17 Burst results for "Peter Hardiman"

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Bay Curious

Bay Curious

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Bay Curious

"In terms of really good archaeological records anyway or maritime people's seafarer peoples who had boats and who had come down the coast flash forward over the course of several thousand years as ice sheets melted sea level. Slowly rose water-filled what we now know as san francisco bay and at that time. Then you start seeing our early sites here the bay and those go back about five thousand years so at this point the ice age sabertooth cats would have been long gone but there would have still been an astonishing amount of wildlife around all the way up to the now extinct california grizzly bear and they would have been home to lots of sea otters which lightfoot says may have been hunted for their rich pelts overtime. People here came to process acorns into a kind of porridge and to use bows and arrows rather than spears to hunt animals like elk. They used to grass like plant called tuli to make lots of things like baskets nets for fish and even boats and structures tuli houses in lose low reads the grew along the shoreline. This is author and publisher malcolm margolin among his books is one called the only way that community nearly us margolin says one. Lasting emblem from the long long stretch of time before the spanish arrived. Are the shell mounds. By the time the first europeans king because they had one hundred miles around it in these films were accumulations of earth of shows of ashes from fires of refuge. Burials some were huge around three hundred feet in diameter and three stories high. They would have taken generations to build up so long. That margolin thinks their use may have gradually shifted over time. There's some questions to visit. The dwelling places over ritual polices terrific. She really you know. She from generation to generation some people use it as ritual so people use it as dwelling many shell. Mounds have since been paved over in places like berkeley and emeryville. The old sites are now shopping. Centers and parking lots. even today. there are ongoing disputes and protests over this type of development. Maybe the best surviving example of a shell mound is in coyote hills regional park near the east side of the dumbarton bridge. But that was only open to the public on certain occasions as to actors question about what happened to the bay area's first people. It's a sad story. Familiar to many waves of colonizers nearly wiped them out survivors had to give up their land and their way of life. Margolin calls the genocide of indigenous californians. An attempt to a race people as appeal said no use for news. I think we've had the sense of ms inferior beings in what they saw. Were people didn't have read closed until the right matters is never that religion. The devastation came in three waves. Starting about two hundred and fifty years ago. With the spanish conquest cruise. It could be initials king. Indians will join into the missions and many of them died from disease of killed outright then during the era of mexican control that followed the land was divided up in ranch cut loose from the spanish missions and with nowhere to return to aloni people were forced to work for mexican ranchers. Mexico gave up rights to california as part of the settlement that ended the mexican american war. A few months after california became a state in eighteen fifty. The first governor. Peter hardiman brunette said to expect a war of extermination against native people are family experienced a lot of hardships. That came with colonization. Too many hardships of a really list through it. All some indigenous people like vincent medina's great-grandmother quietly preserved in passed on the traditions her ancestors lift by for thousands of years if you could imagine the climate during that time and how hard it would be to practice these ways outward also during a time as well that our family kept these things going strong in isolation when not everything could be carried on when way that our families still found a way to keep these things alive was through documenting them medina says his great grandmother and other elders wrote thousands of pages on history language stories religion and food but my great grandmother survived time. She got through it and she's still kept our culture close passing on as much as she could to to everybody in our family around her and through those efforts that's how so many of us including myself grew up empowered with our culture. His family didn't speak true chania when he was growing up. Not even the elders then did but they remembered hearing their elders speak it. Medina says that along with the archives left behind has made it possible to reawaken the language over the last twelve years at one point. He didn't know a single person who spoke it and now a whole community is conversant and that shows right there in action. It shows how you can be able to have things back again that we might have not had a short time ago but that we were always meant to have medina's working to make indigenous culture more visible in other ways to he rents cafe aloni which serves indigenous foods. But what kinds of food. What i find on the menu there acorn soup. It's our most traditional food for lonely people. It makes me ill really proper for us. And he's one among many indigenous community members who are reviving traditional dance basket trie even making boats tuli reads madina sees all. This is carrying forward a story that began a long long time ago. Being here in the space knowing that we're indigenous here that we were created here. It gives us that responsibility in that that obligation to keep these teachings kept close with a lot of integrity. A.

margolin malcolm margolin coyote hills regional park dumbarton bridge tuli california lightfoot san francisco bay Peter hardiman brunette emeryville vincent medina Margolin berkeley bay area medina Mexico chania Medina
"peter hardiman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:10 min | 2 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sarah McCammon. President Trump has taken one of his most aggressive actions yet to weaken the country's environmental laws. Today, the administration announced changes to speed up construction of big infrastructure projects such as oil pipelines and highways. Critics say that move will sideline concerns about climate change and the effects of pollution on poor and minority communities. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. The president was at a UPS facility in Atlanta to announce dramatic changes to the regulations that govern the National Environmental Policy Act or Nipah. He traveled to Atlanta because his administration wants a local freeway expansion project to be among the first approved under the new regulations for decades, the single biggest obstacle to building a modern transportation system. Has been the mountains and mountains of bureaucratic red tape in Washington, D C Depot was signed into law by President Richard Nixon 50 years ago. It requires federal agencies to consider the environmental effects of proposed projects before they're approved. It also gives the public and interest groups the ability to comment on those evaluations. The new regulations set a time limit of two years on environmental reviews, less than half the time they now take. On average. It limits the number and types of projects that fall under Nipah. It puts new limits on public participation and makes it harder to file legal challenges. While Trump focused on building new highways. The oil industry also sees big benefits in today's announcement. A Siri's of pipeline projects have recently been dealt setbacks related to nip a reviews. Mike Summers heads the American Petroleum Institute and says the existing Nipah process has become too cumbersome. We feel if we're going to get our economy moving again post pandemic that this kind of permitting reform is going to be necessary. Environmental groups around Lee criticize today's announcement. Attorney Sharon Beauty No with the Natural Resources Defense Council says the new regulations essentially gut Nipah And take power away from the country's most vulnerable people. Nita gives poor and communities of color, a say in the projects that will define their communities for decades to come. Rather than listen. The Trump Administration's plan aims to silence such voices. There's a long history of polluting highways, pipelines and industrial plants being disproportionately located in these neighborhoods. Beaut. No believes the Trump Administration's new regulations for Nipah are illegal. And she says they will be challenged in court, which means November's election could determine whether these new regulations remain in effect. The presumptive Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, has vowed to reverse dozens of environmental rollbacks Trump has made while in office. Jeff Brady NPR news So who gets to be memorialized in California? There are several schools and streets named after the state's first governor. But what about the native Americans and black people he terrorized? Well this week. We're profiling, statues, memorials and buildings that deserve a second look to see who we honor in America and who we have allowed ourselves to forget. Today, Peter Hardiman Burnett As governor of California, he endorsed the genocide of Native Americans. He also tried to pass a law outlawing African Americans in the state. Author Gregory Noakes has researched and written extensively on Burnett. His book is called the troubled Life of Peter Burnett, and he joins us now welcome. Well, I thank you very much, Ilsa and pleasure to be here. Elias. You mean before Burnett made it out here to California? He was a young man pushing West. Tell us how he came to live in Oregon first. He was a self taught attorney living in Missouri, and he had a fairly distinguished career there. Here's what defense attorney for Joseph Smith after the Mormon War in 18 38. But you want to be rich, and he made all these investments and heavily into debt, and he heard there was free land out in Oregon. So we organize his own wagon train, which actually was the first major wagon train in 18 43 to come to Oregon. And he enters politics in Oregon and in his role I understand in the Legislature, they're he uses a law that bans slavery in Oregon to actually allow slavery there. How did he do that? Well, he did. It was a very tricky maneuver in his party come from the slave owning family brought a couple slaves of his own into Oregon, although one of them drowned on the way and or get it all previously passed a law banning slavery outright. So he passed what became Oregon's first exclusion law banning African Americans coming door again. There's been no such law before, and it's part of the exclusion law. There was this tricky provisions that slave owners would have 23 their slaves after three years. And that was unusual wording, by implication allowed slave owners tohave slaves for three years, right. And so this was change rather quickly, But it did create a window for some slave owners to bring slaves to Oregon in that period. Well, the gold rush, of course, brings him to California. He helps found the city of Sacramento. He has elected the first governor of California. And he was able to get laws and policies on the books that effectively subject gated Native Americans in this state. What were those policies? One of those was a law passed in 18 50 called the Act for the government and protection of Indians and that word protection underline. Because provided for apprenticing native Children toe white people where they could obviously be used his servants or slaves, and then for a vagrant Indian so called vagrant Indians to be hired out to the highest bidder. And it pretty much is like slavery in that period and this apparently involved in his 20,000 native Americans who are were used in that way. And there were also massacres that occurred during his tenure as governor as well right massacres of native Americans. You could say, you know, the one that's stuck out in my mind that I wrote about was ability Island Massacre and Lake County. In 18 50 when as many as 300 promo Indians, innocent Indians, men, women and Children were massacred by the U. S. Calvary. And he had no comment on these air just kind of didn't call out troops to defend them. So in that sense, it was kind of a passive endorsement of extermination. Well, it seems that Burnett has Been reduced to a footnote in California history. I mean, I grew up in California I never learned about him. A lot of people don't know his name despite passing places that bear his name daily. Why do you think that is You must have made a tremendous first impression because we've only touched on a few of the offices that he held over the years. People followed him, but he didn't deliver on his promises. Now, I should say that probably much of the population in the west of that time the white population were hostile to African Americans. But the idea that they would have a governor who seemed to have that it's his only agenda has caused him to be Pretty much for gotten. So you happen you have in California. You have these lists of governors of California and Burnett is always at the top. The very first governor you think that would be a point of distinction, but not much is known about him. Gregory Noakes. His book from 2018 is called the Troubled Life of Peter Burnett. Thank you very much for speaking with us today, but thank you so much as I appreciate the call. I appreciate you're interviewing me. This is all things considered from NPR news..

California Peter Burnett Oregon Nipah Trump Jeff Brady president NPR Atlanta Trump Administration Gregory Noakes attorney Peter Hardiman Burnett Elsa Chang Joe Biden
"peter hardiman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:16 min | 2 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on KCRW

"Traffic slow from Seal Beach Boulevard case you're doubly traffic is brought to you by Cedars Sinai Medical Center. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sarah McCammon. President Trump has taken one of his most aggressive actions yet to weaken the country's environmental laws. Today, the administration announced changes to speed up construction of big infrastructure projects such as oil pipelines and highways. Critics say that move will sideline concerns about climate change and the effects of pollution on poor and minority communities. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. The president was at a UPS facility in Atlanta to announce dramatic changes to the regulations that govern the National Environmental Policy Act or Nipah. He traveled to Atlanta because his administration wants a local freeway expansion project to be among the first approved under the new regulations for decades, the single biggest obstacle to building a modern transportation system. Has been the mountains and mountains of bureaucratic red tape in Washington, D C Depot was signed into law by President Richard Nixon 50 years ago. It requires federal agencies to consider the environmental effects of proposed projects before they're approved. It also gives the public and interest groups the ability to comment on those evaluations. A new regulation set a time limit of two years on environmental reviews, less than half the time they now take. On average. It limits the number and types of projects that fall under Nipah. It puts new limits on public participation and makes it harder to file legal challenges. While Trump focused on building new highways. The oil industry also sees big benefits. In today's announcement. A series of pipeline projects have recently been dealt setbacks related to nip a reviews. Mike Summers heads the American Petroleum Institute and says the existing Nipah process has become too cumbersome. We feel if we're going to get our economy moving again post pandemic that this kind of permitting reform is going to be necessary. Environmental groups around Lee criticize today's announcement. Attorney Sharon Beauty No with the Natural Resources Defense Council says the new regulations essentially gut Nipah And take power away from the country's most vulnerable people. Nita gives poor and communities of color, a say in the projects that will define their communities for decades to come. Rather than listen. The Trump Administration's plan aims to silence such voices. There's a long history of polluting highways, pipelines and industrial plants being disproportionately located in these neighborhoods. Latino believes the Trump Administration's new regulations for Nipah are illegal. And she says they will be challenged in court, which means November's election could determine whether these new regulations remain in effect. The presumptive Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, has vowed to reverse dozens of environmental rollbacks Trump has made while in office. Jeff Brady NPR news So who gets to be memorialized in California? There are several schools and streets named after the state's first governor. But what about the native Americans and black people he terrorized? Well this week. We're profiling, statues, memorials and buildings that deserve a second look to see who we honor in America and who we have allowed ourselves to forget. Today, Peter Hardiman Burnett As governor of California, he endorsed the genocide of Native Americans. He also tried to pass a law outlawing African Americans in this state. Author Gregory Noakes has researched and written extensively on Burnett. His book is called the troubled Life of Peter Burnett, and he joins us now welcome. Hi. Thank you very much, Ilsa and pleasure to be here. Julius. You mean before Burnett made it out here to California? He was a young man pushing West. Tell us how he came to live in Oregon first. He was a self taught attorney living in Missouri, and he had a fairly distinguished career there. Here's what defense attorney for Joseph Smith after the Mormon War in 18 38. But he will want to be rich, and he made all these investments and went heavily into debt, and he heard there was free land out in Oregon. So we organize his own wagon train, which actually was the first major wagon train in 18 43 to come to Oregon. And he enters politics in Oregon and in his role I understand in the Legislature, they're he uses a law that bans slavery in Oregon to actually allow slavery there. How did he do that? Well, he did. It was a very tricky maneuver, and his party come from the slave owning family brought a couple slaves of his own into Oregon, although one of them drowned on the way and or get it all previously passed a law banning slavery outright. So he passed what became Oregon's first exclusion law banning African Americans coming door again. There's been no such law before, and it's part of the exclusion law. There was a tricky provisions that slave owners would have 23 their slaves after three years. And that was unusual wording, by implication allowed slave owners tohave slaves for three years, right. And so this was changed rather quickly, But it did create a window for some slave owners to bring slaves to Oregon in that period. Well, the gold rush, of course, brings him to California. He helps found the city of Sacramento. He has elected the first governor of California. And he was able to get laws and policies on the books that effectively subject gated Native Americans in this state. What were those policies? One of those was a law passed in 18 50 called the Act for the government and protection of Indians and that word protection underlying Because it provided for apprenticing native Children toe white people where they could obviously be used his servants or slaves, and then for a vagrant Indian so called vagrant Indians to be hired out to the highest bidder. And it pretty much is like slavery in that period and this apparently involved in his 20,000 native Americans who are were used in that way. And there were also massacres that occurred during his tenure as governor as well, right massacres of native Americans. Oh, yes, right because you know, the one that's stuck out in my mind that I wrote about was ability Island Massacre in Lake County. In 18 50. What? As many as 300 promo Indians, innocent Indians, men, women and Children were massacred by the U. S. Calvary. And he had no comment on these air just kind of didn't call out troops to defend them. So in that sense, it was kind of a passive endorsement of extermination. Well, it seems that Burnett has Been reduced to a footnote in California history. I mean, I grew up in California I never learned about him. A lot of people don't know his name despite passing places that bear his name daily. Why do you think that is? He must have made a tremendous first impression because we've only touched on a few of the offices that he held over the years. People followed him, but he didn't deliver on his promises. Now, I should say that probably much of the population in the west of that time the white population were hostile to African Americans. But the idea that they would have a governor who seemed to have that it's his only agenda. Has caused him to be a pretty much for gotten. So you happen you have in California. Had these lists of governors of California and Burnett is always at the top. The very first governor. You'd think that would be a point of distinction, but not much is known about him. Gregory Noakes. His book from 2018 is called the Troubled Life of Peter Burnett. Thank you very much for speaking with us today, but thank you so much as I appreciate the call on appreciate you're interviewing me. This is all things considered from NPR news.

