12 Burst results for "Peter Hall"

"peter hall" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

08:16 min | Last month

"peter hall" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"Personal. It's powerful. And Henry Louis Gates joins me now from Los Angeles. Welcome back to the program. And look, your series is almost a perfect paradigm for talking about what we've just been talking about, which I know you've been listening to a little bit of it. You found in your series, so many people discovering what unites them, what connects them as they discover their DNA and all these surprises. Do you still see the possibility of an America that can reconnect rather than spin like a centrifuge out to its divisions where it is right now? Oh, absolutely. And eternal optimists. I fundamentally believe in the principles upon which this country was founded. I think the people Christian are scared. They're scared because of scarcity. They're scared. Look, we have a rampant virus that we can't see, but which is afflicting. So many of us, which has led to so many deaths, the pie, which we once thought in the 60s was infinitely expanding, is shrinking dramatically and in times like that, people were terrified. And there are two kinds of leaders. Those who assuage fears and those who exacerbate fears. And that's the tension that your guests just previously on your show were speaking to. And now going straight to your series, the first episode of the new series is entitled hidden in the genes. And you know, you're looking at racism, you have a lot of African American guests, and you're looking at what that has meant just to knowing themselves and knowing their own stories. What have you learned and given we're talking about, you know, I mean, things like suppressing voter rights, particularly of African Americans, all these years after civil rights legislation is just wild. Well, the let's go back to the original instance of voter suppression just so your audience, people listening can understand how devastatingly effective that can be. Black men in the former confederacy got the right to vote in the summer of 1867. I call that the first freedom summer. Remember, 90% of all black people lived in the south until 1910 and because the reconstruction act, black men in the former confederacy got the right to vote, even before the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified. And guess what? In the summer of 1867, they actually registered to vote. Many of them, of course, because of slavery, it was illegal to teach and enslave man or woman to read and write. They registered 80% of the eligible black men in the summer of 1867 registered to vote and in 1868, they voted. Ulysses S. Grant won the presidency overwhelmingly in the Electoral College. But he only won the popular vote by just over 300,000 votes. 500,000 black men voted for it. Ulysses S. Grant. So the cat was out of the bag, real power was vested in the ballot and these formerly enslaved people embraced it. And that had to be taken away. Why? Because South Carolina Mississippi, Louisiana, where majority black states Christian and Florida, Alabama, Georgia were almost the majority of black states. That was the real seat of black power. And so systematically starting in 1890, but what was called the Mississippi plan, the ten of the 11 former Confederate States had state constitutional conventions without mentioning the word black Negro or race. They disenfranchised those black men. You want to know how dramatic it was, how dramatically effective. In 1898, a 130,000 black men could were registered to vote in the state of Louisiana. One of those majority black states. By 1901, that number had been reduced precisely to 1342 wow. Wow. Honestly. That's why John Lewis was beaten over the head on had a bridge in March 1965. It was to get back the vote. And now the vote is the right to vote from black people is under siege once again. Yeah, in 19 states have already new laws and others are busy doing the same thing, especially in swing states. But interestingly, and this goes to your series, you know, it's also about knowing your history and you point out in the series through your interviews with so many of certainly in the first episode. That because of racism and because of the history that you've laid out, they didn't know. I want to play a sound bite of you talking to Lee Daniels, filmmaker Lee Daniels, who did precious. And he's explaining and just amazed by what you're telling him. It explains why he would never give me information about my grandfather and my grandfather was really loving. Why my grandfather would never give me information about his father. Right. You know? Yeah. It does. And it's just passed down from generation to generation. From one black man to the next black man to the next black man. These silences. Mmm um. Yeah. Well, the silence stops with me. This is a good thing. So that's defiance. The silent stops with me. But what is the silence done? Oh, I think that our, I think the fundamental premise of finding your roots is that our ancestors are in a kind of suspended animation genealogical purgatory. I call it. And they're waiting to be discovered and when our fabulous research team discovers them through the paper trail of genealogy and under CC Moore's leadership genetic genealogy through DNA. We open the vaults where they have been suspended and they tell us their story. And it turns out that mysteriously christiane, those stories have osmotically come down through our family trees and shaped the persons that we've become. It's an act of expiation, you know, an act of confession which provides so much relief that so many people burst into tears. But there are stories of tragedy, but also great stories of triumph and liberation. Let's take Lee Daniels. You know, there always was a free black community, maybe ten to 12% overwhelmingly our people were enslaved until the Civil War. But Lee, we traced back on Lee's maternal line, his mother's mother's line, and we found his third great grandparents whose names happened to be Peter Collins and Marianne longfellow. I love that. And they're listed in the 1850 census for Philadelphia. If you were listed by name in the census, that means you were free. Not only that, we found another generation of his family, his maternal fourth grade grandparents, John longfellow and clarissa Tripp, who were free awesome free people of color, born in Delaware, then they moved to Philadelphia around 1800. So you want to know what Lee Daniels is the genius he is. He comes as my mother used to say he comes from people. He comes from a long line of African Americans in that rare small community who knew and tasted freedom and could enjoy the purposes of freedom and so far as the law allowed. But he didn't know that story. He didn't know why he was so special. He didn't know the silences on one side of his family, the traumas, the tragedies that we on earth. But also he didn't know the glorious part of his family tree. The same thing with Rebecca Hall, Rebecca Hall, of course, is sir Peter hall's daughter. So you think that her

Ulysses S. Grant Lee Daniels Henry Louis Gates Mississippi Louisiana Electoral College Los Angeles Confederate States CC Moore John Lewis America South Carolina Alabama Georgia Florida Marianne longfellow christiane
"peter hall" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

