21 Burst results for "Peter Jennings"

"peter jennings" Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

07:47 min | Last week

"peter jennings" Discussed on Latina to Latina

"Nina Turner Graf knows how to change course while continuing to move forward. She did it early on when she opted against law school and instead chose to pursue a master's in political science, then again as she pursued a career in news that would take her through the halls of ABC NBC and Entertainment Weekly, digital opportunities that gave way to on air opportunities. Before Nina made the biggest pivot of all, picking up her young family and moving to Minneapolis to bring her love of storytelling to Target Corporate communications. And here's the thing. If you know Nina, which I do, we came up together through news, she is not a sit still type. She is continually reassessing how to best align her values and her skills. Most recently, making the leap to lead pipeline manager for target accelerators. Nina is here to share what she has learned from all of these pivots and the work she's doing to change the future of retail. Nina, thank you so much for doing this. Thanks for having me. Nah, I realize as much as I know about your story, there is a key piece of it that I don't know, which is what it was about your upbringing that made you want to be a storyteller. I fell in love with storytelling because I knew I had a story to tell. I think I was the beneficiary of hearing stories. Almost that nausea, if I'm being honest, around how my paternal grandfather fled through, he came, you know, from the Dominican Republic to Washington heights with nothing. To this day, I don't even know really. What's true, in fact, beyond that simple fact because he told his own story the way he wanted it to be understood and shared out. He created his own legacy as did I think everyone in my family and I'm the beneficiary of that. You know, they made certain choices so that I could have the freedom and privilege to create my own story. And truly, I think it was the simple things around my childhood that kind of influenced my journey. You know, my parents didn't let me watch a lot of TV as a kid it was PBS and 60 minutes. Yes. And so when I was a little kid, I had this really vivid memory of sitting down with my tape recorder. Remember those and like recording myself, doing fake newscasts like Peter Jennings, all the while not really connecting the dots and thinking like I could do that. When did you finally give yourself permission to consider journalism as an actual option? It was way back when I had graduated from college. I had taken the LSAT when I realized I'd have to pay for her said law school, and I wasn't really a 110% engaged in that. I took some time to work, and I was working at a law firm as a paralegal. And at the time, it was a Great Recession. So I had all the time in the world to read. Read the internets, and it was such a cool time, like New York magazine had launched a bunch of blogs, you know, The New York Times was taking a more relaxed style to sharing out the news in tandem with really embracing the power of digital. And honestly, Alicia, it was me reading and consuming content and being like, I could totally do this. I could do this. And so I did apply for law school a second time trying to get those scholarships, but I decided to simultaneously take the GRE and apply for my masters and take up some media internships. And that's kind of like the long story short around how I was able to accomplish my first pivot, the first of a few, and change the trajectory of my professional career. You talked about the first pivot, I would argue no one know if you see it the same way that the second pivot is getting into journalism, becoming a writer, doing a lot of work in the digital space, but then both opportunities organically coming to you to be on air and then your own desire to be on air. I wonder one if you see it the same way. And two, if you can sort of pull back the curtain on the amount of thought and effort that goes into that critical pivot. I've really been the beneficiary of others seeing a lot of potential in me. it's been that coupling of being overly prepared, giving a 110% showing up and being old, but also being surrounded by the people who want the best for you and who want to push things for you. It worked at ABC for a while. I had been an assistant, eventually ended up in the digital newsroom, and I had a variety of beats ranging from general news to entertainment and the girl who had been covering the Kardashians went to cover Hillary Clinton. She was like, I'm a serious reporter now. Like, I'm not, but all that to say, you know, landed at NBC, and I was still very much doing digital writing, digital media, as you had mentioned. And the quote unquote big break came when the singer Jenny Rivera had died. And I think it was a slow news day. Like there wasn't really else going on and someone was like, I hear this shitting river person was a big deal to the Aladdin Latino Latino community. And I think someone probably in the broadcast space, you know, the floor below me at 30 rock was like Googling the news and they saw my headline and were like, oh, she's in the building. My editor at the time, she literally was like slapped some lipstick on me and she was like, go downstairs, like, tell them that you wrote the story. Like, tell them you know everything. And yeah, I did a couple of hits for NBC affiliates. And it all snowballed from there and the fact that I was at NBC. And I was in in-house acid, and there were so many properties, you know, whether it's NBC learn or the affiliates MSNBC and I loved it. Did you know that there's a diaper with a stretchy waistband and no Felix you have to mess with? Forget having to mess with Philly diaper tabs. Cruisers 360 stretchy waistband is quick and easy to pull on your little one and easy to remove with easy tear sides, and for easy disposal, simply rip, wrap and roll the diaper, then secure the attached disposal tape. And now, hampers is offering a podcast, tiny tails, experienced story time brought to life for your tiny one with tiny tails, new audiobook series from pampers. These podcast episodes are available on all major podcasting apps. Tiny tail shows classic stories were made for 2023 like Jackie and the beanstalk and Goldilocks. They celebrate characters from all walks of life in each episode is voiced by some of your tiny ones favorite characters. The show features never before heard adventures like tiny owl and stories from Latin America told in Spanish like ABC mariachi, each story is ten minutes, meaning you have a fun activity to do with your tiny one. My girls love podcasts. We listen to them before they go to bed in the car. So I love that I know have a diaper and a podcast to take with me whenever we're on the go. From Hamburg, the number one pediatrician recommended brand download the paper's club app today to start earning rewards with every diaper and wipes purchase. And Walgreens, saving Guinness, this may come in. Caves is looking at us as soon as I say that. Or by a set of kids on savage. Dress it up in this model on the second place. But aggressive was mask a solo too many commandos. Receive it to recede. One of the brigantes came into the watermark and. The Walgreens. And

Nina Nina Turner ABC Entertainment Weekly NBC Peter Jennings Minneapolis Dominican Republic nausea Jenny Rivera New York magazine PBS Alicia The New York Times Washington Hillary Clinton MSNBC Felix
"peter jennings" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:46 min | Last month

"peter jennings" Discussed on Between The Lines

"That have a monetary reason to want to continue the relationship and they place pressure on elected politicians to do so. There are also admittedly an enormous complex web of influence operations that are going on right now in the United States, Australia, and other democracies around the world. Trying to influence us at a local level. So yeah, there's the wolf warrior diplomacy failed, of course, because it's a totalitarian regime that has no ability to convince they simply bully, but we haven't quite gotten to the point yet in our politics, at least in the United States, to admit that communist China is an enemy. We keep saying it's a competitor. It's not a competitor. Competition relies on rules of the game that both sides respect. That's not what this is. China has been very clear that they want to supplant the United States as the world's preeminent power. And they'll break every rule in bully everyone in order to get there. And so it's good that we've woken up. That's very important. But I fear that next year you will still see this instinct, whether it be in Washington or Canberra or Berlin, most prominently, to say, you know what? They're not quite an enemy yet. Let's still try to see if we can cooperate with them. And I'm afraid it'll be the triumph over experience. Well, on that note, I mean, much of the Australian media and this is the view widely held in business circles. They're celebrating our Thor in Sino American relations and Sino, Australian relations because of prison at Xi's meetings with both Biden and Albany on the sidelines of those global events just a few weeks ago. Peter Jennings, is that how you read things? Absolutely not no, Tom, and more fool the people that do see it that way, because all they're doing is focusing on the days media grab. A 32 minute meeting really changes nothing when that's compared to the broad nature of China's strategic objectives. None of which have changed. China is still engaging in its military build up. It's still occupying those islands in the South China Sea still threatening Taiwan and all of its land based neighbors as Xi Jinping says in every speech he gives to the military, preparing for war. And I think that a pull aside meeting at the G 20 is somehow now zero. Everything's back to normal is simply ridiculous. And even the Australian business community shouldn't be fooled by that. I'm disappointed I have to say Tom at the glibness with which a lot of this is being reported in Australia. But what I can say is that in our intelligence community and government in the opposition, there's no such naivety. There is an understanding that China presents still the big strategic risk to the region. Yes, it's great that the latest met and talked for a little bit, but really there is no fundamental change to dealing with the challenge that China presents. And we should stress that penny Wong the foreign minister, her active diplomacy, building bridges with the Pacific island nations to counter growing Chinese influence in the region probably just reaffirms your point Peter.