California Peter Burnett Nipah Oregon Trump Jeff Brady president NPR Trump Administration Gregory Noakes Atlanta attorney Peter Hardiman Burnett Cedars Sinai Medical Center Seal Beach Boulevard
"peter hardiman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:45 min | 2 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mount Sinai dot or GE on the brain There show talk doesn't just mean talking. It also means listening. It's a challenge to allow different points of view to be heard and still keep a strong grip on the truth. We do our research. If we here lies masquerading his opinion. We have to call that out. Brian Lehrer Show weekdays. 10 a.m. to noon on 93.9 FM and AM 20 W n I c Worldwide mobilization against racism has reached a Nobel Peace Prize winning aid organization Doctors Without Borders That organization has provided critical care to people in some of the world's most desperate and dangerous conflict zones for decades. But over the past month, more than 1000 current and former staffers have signed a letter charging the organization with racism and white supremacy. Tomorrow, the group's international board plans to vote on a raft of measures to begin dismantling what even top officials there agree is a pattern of institutional racism. NPR's Nurit Eisenman reports. One of the staffers who signed the letter alleging racism within doctors Without Borders is Margaret Ninguna. She's a Cameroonian immigrant who had a long career in the U. S. Has a social worker before she joined Theeighty Group in 2017. I thought it was a great organisation, given the work that we're doing in countries that have Experience war on from me. The possibility that she faced racial discrimination from them did not cross my mind that all but no gonna says the micro aggressions began literally the moment she reached her first posting. Ah hospital run by the aid groups in south Sudan, suitcases still in hand, No Guna and another new arrival, also an American of African descent. Walked into the office of a top official, a white female. You know, talking to two people when we say hello. So this woman she not us, you know, she turned looked at awesome. Continue talking over the following weeks again and again. No gonna would notice white staffers treating white colleagues one way warmly, respectfully well, for people like her with black skin and an African accent when they weren't being ignored. You have everything that you do have been put on other microscope. Everything that you do is question but no gonna says the situation was far worse for local South Sudanese staff. For them. A job with doctors without Borders was too precious to risk complaining even when white staffers would talk down to them and berate them. You know, it was just very traumatizing to see that to hear that because coming from Cameroon It brought back the colonia mentality. Christos Christou is president of the International Board of Doctors Without Borders. He questions how widespread incidents of outright racism are across the organization's many missions. He says. There is no question the organization is built on a problematic model, essentially the idea of the white savior white doctor going and providing that system to bar people in Africa. There's a little African team and so increase, too, is calling for a total rethink the whole way off, distributing the decision making power but also their sources. But how much of this talk will translate into progress on the ground? Africa. Stewart is the president of doctors Without Borders US board. She points to her own election back in 2017 as a sign of the appetite for change. Consider she notes who raised her a surgical scrub back My mom who could not go to nursing school and her bastard daughter and with a Black Panther dead named Africa. I mean, this is was not born for this. But she also notes that earlier measures that she and others have pushed like a plan adopted by the International Board to increase the pay parity between international staff and local staff. It's taken years to actually implement. It feels like we're part of the solution, but it also feels like, damn it. How long does it take to wear down a mountain parrot? Eisenman NPR news. So who gets to be memorialized in California? There are several schools and streets named after the state's first governor. But what about the native Americans and black people he terrorized? Well this week. We're profiling, statues, memorials and buildings that deserve a second look to see who we honor in America and who we have allowed ourselves to forget. Today, Peter Hardiman Burnett As governor of California, he endorsed the genocide of Native Americans. He also tried to pass a law outlawing African Americans in this state. Author Gregory Noakes has researched and written extensively on Burnett. His book is called the troubled Life of Peter Burnett, and he joins us now welcome. Well, I thank you very much, Ilsa and pleasure to be here. So let me ask you. I mean, before Burnett made it out here to California. He was a young man pushing West. Tell us how he came to live in Oregon first. He was a self taught attorney living in Missouri, and he had a fairly distinguished career there. Here's one defense attorney for Joseph Smith after the Mormon War in 18 38. But he will want to be rich, and he made all these investments and went heavily into debt, and he heard there was free land out in Oregon. So we organize his own wagon train, which actually was the first major wagon train in 18 43 to come to Oregon. And he enters politics in Oregon and in his role I understand in the Legislature, they're he uses a law that bans slavery in Oregon to actually allow slavery there. How did he do that? Well, he did. It was a very tricky maneuver in his party come from a slave owning family brought a couple slaves of his own into Oregon, although one of them drowned on the way and or get it all previously passed a law banning slavery outright. So he passed what became Oregon's first exclusion law banning African Americans coming door again. There's been no such law before, and it's part of the exclusion law. There was a tricky provisions that slave owners would have 23 their slaves after three years. And that was unusual wording, by implication allowed slave owners tohave slaves for three years, right. And so this was change rather quickly, But it did create a window for some slave owners to bring slaves to Oregon in that period. Well, the gold rush, of course, brings him to California. He helps found the city of Sacramento. He has elected the first governor of California. And he was able to get laws and policies on the books that effectively subject gated Native Americans in this state. What were those policies? One of those was a law passed in 18 50 called the Act for the government and protection of Indians and that word protection underlying Because provided for apprenticing native Children toe white people where they could obviously be used his servants or slaves, and then for a vagrant Indians so called vagrant Indians to be hired out to the highest bidder. And it pretty much is like slavery in that period and this apparently involved in his 20,000 native Americans who are were used in that way. And there were also massacres that occurred during his tenure as governor as well, Right massacres of native Americans. Oh, yes, right. You could fit in. You know, the one that's stuck out in my mind that I wrote about was ability Island Massacre and Lake County in 18 50 when as many as 300 promo, Indians, innocent Indians, men, women and Children. Were massacred by the U. S. Calvary, and he had no comment on these or just kind of didn't call out troops to defend them. So in that sense, it was kind of a passive endorsement of extermination. Well, it seems that Burnett has Been reduced to a footnote in California history. I mean, I grew up in California I never learned about him. A lot of people don't know his name despite passing places that bear his name daily. Why do you think that is? He must have made a tremendous first impression because we've only touched on a few of the offices that he held over the years. People followed him, but he didn't deliver on his promises..

Oregon California Peter Burnett Africa International Board of Doctors official Brian Lehrer president Mount Sinai NPR Peter Hardiman Burnett Borders Sudan Cameroon GE Nurit Eisenman Lake County
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Will give you some cash if you take part in their market research a new view points that pays you for completing surveys research and other tasks that will help refine Facebook's products users earn points and automatically receive PayPal contributions whenever they reach point milestones you have to be at least eighteen years old to use your points and you'll be told what information is being collected and how it's used tech report Larry Olson NBC news radio discover something new I heart the long story short too late the exclusion clause that we examined today was ultimately removed from Oregon's constitution in nineteen twenty seven however as we I think it pretty clearly establish that did not remove the actual practices of racial segregation and discrimination once there is one thing one one more thing I think we should add because we we've been talking about the state's right we can talk about the territory when talking about the people but we have yet to talk in detail about the guy who was at the forefront of it all we have yet to talk in detail about Peter Hardiman Burnett who some would call a real **** yeah and he also managed to make it all the way down the Oregon Trail and not even get dysentery and Terry right or die of exposure and he was just a deck well how about this this is a surprise that week knowing casing I worked on for you all are fair what if we have a little extra credit.

Facebook Oregon Peter Hardiman Burnett Oregon Trail dysentery Terry Larry Olson NBC eighteen years
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Tweeter not deleted they're just being pushed behind an extra click apple's holding its version of the Oscars December second with a favorite apps and games of twenty nineteen of it apple usually announces its awards with a press release and now they're holding some sort of a van apple is not expected to announce new products tech report delivery Olson NBC news radio you're hearing one of over twenty five thousand podcasts available to you right now all for free by downloading I heart radio this is the I heart podcast channel the long story short too late the exclusion clause that we examine some day was ultimately removed from Oregon's constitution in nineteen twenty seven however as we I think it pretty clearly established that did not remove the actual practices of racial segregation and discrimination there's one thing one one more thing I think we should add because we we've been talking about the state's right we've been talking about the territory when talking about the people but we have yet to talk in detail about the guy who was at the forefront of it all we have yet to talk in detail about Peter Hardiman Burnett who some would call a real **** yeah and he also managed to make it all the way down the Oregon Trail and not even get dysentery and Jerry right or die of exposure and he was just a deck well how about this this is a surprise that week knowing casing I worked on for you all are fair what if we have a little extra credit.

apple Oregon Peter Hardiman Burnett Oregon Trail dysentery Oscars Olson NBC Jerry
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Out with the research app that will let you participate in three different health studies owners of iPhones and apple watches can opt in for a women's health study hearings study and a heart in movement study the research app makes participation very easy and apple says all of their privacy policies will be in place and the data will not be sold Disney is attaching a warning to some of the shows on its new streaming service animated films like dumbo Peter Pan lady in the trap have a text attach that says this program is presented as originally created it may contain outdated cultural depictions tech report Larry Olson NBC news radio I have not had channel assembled over twenty five thousand podcast you for free right now by downloading the I heart radio the long story short too late the exclusion clause that we examined today was ultimately removed from Oregon's constitution in nineteen twenty seven however as we I think it pretty clearly established that did not remove the actual practices of racial segregation and discrimination there's one thing one one more thing I think we should add because we we've been talking about the state's right we can talk about the territory when talking about the people but we have yet to talk in detail about the guy who was at the forefront of it all we have yet to talk in detail about Peter Hardiman Burnett who some would call a real **** yeah and he also managed to make it all the way down the Oregon Trail and not even get dysentery and Terry ray or die of exposure and he was just a deck well how about this this is surprised that we knowing casing I worked on for you all are fair what if we have a that's right folks extra credit the segment where and we get you know some human.