08:06 min | Last month

"peter hall" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"A little bit of it. You found in your series, so many people discovering what unites them, what connects them as they discover their DNA and all these surprises. Do you still see the possibility of an America that can reconnect rather than spin like a centrifuge outwards divisions where it is right now? Oh, absolutely. I'm on an eternal optimist. I fundamentally believe in the principles upon which this country was founded. I think the people Christian are scared. They're scared because of scarcity. They're scared. Look, we have a rampant virus that we can't see, but which is afflicting. So many of us, which has led to so many deaths, the pie, which we once thought in the 60s was infinitely expanding is shrinking dramatically and in times like that, people were terrified. And there are two kinds of leaders. Those who assuage fears and those who exacerbate fears. And that's the tension that your guests just previously on your show were speaking to. And now going straight to your series, the first episode of the new series is entitled hidden in the genes. And you know, you're looking at racism, you have a lot of African American guests, and you're looking at what that has meant just to knowing themselves and knowing their own stories. What have you learned and given we're talking about, you know, I mean, things like suppressing voter rights, particularly of African Americans, all these years after civil rights legislation is just wild. Well, the let's go back to the original instance of voter suppression just so your audience, people listening can understand how devastatingly effective that can be. Black men in the form of confederacy got the right to vote in the summer of 1867. I call that the first freedom summer. Remember, 90% of all black people lived in the south until 1910 and because the reconstruction act, black men in the former confederacy got the right to vote even before the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified. And guess what? In the summer of 1867, they actually registered to vote. Many of them, of course, because of slavery, it was illegal to teach and enslave man or woman to read and write. They registered 80% of the eligible black men in the summer of 1867 registered to vote and in 1868, they voted. Ulysses S. Grant won the presidency overwhelmingly in the Electoral College, but he only won the popular vote by just over 300,000 votes. 500,000 black men voted for it. Ulysses S. Grant. So the cat was out of the bag, real power was vested in the ballot and these formerly enslaved people embraced it. And that had to be taken away. Why? Because South Carolina Mississippi and Louisiana were majority, black states Christian and Florida, Alabama, Georgia were almost the majority of black states. That was the real seat of black power. And so systematically starting in 1890 with what was called the Mississippi plan, the ten of the 11 former Confederate States had state constitutional conventions without mentioning the word black Negro or race. They disenfranchised those black men. You want to know how dramatic it was, how dramatically effective. In 1898, a 130,000 black men could were registered to vote in the state of Louisiana. One of those majority black states. By 1901, that number had been reduced precisely to 1342 wow. Wow. Honestly. That's why John Lewis was beaten over the head on had a bridge in March 1965. It was to get back the vote. And now the vote is the right to vote from black people is under siege once again. Yeah, in 19 states have already passed new laws and others are busy doing the same thing, especially in swing states. But interestingly, and this goes to your series, you know, it's also about knowing your history and you point out in the series through your interviews with so many of certainly in the first episode. That because of racism and because of the history that you've laid out, they didn't know. I want to play a sound bite of you talking to Lee Daniels, filmmaker Lee Daniels, who did precious. And he explaining and just amazed by what you're telling him. It explains why he would never give me information about my grandfather and my grandfather was really loving. Why my grandfather would never give me information about his father. Right. You know? Yeah. It does. And it's just passed down from generation to generation. From one black man to the next black man to the next black man. These silences. Mmm um. Yeah. Well, the silence stops with me. This is a good thing. So that's defiance. The silent stops with me. But what is the silence done? Oh, I think that our, I think the fundamental premise of finding your roots is that our ancestors are in a kind of suspended animation genealogical purgatory. I call it. And they're waiting to be discovered. And when our fabulous research team discovers them through the paper trail, genealogy and under CC Moore's leadership genetic genealogy through DNA. We open the vaults where they have been suspended and they tell us their story. And it turns out that mysteriously Christian, those stories have osmotically come down through our family trees and shaped the persons that we've become. It's an act of expiation. You know, it's an act of confession which provides so much relief that so many people burst into tears. But there are stories of tragedy, but also great stories of triumph and liberation. Let's take Lee Daniels. You know, they're always was a free black community. Maybe ten to 12% overwhelmingly our people were enslaved until the Civil War. But Lee, we traced back on Lee's maternal line, his mother's mother's line, and we found his third great grandparents whose names happened to be Peter Collins and Marianne longfellow. I love that. And they're listed in the 1850 census for Philadelphia. If you were listed by name in the census, that means you were free. Not only that, we found another generation of his family, his maternal fourth grade grandparents, John longfellow and clarissa, who were free also free people of color, born in Delaware, then they moved to Philadelphia around 1800. So you want to know what Lee Daniels is the genius he is. He comes as my mother used to say he comes from people. He comes from a long line of African Americans in that rare small community who knew and tasted freedom and could enjoy the purposes of freedom and so far as the law allowed. But he didn't know that story. He didn't know why he was so special. He didn't know the silences on one side of his family, the traumas, the tragedies that we on earth, but also he didn't know the glorious part of his family tree. The same thing with Rebecca Hall. Rebecca Hall, of course, is sir Peter hall's daughter. So you think that her noble line would be on her father's side and her mother is a famous opera singer from Detroit. Well,

Ulysses S. Grant Lee Daniels Mississippi Louisiana Electoral College Confederate States CC Moore John Lewis America South Carolina Alabama Georgia Florida Marianne longfellow John longfellow Lee Peter Collins
"peter hall" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