China United States Australia Sino Peter Jennings Canberra Berlin Biden Tom Albany Xi Jinping Washington South China Taiwan penny Wong Pacific island Peter
"peter jennings" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

03:00 min | Last month

"peter jennings" Discussed on Between The Lines

"And there's always that possibility that one day we could wake up, he would be gone and perhaps the war would be over. If Putin is indeed toppled Peter Jennings, is it fair to say that his successor could be just as nationalist and hawkish as Putin was? Well, if Putin is toppled, and I agree with Mary, I think there's a real chance of that in 2023, and we begin to see some signs of dissension in the circles around him at the end of 2022. If he's toppled, it will be because of his idiocy in launching Russia into a war that has been disastrous and basically gone against every strategic objective that Putin said was important to him over the course of this year. And that to me would suggest that perhaps his replacement is going to be a person that wants to take Russia back from that wartime experience. Because it's been a failure for the country, a disaster for the country. So look, it's hard to know. I mean, the truth of the matter is that in Russia and in the former Soviet Union, the changing of leaders was always chaotic unpredictable, hard to see from the west to understand precisely what was going on. And there are obviously particularly prominent at the moment, a number of individuals around Putin, who probably would be worse than him if they became leaders of the country. But a Russia engaged in a major war with a large European neighbor is not sustainable. Russia can not survive if it continues to operate in this way. And so I think ultimately it could be a very difficult and bumpy transition. You know, Putin will go and we will at least have the hope that they will be a Russian leader. That the democracies can deal with. Well, there's no question the world is becoming an intensely dangerous place, but it's communist China arguably. I mean, many guests on this program have made this clear throughout the year. It's chaun of the poses a much greater threat. Mary kissel Kevin Rudd has been a guest on this program a few times this year, and he says, China's wolf warrior diplomacy has failed. And we should expect a global charm offensive from Beijing, but their goal to dominate Asia remains. Your thoughts. With respect to the prime minister, there's actually too much focus on the quote unquote wolf warrior diplomacy. That really has never been the source of Chinese power in my view. The real twist that the CCP has put on Cold War tactics was to entice the west in and to co opt some of our most powerful corporate lobbies and some of our most powerful industries, namely Wall Street, Silicon Valley, and Hollywood, and so there are now entrenched interests, not just in the United States, but in Australia and Europe and the rest of the world.

Putin Russia Peter Jennings Mary kissel Kevin Rudd Mary Soviet Union China Beijing Asia CCP Silicon Valley Hollywood United States Australia Europe
"peter jennings" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:27 min | 2 months ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Out of the three, I think Elvis and Ali were essentially decent people. Lennon, I'm not sure about. Very, very interested. Such a compelling book, folks. It's so fascinating. Killing the legends, the lethal danger of celebrity you can get your copy Amazon.com. It's on all my social sites. If you want to visit their fantastic gift for the holidays or read it for yourself. Bill, what else are you up to? You got a great radio show. I know that. Yeah, we come on right after you on WABC and we're kicking serious push it at nighttime. I want to recommend your book American Marxism and people haven't gotten it. Yeah, it's another great Christmas and holiday gift. You know, if you give killing the legends and American Marxism to yourself, you'll give yourself occupied for a while and you'll learn a lot. And I live at Bill O'Reilly dot com. That's our fortress. We do TV. We do everything. And I have to tell you, I run three corporations now. I worked in the corporate world for 42 years. And I am so happy to be out of it. I can't tell you how much television news has changed. You know, you see it. The whole thing and it's really a shame. I mean, I hid it at the right time. I worked at ABC with Peter Jennings that we came in. We invented the Fox News channel. We became a phenomenal success. But boy, I'll tell you the independence that I have. And I couldn't do this in any other country on earth. I know the only place where I could do it. And the way you did your Fox show has been picked up by so many other people. Have you note, I'm sure you've noticed that, right? Yeah, I mean, Jesse watters is probably the best example. He was trained by us. I think I unleashed a monster there, but I'm not sure. What is a good guy though? We trained him and he knows how to do TV and he's doing well and all the producers. Of Fox News prime time, we're trained by me. So if you can get by me, it's like the navy seals. Our standards are very, very high. We don't make mistakes. It's no BS with us. You don't have to agree, but what we're going to present is very important. Can I give you one stat Mark? I don't know. Absolutely. This is shocking to me. So every time there's a mass shooting of all the buffalo all of that. All the leftists come out and demand gun control. We all know that, right? So last year, there were 690 mass shootings according to the violence project. The violence project tracks everything. Mass shootings of four more people hit by gunfire. How many loan gunmen out of the 690? No. Do you know how many? No. 7. 7, 7. So mostly gang related, I guess. Absolutely. And they won't cover that story. It's the inner city drug gangs in the big metro centers that are slaughtering people in the streets. Slaughtering them. And it's not covered. Doesn't fit the narrative. Yeah, it doesn't fit it. And then if you just step back and you say, oh, you want to ban these guns. You don't think these drug gangs are going to get the guns? It's ridiculous. Come on. It's dangerous. And so the American people are misled when I saw that stat I went, wow. And the final thing that I want to talk to you about that I want to tell you is, did you see corinne Jean Pierre say flat out that Joe Biden went to the border? He did, right? Yes. Crazy. That is the, that is the biggest lie I've ever seen in 50 years of journalism from The White House, from any White House. She just flat out says, oh, yeah, he's been to the border. No lady, he hasn't, and you know he hasn't. Here, Bill, she can get away with that. I don't think the media give a damn anymore. They don't care. That's exactly a 100% right. 20 years ago, ten years ago, you lie like that. Even The New York Times have put it on page one. Now they ignore it completely. And it shocking. It is shocking. They're so partisan. Well, listen, I want people to know, you are a good guy. You know, I feel like I have to say this, you know, early on, you and I went at it. It was a terrible mistake on both of our parts. And the fact of the matter is, Bill really is a good guy and a smart guy. And so I appreciate you, buddy, and the book is. All right, you're killing the legends. Right, you know you're ruining my reputation. It needs to be ruined. I'm telling people I'm a good guy. It's all right. Hey, Mark, have a great season, enjoy it. Really appreciate you having me on. Thank you very much. All right, God bless, buddy. You take care. You're really gonna like this book. Killing the legends, the lethal danger of celebrity and get an Amazon.com right now could be delivered to you. I guess it's too late right now, but tomorrow could be delivered to you the next day

Jesse watters WABC Peter Jennings Lennon Bill O'Reilly Fox News channel Elvis Ali Amazon.com Bill corinne Jean Pierre ABC Fox News Fox navy buffalo Mark Joe Biden White House
"peter jennings" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

