medical event, it's usually put in a medical environment. Yes and I feel that we are discovering a lot. Hot navigate that while also supporting the physiology. And also I was so excited to talk to you today because. We've. There's I feel that there's an aspect of birth that Kinda gets truncated, which is that physiology of the third stage which has a lot of there's a reason that things need to happen to sort of close the cycle. Yup and we're intervening without. So that's what. What we're going to talk about and we're go different places. But where do you WanNa start in exploring that? Let's dive in with that I'm I like to talk about worth as a nervous system event. Because when we look at it that way, we can see the importance of the integrative gifts that we have available to us in the third stage after our birth and how it is important to leverage those gifts in order to kind of feel like we're your complete in the birth I feel like trauma or this is been said by Dr Peter Levin who's a very well known trauma therapist that trauma is a nervous system injury. This is when something really difficult happens on a couple of in any mobilizations response. So we're giving birth and we're definitely immobilized. and if everything goes well and we have time for bodies to down regulate and integrate, then we feel really complete but I think if we don't, there's going to be part of us. That's not feeling well integrated and if bad things have happened to us in our birds that made it through the uncomfortable that connection deepens trauma we don't follow the physiologic. Bright and these are things that will happen even. The regardless of the breath you have, if you have a beautiful birth are a flowing birth with no interventions and everything's going smooth. Even. Under those circumstances because birth is such a big body event that there's league going pelvis still kind of. Not Mentally. Traumatic. But like physically that the definition. Yeah so so you still need to down regulate and integrate no matter the birth. Totally I mean we do it in suck as well. It's really fascinating to me how as above so below. So honoring all of wonderful beautiful different ways there are to get pregnant these days. If we kind of break it down into the basic natural thing sort of the same arc of experience that it might take to create a new life. It's the same sort of arc experience that helps to get the baby out when we're looking at the rise of oxytocin shifts in behavior, and then the need for bonding process afterwards. So I really liked the use those two events. So the overly them on each other to just see how we are missing out on the birth part is we don't leverage were down regulation periods. So let's talk about the sex part 'cause that's something that. Most people are familiar with. And you know what? Some people who've never have had that you know had sexual experiences. We can have a sexual folks who got pregnant and so this is like really just breaking it down to the very basic. So I don't WanNa feel leaving anybody out also I'm.

Leslie Montreal Dr Peter Levin oxytocin
"peter levin" Discussed on a16z

a16z

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on a16z

"New books survival to thrive and founding CEO of mobile iron and Peter Levin. A sixteen z general partner talk with me all about finding go to market fit for the enterprise startup, even once you've found product market fit a lot of enterprise companies never quite hit the gas on growth and can stall out at that critical juncture? So what are the right tools to figure out that missing link of the rape, go to market model? How'd you unlock real growth from that moment, what are the different sales and go to market models? And how do you choose between them? And what are the important metrics, you need to be paying attention to so Bob, let's first maybe start by talking about what product market fit means for the enterprise startup. How is it different for the enterprise startup versus other categories? I think there's a bug in Silicon Valley, which is that at our core. I think we're fundamentally product shop, and we are really really really good helping entrepreneurs build products, but. We are not that good it. Helping entrepreneurs build good markets on the back of their products. There's not necessarily sort of the institutional knowledge that is passed from company to company to company about how to Bill go to markets for consumer companies when you find product market fit, the company takes off magic happens growth unlocks for enterprise and B to B companies where the sales process is more systematic customer decisions of more complicated, you can get the product market fit. When you're first fifteen twenty customers, but growth never really unlocks one of the real court challenges for the B two B community is there's a lot of startups that get to product market fit, but never unlock growth and just sort of bump along how do you know, you've got product market fed. If you're not actually growing doesn't it by almost by definition mean you don't have it if you're not growing. Well, it's order of magnitude about how fast are you growing in many ways for enterprise companies getting to product market fit means can you get to five ten.