The Final Furlong Podcast

06:45 min | 6 months ago

"peter hall" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

"About blackbeard, on beaten in three Persian force, 130 who ocean Murphy talks about on the show, not so long ago, age of kings, Frankie the Tory comes in for the ride. 1.1 million. Just a 1.1 million pocket change to Simon holt. He goes 5 to one. Simon, what's your take on this year's Coventry? It looks very exciting renewal. Well, it looks a hot race. But they always do it as the two year old race is always looked very hot. And sometimes afterwards, it turns out that they weren't quite so hot. It still relatively early in the season for two year olds and we had perfect power one at last year's meeting. He turned out to be a very, very good two year old, didn't he. And may yet prove to be a very good three year old as well, but she shadow won this race last year. He's probably a little bit below top class. The aid no Brian pair extremely promising, don't they blackbeard unbeaten three age of kiwis got to go with the jockey bookings run more on blackbeard, Frankie de Torre on age of kings. There's no real formalise, no correlation with any of the British horses really. I think the ones that have probably shown them the most exciting form is Persian force who won the broccoli first and I don't know if a brokers would be winner is one that royal assets for many years, but he was a very, very good winner of the baroque speed, very impressive and he backed it up when winning at newbury and beating a whole win who re opposes him and should certainly confirm those placings. And you've got to this royal Scotsman who seems to be very highly regarded by Paul and Ollie Cole and he was a very impressive winner of good with the other day, one by wide margin. Just not sure what he beat particularly, but they do regard him very highly and they have had one or two good zeros, the coals at this meeting. There's lots in there that are one races. And it's just quite difficult tying up the form. I think one possible outsider might be Richard fahey's horse rails in four. Rising encore. I'm sorry. As one is last two, one, two out of three. And of course, far he won with the aforementioned perfect power last year. And this was one of pontiff threat, which is a very stiff 6 furlongs last time out. So that's a good sign. And also eating that day. And also on horse called Brie, there have been very impressive on his earliest art when winning at weatherby. So I think that form is okay in breeze Peter hall school commander striker at Wednesday, who has turned out to be a very fast hero. So I think the form has a bit of substance, the time was okay and I might just have a little each way on rousing on call, but it's very hard to be confident and you would have thought that if either the aid O'Brien pair are future group courses where they're going to play a big part. And the other one I should mention is bread zill, who was very impressive at your first time out, won by a wide margin the second has been beaten since, but this horse son of tasleet absolutely ran away with it and was quite well backed as well. So clearly been showing little. But it was good to soft ground that day. And it's going to be a lot quicker, but ask it. 9 lengths you want by that day. Extraordinary to see. It really was. You just don't see that with juveniles. I respect the fact that Roy Moore has gone for blackbird. I'm all over age of kings. I thought he looked all, let's see on debut, but I was still very taken with it. I thought that's a fellow if he can get his act together. He's going to be quite smart. And then he bolted up at the guru. And was very professional that day. And Frankie on board, I wouldn't obviously Frankie's fantastic. And a terrific jockey. So it's interesting that it's not shame me, who has won this race on war command in the past or weighing it's interesting that they've gone for Frankie. And I suspect that that will be something that we'll see throughout the week in terms of second rights for ballet oil. And I just want to take a moment and I think it was probably a hard decision for Ryan. There's been a lot of support from today. That will coincide with the good author and what's coming out, but he's interesting to me. He's the one I'd be pretty strong on. We're seeing these colors a lot, aren't we? These westerberg colors. Which carried by Luxembourg. And becoming much more prominent and playing a big role. And it's the guy from the opal family, isn't it? Yes. And he's a billionaire. And so he's a big player and obviously getting involved in a lot of aid no Brian. I want to see a horse's here as well. So, and they're spending big bucks on, as you said, 1.1 million this was passed. I do like to see form Frank, particularly the two year old formula. You just little bit concerned that the third horse at the Cora did get didn't really improve next time out. But he was very impressive agent king, so but I just think it's very hard to tie up before. It's all about potential, isn't it going into this sort of raising? And most of them are coming into the race of a win and it's almost you have to wait until they get beat to really find out how bad they are or how not bad they are. That's the reality of racing. It's how nothing about your horse is. Because they're winning their maidens and they're not listening doubles like bradsell, who said one by 9 lengths at York, the second has been beaten since, but visually, it was incredibly impressive. But it's so hard to say how good it, how good he is, on time, looking at some of the time figures, royal stocks. And the whole site quite like rousing encore, both posted quite good time figures. So for time freaks, those two could be of interest for sure. Interesting. All right, let's keep them in mind from a time perspective stride analysis by age of kings for me. I think Frankie might end up on the right one here and Ryan might be kicking himself. Wait, we shall see maybe blackbeard's gonna bolt him. But kingman, who is a royal ass governor and of course not I never royal ask out when there's a juvenile, so he's the Cyrus of blackbeard, fascinating race, but the most valuable commodity in racing is potential. At this moment in time, it's all about the excitement and the potential of these horses..

Persian force Frankie Simon holt Brian pair Frankie de Torre Ollie Cole Richard fahey breeze Peter hall school zill Coventry Murphy newbury Simon Brie Roy Moore Paul westerberg bradsell Ryan
"peter hall" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

The Bitcoin Podcast

07:53 min | 8 months ago

"peter hall" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

"I can predict my income and have the ability to pay my staff. I know that has to be a breath of fresh air because before that it probably was a little tough to balance and even have a team at all. So oh, absolutely. It was. And in fact, the real challenge was that the people who have the money to pay for commercial speaking events and conferences are generally doing it because they're trying to promote something. It's either banks trying to promote FinTech, blockchain, bullshit stuff, or it's conferences that are driven by ICO endorsements publicity and marketing. And I don't play in either of those games. I'm not interested in either of those things. So the straight up education on open-source community oriented projects doesn't really have funding for obvious reasons. And so patron gives me an opportunity to continue to do that work and not have to chase around these stupid conferences where they constantly ask me to compromise my integrity, which I don't do, but of course that makes for a complicated negotiations. Would you say that it's interesting that Patreon is the thing that allows you to do that. I feel like this space of cryptocurrency should make it easier to do that is just we don't have the infrastructure to provide such a platform or someone hasn't built it yet. Do you feel like there is something that's moving in that direction or are we still stuck with traditional services that allow you to do it? Until we get there and maybe how far off can we is it that you see? And so we do get there. Yeah, I mean, I think a lot of this is a bit about having a balance between ideology and pragmatism, right? And while I would love to use cryptocurrencies for everything and have everything in my business run on cryptocurrencies, that's not always possible. And part of the reason for that is because my audience is 95% people who are brand new to the space who've been involved in cryptocurrencies for 6 months or less. And that's always been the case because the space is growing so fast. I'm always dealing with the influx of new people. I like to think of myself a bit as the crypto version of a Walmart creator, right? So I'm standing in the front door and saying, oh, welcome. Let me explain how this place works. And as a result, most of the people who walk into my content have never really understood this stuff and probably don't have cryptocurrency. So that's one challenge. The other challenge is, you know, there's a lot of things that are just easier to do with Fiat and one of those things is recurring payments, right? So crypto is a push technology where in order to have a payment, you have to push it. Whereas most Fiat payment systems are pull. You can have recurring mandate that pulls from your credit card. The truth is that when people make a donation, it's usually a one off thing. And it tends to correlate very closely to the price, which means that when the price is really high, that's when people are willing to fund different activities. But when the price drops, then they are very reluctant to spend their crypto. In general, they're reluctant anyway. But even more so. But turns out when the price is low is when I'm doing my best work. Because I don't have all of the distraction of fomo, right? And green into the moon and lambos and all of that shit. So it's in the quiet times in between the you take the people who came in because of all of the exuberance and you try to explain why the technology and the principles are important so that they stay for different reasons. They come for the moon and the lambos. They stay because they understand economic inclusion and the other 6 billion and the power of decentralized control over money and how to control their own keys. So, you know, in a way, crypto isn't ideal for me to have something steady and predictable. And the other thing is, you know, honestly, I'm an entrepreneur, right? I'm a risk taker. I'm willing to go without income for several months and speculate on the future and be willing to put some risk into it. But I can't expect my staff to be the same. They're not entrepreneurs. My staff have mortgages and orthodontist payments and ballet and whatever for their kids, right? They have standing obligations. They need some income security. I can't take on someone new unless I'm sure I can pay them for the next two years. Because it would be a responsible to do otherwise. I can't force them to take risks. The way I do. And so again, that's where crypto isn't really ideal for that. There's too much volatility. And it's important that I have some stability to primarily so that I can bring on staff. And as a result, with Patreon, I've now got 7 people working on a variety of projects behind the scene, and that team has grown over the last year. It's part time mostly, but it gives me tremendous flexibility and really leverage, right? It's a multiplying effect so that I can be much more productive. Part of that realization is I used to do all of my own travel scheduling organization, calendar scheduling, and all of that. Turns out, I suck at it. And part of being an entrepreneur is recognizing not just the things you're good at, but the things you really suck at and then hiring someone who's actually good at those things so that you can get on with other things, right? I'm good at writing books and explaining things. I'm really bad at figuring out if UTC and British standard time is the same today because of daylight savings or not. And so I got someone else to do that. I would like to add to that. I remember our first interview, you sent me an app to calculate time, the time zones, I just put in my time zone. It would spit out what time zone you were in. And I hate to say it was probably the worst user experience. And I ended up just using Google because I had no idea how to use that app. But thank you for your analogy about the Walmart greeter, by the way. At least you're a good one. That's what a good Walmart grid does because when I walk in, they're just like foods on the left. Everything else is on the right. You know the drill. Keep it moving. Welcome to Costco. I love you. Yeah. So let's take it to crypto. There has been one space grows exponentially, so you take a week off and you're just like, what happened? And we look at Bitcoin's development right now, and I was just recently watching, I think his name is Peter. Is it will, Peter? Peter hall. I always get that wrong. And taproot and snore, and there's all these developments happening in Bitcoin that no one really hears about. And then likewise, the same is going on in the Ethereum, which is easily, you know, it's growing to be just as good and functional as Bitcoin, if not better in some aspects.