05:40 min | 5 months ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"Prominence leftist terrorists who were in prison, the leaders of the famous batter meinhof gang Andreas boder and ulrik meinhof. And beyond that, of course, it was also an opportunity to bring attention to their cause. And what better way to bring attention than to perpetrate this attack at the Olympic Games. And they said if their demands weren't met, they would kill all the hostages. And so at this point, Jeremy, the German police is where in all of this. What are they doing? What are they start to try to do to save the hostages? So Germans are trying to figure out what they can do and how they are going to resolve this situation. But it was kind of beyond the capabilities of the Munich police and the Bavarian police really deal with this. They know very little about who these terrorists are. They don't even know how many of them are there. Most people involve figured okay, we're going to figure out a way to make an exchange. We could save the rest of the hostages. And so they start this long series of negotiations. They have set a deadline of noon which is just an hour and 15 minutes ago, saying that they were going to kill all of their hostages at that time. In the event, the ultimatum is not heated, orders would be given to carry out revolutionary and just force in order to give the war chiefs of the Israeli war machine a hard lesson unquote. So originally there's a deadline set for noon, that passes or negotiations, they don't know if the terrorists are watching TV, but all these images are out in the world. You know, you can see German police trying to take positions at the top of the building across the way. So it's almost as if the cameras are also compromising the rescue efforts. This is happening now if you can possibly believe that the games of the 20th olympiad. Peter Jennings is in the village. Peter, can you see this going on? I have a slightly different vantage point, but once again there is a delegation directly under the building underneath. It just keeps dragging on and then a new deadline is set for 5 p.m. by the terrorists. A police spokesman said a squad of 38 volunteers would storm the house if a deal had not been worked out by the deadline. It is 5 o'clock. This is the deadline. The storming if it is going to happen could happen at any moment. Eventually, it's about 9 p.m., they strike a deal. It's not a deal to resolve the situation, but it's a stop gap measure. We're going to get this out of the Olympic village. We're going to get you guys out of Germany and then you can figure this out. So what they're going to do is they're going to provide a plane a Lufthansa passenger jet to the terrorists who will then proceed with the hostages to an Arab country. And when they get there, then they can figure it out, negotiate with the Israelis, whatever it may be, but we're going to get this situation out of the Olympics and out of Germany. And so to be clear here, Jeremy, the terrorists and the Israeli hostages, they are going to be taken by helicopter to an airport at that airport, they're going to board a plane that's going to take them somewhere else to continue negotiations. Meanwhile, what is shaul's reaction to all of this? Now remember, to be back in Germany and to see this unfolding, it's surreal for him. Building 31 is now vacant. The Israeli hostages and the commanders who have held them hostage for this entire day has now left to a makeshift helicopter pad at the back of the Olympic village. All of us, their survivors, we saw how our teammates got off the buses with the terrorists, and then how they climbed the helicopters. One of the helicopters now proceeds out over the Olympic site out over the main stadium where half the lights are on, the second helicopter is now following it. I will sinking in

Andreas boder ulrik meinhof Bavarian police German police Jeremy Olympic Games Munich Peter Jennings Germany Peter Lufthansa shaul Olympics Olympic
"peter jennings" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"From 5 30 till 9 On WLS I have to get something off your mind calling for four for the USA and let in no 844-484-3872 the Dan bongino show By the way I didn't mention at the beginning of the show when I should have a big thank you to everyone who sent me emails and well wishes you know last week I was going through another round two of the rona battle which was I must say round two of it was not nearly as bad as round one round one was a horror I'm guessing I had Delta It's a guess I don't know It didn't have it metabolically broken down or whatever traced but the first bow was pretty ugly I took the Ivermectin hydroxychloroquine the antibodies the Z pack benefit rate on advice and my doctor and was done with it in 36 hours the first round So even though it was ugly this one I didn't even know I was suspect I had the wrong I thought I just had a cold so last week you heard that nasty voice I had I was at the Barry White voice going which I had to sing in a bill can you remove the old little bit You know I'll break a window singing not all Barry Barry was good like that But you know I'm sorry about the voice last week was only so much I could do about that But we didn't miss the day at work We did all our podcasts all the shows and I was happy to do it because it was a busy news week And I feel great today Still you could probably tell a little nasally a little bit But I feel a 100% worked out twice this weekend gonna hit it again tomorrow taking a little break today slept good So life is good and sincerely Thank you very much for all your well wishes It means a lot I read your messages I leave the DMs on the Facebook page open to hear back from the audience and you all are really great So I said at the beginning of the show too in a strike to the anti free speech censorship crowd rumble is sent out the free speech video platform I am a part of it said that a 100 $1 million offer to Joe Rogan for four years if he wants to come on over So there you go He parallel economy The free speech economy is growing folks I'm proud to say I've been a small part of it I have a payment platform for you on your website literally called parallel economy dot com If you want to check that out we have rumble You have truth social coming out you have sub stack for real journalists If give send go coming out as we're not out as an alternative to go fund me folks it's happening This free speech economy is happening It's happening right now right in front of your eyes You should all be very proud that we've all been a small part of it We've had enough of it The left thought just like they had their monopoly on media for 30 to 40 years they took a victory lap way too soon they were cracking the champagne they finished tenth place in a tent with ten way race They just like they did when cronkite and Peter Jennings and them controlled the narrative on the nightly news They thought we've got a monopoly over these idiots And what happened You monopoly was broken and who did it Russell and bob did it folks Limbaugh It is the greatest honor of my life to be on some of the stations he was on You have clay and buck two Friends of mine on other stations Dana lash and Eric Erickson on others Charlie Kirk on another one It's not just me But I'll bet if you call into their shows or listen to their shows Ron at the same time we are going to ask him the same question I can almost guarantee you knowing everyone well I don't know Eric too well but I know the other ones well I can guarantee you they'd say it's the greatest honor of their life to It was Limbaugh who broke that monopoly And then who came along after that and you had Fox News in the 90s And then all of a sudden it wasn't just that the left was on the defensive It was at the left was getting crushed Limbaugh was on 600 stations Fox News was number one beats MSNBC and CNN combined at one point Now you've got newsmax and OAN and others The big tech monopoly is going to get crushed over time It's well folks because people don't like the idea of subjugation They don't like the idea that they're freedom and I'm not talking about their physical freedom as if you're being restrained I'm talking about your freedom to express an idea to assemble and to speak freely People in this country don't like that being curtailed They don't There was always going to be an alternative to the censorship loving platform screw tube Twitter fake book There was always going to be there were always going to be alternatives that were developed It was just going to take time Now it's not going to be overnight You know YouTube and fake book folks and Twitter they have a lot of money and a lot of investors to pour into tech I'm not going to see you and tell you that the tech is going to be flawless on day one on a lot of these places and there's never going to be a hiccup It's not that's just not the way it is Listen I watch Fox in the early days You go back and watch some of those segments in the mid 90s They were like oh boy I think the production value is low and everything It takes a lot of time but I'm just asking you now in this big tech this alternate kind of parallel free speech economy be patient.