Peter Levin CEO general partner rape Bob Bill
"peter levin" Discussed on Dumb, Gay Politics

Dumb, Gay Politics

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on Dumb, Gay Politics

"So we don't have the goddamn forest. Fires. Yes. You know, just somebody be reasonable. So Schwarzenegger can't stand Charlie Sheen. Do you know anything fuck is the Charlie Sheen? He's a fucking cry at. Work on by the way. I love Charley sheet. And no he's been sober for log berries. I don't know what he's doing today. Talking. And I pray for Charlie Chan's by debut for Betty years. He's he's got a hardy goldies, that's what he needs to work on it. We wanted party with them real bad. We don't care. We don't care if he sends us over the Malibu edge on like one of his cars that goes over the cliff guys, those tastes of that's where we lived at behoves states. There's a lot of cliffs there that twenty cars over the side of that just by accident, or whatever it was a lot of cars over there who you see this. You know? You know, I want the best short achieved you'll sharia she has kids, you know, and people that are addicts at at you. You know, what your attic, it's not just the chemicals. You gotta deal with there's a lot of things you gotta deal with the idea with the drugs and alcohol and to really get clean and sober. And at least in my experience. You know, trauma therapy has helped I have to do all I have to work on all cylinders. What's that DBT? Trauma therapy DVD. It's good trauma therapy. Maybe t- stat work dialectical behavioral therapy. Well, I bet you know, the Peter Levin, a method is is what I like it appeared Evita huge fan of his and and write that down the trauma therapy, certainly can not what would you have children? You know, there was a pedophile. It by old Abraham growing up at my mom was a crazy alcoholic. God bless her. She would drop in alcoholics are always, but they're careless. So they and they do stuff like drop you off at the neighbor's house, right? The guy is and he's a guy they don't pay as much attention, and he ends up being a pedophile. And then when you would you be get sober. What you're thirty years old at get clear, and you realize, oh, that's that's really what went down. And that's something I need to deal with and what I did buy life, and you Google this is I had figured out where that guy was now. And because my fear was. I'm going to be back at WalMart somewhat. And that guy's gonna see goes say see that famous guy. I fucked him..

Charlie Sheen Charlie Chan Betty years Peter Levin Schwarzenegger Charley Google DBT WalMart Abraham thirty years
"peter levin" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And what was interesting though, I talk about it also in the book because in the new in the nutrition section the healing food section that the way that our family kind of dealt with stress was through food. And so I remember very clearly after that intervention that we did my grandma just okay now, let's all. Eat family. Just you know, we all we all eight and and then everything was fine again like nothing. We're Hawaiian Chinese German. Yeah. That's quite a mix. Yes. It is that recent mix or is that old mix. You know, what I mean is that is the German of the Chinese of recent origin? No, yeah. Yeah. Generations. When you ate what did you eat probably Chinese food? Yeah. But just really looking at how food can also, you know, become a part of someone's trauma, storing how they can what we're putting in our bodies can exacerbate symptoms of drama. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. So I really wanted to incorporate that as well your own treatment. What was that my own treatments? I've done a few different. I've sought out a lot of of therapeutic dollars. Just based on where it was that. And what I needed in the moment. But a lot of people will really resist particularly trauma survivors over. What's interesting is I didn't know that. I was a trauma survivor. I had no idea that those experiences that I had been through qualified trauma. I didn't even know what trauma was I just thought. Oh, yeah. I went through a flood that happens to people. Yes, I've been through intimate partner violence that also happens to people. So I was doing yoga. I was doing yoga for I've been doing yoga for about. You know over fifteen years and started finding my way into trauma, informed yoga, and then really realizing. And then started doing some self research with authors like, Peter Levin and Bethel. Vander cokes body keeps the score. And and really starting to understand. Yes. I understand that that what I've been through is trauma in that helped really shape my healing founder of. Yeah. Traumatology? And so I'm curious about the yoga informed therapies did. We having spidery based stocks sticks sticking points and some yoga instructor saying wonder why you're stuck there? And know, it was really just me exploring it on my own after I got to my. I'm not sure. But after I got off my abusive relationship, I started working with an on profit that uses art as a healing tool for people that have been through domestic violence, and no, it's an LA. It's called a window between worlds, and they're really fantastic organization. There have art programs in a lot of different shelters all over the country via Chiltern. Yes. No, no. But then I also connected now. So now, I'm the west coast director of nonprofit called purple dot yoga project, and we use yoga as a healing tool to support empower survivors of domestic violence and trauma. And so we work with shelters..