apple Disney Oregon Peter Hardiman Burnett Oregon Trail dysentery Terry ray Peter Pan Larry Olson NBC
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:40 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"That's tangentially familiar with the topic by varying degrees, my favorite of late has been the Colonel, Gladwin bolan. Boy, man. He really he really set the internet on fire with that segment. I let him into of Gladwin. I let him into the Facebook group folks, so I, I hope we're all still cool. Did you create a monster? I don't know. I don't know. We'll today we have another quite informed gentleman. Joining us the host of the new house stuff works show behind the bastards, which does deep dives into horrible people throughout history from Saddam. Hussein's hobby writing erotic fiction to Hitler's spanking fetish, I believe, friends and neighbors ban. If I may Robert Evans, a all has a cracking man. It's, it's, it's weird weird. There's been a lot of like silent head. Shaking on this episode which doesn't really translate super well on the podcast. But yeah, who knew we're talking about Oregon, which is if you like. Yeah. If you go to Portland or whatever it seems on the up and I spent a lot of the last three years like rural southern Oregon, and it's, it's a pretty racist place like Josephine county where I was is chock full of Nazis. There are quite a lot of them out there. So it's, it's, it's a fascinating place even in the modern day. Oh, yeah. Tons of them. It's one of the most racist counties and one of the highest densities of hate groups anywhere in the United States, chock-full, and Nazis, as it turns out, not a good call. No, no terrible coffee and terrible. Craft beer that the Nazis make. Yeah. So when we, we originally talked off air, Robert one of the things that we were very interested in both as colleagues, but also fans of your show was seeing whether there was a specific person associated with the, the supremacist origins of Oregon kind of setting the tone that we could we could learn a little bit more about with you, and you found the guy, right? Oh my God. I sure did any Peter Burnett. I think Peter is, is first name. Yeah. Just a tremendous piece of crap, and may be like, there's a long list of super racist politicians in American history. But he's in the running from most racist, he's, he's, he's definitely like, in that conversation for sure. Yeah. We set him briefly as just having been the one that can came up with the idea of exclusionary laws early on before, Oregon became a state, and he loved this idea so much the name that actress self Burnett lash law, which committed black people who refuse to leave the state to be given lashes, like every six months, or something like that. And he loved it so much genius idea. The Burnett lash law. Yeah, he was so proud of his, his whipping people rule that he stuck his name on it, which is a special kind of, of terrible. But he was actually like a violent jerk way before he went to Oregon when he was still living in clear creek, Tennessee. He was a shop owner like. General store owner. He suspected, this enslaved black man was every now and then breaking into his store at night to drink from his whiskey barrel, because they stored whiskey. Barrels back then it was a different time. Rather than like, taking any of the other actions, you might take in this situation. He sets a trap using a rifle, with, like a string tied to the trigger tied to the window shutter. Holy Spirit when the guy crawled in the middle of the night, this rifle shot him dead. And he wasn't charged with the crime, because it was an enslaved man. And he said he was sorry, but that's like, Peter Burnett before he gets into politics. They must have had a stand your ground law back in those days to. I guess I don't think they had laws. You're talking about the eighteen twenties or whatever. Like there was no rule. And that's such a cartoonish sort of rube Goldberg s kind of contraption. I probably got the kit from acme. That's insane. Okay, go on give us. So one of his early jobs before he gets off to Oregon. I think after he murders this guy with a looney tunes trap, is he's a lawyer and some of his probably most prominent clients were Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon religion, and all of Joseph Smith's apostles, or whatever all of his friends, because they were on trial for kinda sort of fomenting frontier war that had had broken out in and around Missouri. And so he, he is, these guys lawyer in his main achievement as a lawyer seems to be getting the venue changed that the court case was being held in and this venue, change allow Justice myth and all of his guys to escape and run away. And yeah. So that that's his career as a lawyer before he gets on that first big wagon train to. Oregon for the great migration and whatnot. Oh, wow. Yeah. So yo already covered yet. He made the lash law. He made the exclusion law, which he was he was an abolitionist, but he's like an interesting. We when we when you hear about abolitionists in the pre civil war area, usually think about just the few people who would have been like on the right side of history. Some of them were abolitionists because they were that racist. They were so racist. And that was Peter Burnett. He was abolitionist that because he didn't like the idea of there being black people anywhere in his state, and he thought that slave labor was bad for white people. So he was like he wound up the right conclusion, which is that slavery was a bad thing. But he wound up there through the most racist chain of logic that he could have possibly gotten to which is always interesting to me that was a sentiment that was big time shared by the majority of people in Oregon began. They did incorporate and become a state, the majority of people voted against Lavery, but also for ousting all the free. Lead black people. Yeah. And I did find when I was doing my research that in eighteen forty at least Burnett had two of slaves of his own. This is back when he was living in Missouri. And there's some evidence that when he immigrated to Oregon, he tried to bring one slave with him a young girl who drowned in the Columbia River during the voyage, so not a lot of it's kind of an enticing piece of what was going on there. But that that's all the info I found so far on that. Right. Because she was projected to be somewhere between ten to twenty four or something. Yeah, it seems like it might be kind of a creepy. Thomas Jefferson, sort of situation there. I suspected that as well. Yeah. So this guy we've talked about, like talked about what he did in Oregon, but after he got done in Oregon, this dude, moved to California, and he became in eighteen forty nine the first governor of California of the state of California. So California's very first leader as a state in the union was this guy Peterberg net who get a lot of terrible things. Maybe my favorite thing he did that isn't terrible was in eighteen fifty changed thanksgiving that year from Thursday to Saturday, just because it was better for him, personally. I mean I can at it's always thanksgiving's on a Thursday. Yeah, that's fun. But he also tried to bring racial exclusion to California with the Chinese. Right. Well, I with black people, he I tried to, in his first message to the California legislature, he called exclusion by the first important like an issue of the first importance the most important thing, the California could do, because he thought black, people are going to take jobs from white people, and that they would be unhappy in California, and cause disruption because they would be second class citizens, because he wasn't gonna let him be anything but second class citizens. So, yeah, he tried to there were a thousand black people already in California, many of them free, and he tried to have them all kicked out and to stop any more from settling. And that was to racist for eighteen fifties, California. So he lost on that, and he wound up actually lake in eighteen fifty one quitting. Being the governor over this because he tried a couple of times to get California to ban black people, and they just wouldn't do it. And yeah I mean there's some pretty pretty racist quotes from him that I could read, but that's probably not necessary. But it is fun to note that after he was no longer governor and after his political career was over as the world continue to advance in modernize in his old age his crusade, as you mentioned was trying to stop the Chinese from coming to California. So he was just, just comprehensively racist across the board every chance, he, he got, which is impressive in a terrible way. Yeah. At least you can say he was consistent. But honestly, good on you California for anyone listening who is in the state right now. I think that speaks very highly to the character of the state even as far back as the eighteen fifties. He he also published an autobiography, right? At some point. Yeah. That, that's where he started. Ranting about Chinese immigration. Yeah. Robert, Shirley got some sort of amazing come up, right? Like burned to death in a fire. Drowned under suspicious circumstances. Give me a fight with a locomotive. I think he died rich in old. He was in his eighties or somehow, man. That's a bummer. What always happens with these bastards? Right. You're seeing that. The Cosby episode, he kinda got us come up. But even that's sort of like appearance victory, where it's like too little too late for a guy that's been securing people over four years on, you know, unchecked. Yeah every now and then you get a Mussalini or Qaddafi where they get dragged out into the street and punished by the people that they spend decades screwing with. But that's almo- that almost never happens, usually, they die rich in villa somewhere. I'm really glad that you said this Robert because I was listening to the Ghaddafi episode, which I thought was fantastic. And I'm still preparing myself to check out the Weinstein episode which is a two parter, correct. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That one's a big on what we'd like to do is again. Thank you for giving us more insight on the life of Peter Hardiman Burnett. Screw that guy. Yeah. I know. Right. The. But we were wondering if you could tell our, if you could tell our fellow listeners here, a little bit more about behind the bastards and what they can expect when they tune into your show. Well, I mean, our goal is to tell you, everything you don't know about the very worst people in all of history. So, you know, you've probably sat, you know, stoned or whatever in your underpants and watched a lot of documentaries about Hitler on the history channel over the years. But you probably don't know that he based, a lot of his military strategies and his like attitudes on existence in life on a series of young adult novels. They're basically like the German equivalent of Harry Potter back in the eighteen hundred. Oh, wow. And for that matter, while we're on the subject of novelist. You've probably haven't read Saddam Hussein's romance novels, but I have, and that's one of the things we get into in this podcast. I referred to it as a Roddick fiction. Was that crows at a bridge too far? No, no, it is very erotic. In fact, there's a long passage, where an elderly woman yells at children about how sexy mouths are. So that's it's fun. Yeah, those novels in particular largely considered these Meg, low maniacal analogies about his relationship with the country. Yes..

Peter Hardiman Burnett Oregon California Robert Evans Saddam Hussein Hitler Facebook Gladwin bolan Gladwin Saddam Missouri rube Goldberg United States Portland Joseph Smith Josephine county Columbia River acme
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:40 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Am sure it does. It's like when people visit our city, and call it hotlanta. Yeah. I would say this is even more agree. Just probably people running around. They put a burden on the yes, and Portland has this national reputation at least for being a very progressive city, right? Face tattoos or cool. Marijuana decriminalized the streets are paved in marijuana. In fact, in Borland, it does have a particular smell. And in general, people would see it as sort of a bastion of left leaning culture. Yeah. Super chill. You know you can you can buy a sandwich. I song. In Portland, literally doesn't have to be a good song. It's just a song a song or a little soft shoe. Or maybe you got a one man band. Dick Van Dyke situation going on did see a one man bamboo knows there. Did you see that guy just pulled that out of my of my year? Well, you are correct. And there are one man bands in Portland. There are also numerous amazing things amazing bits of history. One of our co workers, a guy named Nathan is actually from Oregon. And he assured us that Portland is more of a cultural exception to the rule. Nowadays, wearing my Timberline lodge hat right now. I bought at the Portland airport. And as you might imagine Portland airport, not a chain restaurant incite my friend, all of the shop sell handmade artistic goods. I bought some really cute little pieces of pottery there for my mom. That's sweet of you. Man, and that's really dope hat. It is a great hat. So it's safe to say that you and I are fans of Portland and would travel there again in the future. Sure, at least modern Portland. Right, right. I don't think I would want to travel there in a time machine to be passed. Yes. Yes. Today's episode is about the origins of Oregon Portland in particular when take or as it's called here in some of these articles that we're looking at the Oregon country. Yeah. Oregon country might sound weird to some people. What is Oregon kept seeing it? And it was a little weird sending. But I figured it out with my internet sleuth skills. What would now be modern day? Oregon Washington state, and I'd Aho was all kind of cluster together in this one big old chunk of land collectively referred to as the Oregon country. Yeah. And this was, let's see way back in eighteen eighteen. Right. The US and Britain agreed to jointly occupy this seems like a odd couple situation. And then I think the US started getting a little greedy and being, you know, we kind of want this for our own when it turn this into some states. Yeah. Because the British wanted to be in the area in Oregon country, mainly to engage in the first trade, and James k Polk who was an expansionist president. Right. Really wanted to make this our own and not not share not go with the Brits anymore. So that. That alternately happened they negotiated. They decided it wasn't worth going to war over the Brits. It anyway. And there was some back and forth. And there's a really great slogan that the northerners used it was fifty four forty or fight, and fifty four forty was talking about the coordinates, the latitude that Mark, the northernmost part of this territory and during these negotiations, the US is first proposal was that the territory be cut in half. Right. With that, with that border at the forty ninth parallel, and the British rejected it. And so the expansionist many of whom were anti slavery northerners, which is super important for this part of where they are the ones who called for more American aggression, get out there, be a big dog fifty four forty or fight. It's hard to say you did really well with that fifty four forty or fight is tough. When you really get it right though, sense of accomplishment, as I'm sure they felt when they finally arrived at a pretty decent deal with the Brits, where they divided the territory along the forty ninth parallel pretty close to fifty four. I guess what's the forty though fifty four? Forty minutes divisions of the grease a decimal. So this is where we end up with Oregon needing to become a state. And when you become a stay, what do you do you have to have a state constitution? And as we know constitutions are not generally made overnights. They often reflect common practices goals or even existing laws that a community has practiced or written down beforehand, and Oregon, had its own pre existing laws in eighteen forty four they passed something called the exclusion law. And this was this was enacted by the provisional government of the region at the time. What, what did the exclusion law do? Yeah. Was this guy named Peter Burnett, who was like kind of Oregon trail kind of blazer, I guess, Peter Hardiman, Hardiman, Vernet, and actually spoiler alert, we're going to dig into him in a little more detail. Later in the show for shadowy big time for shadowing Bush, here's what this dude is just to give you a taste of what his medicine was, like he was a former slave owner and as a really crazy resume did all kinds of interesting things, but by all accounts, a alarming dastardly racist nearly so this exclusion law, that was enacted sort of pre proper government and constitution basically allowed slaveholders to hold on for dear life to those slaves for a maximum of up to three years. And I, I was like, wait is this is this because of emancipation? That was decades later. This is eighteen forty four that wasn't until eighteen sixties, right? And I realize, oh, no, Oregon outlawed slavery in the territory. Right. But here's the thing is going to go. That's nice. What a great bunch of people. Okay. But, but there's more so yeah. This grace period of three years. But then all of those freed black people work required to leave. Yeah, that's the thing, the government of Oregon passed this. Exclusion law of eighteen forty four and in it, they did place, a ban on slavery, with a requirement the slave owners, eventually free their slaves, but they did this with the understanding that any African American who remained in Oregon, after they were freed would be flogged, whiplash and forcibly expelled from the country if they're were caught in the Oregon country, again, within six months, then the punishment would be repeated. And then eventually the law was amended in another version to substitute forced labor, so essentially slavery, instead of flogging and then it was repealed in. Eighteen forty five. So this community was so racist that the didn't even condone slavery. They were so such white supremacist data's didn't want him around, like at all. And there's, there's some language we'll get into a second, but I just want to point this out of the that law, you mentioned about flogging, that was called the Burnett lash law. Because our buddy Burnett was so into this, that he wanted to brandit with his own his name was like a signature thing. And it required that declared rather that offenders, who refused to leave would be punished with, quote, not less than twenty or more than thirty nine stripes, and that would that would be a cycle that would recur every six months until they left. And fortunately, this lash law did get amended and repealed. So as far as we know today. Day. No people wherever lashed as a result of that law. But this was just the first of three different laws likeness that all were meant to ban people of color from Oregon country which, again at that point is like Washington, Oregon, and part of Idaho. A huge swath of land. That's right. And we're getting some of this information from, from places wounded. My favorites was a Washington Post article by deneen l Brown, Colin Portland van blacks Oregon's shameful history as an all white state, or as I've seen it referred to as an all white utopia kinda right after at least there's this weird history of intentional communities and utopian thinking in Oregon. So it's not, not all examples are racist. But this definitely was the idea for the people who are supporting this concept was that somehow society would be better if they all. Felt like if they also identified with the same ethnicity. Now, did they have the same sort of racism that would be common? In the north east at the time wherein, for instance, Italian or Irish immigrants or children of those immigrants are still considered not white enough. I don't know. But what was on the books was specifically targeting people of color in eighteen forty eight this provisional territorial? Government has the law making it illegal for any quote, negro, or mulatto to live in Oregon country, but they did have a provision for people who had native American blood which they weirdly referred to as half breeds. Despicable people. They are big people. But it's interesting that all it takes just get a little white in. You really didn't like black people. Yeah. That's what it boils down to. All right, then. Yeah. So it's state time baby. Here we go. What do you need to make a state as established earlier, yet you need? You gotta have some dirt gotta delineation between your dirt and the other people's dirt, yet to have some people in both sides. Oh, that you can differentiate constitution. There we go. Yes. In eighteen fifty seven the government of what will become Oregon was working on its constitution. They did a couple of things they grossly plagiarized constitutions from other states at the time. That's gonna be some of that constitution is on exactly great work poetry that you, you know, pilfering from his look down upon it's sorta like stealing a boilerplate release form. Yeah. I think that's a very good point. Let's get something cleared. View may be competing to be the next account executive at heart media..