Dan bongino Barry Barry Barry White Limbaugh Joe Rogan Dana lash Eric Erickson Charlie Kirk USA Peter Jennings cronkite Fox News Facebook Russell newsmax bob Ron MSNBC
"peter jennings" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Elgin. Next. So it feels to me like, and you've mentioned the idea that cryptocurrencies are a kind of Ponzi scheme it's Ponzi scheme or pyramid scheme, whatever. And it seems to me that the people who are investing in this sort of thing want massive universal buy in because that's very profitable. Across the world. So they've got this sort of double thing sort of self fulfilling kind of language thing going where they say they make the claim that web three is all this stuff that I'm invested in. And that's the future of the web. And so ordinary consumers of technology news will get the sense from the incredible hype around this concept that web three is the future. So I better start investing in all these startups. And it just seems like a kind of it seems like a grand marketing scheme similar to the metaverse thing. And I don't know if we want to talk about that later. But it seems like a grand marketing scheme to legitimize something that is really that a certain minority of people are super passionate about and the vast majority couldn't care less. They don't understand it. They don't care, et cetera. And they're trying to get the massive sort of the majority of people to just go along with it to invest in it to make the world safe for this sort of thing. For their own profit. I think it's always here to market something that doesn't exist. It's the Vanna White principle. Somebody asked Peter Jennings why everybody liked him and he says, the Vanna White principle. Javan never says anything. So you project upon her you're at the attributes you like. You assume that she's like you. And I think that that's the same thing with this marketing. You assume it's what you want. Yeah. Because it isn't anything. The best paragraph in your column, Mike is the two biggest buzzwords in tech right now. The metaverse and web three describe platforms that don't exist aren't expected to exist even by boosters for a decade at least and probably will never exist of the top 100 concerns for tech pros web three is 101. All right, popping the stack. Jeff Jarvis. So then I read it moxie's piece is really smart. Yeah. But it's difficult to get through. And I was wondering whether to assign to students. It's very dense with ideas and technology. So I read a couple times hoping that would get it. And then Matt mullenweg, who I admired greatly, founder of WordPress, tweeted this. Also, very smart, very very good guy. We didn't talk about it last week, but there was a really good profile of him in protocol. Yes. Which I highly recommend. So Matt said, people seem to be redefining web two as Facebook, et cetera, that own data. Web two, at the time, was platforms like WordPress odio, 6 apart Flickr, technique and delicious that had open data and interoperate. So I was thinking about this and then I started riffing on it on Twitter that became a post. That said that I think that we make a mistake here and thinking that one, two, three is a progression. Second, we make a mistake in thinking that we're at web two or three anyway, we're at web dot zero zero zero zero one or zero zero zero zero one two. And you know my stick, Gutenberg, it's early days. 1475, you've heard that SPO before. But same true with the web, right? It's very, very early. We don't know what it is yet. It's not as like we've graduated from something. The problem with periodization, the problem with thinking that the dark ages were there and they were worthless and the renaissance was a good thing. It's the same problem with saying, well, web true should be discarded and web one should be discarded because now our web three no we're not. And what Matt said here struck me is there's things to learn in a way what moxie asks for at the end of his wonderful piece. In a way, Matt and open-source answer the questions. Because I remember when the Polaris VC VCs who called me when they were thinking about investing in WordPress and they did, and they said, is it nuts? He's going to be open-source, but how does that work? And I said, he's already beat movable type because he's put something out there that because it's open-source, spreads widely, how much of the web does he now serve and gets updated and so in a sense, we've seen web free, it was when one was called open-source. Right, with a similar mission of power to the people and the crowd and also to Wikipedia for that matter. Interested, passionate people will have a bigger influence than the casual user, et cetera, et cetera, to build this thing without top down policy. Yes, it's a creators tool, right, exactly. Right. But one of the differences, though, is that the whole open-source phenomenon was so much less naive in the web three phenomenon. For example, one of the big benefits of blockchains is you can is that the ledger is permanent and public. The greatest doxing tool ever created. You can make a purchase and as part of your notes, you can docks somebody to smithereens and nobody could ever remove that information. Oh, that's interesting. Ever. Yeah. Blockchain is permanent. Right. Another one is like, we'll use the blockchain to cure fake news. What we'll do is we'll make sure that every source of content is registered on the blockchain. And then we'll know exactly where it comes from. Well, that doesn't address fake news at all. Because the problem with fake news is that it's not that people are misled about where it comes from is that they think The New York Times and the Atlantic are fake news and they think everything on 4chan is real. That's the problem. Blockchain isn't going to solve that at all. So there are no solutions to the problems of moderation. Likes to dump all of our Facebook for moderation. But either they do something about hate speech, or when they don't, we get to yell at Facebook. Either way, that's better than just hate speech running rampant in the sort of somehow we're kind of in charge of it. As a group. There's nobody as articulated how that's supposed to how that's supposed to work. Other than other than we're all blockchain enthusiasts and so we're all people of good will, which is essentially how the original Internet was supposed to foresee spam that didn't foresee any of this stuff. Yeah. Because they thought, wow, once information is free, then everybody will be on their best behavior. You talked about marketing previously. I think it makes perfect sense that they would be able to capitalize on it because of this being a pandemic and where people are emotionally and socially these days with the whole resignation and wanting to just take more control of things for themselves instead of depending on their jobs and whatnot. And then there's also the group that say, man, I remember Bitcoin up ten years ago and man, if I had just put $10 in it back then I would rich and blah, blah, blah, blah..

Matt Peter Jennings Elgin Javan Jeff Jarvis Matt mullenweg WordPress Facebook Flickr Mike Twitter chan The New York Times Atlantic
"peter jennings" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

The Breakdown with NLW

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on The Breakdown with NLW

"Them and it reminded me a lot of trading rare items and those specifically like trading party hats and a game called red skip. And I thought to myself like, oh wow, these punks are like the party hats of inscape. They're these very scarce a liquid items that came out a long time ago that people are buying just to show status. They have no utility other that might the art and status. So for me, I fully understood why this would be a good bet by comparing it to gaming experiences. For other people, I think it was a mixture of social pressure from big names starting to really talk about punks and NFTs. I think before January in 2021, it was fairly quiet. And then in January of 2021, you have people like Gary V come in. You have John dales and Peter Jennings from the daily fantasy crowd. You have a bunch of high profile people kind of keeping an NFTs and that was when I think it clicked for a lot of people like, oh crap, top shot is making these people a ton of money. Oh, crap, punks are making these people a ton of money and then later on, you know, board apes and every subsequent project that came out made those people a lot of money. Do you think it mattered that there were two kind of very different types of NFTs popping off at the same time in the sense that you had sort of the profile picks and then not too much longer sort of generative AI art and things like that. But then on the complete other end of the spectrum, you add top shot, which was really not only sort of not just pure crypto natives. It was in some ways steering away from that language in that audience, but still showing the power of this different approach to technology. Yeah, I think having the different options meant there was a little something like for everyone. I know a lot of collectors who ended up only going down the art blocks throughout the whole, but didn't go down the palms rabbit hole or other PFT out of the hole. And vice versa. There's people who just stuck with PFTs and they're still people who just stuck on fortunately with top shot and.

John dales Gary V Peter Jennings
"peter jennings" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"I'm back with Jeff shepherd, the author of the Nixon conspiracy. Jeff, we were talking about this cabal as you put it that went after Nixon. And you know, you make the point that this cabal was at a time when you didn't have Fox News. You didn't have social media. You essentially had a kind of you had The Washington Post. You had The New York Times, you had time and newsweek. You had the three major networks. Now that's what seemed to be one leg of the cabal. On the other hand, you have the Democrats in Congress, and of course Nixon did not have a Republican House or a Republican Senate. So he was a Republican president, but the Congress was from the other party. And then of course, heavily so very, very much Democrat. And then it seems that there was also a kind of partisanship in the investigative agencies and in the judiciary. Now talk a little bit about how this comes together. I'm assuming that we're talking about people who go to the same schools, they all know each other. There's a kind of incestuous relationships among them. I obviously mean that politically, not in the literal sense. Talk a little bit about the origins of the deep state as we call it today. Sure. And of course, the concept of deep state was not known then. We called it the federal bureaucracy or the liberal eastern establishment. It was all Ivy League all liberals. But the Democrats had been in charge since 1932. They mean, you know, you think about it the only president before Nixon was Eisenhower and Eisenhower was not a political president. He was a military leader. So the Democrats were very much used to being in charge and had roughly at two thirds majority in each of the houses of Congress. And then the Watergate special prosecution forced the specially recruited group of attorneys brought in to investigate Nixon. It was a hundred people strong, at least 60 lawyers, and the top 17 had all worked together in the Kennedy Johnson Department of Justice. So you had what amounts to a constitutional inversion. The very people removed from office by Nixon's election were now somehow back in charge of the investigation and the prosecution of Nixon's people. And they targeted them. They set out to get them. Those were the only ones they investigated. There was no hint of investigating any Democrats. They announced that their first press conference, they would investigate every allegation made against the next administration since it first took office. And they followed through on that promise. It wasn't just Watergate. It was everything the administration had done. And that coupled with the complacent press in truly vindictive judges, judges who also evidenced disdain and hatred for the next administration that the administration is people didn't have chance. And then you talk about the press. The press was not only uniform, but this term the narrative, which has become popular. You know, you don't, you don't make it into print unless you further the narrative. There's lots of proof lots of documents that I've uncovered that show there was only one narrative and the narrative was the Nixon White House where a bunch of crooks. Yeah, it's not true they could improve it, but they faked it. So that's what that's what constitutes this cabal and what my book does. It shows the documents and it uncovers what they did behind the scenes. See, what really makes the difference before top Watergate prosecutors, the specially recruited group. Each of them took their internal files with them when lady in office. So we could learn what they had done. I've uncovered those caches of files, and I've uncovered the secret grand jury report on Nixon himself and when you analyze that, which is what my book does. The next conspiracy analyzes these documents and you can see what happened you can see that what we suspect today really was going on back then. And it's been kept from the public because these documents were hidden, but that's what the book discloses. I mean, would you say that part of what made it even more insidious than is that now the press appears to be in a more obvious way on one side or the other. It's kind of like all cards are on the table, but in the era of Walter Cronkite and even continuing later through Dan Rather and Peter Jennings, they always gave you the idea that they were calling it straight. They were calling it from the middle. They were not nakedly partisan. And yet you say that in fact, they were so that their whole middle of the road on the one hand on the other hand was a rhetorical camouflage that in fact they were activist disguised as journalists. Well, even Walter Cronkite is quoted as saying he couldn't believe how his liberal points of view went unchallenged. But it was the only point of view presented. And if you had a readership that thought The New York Times was the middle of the road, you know, that that really was all the news that was fit to print, the American public wouldn't get the other side. Today, there's controversy and there's challenges and counter challenges because there's more than one point of view. But during Watergate there was one narrative and the narrative was.