Vander cokes Peter Levin partner director Bethel founder instructor fifteen years
"peter levin" Discussed on Civics 101

Civics 101

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on Civics 101

"We are winning west on a win. The brand new poll out this morning shows independent voters breaking for Democrats in this year's midterms fifty three two three nine percent. Alien RT puts us past early voting numbers from the last mitchum elections. Is your voter undecided about whether you want to participate in these midterm elections. Election has its status as a coast to coast battled for the house with President Trump Camplin pressure. The first. Evening changed America. Tenant brings me extreme sadness to say, the we are at the end of this midterm addition series. Great joy to have complete fit. That's right. And we have another thing already in the hopper. Stay tuned. We have an amazing series coming. We want to thank all of the people we interviewed for the series. And there are many in. They are wonderful. That includes Keith hip Hughes. Cheryl, cook Kallio who used in every single episode. Bakari sellers. Dan, the six fingered man casino and e Bush Barry burden independent candidates Miley foster the team at mid pot. Oh, Heather Atwood Panetta special. Thanks also to Dylan Scott, Ryan Williams Leah scarring on Jeff stigler sheriff candidate Andy Wilson. Justin, LeBlanc, edgar's, all of you. Dr Peter Levin, guy, marzorati and Tim. I'm today's episode was produced by me McCarthy with Nick Kappa DJ, our executive producer is Eric Janik. Our team includes Ben Henry and Jackie Hilbert. Maureen McMurray has an I voted to instead of a sticker music. In today's episode is keen Moreira Zora broke for free and blue dot sessions civics went to one is a production of HP, our New Hampshire public radio..

President Trump Camplin mitchum Moreira Zora Heather Atwood Panetta Maureen McMurray Keith hip Hughes Tim Eric Janik Dr Peter Levin Ben Henry New Hampshire Jackie Hilbert America Cheryl executive producer HP Miley foster Dylan Scott Bush Barry Andy Wilson
"peter levin" Discussed on Civics 101

Civics 101

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on Civics 101

"There are nonpartisan election protection coalition their national. They'll know what to do. Let me just give you a specific example. Right. So a lot of trans rights groups are trying to look out for people who might be denied at the polls. The ACLU of New Hampshire, for instance, has put together a fact sheet explaining that. Yes. If you have changed your name you need to reregister under that name. However, if for example, your idea appears to show someone of a different gender, you cannot be denied the right to vote, right? Come prepared. Maybe even write these things down before you go just to be on the safe side. But still I can totally see myself being intimidated by the prospect of being denied a ballot. Even if I know my rights. Yeah. In a case like that, it can be worth a quick internet search to figure out if there's an election day carpool program near you that can offer support in Tennessee. For example. There's even a rideshare app for the LGBTQ community in Chattanooga. It helps people get to the polls. And you know what? Nick, if all else fails, you can always. Call your turn general and verify your right to vote, and you can do that right at the polling place, commit chicken for a minute here share. So we started this episode with you saying you're going to give people just one more reason to turn out on election day for midterms and you've given us a couple and somehow twos. Okay. Good. That is what is going for. But I think there's one big thing missing actually lie. People who can't vote yet. Young people people who are going to be able to vote in the future. Just don't have that constitutional right yet in their lives. So many of the laws so many of the laws that we make in this country have to do with those people, but they don't get a say or do they? Do they is this a trick? I mean, I say they do I say young people are instrumental to affecting change go on. Okay. Point number one. Please bear with me on this one. Young people are the future. Oh hannah. Is everybody ruling the rise out there? But it's true. So I think it's important for young people to realize to have a lot of power and they're actually exercising. This is Peter Levin. He's the academic dean at the Tufts University Tisch college of civic life. They're very big voting block. They are gonna run the country..

Peter Levin Tufts University Tisch college ACLU Chattanooga New Hampshire Nick Tennessee hannah
"peter levin" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