Oregon Portland US Peter Burnett Borland Marijuana Dick Van Dyke Timberline lodge James k Polk Nathan Washington Post Peter Hardiman account executive Bush Aho Washington president Idaho
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

13:20 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"That's right, folks, extra credit, the segment wherein. We get some human person. That's tangentially familiar with the topic by varying degrees. My favorite of late has been the Colonel Gladwin bolan. Boy, man. He really he really set the internet on fire with that segment. I let him into of Gladwin. I let him into the Facebook group folks. So I hope we're all still cool. Did you create a monster? I don't know. I don't know. We'll today we have another quite informed gentleman. Joining us the host of the new house of work show behind the bastards, which does deep dives into horrible people throughout history from Saddam. Hussein's hobby writing erotic fiction to Hitler's spanking. Fetish, I believe friends and neighbors, Ben, if I may Robert Evans, a all has a crack man. It's, it's, it's weird. Weird. There's been a lot of like silent headshaking on this episode which doesn't really translate super well on the podcast. But yeah, who knew we're talking about Oregon, which is if you like. Yeah. If you go to Portland or whatever it seems on the up and I spent a lot of the last three years in rural southern Oregon, and it's, it's a pretty racist place like Josephine county where I was is chock full Nazis are quite a lot of them out there. So it's, it's, it's a fascinating place even in the modern day. Oh, yes. Yes. Tons of one of the most racist counties and one of the highest densities of hate groups anywhere in the United States, chock-full, and Nazis, as it turns out, not a good no no terrible coffee. Terrible craft beer that the Nazis make. Yeah. So when we, we originally talked off air, Robert one of the things that we were very interested in both colleagues, but also fans of your show. Oh, was seeing whether there was a specific person associated with the, the supremacist origins of Oregon kind of setting the tone that we could we could learn a little bit more about with you, and you found the guy, right? Oh my God. I sure did any Peter Burnett. I think Peter is his first name. Yeah. Just a tremendous piece of crap in may be like there's a long list of super racist politicians in American history. But he's in the running for most racist. He's, he's, he's definitely like, in that conversation for sure. Yeah, we set him briefly as just having been the one that can came up with the idea of exclusionary laws early on before, Oregon became a state, and he loved this idea so much the name that actress self Burnett lashed law, which emitted black people who refuse to leave the state to be given. Lashes like every six months or something like that. And he loved it so much. I was genius idea. The Burnett lash law. Yeah, he was so proud of his, his whipping people rule that he stuck his name on it, which is a special kind of, of terrible. But he was actually like a violent jerk way before he went to Oregon when he was still living in clear creek, Tennessee. He was a shop owner like. General store owner. He suspected, this enslaved black men was every now and then breaking into his store at night to drink from his whiskey barrel, because they stored whiskey barrels back then it was a different time. Rather than taking any of the other actions, you might take in this situation. He sets a trap using a rifle, with, like a string tied to the trigger tied to the window shutter. Holy spirit. When the guy crawled in the middle of the night, this rifle shot him dead. He wasn't charged with the crime, because it was an enslaved man. And he said he was sorry, but that's like, Peter Burnett before he gets into politics. They must have had a stand your ground law back in those days to. I guess I just don't think they had laws. Talking about the eighteen twenties or whatever, like there is no rule. And that's such a cartoonish sort of rube Goldberg s kind of contraption probably got the kit from acme Betson, same okay, go on, so one of his early jobs before he gets off to Oregon. I think after he murders this guy with a looney tunes trap, is, he's a lawyer, and some of his party's most prominent clients were Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon religion, and all of Joseph Smith's apostles, or whatever all of his friends, because they were on trial for kinda sort of fomenting a frontier war that had broken out around Missouri. And so he, he is, these guys lawyer in his main achievement as a lawyer seems to be getting the venue changed that the court case was being held in and this venue change allowed Justice myth and all of his guys to escape and run away. And yeah. So that that's his career as a lawyer before he gets on that first big wagon train to Oregon for the great migration and whatnot. Oh, yeah. So yo already covered yet. He made the last law, he made the exclusion law, which he was he was an abolitionist, but he's like an interesting we fit when, when you hear about abolitionists in the pre-civil war area. Usually think about just the few people who would have been like on the right side of history. Some of them were just abolitionists because they were that racist. They were so racist. And that was Peter Vernet. He was abolitionist that because he didn't like the idea of there being black people anywhere in his state, and he thought that slave labor was bad for white people. So he was like he wound up the right conclusion. Which is slavery was a bad thing. But he wound up there through the most racist chain of logic that he could have gotten to, which is always interesting to me, those a sentiment that was big time shared by the majority of people in Oregon, again, they did incorporate and be. State the majority of people voted against Lavery, but also for ousting all the freed black people. Yeah, I did find when I was doing my research that in eighteen forty. At least Burnett had two slaves of his own back when he was living in Missouri. And there's some evidence that when he immigrated to Oregon, he tried to bring one slave with him a young girl who drowned in the Columbia River during the voyage, so not a lot of it's kind of an enticing piece of what was going on there. But that that's all the info I found so far on that. Right. Because she was projected to be somewhere between ten to twenty four or something. Yeah, it seems like it might be kind of a creepy. Thomas Jefferson, sorta situation there suspected that as well. Yeah. So this guy we've talked about, like, are y'all talked about what he did in Oregon, but after he got done in Oregon, this dude, moved to California, and he became in eighteen forty nine the first governor of California of the state of California, California's very first leader as a state in the union was this guy Peterberg net who get a lot of terrible things. Maybe my favorite thing he did that isn't terrible was in eighteen fifty. He changed thanksgiving, that year from Thursday to Saturday, just because it was better for him, personally. I mean I can I can give you that it's always weird to me. Thanks, giving Zona Thursday. Yeah, that that's whimsical and fun. But he also tried to bring racial exclusion to California with the Chinese. Right. Well, I with black people, he I tried to in his first message to the California legislature, he called exclusion like the first important like an issue of the first importance the most important thing, the California could do, because he thought black people are gonna take jobs from white people, and that they would be unhappy in California, and cause disruption because they would be second class citizens, because he wasn't gonna let him be anything but second class citizens. So, yeah, he tried to there were like thousand black people already in California, many of them free, and he tried to have them all kicked out and to stop any more from settling. And that was to racist for eighteen fifties, California. So he lost on that. And he wound up actually like in eighteen fifty one quitting. Being the governor over this because he tried a couple of times to get California to ban black people, and they just wouldn't do it then. Yeah. I mean there's some pretty pretty racist quotes from him that I could read, but that's probably not necessary. But it is fun to note that after he was no longer governor and after his political career was over, as you know, the world continue to advance in modernize in his old age his crusade, as you mentioned was trying to stop the Chinese from coming to California. So he was just just comprehensively racist across the board every chance he got, which is impressive in a terrible way. Yeah. At least you can say he was consistent. But honestly, good on you California for anyone listening who is in the state right now. I think that's very highly to the character of the state even as far back as the eighteen fifties. He he also published an autobiography, right? At some point. Yeah. That's where he started. Ranting about Chinese immigration. Yeah. Robert, Shirley got some sort of amazing comeuppance right like burned to death in a fire. Do. Now drowned under suspicious circumstances. Give me a fight with a locomotive. I think he died rich in old. He was in his eighties or somehow, man. That's a bummer now. What always happens with these bastards? Right. You're seeing that the Cosby episode, he kinda got his come up, but even that's sort of, like appear at victory where it's like too little too late for a guy that's been screwing people over for years on, you know, unchecked. Yeah every now and then you get a Mussalini or Qaddafi where they get dragged out into the street and punished by the people that they spent decades screwing with, but that's almost that almost never happens, usually, they die rich in villa somewhere. I'm really glad that you said this Robert because I was listening to the Ghaddafi episode, which I thought was fantastic. And I'm still preparing myself to check out. Out the Weinstein episode, which is a two parter, correct. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That one's a big one. What we'd like to do is again. Thank you for giving us more insight on the life of Peter Hardiman Burnett. Screw that guy. I know rights. But. We were wondering if you could tell our, if you could tell her fellow listeners here, a little bit more about behind the bastards and what they can expect when they tune into your show. Well, I mean, our goal is to tell you, everything you don't know about the very worst people in all of history. So, you know, you've probably sat, you know, stoned or whatever in your underpants and watched a lot of documentaries about Hitler on the history channel over the years. But you probably don't know that he based, a lot of his military strategies in his like attitudes on existence in life on a series of young adult novels. They're basically like the German equivalent of Harry Potter back in the eighteen hundreds so wow. You know, in for that matter, while we're on the subject of novelist, you probably haven't read Saddam Hussein's romance novels, but I have. And that's one of the things we get into in this podcast. I referred to it as a Roddick fiction. Was that crows at a bridge too far? No, no. It is very erotic. In fact, there's a long passage, where an elderly woman yells at children about how sexy mouths are. So that's it's fun. Yeah. Those novels in particular largely considered these Meg, Luma nihil analogies about his relationship with the country. Yes. And they're, they're, it's one of those weird things there's a lot of cases like with the Kim's in North Korea of heart being credited to dictators, didn't actually make it Saddam definitely wrote these books. I'm gonna get into that to an extent. But they're like they're a mix of rants about modern politics and like utopian fiction. And so it's like a mix of Saddam screaming at the people he hates and trying to set up the ideal government that he never quite got to. Make an Iraq. It's, it's a really strange insight into what was going on in the man's head. That's fascinating. I wanna wanna tune in no spoilers. But could you tell us a little bit about some episodes that are coming up soon yet today right now? There is a new episode on Paul Manafort, part, one of which just dropped and part two of which will be Thursday. So that's, that's a big one. I check that out. And we've, we've been doing an ongoing series about king Leopold of Belgium in the Congo. And we're recording episode today about what happened after Leopold, who is one of the worst people in all the history doesn't get enough acknowledgement for just how terrible he was agree. And we're also recording an episode about the serial killer Albert fish with his one of his descendants comedian in LA today. So that's going to be fun. Oh man. That's fascinating. Yeah. We got a good good slate. We are going to wrap it up today. We would've thank you so much for coming on the show. Robert. Evans, friends and neighbors. The mastermind behind one of house of works newest podcast behind the bastards,.

Peter Hardiman Burnett Oregon California Robert Evans Saddam Hussein Hitler Saddam Facebook Colonel Gladwin bolan Gladwin Missouri Ben United States Portland Joseph Smith Paul Manafort rube Goldberg Peter Josephine county Peter Vernet
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:45 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the show, ladies and gentlemen. I'm Ben I'm no. This is a very standard intro. We're trying today. Yeah, we're going we're going straight for it. But we were only able to make this show, of course, with the assistance of our esteemed third member of friends, neighbors, super producer Casey program. Sort of the Nilo, bening would white bread a little homogeneous bet. Yes. Yes. Today. We are. Well, let's let's start in the modern day for a long time. Neither of us had ever been to Portland until pretty recently true, I only spent a little bit of time there. I think you had a little bit more of a fully fleshed out Portland experience. But we tell me in is the the dream of the nineties, in fact, still alive in Portland. Yes. I thoroughly enjoyed the town. I thought it was surprising. I was diplomatic enough. Not to directly, mention the comedy show Portland area to anybody that gets really old. I am sure does, it's like when people visit our city and call it hotlanta. Yeah. This is even more agree. Just probably people running around. They put a bird on it. Yes. And Portland has this national reputation at least for being a very progressive city right, face tattoos or cool. Marijuana's decriminalized. The streets are paved in marijuana. In fact, and Portland. It does have a particular smell. And in general, people would see it as sort of a bastion of left leaning culture. Yeah. Super chill, you know, you can be can buy a sandwich I song in Portland, literally. Doesn't have to be a good song. It's just a song a song or a little soft shoe. Or maybe you got a one man band kinda Dick Van Dyke situation going on. Did see a one man band when I was there. Did you see that guy? Just pulled that out of my of my year. Will you are correct? And there are one man bands in Portland. There are also numerous amazing things amazing. It's of history. One of our co workers, a guy named Nathan is actually from Oregon. And he assured us that Portland is more of a cultural exception to the rule nowadays. Actually wearing my Timberline lodge hat right now. I bought at the Portland airport. And as you might imagine a Portland airport, not a chain restaurant incite my friend, all of the shops sell handmade articifial goods. I bought some really cute. Little pieces of pottery there for me mom. That's sweet of you, man and this really dope hat. It is a great hat. So it's safe to say that you and I are fans of Portland and would travel there again in the future. Sure, at least modern Portland. Right, right. I don't think I would want to travel there in a time machine to pass. Yes. Yes. Today's episode is about the origins of Oregon Portland in particular when take or as it's called here, lemon some of these articles that we're looking at the Oregon country. Yeah. Oregon country, it might sound weird to some people. What is Oregon kept seeing it? And it was a little weird sending. But I figured it out with my internet sleuth skills. What would now be modern day? Oregon Washington state, and Idaho, was all kind of cluster together in this one big old chunk of land collectively referred to as the Oregon country. Yeah. And this was, let's see way back in eighteen eighteen. Right. The US and Britain agreed to jointly occupy this. Yeah. I've seen like a odd couple on a situation and then I think the US started getting a little greedy and being, you know, we kind of want this. For our own when it turn this in some states. Yeah. Because the British wanted to be in the area in Oregon country, mainly to engage in the first trade astray, and James k Polk who is an expansionist president. Right. Really wanted to make this our own and not not chair now. Go with the Brits anymore, so that ultimately happened they negotiated. They decided it wasn't worth going to war over the Brits. It anyway. And there was some back and forth. And there's a really great slogan that the northerners used it was fifty four forty or fight, and fifty four forty was talking about the coordinates, the latitude that Mark, the northernmost part of this territory and during these negotiations the US is I propose. Title. Was that the territory be cut in half? Right. With that, with that border at the forty ninth parallel, and the British rejected it. And so the expansionist many of whom were anti slavery northerners, which is super important for this part of the story, they are the ones who called. For more American aggression, get out there, be a big dog fifty four forty or fight. It's hard to say you did really well with that fifty four forty or fight is tough fun. When you really get it right though. It gives you a sense of accomplishment, as I'm sure they felt when they finally arrived at a pretty decent deal with the Brits, where they divided the territory along the forty ninth parallel pretty close to fifty four. I guess, what's the forty though fifty four forty minutes divisions of degrees? It's like a decimal kind of radical. Okay. So this is where we end up with Oregon needing to become a state. And when you become a stay, what do you do you have to have a state constitution? And as we know constitutions are not generally made overnights. They often reflect common practices goals or even existing laws that a community has practiced or written down beforehand, and Oregon, had its own pre existing laws in eighteen forty four they passed something called the exclusion law. And this was this was enacted by the provisional government of the region at the time. What, what did the exclusion law do? Yeah. Is this guy named Peter Burnett who was like kind of Oregon trail kind of blazer, I guess Peter Hardiman, Hardiman Burnett. And actually spoiler alert, we're going to dig into him in a little more detail later in the show. Foreshadowing big time. Foreshadowing, Bush, here's what this dude is just to give you a taste of what has matter was like he was a former slave owner and has a really crazy resume did all kinds of interesting things, but by all accounts, a alarming dastardly racist. Virulent. So this exclusion law, that was enacted sort of pre proper government and constitution basically allowed slaveholders to poll on for dear life to those slaves for a maximum of for up to three years. And at first, I was like, wait is this is this, because of emancipation? That was decades later. This is eighteen forty four that wasn't until late eighteen sixties. Right. And I realize, oh, no, Oregon outlawed slavery in the territory. Right. But here's the key thing is going to be oh, that's, that's nice. What a great bunch of people. Yeah. Okay. But, but there's more. So, yeah. This grace period of three years. But then all of those freed black people work required to leave. Yeah, that's the thing, the government of Oregon passed this. Exclusion law of eighteen forty four and in it, they did place, a ban on slavery. With a requirement the slave owners, eventually free their slaves, but they did this with the understanding that any African American who remained in Oregon, after they were freed would be flogged, whiplash and forcibly expelled from the country if they were caught in the Oregon country, again, within six months, then the punishment would be repeated. And then eventually the law was amended in another version to substitute forced labor, so essentially slavery, instead of flogging and then it was repealed in eighteen forty five. So this community was so racist that the, the didn't even condone slavery. They were so such white supremacist data's didn't want him around, like at all. And there's, there's some language. We'll get into a second. But I just want to point this out of the that law, you mentioned about flogging or. That was called the Burnett lashed law, because our buddy Burnett was so into this that, he, he wanted to brand it with his own. His name was like his signature thing, and it required that or declared rather that offenders, who refused to leave would be punished with, quote, not less than twenty or more than thirty nine stripes, and that would that would be a cycle that would recur every six months until they left. And fortunately, this last law did get amended and repealed. So as far as we know today. No people wherever lashed as a result of that law. But this was just the first of three different laws likeness that all were meant to ban people of color from Oregon country which, again at that point is like Washington, Oregon, and part of Idaho is a huge swath of land. That's right. And we're getting some. Of this information from a few different places ruined. My favorites was a Washington Post article by deneen l Brown, Colin Portland van blacks Oregon's shameful history as an all white state for as I've seen it referred to as an all white utopia, kind of right after at least there's this weird history of intentional communities and utopian thinking in Oregon, so it's not, not all examples are racist. But this definitely was the idea for the people who were supporting this concept was that somehow society would be better, if they all felt like if they also identified with the same ethnicity. Now, did they have the same sort of racism, that would be common in the northeast at the time wherein, for instance, Italian or Irish immigrants or children of those immigrants are still considered not white enough? I don't know. But what was on the books was specific? Typically targeting people of color in eighteen forty eight this provisional territorial government passed a law making it illegal for any quote, negro, or mulatto to live in Oregon country, but they did have a provision for people who had native American blood, which they weirdly referred to as half breeds despicable people. Big old people. But it's interesting that all it takes just get a little white in. You really didn't like black people. Yeah. Yeah. That's what it goes out to. All right. Then. Yeah. So it state time baby here we go. What do you need to make a state as established earlier? Yeah. You need. You gotta have some dirt. You gotta have delineation between your shirt and the other people's dirt, yet, to have some people in both sides, so that you can differentiate constitution. There we go. Yes. In eighteen fifty seven the government of what would become Oregon was working on. It's constitution. They did a couple of things they grossly plagiarized constitutions from other states at the time. You know, there's gonna be some of that, right? I constitution is on exactly great work poetry that you, you know, pilfering from his his looked down upon. It's almost like stealing a boilerplate release form or say. Yeah, I think that's a very good point. Blue Cross Blue shield believed everyone should have access to healthcare, no matter who you are or where you live. That's why in every state are companies are working to improve health and expand access to care from training..