Fiat Walmart Patreon Costco Google Peter Peter hall
"peter hall" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

Something Rhymes with Purple

07:57 min | 9 months ago

"peter hall" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

"Not. So can you give us the criteria for us on it? I certainly can. I love it being a little sound, just one sonata. Give it to me. Delicious poetry from eat Dali. And I say it's from Italy, because the sonnet form was pioneered by the Italian scholar petrarch, who I mentioned a moment ago. Locally known as Francesco petraca, 1304 to 74, and fellow renaissance birds, but it was adopted and developed by the English from the 1500s onwards. And Shakespeare is rightly considered the elizabethan sonnet Maestro. And you're right. The traditional sonnet has 14 lines, is written in iambic pentameter and has a set rhyming scheme. Let me try and explain the contemplative, it's quite difficult. And I am Bigfoot. Is an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The doom and funny enough, the da doom is the rhythm of the human heartbeat. Which is why and there's research that shows this babies and toddlers respond well to Shakespeare and why Shakespearean verses easy to learn at any age when the great dame Judi Dench told me that her first poem she learned as a little girl was Shakespeare, I didn't believe her. But I then went to the memory laboratory at Cambridge University and they explained to me, oh, no, no, no, no. It is absolutely the dad, is the rhythm of the human heartbeat, and that's why it's so easy to get you in and understand it. But you can get the rhythm. Penta means 5, doesn't it in Greek? And meter comes from the Greek for measure, I think. So a standard line of iambic pentameter is 5 iambic feet in a row. So you can hear that in any number of Shakespeare's lines. When I do count the clock that tells the time that sonnet 12 in faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes at solid 141. The opening of 12th Nigel knew the first line of the play 12th night, most people do. If music oh, yes, be the food of love player. Yes. If music be the food of love, play on. The first line of Romeo and Juliet? No idea. You will recognize it to households both alike in dignity. Yes. The great director Peter hall was very emphatic about how you had to speak Shakespeare using the iambic pentameter. Don't muck about with it. Don't try and make it naturalistic. If you wanted to be naturalistic, he'd written in prose. It's poetry for a reason. And there is something quite extraordinary about it. Now, to work out what is a sonic watcher's experience on it and a petrarchan sonnet, with the Shakespearean sonnet the rhyming pattern is AB AB CD CD EF EF GG. Those are the lines that rhyme, a and B rhyme and then they repeat their prime C and D to get that. And with the bedrock and so on, it's a BBA ABBA CD ECD, or ABA, a, B, B, a, a, B, C, D it's very complicated. That's how you will work out whether the sonic you're worrying about. But can I give you the first verse? Yes. And you can tell me. Yeah, okay. So this isn't actually my favorite Louise poem, but it is a lovely one. Is it 14 lines for a start? Yes. Good. It's good to start. It is. Louis mcneese and Irish poet born in Belfast and highly recommend him. Anyway, Sunday morning. Down the road, someone is practicing scales. The notes like little fishes vanish with a wink of tails. Man's heart expands to tinker with his car for this is Sunday morning, fate's great bazaar. Regard these means as it ends, concentrate on this now. That's the first answer. And then this is the last four lines. But listen up the road, something gulps, the church spire opens its 8 bells out, skulls, mouths which will not tire. To tell how there is no music or movement which secures escape from the weekday time, which deadens and endures. Is that a sonnet? It's Louis magnificent take on a sonnet. It's not a traditional sonnet. It doesn't form the traditional rhyming patterns, but it does do, I think, because of that train that you gave us. What sonnets tend to do because they're divided into sections that do different jobs. In the petrarchan sonnet, the sections are broken up into an octave, which is the first 8 lines of the poem, and assess that the final 6 lines. In your Shakespeare son, there are three quatrains, three four line stanzas followed by a final couplet. And that sounds the way we're going to sound as if he's done that. He's broken it up into sections to tell his story. Well, he does use the words on it in the middle. It stands at which I didn't tell you. Oh no, and it is, if it's 14 lines, I mean, who makes the rules of these things? We made by academics retrospectively. It's not a traditional Shakespearean or petrarchan side. But it's a magnificent. I used to line a small eternity a sonnet self contained in rhyme. So I think he has meant that this is one even matter to him. But anyway, beautiful permanent gave me a chance to shout out lume at least. But also, I'll tell you what it does do, it has in it a Volta. A Volta marks the transition to the final section of the poem. The original Volta was an Italian dance that involved a sudden quick twist or move. And in a sonnet, the Volta is the turn of thought or argument that comes before the poem ends. So that's what Magnus gives you at the end there, doesn't it? He just rams it home with his final thoughts. Do you agree? Yeah. Yes, it does. It definitely steps out from something that feels quite comforting and secure and then so often it kind of it goes off in a different direction. It's interesting when you were talking about iambic pentameter. Did you know about the origin of amber? No, I'd love to. Well, it goes back to what I am bus. It goes back to the Greek for attacking verbally weirdly or not because the first iambic verses were used by satirists to lampoon other people. So they were kind of caricatures, if you like. Obviously it doesn't fit with the way that it progressed, but that was its early, early meaning. Very interesting. I mean, the world is awash with glorious sonnets, and if I'm going to recommend a book, you'll find 600 of the best of them in the penguin book of the sonnet. 500 years of classic tradition in English. So these are solids in English, but it does include people like magnes who have sort of veered a bit from the norms. Okay. It's edited by Phyllis Levin. I have so many favorite sonnets. I'm quite a traditionalist, but I also like people like Gerard Manning Hopkins who writes on its very curious forms that you wouldn't recognize as a sonnet. But I learned almost my favorite one on Westminster bridge, which I thought I'd perform for you now or read to you now. And I learned this in the 1990s when I was a member of parliament. People internationally may find this hard to believe that I was a member of people nationally made by John buddy. I was a member of the parliament years and years ago. And quite a few members of parliament interestingly over the years have written bird to Jeffrey chaucer, you know, great poet was a member of parliament John donne was a British member of parliament. George Herbert, Andrew marvell, all people who were MPs in their time. Anyway, I'm not a poet, but I'm a lover of poetry, and late at night, when I was an MP, we used to have all night sittings, would you be required to vote in the middle of the night? And I would go out of the House of Commons between votes and cross and recross the River Thames to learn wordsworth's poem..