The EVRYMAN Podcast

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

"And then my wife is down here about a year ago and went to yoga class. And you were was she was told about a workshop you were doing and she didn't get to go, but you I hit our radar then then hit our raider Molly mentioned who you were. And I think there's one more touch point too, but it felt it just felt that nice natural. I don't know know someone comes into your orbit and felt felt good, so so it's exciting to be here now, and so I'll try to lay out what I'm most excited about and then we'll just kind of dive in wherever feels most appropriate. So. Every man we've been around for about sixteen eighteen months, and our mission is to help men become themselves fully and kind of what we're fighting. Its two main things we fight against is emotional suppression and repression, and men who are just not in touch with what they feel and unable to share with other people. And the other main thing we fight is just the 'isolation disconnection that men have from other human beings and they worked together in this. So our practice and of tackles both at once. It's double play where by helping men get in touch semantically and emotionally and sharing with another man tackles both problems at once because it it, it begins to loosen the binds or the or the the dam. That's holding a lot of the repressed and suppressed stuff back. But it also that active owner ability creates deep connection right there. So it's just this, it's this powerful practice and it is medically based and. So a lot of our work comes from my mentor when Marcus who studied with Peter Levin and studied with Ron Kurz and studied Milton Erickson stuff. He's a role for. So it's very common lineage. Jerry common lineage, right. Very, very similar shoulders to to come from so and. And here's the other big thing. The big part of this I mentioned that we just moved to California, and so you met my wife a lease who's taking your one of your courses right now as we speak and our marriage, and she's been on the podcast and we're very open about this. So it's okay for me to share has been deeply impacted by a lot of sexual trauma that she has experienced in her life and our time in Montana, which was we got literally got married about a week after moving to Montana. Really. I mean, we went through a lot of hell and we went through a lot of struggle and strife and and moving here in US how how it was moving to California. We are completely on a new chapter and upswing of that, and and it's not all about her and her trauma. Obviously, that's just a piece of it. But you know, she's. It's interesting, and I realize that I'm talking about here, but I'm just going to get it out at the beginning and then we can open it up. I came into our relationship with this semantic background in lineage and practice and all these things. And I tried to share that with her, but I don't think I had the right artful skills to shirt with her, but you know, on her own, she has found you in your work in and some similar things, and and we're really on a path of healing is really beautiful. So so yeah, that's a lot. Thank you for being here. I'm really excited to share you and your work with the men of our community and all the other listeners. I just get the sense of something really big that you're doing like like when I look at your website and I see what you're engaged in to me, this is this is like world building type practice. And the last thing I'll throw out there before it just stopped talking is also really excited by the level of practice and training that you've undergone and looking at your website of all the certifications, and all the things that you have taken on is really inspiring to me and it's it's hell. It's kind of spurring me right now to look at like to get more excited about learning again. So that's a lot of throw at you, but thanks. Well start is with your initial..

Ron Kurz California Montana US Molly Jerry Milton Erickson Marcus Peter Levin sixteen eighteen months Milton
"peter levin" Discussed on Dreamland

Dreamland

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on Dreamland

"And or calls one of the most influential artists in new age pop and adult alternative circles for music than move your heart set your spirits or visit www dot railing dot com contact in the desert this year the magic happens from june one two three in a brand new venue in indian wells california whitley strieber will be there telling the joyous story of the afterlife revolution and all that has happened with end since the book was published then in his second lecture he's going to be talking about close encounter experiences that are happening to him right now he reports that there are more of these experiences in his life than ever before but what are they what do they mean he will bring a completely new insight at a completely new vision of this powerful experience contacted the desert features such superstars as george noory george sucralose linda moulton how freddie silva nick pope james gillan peter levin data travis walton at many more don't miss this incredible weekend of enlightenment and discovery go to contact in the desert dot com and sign up today we're talking to cynthia su larson her new book quantum jumps an extraordinary science of happiness and prosperity and you can go deeper into what she is talking about watch our tapes read her blogs at cetera at reality shifter's dot com and do you have any upcoming presentations or anything cynthia i will be the keynote speaker at the west coast conference happening in santa cruz california the west coast ousters conference tell us that's fascinating because in my life i've used ousting i douse but we where i lived in upstate new york there was a douse her who all the builders used to find wells and he was really excellent you've found us a great well tell us a little bit about dousing and how you happen to be going there right well i've been also practice.

george noory george sucralose new york james gillan peter levin travis walton santa cruz
"peter levin" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"Favourite okay thank you evan gothi it's like g go but anyway grace nichols i have no idea if this is the name that's read you guys are great it is eleanor win benjamin chen peter habena jenny jensen stephen boyd at dj imperial rob shrek literally says im brackets cool podcast closing brackets don't know the somebody was attempting something there too i don't know what it is diener beings and lyon driving a semi truck understandings kenneth lou decision paralysis trying to pick a witty name there you go that's what i understand peter levin yusuke urumchi m i brennan i guess assad oh cool we finally got assad pledge chris gun pt silk monkey and bret williams thank you guys so much for pledging pitcher dot com slash and thank you too this name begins with a check mark so it is it is check mark over and the last name is arn a r n f j checkmark then there's a character then there's then there's checkmark then there's the infinity symbol so in vanity sandon the that's the middle name the last name of bjarnason so ovar bjarne michigan thank you not sure what alien races chris johnson christian wagner will sundstrom joke asser tha lisa smith morgan woodbury king leon god of the aboriginals your your badge sti brian highness her jacob the hitman hit good wrestling name chris kaiser duma segue adopt a homeless special prosecutor at opposed decline obstruction of justice elena soto molly as meal greg johnson kevin kanji ed yoder general.