Oregon Portland Hardiman Burnett Timberline lodge Dick Van Dyke bening US Marijuana Idaho producer Casey Blue Cross Blue shield James k Polk Nathan Washington Post Peter Hardiman Bush Washington
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

13:13 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Can generally familiar with the topic by varying degrees. My favorite of late has been the Colonel Gladwin bolan. Boy, man. He really he really set the internet on fire with that segment. I let him into Gladwin. I let him into the Facebook group folks. So I hope we're all still cool. Did you create a monster? I don't know. I don't know today. We have another quite informed, gentlemen. Joining us, the host of the new house work show behind the bastards, which does deep dives into horrible people throughout history from Saddam. Hussein's hobby writing erotic fiction to Hitler's spanking fetish, I believe, friends and neighbors benef-. I may. Robert Evans AOL has crack if it's weird weird. There's been a lot of like silent headshaking on this doesn't really translate super well on the podcast. But yeah, who knew we're talking about Oregon, which is if you like. Yeah. If you go to Portland or whatever it seems on the I spent a lot of the last three years in rural southern Oregon, and it's, it's a pretty racist place Josephine county where I was is shock full Nazis. They're quite a lot of them out there. So it's, it's, it's a fascinating place even in the modern day. Oh, yes. Yet, tons of it's one of the most racist counties, and one of the densities of hate groups anywhere in the United States, chock-full, and Nazis turns out, not a good coffee. No, no terrible coffee, terrible craft beer that the Nazis make. So when we, we originally talked off air, Robert one of the things that. We were very interested in both colleagues, but also fans of your show was seeing whether there was a specific person associated with the, the supremacist origins of Oregon kind of setting the tone that we could we could learn a little bit more about with you, and you found the guy, right? Oh my God. I sure did any Peter Burnett. I think Peter is first name. Yeah. Just a tremendous piece of crap, and may be like, there's a long list of super racist politicians in American history. But he's in the running for most racist. He's, he's, he's definitely like, in that conversation for sure. Yeah. We set him briefly as just having been the one that can came up with the idea of exclusionary laws early on before, Oregon became a state, and he loved this idea so much the named it after himself. Burnett lash law, which emitted black people who refuse to leave the state to be given. Lashes like every six months or something like that. Any loved it so much genius idea. The Burnett lash law. Yeah, he was so proud of his, his whipping people rule that he stuck his name on it, which is a special kind of, of terrible. But he was actually like a violent Jere way before he went to Oregon when he was still living in clear creek, Tennessee. He was a shop owner like. General store owner. He suspected, this enslaved black man was every now and then breaking into his store at night to drink from his whiskey barrel, because they stored whiskey. Barrels back then it was a different time. Rather than taking any of the other actions, you might take in this situation. He sets a trap using a rifle, with, like a string tied to the trigger tied to the window shutter. Holy so that when the guy crawled in the middle of the night, this rifle shot him dead. He wasn't charged with the crime, because it was an enslaved man. And he said he was sorry, but that's like, Peter Burnett before he gets into politics. They must have had like a stand your ground law, back in those days to guess I just don't think they had laws. You talking about the eighteen twenties or whatever there was no rules. And that's such a cartoonish sort of rube Goldberg s kind of contraption probably got the kit from acne. That's insane. Okay, go on give us. So one of his early jobs before he gets off to Oregon. I think after he murders this guy with a looney tunes. Traff is he's a lawyer and some of his party's most prominent clients were Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon religion and all of Joseph Smith's, you know, apostles, or whatever all of his friends, because they were on trial for kinda sort of fomenting a frontier war that had broken out in and around Missouri. And so he, he is, these guys lawyer in his main achievement as a lawyer seems to be getting the venue, changed that the court case was being held in this venue change allow Justice myth and all of his guys to escape and run away. And yeah. So that that's his career as a lawyer before he gets on that first big wagon train to Oregon for the great migration and whatnot. Yeah. So yo already covered yet. He made the lash law. He made the exclusion law, which he was he was an abolitionist, but he's like an interesting. We fit when we when you hear about abolitionists in the pre-civil war airy usually think about just the few people who would have been like on the right side of history. But some of them were just abolitionists because they were that racist. They were so racist. And that was Peter Burnett. He was abolitionist that because he didn't like the idea of there being black people anywhere in his state, and he thought that slave labor was bad for white people. So he was like he wound up the right conclusion. Which is slavery was a bad thing. But he wound up there through the most racist chain of logic that he could have possibly gotten to which is always interesting to me, those a sentiment that was big time shared by the majority of people in Oregon began. They did incorporate and be. Become a state, the majority of people voted against Lavery, but also for ousting all the freed black people. Yeah. And I did find when I was doing my research that in eighteen forty at least Burnett had to slaves of his own. This is back when he was living in Missouri. And there's some evidence that when he immigrated to Oregon, he tried to bring one slave with him a young girl who drowned in the Columbia River during the voyage, so not a lot of it's kind of an enticing piece of, like what was going on there. But that that's all the info I found so far on that. Right. Because she was projected to be somewhere between ten to twenty four or something. Yeah, it seems like it might be kind of a creepy. Thomas Jefferson, sort of situation, there suspected that as well. Yeah. So this guy we've talked about, like talked about what he did in Oregon, but after he got done in Oregon, this stewed moved to California, and he became in eighteen forty nine the first governor of California of the state of California. So California's very first leader as a state in the union was this guy Peterberg net who get a lot of terrible things. Maybe my favorite thing he did that isn't terrible was in eighteen fifty. He changed thanksgiving, that year from Thursday to Saturday, just because it was better for him, personally. I mean I can I can give. That it's always weird to me, the thanksgiving Zona Thursday. Yeah. That that's in fun. But he also tried to bring racial exclusion to California with the Chinese. Right. Well, I with black people, he I tried to in his first message to the California legislature. He called exclusion like the first important issue of the first importance the most important thing, the California could do, because he thought black, people are going to take jobs from white people, and that they would be unhappy in California, and cause disruption because they would be second class citizens, because he wasn't gonna let him be anything but second class citizens. So, yeah, he tried to there were like a thousand black people already in California, many of them free, and he tried to have them all kicked out and to stop any more from settling. And that was to racist for eighteen fifties, California. So he lost on that, and he wound up actually lake in eighteen fifty one quitting being the governor over this because he tried a couple of times to get California to ban black people, and they just wouldn't do it. And yeah I mean there's some pretty pretty racist quotes from him that I could read, but that's probably not necessary. But it is fun to note that after he was no longer governor and after his political career was over, as you know, the world continue to advance in modernize in his old age his crusade, as you mentioned was trying to stop the Chinese from coming to California. So he was just just comprehensively racist across the board every chance he got, which is impressive in a terrible way. Yeah. At least you can say he was consistent, but honestly good on you California for anyone listening in the state right now. I think that speaks very highly to the character of the state even as far back as the eighteen fifties. He he also published an autobiography, right? At some point. Yeah. That's where he started. Ranting about Chinese immigration. Yeah. Robert, Shirley got some sort of amazing comeuppance right like burned to death in a fire drowned under suspicious circumstances. Give me a fight with a locomotive. I think he died rich in old. He was in his eighties or somehow, man. That's a bummer. Westwood always happens with these bastards, right? I mean, I bet you're seeing that the Cosby episode, he kinda got us come up. But even that sort of like a pyrrhic victory where it's like too little too late for a guy that's been screwing people over four years on, you know, unchecked. Yeah every now and then you get a Mussalini or Qaddafi where they get dragged out into the street and punished by the people that they spent decades screwing with, but that's almost almost never happens, usually, they die rich in villa somewhere. I'm really glad that you said this Robert because I was listening to the Ghaddafi episode, which I thought was fantastic. An still preparing myself to check out the Weinstein episode which is a two parter, correct. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That one's a big one. What we'd like to do is again. Thank you for giving us more insight on the life of Peter Hardiman, brunettes, screw that guy. Yeah. Right. But. We were wondering if you could tell our, if you could tell our fellow listeners here, a little bit more about behind the bastards and what they can expect when they tune into your show. Well, I mean, our goal is to tell you, everything you don't know about the very worst people in all of history. So, you know, you've probably that, you know, stoned or whatever in your underpants and watched a lot of documentaries about Hitler on the history channel over the years. But you probably don't know that he based, a lot of his military strategies in his like attitudes on existence in life on a series of young adult. Novels are basically, like the German equivalent of Harry Potter back in the eighteen hundreds. Oh, wow. You know, in in for that matter, while we're on the subject of novelist. You've probably haven't read Saddam Hussein's romance novels, but I have. And that's one of the things we get into in this podcast. I referred to it as a Roddick fiction that crows at a far. No, no. It is very Roddick. In fact, there's a long passage, where an elderly woman yells at children about how sexy mouths are. So that's it's fun. Yeah, those novels in particular largely considered these Meg, low maniacal analogies about his relationship with the country. Yes. And they're, they're, it's one of those weird things there's a lot of cases like with the Kim's in North Korea of being credited to dictators, didn't actually make it Saddam definitely wrote these books when we get into that, to an extent, but they're like, they're mix of rants about modern politics and like utopian fiction, and so it's like a mix of Saddam's screaming at the people he hates and trying to set up the ideal government that he never quite got to make an Iraq. It's, it's a really strange insight into what was going on in the man's head. That's fascinating. I wanna I wanna tune in no spoilers. But could you tell us a little bit about some episodes that are coming up soon yet today? Right now. There is a new episode on Paul Manafort, part, one of which just dropped and part two of which will be Thursday. So that's, that's a big one. I check that out. And we've, we've been doing it ongoing series about king Leopold of Belgium in the Congo, and we're recording episode today about what happened after Leopold, who is one of the worst people in all history and doesn't get enough acknowledgement for just how terrible he was agree. And we're also recording an episode about the serial killer Albert fish with his one of his descendants comedian in LA today. So that's going to be fun. Oh, man that's fascinating. We got a good good slate. We are going to wrap it up today. We wanna thank you so much for coming on the show. Robert Evans friends and neighbors the mastermind behind one of house of works newest podcast behind.