Nixon Jeff shepherd Republican House Congress Eisenhower Kennedy Johnson Department of newsweek The Washington Post Fox News The New York Times Ivy League Jeff Senate Walter Cronkite White House Peter Jennings Dan Rather
"peter jennings" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"It's devastating to me I sat on my regular Fox and Friends appearance I do on Saturday morning When it comes to these tragedies this is typically the time where people thankfully put their political leanings aside and we tend to come together in communities You know folks I have to take that back and see why why would you do that And it makes me sad to do it Because in the communities yes they are coming together Kentucky and the other areas may feel Kentucky on fox right now They are coming together But nationally politicians are just as disgraceful on Friday before the hurricanes hit as they were on Saturday morning They're disgusting Exhibit a Jim queue up for me cut one Here is this callous Sena old man in The White House Is president name only This grotesque corrupt human being Implying hinting at and trying to be too cute by half That somehow climate change is playing a role in this Ladies and gentlemen we have an even buried the victims yet We haven't even buried the victims yet Maybe say to the reporter who asks him this question accused him of hey it's not the time for that now Maybe have that sister soldier moment one time like Bill Clinton did just one time where you say you know what this isn't the time for that debate Nope he couldn't resist Joe Biden because he's weak and because he's stupid He's a genuinely stupid person who doesn't understand In the midst of a crisis in the red zone which is still red hot we're still trying to rescue people that this is not the time to make a silly already discredited argument about the link between storm intensity global warming and tornadoes here Check this out Well all that I know is that the intensity of the weather across the board has some impacts as a consequence of the warming of the planet And the climate change the specific impact on these specific storms I can't say at this point I'm going to be asking the EPA and others to take a look at that But the fact is that we all know everything is more intense when the climate is warming Everything And obviously it has some impact here but I can't give you a quantitative read on that Obviously it has an impact here How do you know that Because there's no data to back that up

Walter Cronkite middle village queens national hurricane center pritzker Peter Jennings Tom Brokaw IPCC Illinois Chicago Dan fema boxing Florida
"peter jennings" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on Between The Lines

"These the world who in camber has the capacity to mike that imagine me leave to a world where american power and purpose is obsessed with its domestic problems. That's academic historian. James karen bridge koby does washington's focus on serious domestic problems main. We should doubt american staying power in idea. No i don't think so. At all. And i think peter jennings actually put this in a really nice way. I mean if you look at american history through not for rose colored glasses. But through the the i mean. America has long had deep divisions and a pretty chaotic political turbulence. Sort of history in which you know. I think he mentioned exactly right fifty years ago. There was marches on a million people in front of the capitol people burning themselves in front of the pentagon over vietnam. Mass societal unrest multiple cities burnt to the ground. My mother grew up in detroit which used to be the silicon valley of of the united states. You know became a smoking hulk in the nineteen sixties you know riots etc drugs everything everything everything but america still end up winning the cold war that that's sort of the feature of our system that's how it actually works out in fact it may be a sign that we're grappling with problems. That may be too rosy. I think we do have very profound problems. But so of course this. China china has enormous internal problems that they may be covering up under xi jinping sort of Suffocating leadership. The other thing i would say is the one thing that republicans and pretty much agree on. That's meaningful the naming post offices and even that who knows is is the challenge from china. In fact there are actually competing over. Who's better at it. And i mean president biden and president trump. Not on the same page on pretty much anything. The one thing that senior vitamin rich before sayings china and asia or the party. And they're moving in that direction and so i think you know the proof is in the pudding. It's there in front of you. But tom with the humiliating. Us withdraw from afghanistan. A month ago you among other friends of america you've been very critical of the of us resolve commitment you even compared the debacle in kabul with the suez crisis in fifty six. Which of course. Precipitated britain strategic retreat. So why should we have confidence in. Us dying power in asia. Tom on the crisis was a strategic retreat for the uk. But it didn't happen tonight. It took ten years and the difference is of course. The economics of british leadership switched at that point over to washington will make clear. That's that's not the case here. What we're seeing is something quite different. You know the united states still dominates the world's largest economy and suddenly has every expectation to do so for many years to come in as briggs says the internal difficulties that the chinese system is facing whether it's demographics or whether it's You know the environmental challenges of sodomization of the eastern seaboard or or desertification of the north. A huge so these issues that are gonna go away what we really need to be talking about his not whether or not. The united states will stay demonstrate. Very clearly that it's going to stay in countries like japan south korea and indeed his cooperation with Australia eights how on earth are we going to manage this Current competition. And i think the way to do that is to make it very clear. That war is not an option. In the way you do that is by making decisions. Like the australian government has made which is to say that we will maintain the capability to defend ourselves and i think you know by nuclear powered submarines as these submarines is a very clear statement..

Us James karen bridge koby china peter jennings president biden president trump washington pentagon mike asia vietnam detroit kabul afghanistan tom britain Tom briggs uk south korea
"peter jennings" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Which is screening this week at the Toronto International Film Festival. His friend, I mean, had never shared his story of fleeing Afghanistan with anyone before opening up to Jonas. And how you told the story is really interesting to me, and there was a couple of paths available to you. You could have shot this and made this into a more traditional documentary. You could've fictionalize it and turned it into a narrative film. But instead you take the audio interviews that you've done and you animate them. You can you have them animated So it becomes a sort of animated. Documentary. When did you know That's how you wanted to make this film actually was coming from the get go out by myself have a background radio And I asked, I mean, actually many years ago, I think 15 years ago if if I could do already documentary about his about his story, and he said at that time, he said no, and said that he wasn't ready to share his story. But he knew that he would have to do it at some point and And when he was ready, he would tell it to me. And then he has passed and I was invited for this workshop called any Ducks rave gather and he made us and documented for America's to develop ideas for animated ducks and again, I had thought about. Maybe this was a way to tell his story, and I asked him again and he finally said yes, and also because with the animation we could make him anonymous. But also because you know what the animation like most of the story takes place in the past. Uh, so it was really a way to make his childhood home Come alive and made Afghanistan the eighties come alive and also because it's very much a story about memory and trauma, and with animation enabled us to be more expressive about this things that are hard to talk about in ways that Important to be realistic, but more so being honest towards the emotionally as when you scared or afraid or angry. I thought it was a really powerful choice when all of a sudden in the middle of 25 minutes of animation of gun by so far there is a news footage clip an actual archival news footage clip and they could not be more different In some ways, you know as an animated documentary, and then it's the news. Um, tell me a little bit about that decision, but I thought it was. It was important throughout the films kind of remind people that this is a true story. No, it's not a fiction and and and that the reason why he's pushed on this, uh, traveled to the scene for five years. It's because of historical events that really happened. So I want throughout the film to remind people that this is this is this is Real. This is a true story. Um, so that's why we put in archive as well. So I want to play a little bit of that archival footage. Take a listen to this overseas. Today. The last of the American Embassy personnel in Afghanistan flew out of the capital Kabul today and went to India. Most other Western embassies are either closed or closing. The conventional wisdom is that when the Soviets are finally completely withdrawn from the country sometime in the next couple of weeks The Afghans will set on one another, and the capital will be even more dangerous than it is now. So that's Peter Jennings.