stephen boyd lyon christian wagner prosecutor eleanor kenneth lou peter levin assad bret williams bjarne michigan wrestling chris kaiser elena soto
"peter levin" Discussed on a16z

a16z

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on a16z

"Hi and welcome to the a sixteen podcast in this episode dick costello former ceo of twitter and as succeed general partner peter levin talk about all things leadership how to do what you love why a background in comedy improv might be more useful than you think and the importance of resilience the conversation was recorded as part of the brake line tech program for military veterans hosted at andriessen horwitz last time we met you were still ceo at twitter and we haven't met sense so what have you been up to and what was the departure like when i told the company i was leaving and one of the employees asked me what i was going to do next first thing i'm going to sleep until ten am like didn't do anything for six months except travel around when to cuba went to africa sort of all over the place and then not strange background in comedy and i'd always wanted to go into comedy so i contacted the hbo folks who are doing the tv show silicon valley and said have want to come work on silicon valley and the ceo hbo richard pep ler said well we need to like technical consultant but like we can't like pay you to do it and i said i'll just do it for free it was like oh okay great that's works that works for us anyway so i went and worked on season three of silicon valley for that year so it was in the writer's room the whole summer which was awesome and just to see the perspective that the people in hollywood have about like silicon valley and the way they view it differently than the people here view it you did improv early on in your career and i needed tack.

ceo twitter richard pep ler technical consultant writer hollywood silicon valley dick costello general partner peter levin andriessen horwitz cuba africa hbo six months
Dick Costolo and Peter Levine talk about everything