Oregon Peter Burnett California Robert Evans Saddam Hussein Facebook Hitler Saddam Colonel Gladwin bolan Gladwin Missouri rube Goldberg United States Portland Paul Manafort Peter Hardiman Peter Josephine county Albert fish Joseph Smith
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:33 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the show. Ladies and gentlemen. I'm Ben I'm no. Wow. This is like a very standard intro. We're trying today. Yeah, we're going we're going straight for it. But we were only able to make this show, of course, with the assistance of our esteemed third member of friends, neighbors, super producer Casey. Peckham. Sort of a vanilla opening would you white bread a little homogeneous bay? Yes. Yes. Today. We are well let's, let's start in the modern day for a long time. Neither of us had ever been to Portland until pretty recently true, I only spent a little bit of time there. I think you had a little bit more of a fully fleshed out Portland experience. But we tell me then is the dream of the nineties. In fact, still alive in Portland. Yes. I thoroughly enjoyed the town at the root surprising. I was diplomatic enough, not to directly mention the comedy show, Portland area to anybody that gets really old. I am sure does, it's like when people visit our city and call it hotlanta. Yeah. This is even more. Agreed. Just probably people running around. They put a bird on the yes. And Portland has this national reputation at least for being a very progressive city right, face tattoos or cool. Marijuana's decriminalize. The streets are paved in marijuana. In fact, and Portland. It does have a particular smell. And in general, people would see it as sort of a bastion of left leaning culture. Yeah. Super chill, you know, you can be can buy a sandwich. I song. In Portland, literally. You have to be a good song. It's just a song a song or a little soft shoe. Or maybe you got a one man band kinda Dick Van Dyke situation going on. Did see a one man band when I was there. Did you see that guy? No. I just pulled that out of my of my year. We'll you are correct. And there are one man bands in Portland. There are also numerous amazing things amazing. It's of history. One of our co workers, a guy named Nathan is actually from Oregon. And he assured us that Portland is more of a cultural exception to the rule nowadays. Yeah. Actually wearing my Timberline lodge hat right now. I bought at the Portland airport. And as you might imagine Portland airport, not a chain restaurant incite my friend, all of the shops sell handmade artistic goods. I bought some really cute little pieces of pottery. They're for me. Mom. That's sweet of you, man. And this really DOE, Pat, it is a great hat. So it's safe to say that you and I are fans of Portland and would travel there again in the future. Sure, at least modern Portland. Right, right. I don't think I would want to travel there in a time machine to past. Yes. Yes. Today's episode is about the origins of Oregon Portland in particular, well, one take or as it's called here. I'm in some of these articles that we're looking at the Oregon country. Yeah. Oregon country, it might sound weird to some people. What is Oregon kept seeing it? And it was a little weird, sending computer, but I figured it out with my internet sleuth skills. What would now be modern day? Oregon Washington state, and Idaho, was all kind of cluster together in this one big old chunk of land collectively referred to as the Oregon country. Yeah. And this was, let's see way back in eighteen eighteen. Right. The US and Britain agreed to jointly occupy this seems like a odd couple a situation. And then I think the US started getting a little greedy and being, you know, we kind of want this. For our own went turn this into some states. Yeah. Because the British wanted to be in the area in Oregon country, mainly to engage in the first trade astray, and James k Polk who is an expansionist president. Right. Really wanted to make this our own and not not share now go have with the Brits anymore, so that ultimately happened they negotiated. They decided it wasn't worth going to war over the Brits. Did anyway. And there was some back and forth. And there's a really great slogan that the northerners used it was fifty four forty or fight, and fifty four forty was talking about the coordinates the latitude that Mark the northernmost part of this territory and during these negotiations. The US is first proposal. Was that the territory be cut in half? Right. With that, with that border at the forty ninth parallel, and the British rejected it. And so the expansionist many of whom were anti slavery northerners, which is super important for this part of the they are the ones who called. For more American aggression, get out there, be a big dog fifty four forty or fight. It's hard to say did really well with that fifty four forty or fight. It's tough. Fun when you really get it right though sense of accomplishment, as I'm sure they've gotten when they finally arrived at a pretty decent deal with the Brits, where they divided the territory along the forty ninth parallel yes, pretty close to fifty four. I guess what's the forty though fifty four? Forty minutes divisions of the grease like a decimal. Okay. So this is where we end up with Oregon needing to become a state. And when you become a stay, what do you do you have to have a state constitution? And as we know constitutions are not generally made overnights. They often reflect common practices goals or even existing laws that a community has practiced or written down beforehand, and Oregon, had its own pre existing laws in eighteen forty four they passed something called the exclusion law. And this was this was enacted by the provisional government of the region at the time. What, what did the exclusion law do? Yeah, it was this guy named Peter Burnett, who was like, kind of Oregon trail kind of blazer, I guess Peter Hardiman, Hardiman Burnett. And actually spoiler alert, we're going to dig into him in a little more detail later in the show foreshadowing. Big time for shadowing. But here's what this dude is just to give you a taste of what his matter was, like he was a former slave owner and has, has a really crazy resume did all kinds of interesting things, but by all accounts, a alarming dastardly racist nearly through. So this exclusion law, that was enacted sort of pre proper government and constitution basically allowed slaveholders to hold on for dear life to those slaves for a maximum of for up to three years. And at I, I was like, wait is this is this because of emancipation? That was decades later. This is eighteen forty four that wasn't until like eighteen sixties. Right. And I realize, oh, no, Oregon outlawed slavery in the territory. Right. But here's the key, your thing is going to go. Oh, that's, that's nice. What a great bunch of people. Yeah. Okay. But, but there's more. So, yeah. This grace period of three years, but then all of those freed black people work required to leave. Yeah, that's the thing. The government of Oregon pass this. Exclusion law of eighteen forty four and in it, they did place, a ban on slavery, with a requirement the slave owners, eventually free their slaves, but they did this with the understanding that any African American who remained in Oregon, after they were freed would be flogged, whiplash and forcibly expelled from the country if they were caught in the Oregon country, again, within six months, then the punishment would be. Repeated. And then eventually the law was amended in another version to substitute forced labor, so essentially slavery, instead of flogging and then it was repealed in eighteen forty five. So this community was so racist that the, the didn't even condone slavery. They were so such white supremacist data's didn't want him around, like at all. And there's, there's some language we'll get into in a second. But I just want to point this out of the that law, you mentioned about flogging or that was called the Burnett lash law. Because our buddy Burnett was so into this that he, he wanted to brand with his own his name was like a signature thing, and it required that or declared rather that offenders, who refused to leave would be punished with, quote, not less than twenty or more than thirty. Nine stripes, and that would that would be a cycle that would recur every six months until they left. And fortunately, this lash law did get amended and repealed. So as far as we know today, a no people wherever lashed as a result of that law. But this was just the first of three different laws likeness that all were meant to ban people of color from Oregon country which, again at that point is like Washington, Oregon, and part of Idaho. A huge swath of land. That's right. And we're getting some of this information from a few different places wounded. My favorites was a Washington Post article by deneen, L Brown. Cohen, Portland band blacks Oregon's shameful history as an all white state, or as I've seen it referred to as an all white utopia kind of right after at least there's this weird history of intentional communities and utopian thinking. In oregon. So it's not, not all examples are racist. But this definitely was the idea for the people who were supporting this concept was that somehow society would be better, if they all felt like if they also identified with the same ethnicity. Now, did they have the same sort of racism, that would be common in the northeast at the time wherein, for instance, Italian or Irish immigrants or children of those immigrants are still considered not wide enough? I don't know. But what was on the books was specifically targeting people of color in eighteen forty eight this provisional territorial government passed a law making it illegal for any quote, negro, or mulatto to live in Oregon country, but they did have a provision for people who had native American blood, which they weird. Referred to as half breeds despicable people people. But it's interesting that all it takes just get a little white in. You really didn't like black people. Yeah, yeah. That's what it boils down to. All right. Then. Yeah. So it state time baby here we go. What do you need to make a state as established earlier? Get you need. You gotta have some dirt. You gotta have a delineation between your dirt and the other people's dirt, yet to have some people in both sides. Oh, that you can differentiate constitution. There we go. Yes. In eighteen fifty seven. The government of what would become Oregon was working on its constitution. They did a couple of things. They grossly plagiarized constitutions from other states at the time of that's just gonna be some of that, right. Constitution is not exactly. Great work poetry that you, you know, pilfering from is looked down upon. It's sort of like stealing a. Boilerplate release form our site. Yeah, I think that's a very good.

Oregon Portland Hardiman Burnett US Timberline lodge Peckham Dick Van Dyke Marijuana Idaho producer Casey Washington Post Pat James k Polk Nathan Peter Hardiman Washington president
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

13:21 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"That's right, folks, extra credit, the segment wherein. We get, you know, some human person. That's tangentially familiar with the topic by varying degrees. My favorite of late has been the Colonel Gladwin bolan. Boy, man. He really he really set the internet on fire with that segment. I let him into of Gladwin. I let him into the Facebook group folks. So I hope we're all still cool. Did you create a monster? I don't know. I don't know today. We have another quite informed gentleman. Joining us the host of the new house of work show behind the bastards, which does deep dives into horrible people throughout history from Saddam. Hussein's hobby writing erotic fiction to Hitler's spanking fetish, I believe, friends and neighbors ban. If I may Robert Evans a all has cracking man. It's, it's, it's weird. Weird. There's been a lot of like silent headshaking on this episode, which doesn't really translate super well in the podcast. But yeah, who knew we're talking about Oregon, which is if you like. Yeah. If you go to Portland or whatever it seems on the I spent a lot of the last three years in, like rural southern Oregon, and it's, it's a pretty racist place Josephine county where I was is chock full of Nazis. There are quite a lot of them out there. So it's, it's, it's a fascinating place even in the modern day. Oh, yeah. Tons of them one of the most racist counties. And one of the highest densities of hate groups anywhere in the United States, chock-full and Nazis, as it turns out, not a good. No, no terrible coffee. Terrible craft beer that the Nazis make. Yeah. So when we, we originally talked off air, Robert one of the things that we were very interested in both colleagues, but also fans of your show was seeing whether there was a specific person associated with the, the supremacist origins of Oregon kind of setting the tone that we could we could learn a little bit more about with you, and you found the guy, right? Oh my God. I sure did any Peter Burnett. I think Peter is his first name. Yeah. Just a tremendous piece of crap, and may be like, there's a long list of super politicians in American history. But he's in the running for most racist. He's, he's, he's definitely like, in that conversation for sure. Yeah. We set him briefly as just having been the one that can came up with the idea of exclusionary laws early on before, Oregon became a state, and he loved this idea so much they named it after himself. Burnett lashed law, which emitted black people who refuse to leave the state to be given. Lashes, like every every six months or something like that. And he loved it so much genius idea. The Burnett lash law. Yeah, he was so proud of his, his whipping people rule that he stuck his name on it, which is a special kind of, of terrible. But he was actually like a violent jerk way before he went to Oregon when he was delivered in clear creek, Tennessee. He was a shop owner like. General store owner. He suspected, this enslaved black man was every now and then breaking into his store at night to drink from his whiskey barrel, because they stored whiskey. Barrels back then it was a different time. Rather than taking any of the other actions, you might take in this situation. He sets a trap using a rifle, with, like, a string tied to the trigger tied to the window shutter police fit when the guy crawled in the middle of the night, this rifle shot him dead. He wasn't charged with the crime, because it was an enslaved man. And he said he was sorry, but that's like, Peter Burnett before he gets into politics. They must have had like a stand your ground law back in those days to. I guess I don't think they had laws. The eighteen twenties or whatever like there. No rules. And that's such a cartoonish sort of rube Goldberg s kind of contraption. I probably got the kit from acme Betson, same. Okay, go on. Yeah. So one of his early jobs before he gets off to Oregon after he murders. This guy with a looney tunes trap, is, he's a lawyer, and some of his party's most prominent clients were Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon religion, and all of Joseph Smith's apostles, or whatever all of his friends, because they were on trial for kinda sort of fomenting frontier war that had broken out in and around Missouri. And so he, he is, these guys lawyer in his main achievement as a lawyer seems to be getting the venue, changed that the court case was being held in this venue change allow Justice myth and all of his guys to escape and run away. And yeah. So that that's his career as a lawyer before he gets on that first big wagon train to Oregon for the great migration and whatnot. Yeah. So y'all already covered yet, he made the last law, he made the exclusion law, which he was he was an abolitionist, but he's like an interesting we fit when, when you hear about abolitionists in the pre civil war airy usually think about just the few people who would have been like on the right side of history. Some of them were just abolitionists because they were that racist. They were so racist. And that was Peter Burnett. He was abolitionist that because he didn't like the idea of there being black people anywhere in his state, and he thought that slave labor was bad for white people. So he was like he wound up the right conclusion, which is that slavery was a bad thing. But he wound up there through the most racist chain of logic that he could have possibly gotten to which is always interesting to me that was a sentiment that was big time shared by the majority of people in Oregon began. They did incorporate and. State the majority of people voted against Lavery, but also for ousting all the freed black people. Yeah, I did find when I was doing my research that in eighteen forty at least Burnett had two of slaves of his own, when he was living in Missouri. And there's some evidence that when he immigrated to Oregon, he tried to bring one slave with him a young girl who drowned in the Columbia River during the voyage, so not a lot of it's kind of an enticing piece of what was going on there. But that that's all the info I found so far on that. Right. Because she was projected to be somewhere between ten to twenty four or something. Yeah. It seems like it might be kind of a creepy. Thomas Jefferson, sorta situation there. Yeah. I suspected that as well. Yeah. So this guy we've talked about, like talked about what he did in Oregon, but after he got done an Oregon, this dude, moved to California, and he became an eighteen forty nine the first governor of California of the state of California. So California's very first leader as a state in the union was this guy Peterberg net who get a lot of terrible things. Maybe my favorite thing he did that isn't terrible was in eighteen fifty changed thanksgiving that year from Thursday to a Saturday, just because it was better for him, personally. I mean I can Hainan at it's always weird to me. Thanks giving on a Thursday. Yeah, that's fun. But he also tried to bring racial exclusion to California with the Chinese. Right. Well, I with black people, he I tried to in his first message to the California legislature. He called exclusion like the first important like an issue of the first importance the most important thing, the California could do, because he thought black people are gonna take jobs from white people, and that they would be unhappy in California, and cause disruption because they would be second class citizens, because he wasn't gonna let him be anything but second class citizens. So, yeah, he tried to there were like a thousand black people already in California, many of them free, and he tried to have them all kicked out and to stop any more from settling. And that was to racist for eighteen fifties, California. So he lost on that, and he wound up actually lake in eighteen fifty one quitting. Being the governor over this because he tried a couple of times to get California to ban black people, and they just wouldn't do it. And yeah I mean there's some pretty pretty racist quotes from him that I could read, but that's probably not necessary. But it is fun to note that after he was no longer governor and after his political career was over, as you know, the world continue to advance in modernize in his old age his crusade, as you mentioned was trying to stop the Chinese from coming to California. So he was just, just comprehensively racist across the board every chance, he, he got, which is impressive in a terrible way. Yeah. At least you can say he was consistent. But honestly, good on you California for anyone listening who is in the state right now. I think that's very highly to the character the state even as far back as the eighteen fifties. He he also published an autobiography, right? At some point. Yeah. That's where he started. Ranting about Chinese immigration. Yeah. Robert, Shirley got some sort of amazing come up, right? Like burned to death in a fire drowned under suspicious circumstances. Give me a fight with a locomotive. I mean, I think he died rich in old. He was in his eighties or somehow, man. That's a bummer now. It's always happens with these bastards, right? I bet you're seeing that. The Cosby episode, he kinda got his come up, but even that's sort of like a pyrrhic victory where it's like too little too late for a guy that's been scaring people over for years on, you know, unchecked. Yeah every now and then you get a Mussalini or Qaddafi where they get dragged out into the street and punished by the people that they spend decades screwing with, but that's almost that almost never happens, usually, they die rich in villa somewhere. I'm really glad that you said this Robert because I was listening to the Ghaddafi episode, which I thought was fantastic. An still preparing myself to check out the Weinstein episode which is a two parter, correct. Yeah, yeah, yeah. That one's a big on what we'd like to do is again. Thank you for giving us more insight on the life of Peter Hardiman, brunettes, screw that guy. Yeah. I know. Right. But. We were wondering if you could tell our, if you could tell our fellow listeners here, a little bit more about behind the bastards and what they can expect when they tune into your show. Well, I mean, our goal is to tell you, everything you don't know about the very worst people in all of history. So, you know, you've probably sat, you know, stoned or whatever in your underpants and watched a lot of documentaries about Hitler on the history channel over the years. But you probably don't know that he based, a lot of his military strategies in his life attitudes on existence in life on a series of young adult novels. They're basically like the German equivalent of Harry Potter back in the eighteen hundreds so. Well, you know, and, and for that matter Weller on this novelist, you probably haven't read Saddam Hussein's romance novels, but I have. And that's one of the things we get into in this podcast. I referred to it as a Roddick fiction was that far. No, no. It is very erotic. In fact, there's a long passage, where an elderly woman yells at children about how sexy mouths are. So that's fun. Yeah. Those novels in particular largely considered these Meg, low maniacal analogies about his relationship with the country. Yes. And they're, they're, it's one of those weird things there's a lot of cases like with the Kim's in North Korea Hart being credited to dictators who didn't actually make it Saddam definitely wrote these books, and we'll get into that to an extent. But they're like they're a mix of rants about modern politics and like utopian fiction, and so it's like a mix of Saddam's screaming at the people he hates and trying to set up the ideal government that he never quite got to make an Iraq. It's, it's a really strange insight into what was going on in the man's head. That's fascinating. I wanna wanna tune in no spoilers. But I could you tell us a little bit about some episodes, that are coming up soon today right now there is a new episode on Paul Manafort, part, one of which just dropped in part two of which will be Thursday. So that's a that's a big one. I'd check that out. And we've, we've been doing it ongoing series about king Leopold of Belgium in the Congo, and we're recording EPA today about what happened after Leopold, who is. One of the worst people in all the history and doesn't get enough acknowledgement for just how terrible he was agree. And we're also recording an episode about the serial killer Albert fish with his one of his descendants, who is all comedian in LA today. So that's gonna be fun. Oh man. That's fascinating. Yeah. We got a good good slate. We are going to wrap it up today. We want too much for coming on the show. Robert Evans friends and neighbors the mastermind behind one of house of works newest podcast behind the bastards, if you.