Peter Jennings five years 25 minutes Today Toronto International Film Fes Afghanistan India Kabul Jonas today this week 15 years ago many years ago America eighties American Embassy next couple of weeks Ducks rave Afghans Soviets
"peter jennings" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Novia and you are Princess shut. Up the Princess Diaries, a box office hit. If you had a flight out of Mitchell International at the chances are it was with these guys. Certainly, if you were New York Mountain no T s a no recon population. You've got a full meal on the way with honest to goodness silverware and a fresh baked chocolate chip cookie dough, walkie processing the loss of philanthropist Jean Bradley Pitt. She died Sunday, September 9th at the age of 82. The arena that she and her husband gifted to the city. The Bradley Center was just 13 years old. Funeral arrangements were still pending. This is World News tonight with Peter Jennings. Good evening, everyone. We're going to begin tonight. With the red hot battle about keeping the country out of recession. Network evening news was still a big deal. Peter Jennings and company told us what we had missed during the day before we settled in to watch the Giants and Broncos on Monday night Football. At what? We then called Miller Park. The Brewers were getting whitewashed by the Cardinals. Ain't nothing that night doing is crying over hundreds of ships and point to its belly challenge. David Letterman millions of us in need of a laugh, headed to bed, but first, they caught some time with their favorite late night talk show host of choice. No doubt that includes some 3000 people, many of them from New York would wake up the next morning. Good Morning America and Charles Gibson. I'm Diane Sawyer Tuesday, September 11th 2000 and one Americans who would not live to see that day's end. A country that would witness the unthinkable witnessed the unspeakable and never be the place that it was that table for Monday, September 10th 2000 and one Now we're thanks to Wtmj s Jean Miller for.

David Letterman Peter Jennings Diane Sawyer Charles Gibson New York Jean Bradley Pitt Sunday, September 9th Novia Monday, September 10th 2000 Broncos Monday night Jean Miller Tuesday, September 11th 2000 Giants Cardinals New York Mountain Miller Park tonight next morning Mitchell International
Who Belongs in a War Zone?

Throughline

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Who Belongs in a War Zone?

"Belongs in a war zone. We were sitting in the lobby and It was such a scene. You know you'd see peter jennings and then you'd see christiane amanpour and really cool right. 'cause everybody's just like you know. I belong hair right. Tara sutton freelance. Journalists did not feel like she belonged in baghdad. When she got there in two thousand three at the start of the iraq war and then up popped marla like hi. I'm marla marla ruzicka in jeans and a long afghan style sheepskin best. She looked like a hippie. You know mean and she was skinny and her hair was kind of uncombed. And she's a bedraggled cute but bedraggled and just sort of like floating around like what are you doing here exactly the two women start talking and tara. The freelance journalist says she's they're writing an article about iraqi children in war and goes i was just in afghanistan. And there's a lot of traumatize people there. And i remember like we were laughing. A lot of traumatize people enough denison like not your thoughts were what a ding dong like. Who is this person. I mean the first impression of her was mystifying. Macos quil lawrence admit marla more than a year earlier in afghanistan when she'd inexplicably popped up at the beginning of that war. How did she even get here. I'm in most of us. Took a pretty arduous route. Either people came across land from pakistan or got on some of the early flights that flew into an abandoned airstrip north of the capital. How is she surviving here. Where all of us have trucked in a about little cash to try and get by. She's come here without a place to stay without a driver or a security detailer and she's already couch surfing at this point right. Yeah and she didn't act like the rest of us. She looked like the rest of us. She didn't fit and by the rest of us. He means the four kinds of people that usually show up at the beginning of conflict.

Tara Sutton Marla Marla Ruzicka Christiane Amanpour Peter Jennings Baghdad Afghanistan Iraq Tara Denison Marla Pakistan
"peter jennings" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Emily dickenson dies tragically explode. Come jeremy jeremy roth gerber peace corps in pretoria south africa. I had no idea there were other people out there in the little verse that had the same hatred of jeremiah was a bullfrog as i do. Born in nineteen seventy four and frequently teased about. My name is a child even though it is not jeremiah. It's jeremy. I finally asked my parents why they didn't just name me jeremiah. If i was going to receive the same tired jokes and ridicule about my name to which their response was. We didn't want other kids making fun of your name if it was jeremiah. Thanks mom and dad. They've obviously never. Owned a subaru. And from peter jennings but of course not that peter jennings our peter jennings. I'm so impressed with your growing and eclectic group of sponsors of the show that i was wondering about sponsorship. I'm already bored. In retirement and reopened formerly jennings jennings and is now three jennings law office in the same beautiful building in michigan circa nineteen sixty. It would be worth the money just to hear your rant after reading three jennings law from ad-lib personal story here showing the dialogue is so i got on your tiny. Everyone has always do wear what. Who's your picture. What does not sure. Who's your favorite batter. Soto baby get away right. All right brian..

jeremiah Emily dickenson jeremy jeremy roth gerber peace corps peter jennings pretoria south africa jennings jennings jeremy jennings law office michigan jennings Soto brian
"peter jennings" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Disposition toward Ruby. And then kind of let let out what their defense was going to be, and then pulled again and found out more people had empathy, I guess for Ruby After they let out the fact that I guess he was supposedly suffering from this epileptic fit or whatever, and that that led him to believe. Okay. If I go this this route, I'll get him off. And obviously it was only the deliberation was only a couple hours and they came back guilty as charged. And for the death penalty. I mean that No one. No one was surprised that Ruby got convicted based on this defense. What is surprising is that they've given the death penalty and there are a lot of people who believe that that death penalty was directed it the lawyer, um as much as it, Jack Ruby now, eventually, the conviction got overturned. Jack Ruby was going to get a new trial before he died, and I think he would have pursued this manslaughter defense and he would have probably been out with time served. How long was he in prison? Well, you know, it's 1963 when it happened. He dies in January, 67 So he's in prison for the entire 33 plus years. How long was the delay? Time between the arrest and the trial? Because today I think they'd be like three years before they got around to it. No, you're right. It's a good question, and it was only four or five months. Um, from the time that, uh, you know, we had to bail hearings in that period, etcetera. So this trial, you know, moved very quickly, um, with a lot of expert witnesses and all that to correct and that's right. That's right. And so to think about that, that that they all had to figure out like they had to, you know, do their interviews with Ruby. Had to look at all the documentation etcetera, and the fact you're talking about a trial that's happening in March of 64. It's kind of amazing. We go. Dan Abrams book out called Kennedy's Avenger. Done with the David Fisher taking a look at the trial of Jack Ruby, Assassin of Lee Harvey Oswald. Um, what conclusions do you come away with? Other than the fact that Melvin Bell I blew it? Um, that again that Ruby was not part of a conspiracy that, um that that Ruby could have pursued a very different defense. And I think done so effectively. Um, I think that there were a number of other factors like like Dallas at the time, which were relevant. Right, which is that this is a huge black eye for Dallas, right? Kennedy has just been shot there. They actually we're pretty proud of themselves, the police and how they caught as well. Right. I mean Oswald then goes and shoots. Remember a police officer? Yeah, um and David tippet and and he shoots this police officer, and there are eye witnesses and They call it in, and then Oswald starts running away and he escapes. Gets into a movie theater and an eyewitness spots. You know, a suspicious guy sneaking into the movie theater. The police didn't surround the movie theater. They go in, and they're sort of like going. They try not to immediately go to him. They sort of like our questioning different people to make it not clear to Oswald that they're coming for him. And when they get to Oswald punches, the car tried to pull his gun out. Um, and you know that it's all super, You know? Interesting. I think forgotten stuff. About the Oswald arrest. Yeah, well, ABC did a thing a few years back where they went back and covered the story as it was covered at the time. It was years back, as in Peter Jennings anchored it. And when they laid out the facts of the case and how things unfolded at the time, a lot of people who were conspiracy theorists said to themselves, You know what that does make sense. That probably is what happened. It was. It was well done at the time. I forget I want but 10 plus years ago, 12 years ago. I don't know. Yeah, Yeah, yeah. All right, Dan. I'm out of time. I got to go. But the book get it anywhere. I'm sure Amazon Kennedy's Avenger. Dan Abrams with David Fisher and thanks for the book and thanks for your time and have a great weekend. Thank you. Appreciate it. Audios 8 22 right now. Back to traffic. Yes, sir. Initially. The Brent Spence bridge this morning. Oh, that was so half hour ago. Really? Oh, yes. All better. Oh, for the most part dispenses all better. Yeah, That'll be all better in November. Correct? Yeah. That's got about Fox. Pretty much burned off to Yep, yep. Yeah, Everything's coming up Roses. Kind of Alright. What you got? From the UC health traffic Center. Your pain shouldn't wait. You see health, orthopedics and sports medicine offers. Same day appointments called for 75 86 92 scheduled there's an accident on South Bend, 75 cars are on both shoulders. In fact, they blocked off the left leg now just above 2 75. That's backing traffic Past Union Center. But much, much better across the branch. Spence Bridge on Southbound 75 DeLay times have dropped to write about two minutes North bound 75..