Shakespeare Francesco petraca Louise poem petrarch Louis mcneese Judi Dench Peter hall Cambridge University Nigel Juliet Romeo Italy ABA Belfast Louis magnes Phyllis Levin Magnus Gerard Manning Hopkins rams
"peter hall" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:57 min | 11 months ago

"peter hall" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg law I divided Supreme Court rejects a religious challenge a little about the facts of the case Peter views with prominent attorneys in Bloomberg legal experts I guess his former federal prosecutor Jimmy Carole joining me is Bloomberg law reporter Jordan Rubin And analysis of important legal issues cases and headlines The Supreme Court takes on state secrets multiple lawsuits were filed against the emergency rule Is this lawsuit for real Bloomberg law with June Grasso From Bloomberg radio Welcome to the Bloomberg wall show I'm Jim Rosso ahead in this hour The Supreme Court will decide whether thousands of immigrants can remain in detention indefinitely And 2022 in judicial nominations President Joe Biden beat out every president since Ronald Reagan in getting judges confirmed in his first year and Biden helped to diversify the bench with his nominees 20 were black 14 were Hispanic or Latino 13 were Asian American and Pacific Islander and three were Native American But the road to confirmations may be more difficult this year Joining me is professor Carl Tobias of the university of Richmond law school So first of all tell us what Joe Biden accomplished with his judicial confirmations in 2021 Well he hide Ronald Reagan's record for the first year of a presidency because Biden confirmed 40 appellate and district judges 11 for the appeals courts 29 for the district court And you have to go back to the time of Reagan to see anyone who came close to that And easily surpassed the number whom Trump nominated and confirmed in 2017 So it was very successful And the nominees who were confirmed and the nominees themselves were very diverse in terms of ethnicity gender sexual orientation experience and ideology and all of that is critically important for the federal judiciary So some groups are complaining that there should be more Hispanics on the bench and nominees who are disabled or who have a background in disability law Are you getting the best candidate possible when you're looking to change the diversity on the bench Well the credit on which kind of diversity you're talking about but the types of diversity which Biden has promoted I think are important to have a judiciary that reflects the country gives more confidence to citizens in the federal courts when it reflects America limits prejudice against people who might experience dissemination federal courts And so all of that is valuable and also means you'll have a better decision And so everyone has a different mission of what qualified person is for the federal bench But certainly all of Biden's nominees and companies have been highly qualified and I think something like 8 90% of the highest American bar association ratings There's a vacancy on the Philadelphia circuit court That'll give Biden a chance to flip that circuit Yes Brooke Smith who was the chief judge of the court recently assuming senior status And he was appointed by Republican president And so that means when his seat is still that court will flip back if you will to a majority appointed by democratic presidents How many other circuits has Biden managed to flip back in a year The other I think was the second because a Vermont judge Peter hall resigned and then die a week later But he had been appointed by Republican president And so that meant killing his seat with judge Robinson meant that that court flipped back Trump had managed to appoint enough people that there was a majority appointed by Republican president but it flipped back to Democrats with replacement overall So how important is that flipping of the circuits when the panels are composed of three judges and so it depends on the luck of the draw for that It does and you also have to remember on bonk review by majority of judges and active service and so the second subject rarely takes up on bonds but other courts are quite active on that front But you're correct I mean they're supposed to be random draws for three judgments And it's somewhat of a recruit measure to talk about who the appointing president was But generally I think when it's a Republican the nominees and appointees are more conservative and when is a Democrat the point is in nominees are more moderate than sometimes with them So tell us a little about the 6th circuit nominee who's facing opposition from the Republican senators Andre Mathis is a nominee for the 6 circuit He's highly qualified He's a longtime commercial litigator but has done a fair amount of criminal litigation as well And was nominated recently by the president the home state senators from Tennessee senator Blackburn He sits on judiciary committee and senator hagerty said they weren't consulted enough by The White House in terms of whether they agreed to that nomination And the president did go forward and nominate Mathis but The White House and the council's office you have responsibility for that said that there was considerable consultation with the home state senators So maybe that's Blackburn We'll bring that up in the hearing Coming up next will the confirmation process be more uphill in year two This is Bloomberg The market.