Oregon California Peter Burnett Robert Evans Saddam Hussein Hitler Saddam Facebook Colonel Gladwin bolan Gladwin Missouri rube Goldberg United States Portland Paul Manafort Joseph Smith Peter Hardiman Peter Josephine county Albert fish
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

13:17 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"History can be beautiful. That can be boring and often pretty ridiculous. Let's join Ben Bullen and Noel Brown as dive into some of the weird stories for cross the span of humanity. This is ridiculous history podcast. Welcome to the show. Ladies and gentlemen. I'm Ben I'm no. This is a very standard intro trying today. Yeah. We're going we're going straight for it. But we were only able to make this show, of course, with the assistance of our esteemed third member of friends, neighbors, super producer Casey. Peckham. Sort of vanilla opening would white bread a little homogeneous bet. Yes. Yes. Today. We are. Well, let's let's start in the modern day for a long time. Neither of us had ever been to Portland until pretty recently true, I only spent a little bit of time there. I think you had a little bit more fully fleshed out Portland experience. But we tell me then is the dream of the nineties. In fact, still alive in Portland. Yes. I four Alie enjoyed the town thought it was surprising. I was diplomatic enough. Not to directly, mention the comedy show Portland DEA to anybody that gets really old. I am sure it does. It's like when people visit our city, and call it hotlanta. Yeah. This is even more agree. Just probably people running around put a bird on the, yes. And Portland has this national reputation at least for being a very progressive city, right? Face tattoos or cool, marijuana decriminalized the streets are paved in marijuana. In fact, in Portland, it does have a particular smell. And in general, people would see it as sort of a bastion of left leaning culture. Yeah. Yeah. Super chill. You know you can you can buy a sandwich. I song. In Portland, literally. A good song. It's just a song a song or a little soft shoe. Or maybe you got a one man band. Dick Van Dyke situation going on did see a one man band when I was there. Did you see that guy? No. I just pulled that out of my of my year where you are correct. And there are one man bands in Portland. There are also numerous amazing things amazing bits of history. One of our co workers, a guy named Nathan is actually from Oregon. And he assured us that Portland is more of a cultural exception to the rule nowadays. Actually wearing might Timberline lodge hat right now. I bought at the Portland airport. And as you might imagine Portland airport, not a chain restaurant incite my friend, all of the shop sell handmade artistic goods. I bought some really cute. Little pieces of pottery there for me. Mom. That's sweet of you, man, and is really dope. Hat it is. So it's safe to say that you and I are fans of Portland and would travel there again in the future. Sure, at least modern Portland. Right. Right. I don't think I would want to travel there in a time machine to pass. Yes. Yes. Today's episode is about the origins of Oregon Portland in particular when take or as it's called here. I'm in some of these articles that we're looking at the Oregon country. Yeah. Oregon country might sound weird to some people. What is Oregon kept seeing it? And it was a little weird sending. But I figured it out with my internet sleuth skills. What would now be modern day? Oregon, Washington state, and Eita Aho was all kind of cluster together in this one. Big old chunk of land collectively referred to as the Oregon country. Yeah. And this was, let's see way back in eighteen eighteen. Right. The US and Britain agreed to jointly occupy this seems like a odd couple on a situation. And then I think the US started getting a little greedy and being, you know, we kind of want this for our own when it turn this into some states. Yeah. Because the British wanted to be in the area in Oregon country, mainly to engage in the first trade, and James k Polk who is an expansionist president. Right. Really wanted to make this our own and not not share now. Go with the Brits anymore. So that. Ultimately happened they negotiated. They decided it wasn't worth going to war over the Brits. It anyway. And there was some back and forth. And there's a really great slogan that the northerners used it was fifty four forty or fight, and fifty four forty was talking about the coordinates, the latitude that Mark, the northernmost part of this territory and during these negotiations, the US's first proposal was that the territory be cut in half. Right with that with that border at the forty ninth parallel, and the British rejected it. And so the expansionist many of whom were anti slavery northerners, which is super important for this part of where they are the ones who called. For more American aggression, get out there, be a big dog fifty four forty or fight. It's hard to say to really well with that fifty four forty or fight. It's tough. Get it right. Accomplishment as I'm sure they felt when they finally arrived at a pretty decent deal with the Brits, where they divided the territory along the forty ninth parallel pretty close to fifty four. I guess what's the forty though fifty four? Forty minutes divisions of degrees decimal, kind of red. Okay. So this is where we end up with Oregon needing to become a state. And when you become a stay, what do you do you have to have a state constitution? And as we know constitutions are not generally made overnights. They often reflect common practices goals or even existing laws that it community has practiced or written down beforehand, and organ had its own pre existing laws in eighteen forty four. They passed something called the exclusion law. And this was this was enacted by the provisional government of the region at the time. What, what did the exclusion law do? Yeah. Was this guy named Peter Burnett who is like a kind of Oregon trail kind of blazer I guess Peter Hardiman, Hardiman Burnett. And actually spoiler alert, we're going to dig into him in a little more detail later in the show. Foreshadowing big time for shadowing. Here's what this dude is just to give you a taste of what his matter was, like he was a former slave owner and as a really crazy resume did all kinds of interesting things, but by all accounts, a alarming dastardly racist. Fearless. So this exclusion law, that was enacted sort of pre proper government and constitution basically allowed slaveholders to hold on for dear life to those slaves for a maximum of up to three years. And I, I was like, wait is this is this because of emancipation? That was decades, eighteen forty four that wasn't until eighteen sixties, right? And I realize, oh, no, Oregon outlawed slavery in the territory. Right. But here's the thing is going to be. Oh, that's, that's nice. What a great bunch of people. Yeah. Okay. But, but there's more. So, yeah. This grace period of three years. But then all of those freed black people work required to leave. Yeah, that's the thing, the government of Oregon passed this. Exclusion law of eighteen forty four and in it, they did place, a ban on slavery with a requirement this leave owners, eventually free their slaves, but they did this with the understanding that any African American who remained in Oregon, after they were freed would be flogged, whiplash and forcibly expelled from the country if they're caught in the Oregon country, again, within six months than the punishment would be. Repeated, and then eventually the law was amended in another version to substitute forced labor, so essentially slavery, instead of flogging and then it was repealed in eighteen forty five. So this community was so racist that the, the didn't even condone slavery. They were so such white supremacist didn't want him around, like at all. And there's, there's some language. We'll get into a second, but I just wanna point this out the that law, you mentioned about flogging or that was called the Burnett last law, because our buddy Burnett was so into this, that he wanted to brandit with his own his name was like a signature thing, and it required that or declared rather that offenders, who refused to leave would be punished with, quote, not less than twenty or more than thirty nine. Nine stripes, and that would that would be a cycle that would recur every six months until they left. And fortunately, this lash law did get amended and repealed. So as far as we know today. No people wherever lashed as a result of that law. But this was just the first of three different laws likeness that all were meant to ban people of color from Oregon country which, again at that point is like Washington, Oregon, and part of Idaho. A huge swath of land. That's right. And we're getting some of this information from, from places moon of my favorites was a Washington Post article by deneen, L Brown, Colin Portland band blacks Oregon's shameful history as an all white state, or as I've seen it referred to as an all white utopia kind of right after this weird history of intentional communities and utopian thinking. In oregon. So it's not, not all examples of racist. But this definitely was the idea for the people who are supporting this concept was that somehow society would be better, if they all felt like if they also identified with the same ethnishity now, did they have the same sort of racism, that would be common in the northeast at the time wherein, for instance, Italian or Irish immigrants or children of those immigrants are still considered not white enough. I don't know. But what was on the books was specifically targeting people of color in eighteen forty eight this provisional territorial government passed a law making it illegal for any quote, negro, or melodic to live in Oregon country, but they did have a provision for people who had native American blood. They weird. Referred to as half breeds despicable people people. But it's interesting that all it takes just get a little white in. You really didn't like black people. Yeah. That's what goes out to. All right. Then. Yeah. So it state time baby here we go. What do you need to make a state as established earlier, yet you need? You gotta have some dirt gotta have delineation between your dirt and the other people's dirt, yet, to have some people in both sides, so that you can differentiate the constitution. There we go. Yes. In eighteen fifty seven. The government of what would become Oregon was working on its constitution. They did a couple of things. They grossly plagiarized constitutions from other states at the time, you know. Gonna be some of that, right? Constitution is not exactly great work poetry that you, you know, pilfering from his look down upon. That's almost like stealing a boilerplate release form. Right. Yeah. I think that's a very good point. At bluecross blueshield, our companies take what we learned from covering one in three Americans to make.