Dan Abrams Jack Ruby David Fisher Melvin Bell David tippet Peter Jennings January, 67 Oswald March of 64 Amazon South Bend UC health traffic Center Spence Bridge November ABC Kennedy Dan 75 cars 33 plus years 1963
"peter jennings" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Up with me? That's right. Welcome back, everybody. Jason and Alexis in the morning. Hey, good looking. What you got cooking are federally mandated food talk while while we wait while we wait. We're about four minutes away. From dawn's favorite moment of the year, punks a tawny Phil decides whether we're going to have more winter or more spring and dawn. I was watching the live feed during that commercial break, and I don't know if you know this. But they he has a new stump this year. Oh, my God. No Bad news. Some smell Lexie. That's what that's the joke he made. Did you watch that too? Yeah. You know what? I found the whole thing. Oddly uplifting, Heywood, not me of every single day. And he says at some point, I mean, it means something different this year. More more so than others. I feel Because of, you know pandemic. But he says At some point there will be a breaking point and the monotony will change. It will be changed and I was like, Oh, wow. And then look at how many guys and there's alloy. Did you see the slick editing they did with all the introducing all the people and who they were like the ice man, and then they like, throws the frame, and then they said Hunterson the hunter? Yes, just really cute. Well, All's I'll keep an eye on the feed. So, Lex, if I have to interrupt you, I apologize. But we mentioned this yesterday. They're doing live covert tests now on stage. Yeah. Oh, God. We'll see if Phil Phil test positive or negative to, um American Airlines. American Airlines is getting into the wine business, Lex. Yeah, they are because they have so much extra wine there now starting a delivery service, which is genius. I guess this will pump about 40 to 50 grand, which is Nothing compared to the number of flights being lost and alcohol now is banned for most cabins because of the spread of covert 19. So you can sign up for the American Airlines. Flagship Sellers Monthly subscription. If you'd like $99 a month? Yeah. Or you could buy single bottles as well. You could buy a three pack of champagne for $300. Discounted prices. Mm. No. Do you think I don't know? Because here's the deal. I some of that wine isn't A. I want to make sure it's a good deal because some of that wine is nasty s O. You know what I mean? It only takes good 35,000 ft. Exactly. Lex. It's like a change in which is quality Every time know that, wherever you know Only accept no on Lee acceptable at that elevation, But some of this wine you're on Lee drinking it because it's the on Lee thing available. I mean, that's be clear. That'll do pig. That'll do s so am I going to pay extra for American Airlines wine? I don't know. Well, the price and bottles for a single bottle 13 to $40. Okay, Lux, I don't arrange their don't interrupt you. I don't mean to interrupt you. This is Peter Jennings live of feed coverage of punks. A tawny Phil. They're removing him or they're knocking. Yes. So let's go live. I have the Okay? Or not. Out there taking him out. Your feet. Must be a little bit quicker than mine. Okay, He's there. Oh, God, he's out. He's out. Everybody. The ground Hog is out of his tree stump. They're now placing them on the red carpet. That's on top of the stump. There's a lot of hay in there. Yeah, Ladies and gentlemen. This year of Ceres. The great Oz of weather forecasting Punks and Tony fill the raising him up like Simba Pride rock now and you know what it's so much nicer for him because He doesn't have all the people to scare him, You.

Phil Phil Lex Peter Jennings American Airlines Heywood Jason Tony Lee Hunterson Alexis Lux
"peter jennings" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"peter jennings" Discussed on AP News

"With my grandfather, and it was probably one of the biggest force moments of my life. He adds that Aaron was an inspiration to others. It wasn't long enough enough in that world. You know, we need guys like Hank Aaron around. They'd like to brave say Erin died overnight in his sleep. Former Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw says he is retiring from NBC News after working at the network for 55 years. The author of The Greatest Generation is now 80 years old for two decades. Brokaw, NBC is Peter Jennings and CBS Dan Rather, with the nation's three most visible broadcast journalists. I'm Tim McGuire. AP News AP News For Friday January 22nd I'm Tim McGuire. Timeline is set for former President Trump's second impeachment trial opening arguments on the eighth of next month. On Monday, the House will send to the Senate the article of impeachment charging Donald Trump with incitement of insurrection. The senators will be sworn in Tuesday with arguments beginning about two weeks later. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says there needs to be accountability for January 6th insurrection at the Capitol. Incited by Donald J. Trump. Was a day none of us will ever Forget. Not everyone agrees House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy. I don't believe you provoked if you listen to what he said at the rally, meanwhile, is South Carolina elections lawyer Butch Bowers will present the defense for Donald Trump, the first president to undergo an impeachment trial after leaving office. Jackie Quinn Washington President. Biden is also called on Congress to quickly begin work on his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief and recovery package. He notes that the price tag is high. But the needs are great and the timeline is right and this moment of crisis. With this for the interest rates as low as they are historic lows. It is smart. Fiscal investment, including deficit spending. And they're more urgent than ever. Conservative Republicans in Congress called their proposal and expensive, unworkable. Liberal wish list. Hank Aaron is dead at 86, the Atlanta Braves home run legend who broke Babe Ruth's career home run mark in 1974 died in his sleep in Atlanta. Add Seymour tells WSB read every Hank Aaron Book of the kid. Try.

Hank Aaron Donald J. Trump Tom Brokaw president Tim McGuire Senate Congress Kevin McCarthy AP NBC News Chuck Schumer Atlanta Braves Dan Rather Biden NBC Babe Ruth Peter Jennings Atlanta Jackie Quinn Washington
Remembering when Howard Cosell announced he death of John Lennon

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

05:35 min | 2 years ago

Remembering when Howard Cosell announced he death of John Lennon

"Time out, is called three seconds remaining. John Smith is on the line and I don't care what's on the line. Howard, you have got to say way. No in the booth. Yes, we have to say it. Remember, this is just a football game. No matter who wins or loses and unspeakable tragedy confirmed to us by ABC News in New York City. John Lennon, outside of his apartment building on the west side of New York City. The most famous perhaps of all of the Penis, shot twice in the back, rushed the Roosevelt Hospital dead on arrival. Hard to go back to the game. After that news flash, which in duty bound we have to take Right I need it is remember remember watching watching that that money money night game because I'm the oldest of 45 in here. I remember that when Howard Cosell reported that Mark David Chapman had murdered John Lennon in front of his apartment in New York. And wow, There was no social media back then. But the outpouring of great people were devastated. Devastated. Remember Princess Diana? Member seeing people lined up on Michigan Avenue. They were having some type of a memorial to her in Chicago because she had been here over at Northwestern and this one, and when Elvis that, like those three stick out in my mind, remembering those being announced Am I? Harry Carey, talking about the death of Elvis and crying. Harry and Elvis were tight. And you had John Lennon and this one. It was unbelievable. I know for those who have never heard that clip. They say. You know, Howard Cosell just can't kind is barreling in with the news. You gotta understand that Howard had no finesse. Like that voice and the the cadence. That's who he was. You would think you know, Living more somber, You know, eh, Frank? We've got some sad news, but he did the way he did it. You know if you hear the way he did, as on arrived, yes, that he comes barreling in with the news. But that's who Howard Woz, and so it actually is more jolting when he gives the news. And you know, Howard puts it in perspective, though. I gotta give him credit. He says just a football game. But I got you this news, Frank back to you. And I know you know what Franklin for does after that, That's gonna be tough hearing that news because of just how How much the Beatles and how much John Lennon meant in that era. No question. Do you know it's crazy, but that's so hard. He brings up the game right, so there were three seconds left in the game at that point. It was Patriots Dolphins. The scheme was tied at 13, and they sent in Patriots kicker John Smith Toe win the game. This is Howard Cosell makes the announcement three seconds left. Here comes the kicker Patriots kicker John Smith to kick the game winning field goal and it was blocked. That game went into overtime in the Dolphins won it But like there's a story on ESPN dot com today that the kicker John Smith will forever be linked to this because it's like right after Howard Cosell, who's one of the most you know, notorious broadcasters of all time, announces such an event. Then millions of people watching are glued to their seats, sees this poor man have to go in there. He probably doesn't even know what's going on. But he's gets his field goal blocked, and now he's forever linked to it. Yeah, I remember watching that money and I found ball. Thank you. Monday night football. Woz, eh? It was a thing, man. It was a happening like we didn't have Game on month. Two games on Monday. Oh, Tuesday, we're gonna play. Oh, we gotta shut this. We're gonna play it on Wednesday and we got Thursday night football. We got 40,000 didn't have all that There wasn't even son in a football. No, it was Sunday afternoon. You had a late game. That would sometimes get you know you served by Heidi, right? Um, correct, but But when you didn't have that going on, it was it was money Money. Knight was the only night game going on. During that time. Money? No, it was the only time I can get that all the highlights of the week also is why Berman does it kind of been a traditional manner on my football today. You've seen the highlights a million times, but it just Berman in there. Give that gravitas of what? It was back in the day. So yes. Oh, my night football had such a such an enormous event. It was it was that for and also money that baseball for me as well, Because it is part of the brand going night football. Think of money. I'd baseball. The Tigers are playing with the lights. That's interesting. Yeah, Esso. It Z one of those things cap where When you have that kind of news now, keep in mind. They didn't break into the game, ABC News or anything else like that? It was announced right there at the game, Correct. It was strong, right? It wasn't We have to break away because we've got major news. Here's you know. What's that? Peter Jennings? No, no, no, no, no, Howard. And you know, in his ear there like you got to announce this and you've got to do it right now. Because I think it was the right decision. I mean, that was a massive massive name.