Biden Supreme Court Jimmy Carole Jordan Rubin Bloomberg radio Jim Rosso President Joe Biden Bloomberg Carl Tobias university of Richmond law sch Ronald Reagan Grasso Trump Philadelphia circuit court Brooke Smith Joe Biden judge Robinson Peter Reagan
"peter hall" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"peter hall" Discussed on The Experiment

"I mean, I'm crying over here. This movie works. So yeah, why do you think this works? I think that this movie does a really good job of showing exactly what happens when somebody passes. It's showing the true tragedy. The tragedy isn't necessarily like this light skinned black person is found out. Or the tragedy isn't that a white person found out that this light skinned black person has been lying to them. The tragedy in this is that you see that in order to pass Sarah Jane has to completely leave her old life behind. She has to pretend that her mother does not even exist. And one thing about a lot of passing movies is that they kind of equate blackness with dehumanization poverty. Like to be a black person in America is to be always downtrodden. You would never want to be or something. You would never want to be a black person, right? But you realize that blackness is not just all the terrible things that white people do to us. Blackness is also a heritage to be proud of. And that when you turn your back on it, there's actual real pain in real repercussions. And those repercussions don't always involve white people. And I just have a lot of affection for this movie, imitation of life. Even though it has the exact same issues that we were just talking about with pinky. You know, where it's written and directed by white people and the person who's playing the passing character is a white actress and a lot of the scenes are melodramatic. As far as I know, a lot of these passing movies had these same problems. And the last major Hollywood movie that had a passing story line that I can think of came out almost 20 years ago. Why do you think that is? Do you have a theory? Well, my theory is that, you know, we've come a long way. We've definitely changed the way we think and talk about race and identity in this country. And obviously there were a lot of societal changes, you know, segregation ended. And also, we have more mixed race people than ever. And they can talk for themselves. They don't need if they ever did need somebody. They don't need a white writer director to explain their existence to other white people. So there's kind of no need for the passing movie. But you know, as I say that, there is a new passing movie. And it's called simply passing. Oh, you haven't ever thought to? What? The other thought of passing? No, why should I? No, I have everything. And in a big change from precedent, this movie is actually going to start black people. Ruth negga and Tessa Thompson are playing the leads, and it's directed by a woman named Rebecca Hall. So I'm recording myself. How's everybody doing over that? So rebel hall has had this long career in movies as an actor. She was in the prestige, Iron Man three. Movies that really don't call attention to anyone's race or anything or talk about race in any way. And this is important because if you see a picture of Rebecca Hall, you would assume that she's a white woman. But her mother is actually a mixed race black woman. So Rebecca's mom is an opera singer named Maria Ewing. And she's a huge international opera star actually. She was born in Detroit and she is known for rose like salome and Carmen and Ewing met Rebecca's father, the famous white British theater director Peter hall, when he directed her in a show at an opera festival in England. I mean, she went from, you know, it was a working class background. She wasn't in a kind of elite educational anything or anything like that, but she sort of was brilliant at singing and it just catapulted her into huge success very quickly. I mean, she won some competitions and then got into the Cleveland institute of music when she was very young, then, you know, became a sort of opera star overnight. And there were a lot of mysteries around my mother's racial identity. There were plenty of opera publications that referred to her like some people referred to as black some people referred to as white. Some people referred to as often she would just be described as exotic, which is really troubling. When you looked at your mom, when you were a kid, what did you see? Did it visit something like she doesn't look like all the other British moms? No, I saw a black woman. I'm dead. I did. Really? Yeah. Yeah. And I don't even know if she knows this. But I'm like, I did. She always looked like to me. And I was like, I know other people who look like you, and our identifying wholly is black. Did you ever tell her that late? Yeah. Yeah. What did she say to that or? I find it difficult to talk about this side of it because I don't want to put words. I understand my mother's mouth and it's her story, you know? But it's like, and it's super tricky. You know, she grew up in a white neighborhood, playing with the neighbor, white woman, and their kids, and then, you know, cut to her being 16 years old and coming home from school with her father and getting out of the car and the neighbors saying horrible racial epithet. And why don't you die? I think if you're the child of someone who has essentially told you that this thing is not to be spoken of, your ray is going I'm scared to speak of this. It was incredibly complicated for her, you know? She was just vague. Like it was the story would change and mutate. So there was this narrative of it's possible maybe a little bit or it's a little bit this or a little bit there. And as a minimized and dismissed on some level, because I think that's probably an easier way to negotiate it. I don't begrudge that, you know. I don't want to criticize that. It's a sort of response that I think is probably quite natural. I think she just didn't know what she was meant to feel about it. In Rebecca wasn't sure how to feel about it either. Until she read a book, a novel. I read passing first 13 years ago. So passing was actually written by mello Larson in 1929. And Larson was a mixed race black woman who was part of the Harlem renaissance. So the novel isn't new, but Rebecca first encountered it when she was in her 20s. It was a moment in my life where I was spending more time in America. Do you remember who gave it to you? Yeah, I've got to get credit where credit's dude. It was a white guy. Wait. Yep. So this white guy, he's so he hands you the book. What is his intention? Was it a moment where I was in a kind of clumsy muddy way? I was finding myself in rooms of people. And this is often a mixed race experience, I guess. Or, you know, a white passing experience when you find yourself in rooms where people are making assumptions about you based on how you look and maybe saying things that they wouldn't. Otherwise, and I didn't have words. I didn't have phrases like passing or white, you know to sort of understand kind of where I sit in it. My friend gave me the book because of that. And was like this book might mean something to you I'm almost embarrassed to say it, but I remember looking at the title and thinking, passing, like, why would anyone call a book passing? What does.

Rebecca Hall Ruth negga Tessa Thompson Rebecca Maria Ewing famous white British theater Sarah Jane Peter hall Cleveland institute of music salome America Ewing Hollywood Carmen Detroit mello Larson England Larson
"peter hall" Discussed on Pop Culture Affidavit

Pop Culture Affidavit

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"peter hall" Discussed on Pop Culture Affidavit