Oregon Portland Hardiman Burnett US Noel Brown bluecross blueshield Timberline lodge Peckham Dick Van Dyke Ben Bullen producer marijuana Casey Alie Washington Post James k Polk Nathan Peter Hardiman
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:24 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"That's right, folks. Extra credit, the segment wherein. We get some human person. It's tangentially familiar with the topic by varying degrees. My favorite of late has been the Colonel Gladwin bolan. Boy, man. He really he really set the internet on fire with that segment. I let him into of Gladwin. I let them into the Facebook group folks. So I hope we're all still cool. Did you create a monster? I don't know. I don't know today. We have another quite informed, gentlemen. Joining us the host of the new, how stuff works show behind the bastards, which does deep dives into horrible people throughout history from Saddam. Hussein's hobby writing erotic fiction to Hitler's spanking fetish, I believe, friends and neighbors ban. If I may Robert Evans AOL has cracking man. It's, it's weird weird. There's been a lot of like silent headshot. Shaking on this episode which doesn't really translate super well in the podcast. But yeah, who knew we're talking about Oregon, which is if you like. Yeah. If you go to Portland or whatever it seems on the up and I spent a lot of the last three years in, like rural southern Oregon, and it's, it's a pretty racist place like Josephine county where I was is chock full Nazis. There are quite a lot of them out there. So it's, it's, it's a fascinating place even in the modern day. Oh, yeah. Tons of them. It's one of the most racist counties and one of the highest densities of hate groups anywhere in the United States, chock-full, and Nazis, as it turns out, not a good call. No, no terrible coffee and terrible. Craft beer that the Nazis make. Yeah. So when we when we originally talked off air, Robert, one of the things that we were very interested in both colleagues, but also fans of your show was seeing whether there was a specific person associated with the, the supremacist origins of Oregon kind of setting the tone that we could we could learn a little bit more about with you, and you found the guy, right? Oh my God. I sure did any Peter Burnett. I think Peter is his first name. Yeah. Just a tremendous piece of crap, and may be like, there's a long list of super racist politicians in American history. But he's in the running for most racist. He's, he's, he's definitely like, in that conversation for sure. Yeah. We set him briefly as just having been the one that can came up with the idea of exclusionary laws early on before, Oregon became a state, and he loved this idea so much they named it after himself. Burnett lashed law, which emitted black people who refuse to leave the state to be given. Lashes, like every every six months or something like that. And he loved it so much genius idea. The Burnett lash law. Yeah, he was so proud of his, his whipping people rule that he stuck his name on it, which is a special kind of, of terrible. But he was actually like a violent jerk way before he went to Oregon when he was still living in clear creek, Tennessee. He was a shop owner like. General store owner. He suspected, this enslaved black man was every now and then breaking into his store at night to drink from his whiskey barrel, because they stored whiskey. Barrels back then it was a different time. Rather than taking any of the other actions, you might take in this situation. He sets a trap using a rifle, with, like a string tied to the trigger tied to the window shutter. Holy Spirit when the guy crawled in the middle of the night, this rifle shot him dead. And he wasn't charged with the crime, because it was an enslaved man. And he said he was sorry, but that's Peter Burnett before he gets into politics. They must have had like a stand your ground law back in those days to. I guess I don't think they had laws. The eighteen twenties or whatever. Like there was no rule. And that's such a cartoonish sort of rube Goldberg esque kinda contraption. He probably got the kit from acme. That's insane. Okay, go on give us. So one of his early jobs before he gets off to Oregon. I think after he murders this guy with a looney tunes trap, is, he's a lawyer, and some of his party's most prominent clients were Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon religion, and all of Joseph Smith's apostles, or whatever all of his friends, because they were on trial for kind of sort of fomenting frontier war that had broken out around Missouri. And so he, he is, these guys lawyer in his main achievement as a lawyer seems to be getting the venue changed that the court case was being held in and this venue, change allow Justice myth and all of his guys to escape and run away. And yeah. So that that's his career as a lawyer before he gets on that first big wagon train to. Oregon for the great migration and whatnot. Wow. Yeah. So yo already covered yet. He made the lash law. He made the exclusion law, which he was he was an abolitionist, but he's like an interesting. We when we when you hear about abolitionists in the pre civil war airy usually think about just the few people who would have been like on the right side of history. But some of them were just abolitionists because they were that racist. They were so racist. And that was Peter Vernet. He was abolitionist that because he didn't like the idea of there being black people anywhere in his state, and he thought that slave labor was bad for white people. So he was like he wound up the right conclusion, which is that slavery was a bad thing. But he wound up there through the most racist chain of logic that he could have possibly gotten to which is always interesting to me that was a sentiment that was big time shared by the majority of people in Oregon began. They did incorporate and become a state, the majority of people voted against Lavery, but also for ousting all the free. Read black people. Yeah. And I did find when I was doing my research that in eighteen forty at least Burnett had to slaves of his own. This is back when he was living in Missouri. And there's some evidence that when he immigrated to Oregon, he tried to bring one slave with him a young girl who drowned in the Columbia River during the voyage, so not a lot of it's kind of an enticing piece of what was going on there. But that that's all the info I found so far on that. Right. Because she was projected to be somewhere between ten to twenty four or something. Yeah, it seems like it might be kind of a creepy. Thomas Jefferson sorta situation. There. I suspected that as well. Yeah. So this guy we've talked about, like talked about what he did in Oregon, but after he got done an Oregon, this dude, moved to California, and he became an eighteen forty nine the first governor of California of the state of California. So California's very first leader as a state in the union was this guy Peterberg net who get a lot of terrible things. Maybe my favorite thing he did that isn't terrible was an eighteen fifty he changed thanksgiving that year from Thursday to Saturday, just because it was better for him, personally. I mean I can I can give. Hi. It's always weird to me. Thanksgiving's on a Thursday. Yeah, that's fun. But he also tried to bring racial exclusion to California with the Chinese. Right. Well, I with black people, he I tried to in his first message to the California legislature. He called exclusion like the first important like an issue of the first importance the most important thing, the California could do, because he thought black, people are going to take jobs from white people, and they would be unhappy in California, and cause disruption because they would be second class citizens, because he wasn't gonna let him be anything but second class citizens. So, yeah, he tried to there were like a thousand black people already in California, many of them free, and he tried to have them all kicked out and to stop any more from settling. And that was to racist for eighteen fifties, California. So he lost on that, and he wound up actually like in eighteen fifty one quitting being the governor over this because he tried a couple of times to get. California to ban black people and they just wouldn't do it. And yeah I mean there's some pretty pretty racist quotes from him that I could read, but that's probably not necessary. But it is fun to note that after he was no longer governor and after his political career was over, as you know, the world continue to advance in modernize in his old age his crusade, as you mentioned was trying to stop the Chinese from coming to California. So he was just just comprehensively racist across the board every chance he got, which is impressive in a terrible way. Yeah. At least you can say he was consistent, but honestly, good on you, California for anyone listening. Who is in the state right now? I think that's very highly to the character of the state even as far back as the eighteen fifties. He he also published an autobiography, right? At some point. Yeah. That's where he started. Ranting about Chinese immigration. Yeah. Robert, Shirley got some sort of amazing come up, right? Like burned to death in a fire. Drowned under suspicious circumstances. Give me a fight with locomotive. I think he died rich in old. He was in his eighties or somehow, man. That's a bummer. Always happens with these bastards. Right. I bet you're seeing that the Cosby episode, he kinda got us come up. But even that's sort of, like, appear victory where it's like too little too late for a guy that's been screwing people over four years on unchecked. Yeah every now and then you get a Mussalini or Qaddafi where they get dragged out into the street and punished by the people that they spend decades screwing with, but that's almost that almost never happens, usually, they die rich in villa somewhere. I'm really glad that you said this Robert because I was listening to the Ghaddafi episode, which I thought was fantastic. And I'm still preparing myself to check out the Weinstein episode which is a two parter, correct. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That one's a big one. What we'd like to do is again. Thank you for giving us more insight on the life of Peter Hardiman, brunettes, screw that guy. Yeah. I know. Right. But. We were wondering if you could tell our, if you could tell our fellow listeners here, a little bit more about behind the bastards and what they can expect when they tune into your show. Our goal is to tell you, everything you don't know about the very worst people in all of history. So, you know, you've probably sat, you know, stoned or whatever in your underpants and watched a lot of documentaries about Hitler on the history channel over the years. But you probably don't know that he based, a lot of his military strategies in his like attitudes on existence in life on a series of young adult novels that were basically, like the German equivalent of Harry Potter back in the eighteen hundred. Oh, wow. And for that matter, while we're on the savage of novelist. You probably haven't read Saddam Hussein's romance novels, but I have, and that's one of the things we get into in this podcast..

Oregon California Peter Burnett Robert Evans Saddam Hussein Hitler Colonel Gladwin bolan Facebook Gladwin Saddam Missouri Peter Hardiman rube Goldberg United States Portland Joseph Smith Peter Josephine county Peter Vernet Columbia River
"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:53 min | 3 years ago

"peter hardiman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the show, ladies and gentlemen. I'm ben. I'm no. Well, this is a very standard intro drying today. Yeah, we're going we're going straight for it. But we were only able to make this show, of course, with the assistance of our esteemed third member of friends, neighbors, super producer, Casey Patton. Sort of the Nilo winning would white bread a little homogeneous bet. Yes. Yes. Today. We are. Well, let's let's start in the modern day for a long time. Neither of us had ever been to Portland until pretty recently true, I only spent a little bit of time there. I think you had a little bit more of a fully fleshed out Portland experience. But we tell me then is the dream of the nineties. In fact, still alive in Portland. Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed the town. I thought it was surprising. I was diplomatic enough. Not to directly, mention the comedy show Portland area to anybody that gets really old. I am sure it does. It's like when people visit our city, and call it hotlanta. Yeah. This is even more. Agreed. Just probably people running around. They put a bird on it. Yes. And Portland has this national reputation at least for being a very progressive city, right space tattoos or cool. Marijuana's decriminalized. The streets are paved in marijuana. In fact, endorsed land. It does have a particular smell, and in general, people would see it as sort of a bastion of left leaning culture, super chill. You know, you can be can buy a sandwich, I song. In Portland, literally doesn't have to be a good song. It's just a song a song or a little soft shoe. Or maybe you got a one man band. Dick Van Dyke situation going on. They did see a one man band when I was there. Did you see that guy pulled that out of my of my year, will you are correct? And there are one man bands in Portland. There are also numerous amazing things amazing. It's history. One of our co workers, a guy named Nathan is actually from Oregon. And he assured us that Portland is more of a cultural exception to the rule nowadays. Wearing might Timberline lodge hat right now. I bought at the Portland airport. And as you might imagine the Portland airport, not a chain restaurant incite my friend, all of his shop sell handmade artistic goods. I bought some really cute little pieces of pottery there for my mom. That's sweet of you, man, and is really dope hat. It is a great hat. So it's safe to say that you and I are fans of Portland and would travel there again in the future. Sure, at least modern Portland. Right. Right. I don't think I would want to travel there in a time machine to be passed. Yes, yes. Today's episode is about the origins of Oregon Portland, in particular. Wow. Take or as it's called here. I'm in some of these articles that we're looking at the Oregon country. Yeah. Oregon country, it might sound weird to some people. What is Oregon kept seeing it? And it was a little weird sending. But I figured it out with my internet sleuth skills. What would now be modern day? Oregon Washington state, and I'd Aho was all kind of cluster together in this one big old chunk of land collectively referred to as the Oregon country. Yeah. And this was, let's see way back in eighteen eighteen. Right. The US and Britain agreed to jointly occupy this seems like a odd couple situation. And then I think the US started getting a little greedy and being, you know, we kind of want this. For for our own went turn this into some states. Yeah. Because the British wanted to be in the area in Oregon country, mainly to engage in the first trade. Right. And James k Polk who is an expansionist president. Right. Really wanted to make this our own and not not share now go has with the Brits anymore, so that ultimately happened they negotiated. They decided it wasn't worth going to war over the Brits. It anyway. And there was some back and forth. And there's a really great slogan that the northerners used it was fifty four forty or fight, and fifty four forty was talking about the coordinates the latitude that Mark, the northernmost part of this territory and during these negotiations the US's first proposal. Was that the territory be cut in half? Right. With that, with that border at the forty ninth parallel, and the British rejected it. And so the expansionist many of whom were anti slavery northerners, which is super important for this part of the story, they are the ones who called. For more American aggression, get out there, be a big dog fifty four forty or fight. It's hard to say you did really well with that fifty four forty or fight. It's tough. Fun when you really get it right though sense of accomplishment, as I'm sure they felt when they finally arrived at a pretty decent deal with the Brits, where they divided the territory along the forty ninth parallel pretty close to fifty four. I guess, what's the forty though fifty four forty minutes division of the grease a decimal. So this is where we end up with Oregon needing to become a state. And when you become a stay, what do you do you have to have a state constitution? And as we know constitutions are not generally made over nights. They often reflect common practices goals or even existing laws that a community has practiced or written down beforehand, and Oregon, had its own pre existing laws in eighteen forty four they passed something called the exclusion law. And this was this was enacted by the provisional government of the region at the time. What, what did the exclusion law do? Yeah. Was this guy named Peter Burnett, who was like kind of Oregon trail kind of blazer, I guess Peter Hardiman, Hardiman Burnett. And actually spoiler alert, we're going to dig into him in a little more detail. Later in the show. Foreshadowing big time for shadowing. Here's what this dude is just to give you a taste of what his matter was, like he was a former slave owner and as a really crazy resume did all kinds of interesting things, but by all accounts, a alarming dastardly racist. Nearly. So this exclusion law, that was enacted sort of pre proper government and constitution basically allowed slaveholders to hold on for dear life to those slaves for a maximum of up to three years. And I, I was like, wait is this is this because of emancipate Manama? No. That was decades later, this eighteen forty four that wasn't until eighteen sixties. Right. And I realize, oh, no, Oregon outlawed slavery in the territory. Right players, the UK the you're gonna oh that's, that's nice. What a great bunch of people. Yeah. Okay. But, but there's more. So, yeah. This grace period of three years. But then all of those freed black people work required to leave. Yeah, that's the thing. The government of Oregon pass this. Exclusion law of eighteen forty four and in it, they did place, a ban on slavery. With a requirement that slave owners, eventually free their slaves, but they did this with the understanding that any African American who remained in Oregon, after they were freed would be flogged, whiplash and forcibly expelled from the country if they were caught in the Oregon country, again, within six months than the punishment would be repeated. And then eventually the law was amended in another version to substitute forced labor, so essentially slavery, instead of flogging and then it was repealed in eighteen forty five. So this community was so racist that the, the didn't even condone slavery. They were so such white supremacist didn't want him around, like at all. And there's, there's some language. We'll get into a second, but I just want to point this out of the that law, you mentioned about flogging, that was called the Burnett lash law. Because our buddy Burnett was so into this that he wanted to brand it with his own. His name was like a signature thing, and it required that or declared rather that offenders, who refused to leave would be punished with, quote, not less than twenty or more than thirty nine stripes, and that would that would be a cycle that would recur every six months until they left. And fortunately, this lash law did get amended and repealed. So as far as we know today, a no people wherever lashed as a result of that law. But this was just the first of three different laws likeness that all were meant to ban people of color from Oregon country which, again at that point is. Like Washington, Oregon and part of Idaho, a huge swath of land. That's right. And we're getting some of this information from different places wounded. My favorites was a Washington Post article by deneen, l Brown, Colin Portland band blacks Oregon's shameful history as an all white state, or as I've seen it referred to as an all white utopia, kind of right after at least there's this weird history of intentional communities and you told me it and thinking in Oregon, so it's not, not all examples are racist, but this definitely was the idea for the people who were supporting this concept was that somehow society would be better, if they all felt like if they also identified with the same ethnicity. Now, did they have the same sort of racism that would be common in the north east at the time wherein? For instance, Italian or Irish immigrants or children of those immigrants are. Still considered not white enough. I don't know. But what was on the books was specifically targeting people of color in eighteen forty eight this provisional or territorial government has the law making it illegal for any quote, negro, or mulatto to live in Oregon country, but they did have a provision for people who had native American blood, they weirdly referred to as half breeds. Despicable people people. But it's interesting that all it takes just get a little white in. You really didn't like black people. Yeah, yeah. That's what it boils down to. All right. Then. Yeah. So it state time baby here we go. What do you need to make a state as established earlier yet? You need. You gotta have some dirt. You gotta have delineation between your dirt and the other people's dirt, yet to have some people in both sides. Oh, that you can differentiate constitution. There we go. Yes. In eighteen fifty seven the government of what will become organ was working on its constitution. They did a couple of things they grossly plagiarized constitutions from other states at the time of day, you know. Gonna be some of that, right? Constitution is not exactly great work poetry that you, you know, pilfering from his look down upon it's almost like stealing. Boilerplate release form site. Yeah. I think that's a very good point. This report is sponsored by bass pro shops. Well, the drive still problem for at the moment as I look over the I forty and I twenty five little bit of the flow down on the southbound side of I twenty five there around Jefferson looking at the CEO, that's all up to speed fame story on tramway and course now you have anything else to report you go ahead..

Oregon Portland Hardiman Burnett US Casey Patton Timberline lodge Nilo Dick Van Dyke Marijuana bass pro shops producer James k Polk UK Nathan Washington Post Washington Peter Hardiman Manama