a16z

08:17 min | 3 years ago

Dick Costolo and Peter Levine talk about everything

"Hi, and welcome to the a sixteen podcast. In this episode, dick Costello, former CEO of Twitter and as succeed, general partner, Peter Levin talk about all things leadership, how to do what you love. Why a background in comedy improv might be more useful than you think and the importance of resilience? The conversation was recorded as part of the brake line tech program for military veterans hosted at Andriessen Horwitz. Last time we met you were still CEO at Twitter and we haven't met sense. So what have you been up to and what was the departure? Like when I told the company I was leaving and one of the employees asked me what I was going to do next. I think I'm going to sleep until ten am like didn't do anything for six months, except travel around, went to Cuba, went to Africa, sort of all over the place. And then I'd not strange background in comedy, and I'd always wanted to go into comedy. So I contacted the HBO folks who are doing the TV show Silicon Valley and said, have want to come work on Silicon Valley and the CEO. HBO Richard pep ler said, well, we need to like technical consultant, but like we can't pay you to do it. And I said, I'll just do it for free. It was like, oh, okay, great. That's works. That works for us. Anyway. So I went and worked on season three of Silicon Valley for that year. So it was in the writer's room the whole summer, which was awesome. And just funny to see the perspective that the people in Hollywood have about like Silicon Valley and the way they view it differently than the people here view it. You did improv early on in your career and I needed tack. And how are those two? Are they related like outed one overlap and the other? You're the only person in Silicon Valley who kinda has that background for my under. Yeah, you're, I think that's true. So the need to tell the idea what happened was I was getting computer science degree, university of Michigan, and at the time it wasn't an engineering department. It was in the sort of humanities department back when I got it because I'm oldest. Fuck. So. I decided I had to take a class in my senior year that allowed me to have time to work on my operating systems class because my operating systems class was super hard involved tons of coding and I had to spend tons of time on that. So I thought while I'll take an acting class because that'll be like super easy. And I won't really have to do anything, and I'll just go up and do scenes and stuff and can spend most of my time on my operating systems class and had a ball doing that my first term senior year. So I decided it was gonna take another acting class and start doing like stand up at the student union on like open mic night and stuff. And that went really well and was super fun. So I decided when I graduated not to take any of the programming job offers I had and instead tried to go to second city in Chicago and do improv comedy and get into Saturday Night Live from there because that was sort of the steppingstone to SNL for everybody at the time and still is. In fact, I remember I got my first day and you're doing the second city training center and Steve corral and I in Rachel drafts role in the same group. So he and I and Rachel know each other from like. God thirty years ago. Now, anyway, long story, short, eventually, several years later, got my audition for us and Allen didn't didn't even make it to call backs. They're just got sort of nuked in the first round and addition for mad TV, which was on FOX at the time and didn't get that was like, all right, got to go get a programming job and went back into tech from there and amazingly using years later, the improv background and doing improv in front of, you know, hundreds and thousands of people without having a script like totally serves you well being a leader. One first thing you learn improv is that listening is the most important thing you can do on stage because he got to be aware of what else is happening in the scene and what else other people are doing. Otherwise, if you go out there was some preconceived idea about where the scene should go, and it's already going in another direction. It's not gonna make any sense. I mean, the people who are the best listeners turn out to be the best improvisers while eighty percent of what you do as a manager and a tech company and Silicon Valley is gather feedback and listen to your team and the people who go into the room thinking that they already know what the answer is and. Making decisions that create misery for the team or aren't based on the right information or full information, or maybe based on one stakeholders point of view, and they don't end up being very good managers leaders. The second thing was it was very easy to do things like interviews. I remember on first CNBC interviewed. The person was like, hey, this is going to be live. Is that okay with you? And I was like, I've been booed on stage at eleven pm at the Adelaide opera house by two thousand drunk Australians. Like I'm gonna be fine. Having a camera here while we talk for five minutes about advertising, you know, all these things that you do seem like they're totally random end up helping you as a leader. I teach at the DSP here and often my students come to me and say, hey, like what should I do after I graduate? What should I do with my career? And the simplest answer I give them do what you love as opposed to what's expected of you. Because many people come out of whatever environment and there's all these external pressures. He come out of school. You come out of a program, whatever, and people expect you to do certain things and. We tend to bend in those directions because of these external pressures. And so you're famous for doing what you love and not what's expected and how do you get over that? What's your advice there couldn't agree with you more? My commencement speech at university of Michigan in twenty thirteen. I basically told them the exact same thing. You just said, I said, listen, you all got here by meeting and exceeding expectations. You know, you get into the university of Michigan and you graduate from it by meeting and exceeding expectations. The problem is now there are no longer expectations, and if you do what you think you're expected to do or supposed to do instead of doing what you love, you know when things go wrong as they never do, you'll be standing there frozen on the stage of your life wondering, well, now what am I supposed to do? And instead if you do what you love and things go wrong as notably, will you become resilient, you know? All right. Well, the acting stuff I just all right. Well, that didn't work. I'll go do another edition. Okay. That didn't work. I'll go do this and you know, bounced around and do that stuff for seven eight years and didn't make any money. But it was awesome. I was having a ball performing and every time I took a big risk in my life that wasn't the right thing to go do next. It totally paid off for me and worked out long-term, and you know the other problem with doing what you're expected to do is people always tell students, they have to make an impact in the world. And I always thought like, I don't know what to do with that. What I'm supposed to do. And if I think back on the things that Twitter of things that I did in my life that ended up making an impact or having a big impact, I didn't even know they were making an impact while we were doing them to remember one time Medvedev the president of Russia was at Twitter and we were scrambling around trying to deal with him being there that day. And you know there were all these security dogs in the building and the building landlord didn't want dogs in the building. And the CIA was like, you're going to have frigging dogs in the building, and you're, you're running around and like it's a nightmare. And people are like trying to get an autograph from him. He's not going to give you an autograph is the president of Russia. Anyway. The next day in the fun of the New York Times was like, you know, Medvedev greets Obama on Twitter and there's the exchange greetings on the platform. And I was like, oh, that was like a big day in the world. But at the time I was like, shit stop asking for an autograph. So I just remember that is one of those great examples of you can't think about that stuff in advance and try to plan it out. It's kind of like what happens when you look over your shoulder is like, oh, that was those things that we did made this big impact. So you just have to do the things you want to do. If you're not doing what you love, you're not really going to be great at it and there's going to be somebody else who's doing that job that you think you're expected to go do. Who loves that job who will crush you right? Because they really want to go do it. And so the answer is actually so simple. Go, do what you love. No, you're right. I remember I saw hadn't seen St. for like twenty five years and he gave a talk here at the Lucille. Oh, Packard children's hospital, and it brought the Chicago Tribune review from nineteen Eighty-six six of our show at second city. It's picture of him and I and the other six people in the group and went up to him afterwards and showed in the picture. And he patted me on the back, you know, the CEO of Twitter, this slick, two thousand twelve, and he patted me on the back and said, I'm sorry, it didn't work out for you.