"Fights caused their sheriff scrapes and bruises. They show Some stills from the film and get a little bit into how these things were put together you flipping through some more. We have a little bit of production notes and in how things were put together a conversation interview director albert. Pune you have a like almost like you could tear this out and put it on your wall. Tiger beat sort of picture van dam holding a gun on another one with a vincent klein Kind of a pinup page photograph. And then finally a people actually wrote letters to the movie and had their Had their opinions like a letter. It's really interesting and the ads are for other candidates releases. So there's one the first one says to tough now available. Videocassettes bronze bronson's kin getafe forbidden subjects. And then american ninja three blood hunt. I'm pretty sure i saw that. I know american ninja too. I love american. Ninja one but River of death death. Michael dudenkov robert von donald pleasants. Movie scene. that i had michael dudakovic's actors. I really liked the eighty s and my dad really liked. I remember that. I remember another ninja type of movie. That wasn't american ninja with him a track that one down there's a three Like a triptych of of movies on an ad for tommy lee jones. Virginia madsen movie called gotham track. Twenty nine featuring theresa russell gaffe gary oldman and christopher lloyd and five corners with jodie foster. Tim robbins todd. Graff and john turturro a ad for a bunch of horror films from cannon videos crucible a har- beast of the seller dracula's last rites new year's evil blood on satan's clyde schizoid started class kinski. There actually is funny enough. There's a comic book convention ad those greatest and comic book as that you would see. There's so that's a legit comic book ad here and The you have an ad for cannon movie tales fairy tale things beauty the beasts puts boots the printing on. This is a couple of words that obviously looks like something didn't line up. And then the powwow highway which was called which the seattle times called the native american rainman. And then on the back of a candid video ad for cyborg which notes that john. Claude van damme was in predator. And this was something that I was like when i was a kid. I was like he's in predator. And there's i'd seen predator wartimes than i probably count at that point It wasn't until years later is that i knew that learned that. He was cast as the predator but early into pre production. It just didn't work out. He was complaining about how the the suit made him sick. He could move in it. They decided to go with. Kevin kevin peter hall who was much more bigger at imposing. And and what you got. It made him The elliott war. Like you didn't really have any lines. And things like that. But i guess because they damp had been cast in the movie candidate thought we'll put predator in there so I don't think that any footage of vandamme and the predator costume exists by the way. Not in these sort of eric. Stoltz shot fifteen minutes or so back to the future before they decided to replace him with michael j. fox and you can still see the back of stoltze his head in one of the scenes in that film sort of way i think they just they realized pretty quickly in the van dam was going to work out but anyway i wanted to note that promo comic because like i said i've had it for a long time at this point and it'll it rotates through cheap bins every once in a while at it's just kind of audie curiosity like somebody would put a whole comic together justice a problem for this movie an r. Rated movie that and this is clearly aimed at kind of slightly older kids who were two youngest already movies technically but then again late late eighties. We're getting ready to movies at twelve so cannon that all right that does it for cyborg I do have some feedback. And what. I'm.

van dam vincent klein Michael dudenkov robert von donald pleasants michael dudakovic theresa russell clyde schizoid cannon seattle times Pune Claude van damme bronson christopher lloyd john turturro tommy lee jones Tim robbins gary oldman jodie foster albert madsen
"peter hall" Discussed on Bald Move TV

Bald Move TV

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"peter hall" Discussed on Bald Move TV

"Adrian. Brodie weighed in the role. So right it was a joke. It's a fucking joke in the problem here. Is that this. Richard chavez guy who plays poncho looks in my mind. Identical adrian brodie. I can't unseeded man. And so every time i that character i'm just like fuck. It's a reminder of the horrors of predators. Yeah you're not wrong in boy. That's the the thing. Is i remember when we were talking ourselves into predators. Like oh adrian brodie. He's a good actor and maybe he'll be like thinking maybe he'll be like resourceful squirrelly no they just tried to have him be arnold character and it did not work at all. Now bit okay. We talked we teased this before. But there is a a hidden aspect to the casting. Which was the fact that john claude van damme was originally supposed to be the predator with an entirely different predator costume which i heard some people say was like a long neck dog faced abomination i actually think it was a cool cool monster concept but it did not work at all. Do you wanna talk about this jim. Oh yeah i mean. He essentially. I think he was pretty new in hollywood. He had done like a ton of stuff he had broken out. Certainly as like a frank dukes in bloodsport is pre bloodsport. Right like a year before they describe as fresh off the boat from brussels wanting to get his face in front of the is. Wow people with this split kicks and all that stuff. Yeah very impressive martial arts slash dancing skills and so he comes over and he's like the they've cast him for the predator and he gets on said and they've got they're doing the visual effect shots the stealth shots so they put them in this stupid red suit right the thing he he's like i look like i'm trying to be a superhero in those old bad superhero movies. Yeah yeah yeah. I hate this. I don't wanna do this terrible. So they call him down. They say look man. Don't worry none of the. You're not going to see any of this right. You're invisible for like half the movie and he's like what. I'm invisible for half the movie i want to be on the screen motherfuckers. And so he got pissed off about that and then apparently like when they went onto the shooting with the predator costume that the first version that you mentioned it was extremely hot at that point and he was like passing out in the suit because the cooling system in it was so bad and eventually go ahead go ahead oh i was gonna say he just kept complaining and complaining all the this. I'm talking like oak. keeps complaining. Play this over the course two weeks not like this was months of shooting right. It's two weeks he's complaining. And eventually they just i the producers come in they put a plane ticket on his hotel bed when he gets back they just say. Get out of here. Get out of your mind and action for a month. They totally revamp. And change the suit and the monster and bring in peter hall who is like a seven foot four dude. Yeah he yeah. He's like seven six. Played harry harry and the hendersons. Which i thought was a cool act. I was kinda bummed out that he is life. Tragically cut short. He was only in his early thirties when he of aids like he was one of the very first victims of the aids pandemic So he probably would have been a lot of notable movie monsters and other roles etc etcetera and Yeah the game. Also the helicopter. He's he's a helicopter pilot in. This movie has a cameo. Oh nice. I find the job ever wanted to get his face on screen and the student ended up doing it. Yeah that's hilarious. I'm sure because the other thing is i've always heard. Jc especially at this stage in his career the early And the meet the rise. Is he such an asshole by sasha conceded. Asshole one thing that like you get like yeah. He's funny and he's charismatic. And all that but like he thinks that he is god's gift to literally everything. So i imagine like this guy and and the other thing is i guess. A lot of the predator jungle effect like camouflage still jcp d. In the original suit that makes sense like a lot of tim tumbling through the forest and all that stuff because they also like they re than the predator was redesigned. Because also jean claude. Who's like what mid five feet. Five six five seven five nine ish up against arnold who's like legit six foot tall and massive just didn't look threatening even with the suit and they originally intended him to be kind of like is very acrobats ninja. Kind of like almost monkeys swinging through trees which that's the thing is like the all that is still in the early going of the predator when he find the cnn predators. Like how fuck is this. Do just go and treetop to treetop like this four hundred pound tank dude but like it's not just the vdi a total premadonna. Donna asshole but like in some of the tests footage of like the the combat with arnold. It was just kind of not coming together so they wanted a a much more physically imposing alien. They brought on sam winston. I guess he was in a car with james cameron when he got the like. Hey you need to come down to mexico and save production and they were spit ball in. James cameron's i you know i've always wanted to see monster like mandible. 's sandwich like oh. Yeah that could do. And then you've got the the icon. I mean when the predator takes off his his face mask. It's one of the one of the best horror reveals in science fiction horror. I mean it's kim to something like alien when you see the alien for the first time as jaws. Yeah this isn't as much like horror sifi as as alien but it's it's in that genre for sure it definitely has a lot of horror which is one of the things that like scared me as a child..