Howard Cosell John Lennon John Smith Elvis Football Roosevelt Hospital Howard New York City Patriots Howard Woz Mark David Chapman Harry Carey Abc News Princess Diana Frank Dolphins Harry Chicago Beatles
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 2 years ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
Does Plant Based Keto Diets Work?

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

08:35 min | 3 years ago

Does Plant Based Keto Diets Work?

"For anyone listening the whole idea about adding fat to your plant based i it seems very foreign i mean here's the thing i've been doing this for a number years instead of hosting it out there so that people can see what i do for it to be an option in it's amazing how much push back i get from both the plant as community and the low carb community and it's for different reasons but it's fine i have enough friends in my life that i don't i don't need anymore but your furniture thanks but so you know people think that you can't do it so the low carb people think that you you can't get enough eighteen if you're eating a plant based low carb diet and honestly there are a lot of options and we can talk about those in a second for that from the fats the in point i mean for me it was a matter of there's three macronutrients fat protein and sugar and carbohydrates and if your limiting one of those injuries one or the other and for me i found through experimentation what my optimal amount of protein per day is if i'm going to maintain gene you know i work really hard long hours and i also run a lot like i found what amount of protein i need to sort of maintain my composition and then the fat the things that i added in from a fat standpoint are avocados nuts and seeds i do use some olive oil l. olives cheese flax seeds things like those which for the most part our whole real foods so you know what my they may look like what a meal for may look like is there these beans called lucchini beans that are have zero net carbs they have a ton of fiber or yeah i can use blacks way beans or tofu or hamper some other things like that i also so i can't use the things that have written in them because i wanted genetic lottery that way so i'll have those is my primary protein source and then i'll have a bunch of leafy green vegetables i'll have salad with some olive oil on it i'll put some nuts and seeds on it i eat a ton of broccoli and asparagus and cauliflower and you know put guacamole on everything and hot sauce because everything is better with hot sauce and nutritional he's you know so my diet's it's pretty simple it's pretty straightforward it's mostly wholefood i mean some people argue whether olive oil is a whole fruit or not but we're not going to today i mean olive oil battle far too many times right and at the end of the day every single one of my modifiable markers improved to the optimal range so you know for me and for many of my patients this is way that sustainable and you know i have no objective reason to think that there are downsides in my ANC which is a measure of my control varies between you know four point seven and five point three which is almost unheard of the goal for type one diabetic is six point five five to seven i mean that's amazing i totally agree with you when i when i went into my vegan pita experiment i'll be fully honest full disclosure i was very anti i heat oh diet on forever very anti i like you and i like eat them but it was very much like very not i was hoping he was going to be l. two weeks i was like this is gonna blow up my LDL and then over that span of time in july i was like wait a second to actually read the data read about polyunsaturated fatty acids read about actually talk to different lipid allergists and everyone's like you're limited profile probably won't change at all and didn't if anything even mildly grooved with zero it just felt significance but there was some tiny in prevention so i think that year idea that it can be helpful is actually very clear to me now i know i know tation in ascribe for my each and i think it's i think it's very interesting you know way to eat and have the benefits of the first things i want to start out with you guys a. b. six you guys can go into how do you go into joe says and how you mateen thing he does is just kind of like the basics going into kito animal martha before we do that danielle can i say that i wanna i wanna thank you for doing what you did because it was pretty brave and unusual i think we're all aware this ridiculous diet or detention more thing that happens out there that's frankly just annoying as hell and it was great to see you try this and admit that you went into it with a not such an open mind and then admit that you really had a better experience than you thought you were the product of that has been tremendous i mean first of all it's brought the three of us together in a way that none of us expected it's been fun and we'll talk about all that later but it was really awesome that you did another carries like wait i've been talking about this for five years old sudden danielle opens her mouth and like the whole vegan kita i thank you i think it's for me at like i think that i've just been i tell you over the past two years i've realized how complex obesity isn't free conceicao kind of explain understand how key johnson precipitate but for anyone listening it works i mean maybe doesn't work for everyone in mountain state that everything everyone but for me like i had really great and i think that it's something that once you experience it you can't unknow it it's really interesting experience it works for people that want to try it so yes most people have been asking these kind of the basics you could just kind of describe how do you go into toes says on the whole you know there's like a lot of myths about you can't have any carbs where i kind of to sell zavos society to is it is significant when you're in ketosis that you know i used to think you had to be a special kind of stupid to miss a meal because all i could think of that was wanting to eat all the time and when i'm in ketosis which is now most of the time i have to remind myself to eat like i'll operate all day and then not eat until you get home from like this i have actually not looked into this there's something about the key johnson actually suppress like what is the what is the actual mechanism of up yeah need maybe ethan you can talk more about this there's different theories on it i don't know that anybody fully understands how it impacts the different hunger hormones i think there's sort of a theory behind ended at you know if food was in scarcity and we were hungry all the time we would not work communal species than we would not get along very well if we got you know we're perpetually angry until we found food but i i don't think anybody fully understands the mechanisms how it impacts the hunger hormones specifically but those questions are being asked yeah there have been so star if you start at the beginning there are definitely there've been randomized controlled trials to look at appetite and society and every other measure of hunger her absence of hunger and i think there's no doubt that on a proper peter jennings diet that hunger is reduced versus other diets i think people believe that i don't think we understand the anisim and i think as carrie alluded there are lots of studies looking at potentially the role of grellet or other hormones that affect appetite might personal favourite theories it has something to do with insulin but i'm sure that's not all of it and to be just circle back to your question before about whether or not it's key tones itself or its carbohydrate restriction or something else we don't know it could be any of that MR all of them it's interesting i notice a definite difference i think up to save nutrition show individualized but i do think about on some level is because i think there's some people who can eat and i normally do i normally might like regular diets like gazillion grab carbohydrates damn fine but i am kind of always hungry i've never experienced the feeling of being like not hungry at all until it was just it's like i've never felt like shocking i think that's the most common thing that i hear from people who started for the first time is that there is i feel like they're never hungry and you know some people think it's just you're eating all this fat and fat has various at satiated and again there are like one hundred fifty theories and it needs to be worked out why but i think it's pretty clear that the the flip difference i mean i don't think it's the fact that you're eating because like i said i can have my last meal at six o'clock at night and i can go until six o'clock the next night in have operated the whole day it's not like drinking butter for breakfast and that's the reason why i'm not

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