Twitter Silicon Valley CEO University Of Michigan HBO Russia Andriessen Horwitz Africa President Trump Medvedev Peter Levin Cuba Dick Costello Saturday Night Live FOX Rachel Chicago Packard General Partner Adelaide Opera House
"peter levin" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Uh is very difficult for anybody to do this on our own some people do it i certainly couldn't do it on my own i've needed a lot of help inter's of therapy uh that helps you understand what happened to me and said that there's there's a reason for it uh so that not as if there's a reason for it then it's no longer me i'm not somebody to be ashamed of i'm just somebody had developed on certain lines for some very good reasons but it is not in my deepest character in it's not who i am and i don't have to be that way that's a relief to know he's also not that i'm genetically program some doomed to stay that way you know number one number two you have to reconnect with the body beverages body therapies my friend peter levin are and his somatic experiencing walking tiger is that what is taking the time waking the tear we can take it was his first book and he's written many wonderful book since then um so says the semantic somatic experiencing his method is called which he developed his brilliant hour there is the mdr i am movement desensitization uh reprogramming uh which is a way of bypassing the conscious minding getting to the emotional brain and quicker than talk therapy by itself can do since combined with dr tevi but it takes you pass just a conscious defensive eagle like mind uh there is emotional fedin tapping that people do there's various variations on that.

peter levin dr tevi
"peter levin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Uh trump would be one that i would say some time bells on some things clearly a matter because the more you age your views really don't change all that much where you started from all right even thanks peter levin you know what i was in high school uh or even in college for that matter of students wanting to get involved in politics they ran for student government that didn't run for uh you know public office uh is are we seeing i'm curious weather as you look at civic education and civic awareness are you seen sort of the same level of interest in running for student government positions well of course a lot more people were interested in government than run for governor of this in a way it's a more important social phenomenon um we we need to worry about the the quality of opportunities that we offer our young people to be in their everyday lives involved in in issues and in school governance and uh actually soon government is is fine i'm for it um it's a little limited it tends to be a small number of kids um can see a little bit of a popularity contest there are a lot of other ways young people can be involved uh we tend to under in less than those and so when we look when might that colleagues had circle here look at uh which young people aren't alton extra 'collectivities or in groups that they govern and run they find big disparities in big gaps for a lot of kids so um speaking more generally uh here as someone who works on studies citizenship civic awareness what's your assessment of our level of civic literacy in this country.

peter levin
"peter levin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"peter levin" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"A liberte terry and candidate for kansas governor aaron komen 17yearold independent candidate and tyler ruzic a 17yearold republican candidate also with us his peter levin is associate dean and professor of citizenship and public affairs at tufts university and before i go back to you peter want at least one of you guys who's running for governor in kansas to address the listener who says that a 17yearold brain has severely underdeveloped executive functions stay in school than i'll take you seriously yet can i comment on that okay okay well i thank you have to realize we have a president who seventy years old donald j trump and i really don't think his brains for developed i think it's highly unlikely that mr trump has alltime os or something eats surfing insists the wrong with mr trump so if the american people are going to elect somebody's slight donald trump who is brain has not developed i think is kind of hypocrisy the turnaround to a 17yearold who doesn't have any mental illnesses unlike trump and you know i think i just think you have to look at it look at who we elected i mean trump is not develop is brain he he people have done studies and he talks on a fifth grade level okay that aaron coma there was year right yes the either of the other two of you wanna point weighin on that yes all i'd have to ask is ha has that as a tyler who had heard burning this ethan or even sir has that comments are heard bernie sanders a book between wanting one's money in having three houses and then saying we all need to show equally that's disingenuous that that seems to point to something that's immoral in lacks cognitive ability to think through problems and that's not just on the left the right you have guys like john mccain.

peter levin associate dean professor tufts university kansas president donald j trump ethan bernie sanders john mccain aaron komen tyler ruzic executive aaron coma seventy years