james cameron john claude van damme Adrian adrian brodie Richard chavez six foot sam winston four hundred pound Brodie two weeks jean claude James cameron peter hall harry harry five feet arnold mexico sasha seven foot first version
"peter hall" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"peter hall" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Right so so landau's grade in this to let let's talk about some of the other actors here You have kevin peter hall Playing the monster. The hunter itself and a hall is a legendary monster player who most ironically went on to play the predator in both predator one and two so this is where things almost kind of suspicious and you wonder like. I don't know about the screenwriters who wrote predator but but did they actually watch this movie. Were they actually just ripping it off. I don't know i mean. I think we'll get into that a little bit. When we discussed the ideas behind it sort of the the mythic underpinnings of the film. But maybe not kevin. Peter hall also played some other monsters during his time he. He is sadly died in one thousand nine hundred ninety one but before then he played the newton bear in the nineteen. Seventy nine film prophecy. He also played hairy in. Harry and the hendersons heart is bulging and he was big john and big top peewee Yeah so famously. Very tall actor. Great great presence for creature type roles and you know what i gotta say his his body performance as the predator in the predator film. Kind of makes it. I knew originally. They had cast jean claude van damme to play the predator. And no insta jean. Claude van damme. But i don't know if that would have been as effective in the movie. Especially standing next arnold schwarzenegger like the aliens literally smaller than him. Yeah i hear is key. I think But also know he's got a great physicality in the role to he moves his arms and his stance and all that he he really knew how to play a non speaking role. Now this this movie also gave us a key cinematic debut. The ginger baby-faced himself. David caruso david caruso so he plays one of the main point teens in this He's one of the ones that unfortunately does not make it all the way to the bar. He and his girlfriend or swimming in the lake. I think the last time we see them. They're literally on a towel getting ready for for some make out action and then And then they just end up later in the in the waterworks. Shed But so he is. He's very ginger. And he's wearing shorts in this movie. That are so short. They inherited the axis of time and space. I'm like i can't believe that people once wore shorts short. Yeah it's it's crazy. He would of course go on to to make a career out of playing mostly cops and detectives and occasionally criminals who basically seem like cops but it and that's his point he was only twenty four years old and he just plays a horny teen. It gets himself killed by alien. Yeah but then. Also we have Veteran character actor cameron. Mitchell who i mentioned that. He's in the prologue. He's one of the hunters who gets killed at the beginning of the movie. And i must admit the whole time i was watching him in the prologue. I thought he was jack palance because he kind of looks like him he has he has his face..

Claude van damme David caruso Mitchell Peter hall kevin peter hall kevin Harry claude van damme both two nineteen twenty four one david caruso arnold schwarzenegger jack palance one thousand nine hundred nine bear years old big john
"peter hall" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"peter hall" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"The writings wanted him, but the package wanted no part of facing Brett Farb twice that upcoming year, so they said, Well, we're not train them to the Vikings. So yeah, wait. The next year, Joe did and he played. The Vikings have beat him twice right because he had a year to go on his contract. And then when his contract was up, he was a free agent. You go sign with anybody wanted he signed with the Vikings, but that last year the contract he had the honor and he had to play for the Jets, because that's where the package trade them. Thanks, Jody. You gotta but appreciate the call Carlos from Alabama. Close out the hour for us. Hello, Carlos. Hey, Good afternoon. Brody. How are you, buddy? Hey, put it, You know, Happy Mother's Day. Everybody idea. Don't know We're fathers, but we have mothers. Do you know it's true? God bless on, mom. Yeah. You don't know women on his rotten wasting. I'm just I'm not saying I'm no general is a journalist or anything like that. But he has to deal with a with Roger Jody. He's no different from Com. Brady. You see our Tom Brady was unhappy with your own mom. What happened the following year when he got out of New England. You want a Super Bowl? Right? Peter Hall of Famer. What do you think Rocky is People Hall of Fame were selling this student anything but a Super Bowl. I'm gonna write this down on Mother's Day. 2021. I said here, Roger. He's gonna be with a cruise that gonna continue with this Super Bowls? Um, Jody, I'm serious about that. Would not be surprised is he is that kind of player Hey, is so good and so talented that he makes a very good team, a great team. Good team, a very good team and a below average team and above average team. All you gotta do is put his name on your line up and he's going to have that kind of a impact on the outcome of your upcoming season. So yeah, there should be all these teams in the National Football League that should be lining up to see if they can give the Green Bay Packers what they want. If Green Bay decides Is that we just can't do it. We need to move on, man. There's no way he's coming back in. There's no way we're mending the fences. We have to do its best for the Green Bay Packers and get his much as we can possibly get. In exchange for him. There should be a lot of.

Carlos Roger Jody Tom Brady Brett Farb Roger Vikings Green Bay Packers Joe Green Bay Jody Alabama New England Super Bowl Super Bowls next year last year 2021 National Football League Mother's Day Jets
Senior Status for Judges Explained

Bloomberg Law

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Senior Status for Judges Explained

"Judges have announced they will take senior status or retire since the election. Adding to about 50 federal judicial vacancies that existed before the election. With a narrow democratic majority in the Senate and no 60 vote threshold for judicial nominees, Biden has an opportunity to make an impact on the court's starting with the second circuit, which it now appears he can flip back to a Democratic appointed majority. Joining me is Professor called to bias of the University of Richmond Law School. Carl tell us what senior status means for judges and who's taking it well. Senior status is a form of semi retirement when judges satisfied the rule of 80. When they're 65 15 years of experience. They can take that status. They usually have a half caseload. On. Do they continue to receive the cola's that all federal judges have? And so it's a great opportunity for the judges. Because you retain their experience. But the court then gets another active judge. And so that's extremely valuable and brings new people into the system and gives the courts more resource is which many of them need. The most recent one is Judge Peter Hall on the second Circuit. Who last Thursday soon senior status. And so that's important because he's the third judge on that court. Assume senior status and means that they'll be Mork people on the court appointed by Democratic presidents than Republican president Want Judge Hall is replaced by by pointy so fighting has an opportunity to flip the court back to a democratically appointed majority, which Trump was able to flip during his time.

University Of Richmond Law Sch Biden Senate Judge Peter Hall Carl Cola Judge Hall Mork Donald Trump