19 Episode results for "Peter Gabriel"

Peter Gabriel: Genesis of a Rock Star

What It Takes

57:01 min | 1 year ago

Peter Gabriel: Genesis of a Rock Star

"A lot of people want to be a rockstar. Why does it feel to be a rockstar and have you look out, and there's thousands of people, and they know every lyric and they're moving to your music filling whereas a bit like the seven year old jumping on the table and family get together and showing off, but it's the biggest sale, but actually I'm a real mixture between us of show of extrovert and a very shy person. But when you feel the engagement, and you feel the warmth of the people is like nothing else. It's an amazing experience great privilege. Feeling is mutual. Peter Gabriel speaking on behalf of rock fans. If I may I saw Peter Gabriel and concert in nineteen eighty eight. And it was an amazing experience and the great privilege. Gabriel was at the peak of his fame, man. He'd recently had huge hits off his album. So including this one the video for sledgehammer, by the way, still holds the record for the number of MTV video awards nine. Good. Of course. Peter Gabriel had been one of the biggest stars of the nineteen seventies to as front man for the rock band. Genesis but much of his career has also been dedicated to the cause of human rights and to bringing hundreds of musicians from around the world to international attention though festival the studio and a record label he created. So we've got music politics and much more from Peter Gabriel on this episode of what it takes a podcast about passion vision, and perseverance from the academy of chief -ment. I'm Alice Winkler. This child is gifted and I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity, and you don't take it. You may never have another show. It always so clear. It was just like the picture started to form itself. There was new. We ally could prevail over the truth dot NIST over light there over life. Every day. I wake up and decide today, I'm going to love my life decide. If they're gonna break your leg. Once when you go in that play stay out of there, and then along companies differential experiences that you don't look for you don't plan for the boy, you better not miss him. Peter Gabriel is sixty nine now when he took the stage at the academy of chief -ment summit in London in two thousand seventeen he didn't look anything like his former rocker self no bat wing costume or fluorescent makeup from his Genesis days. No, white flappy jacket or gelled hair from the eighties. In fact, not much hair at all just a fringe of white ago tea and glasses, but still those piercing blue eyes and still that sandy warm voice, which captivated all the scholars and honorees gathered when he was asked to give an impromptu speech, I started off. Spectacular candidate for the academy of non-achievement. My parents who quite worried I was fitting most of my exams at school and. But I had found something that I truly loved when we were taken away on holiday, and it was a band playing used to watch the drama and whenever. My parents who want to go to bed. I would just sit there hypnotize thinking I wanna hit things and make a loud noise, and I was sent to very formal traditional English school and music was a place. We had a basement where we with a record player, and I could turn it up loud on I could feel things and I could dance around and feel like a free man, and it was a wonderful release. And then I got interested in actually trying to put songs together. And it was. A songwriter was really the goal for me. Then with the bands that I could occupy myself with as as a drum not a very good Trump really enthusiastic, but just know very talented, but managed to get my find my way into jazz band and into a rock band blues band. So anyone that would have me? I'd be delighted and we started dreaming of some writing. I'm going to devote here because I'm improvising to a story that I liked about another songwriter who was determined to get Elvis Presley to sing one of his songs. So he's so that he was he tried Colin music where controlling music publisher, and they controlled everything Elvis ever recorded amiss guy was absolutely obsessed with a single idea of getting a song of his recorded by Elvis, so he heard he was going to play in Las Vegas again and come out of retirement. So he sat in the toilet where he thought Elvis would go and as a human being he needed to do his normal things, and waited and waited and waited and in the end. The great man came to do business in the cabin next to him, and he summoned up enormous courage and asked if he could give them a song and Elvis said, well, if it's any good, I'll know just sing it to me. And so from one cabin to another. In the ghetto was sung, and it was the only sort of social countries. So that Elvis ever recorded. But I think part of the reason we here is to say how we got away with doing what we do and encourage you really to take those crazy chances, and I know plenty of voices that are going to tell you your crap you can't do this. It's it's not gonna work. Don't be one of those voices. You've got to be the voice that says. Okay. Maybe I maybe might would. Maybe I just can't do that. One of the first obstacles Peter Gabriel had to overcome on his way to start him was the disapproval of that fancy boarding school where he and his classmates formed Genesis. So guys. The sheet. Though benny. He talked about the band's somewhat subversive beginnings during his interview with Mary Jordan for the academy of chievements in two thousand eighteen there was a lot of discussion about whether we should continue with music in those other school. Now would be very proud of Genesis history. They want very supportive they sort of total rated a rogue group. And remember, my grandmother was told not to carry on playing and mixing with this reputable types. And so this was something that for us was really important because it was not quite Tom Brown's schooldays, but it was a formal English cool with discipline. Not a lot of compassion and the tighter the discipline the moon human nature wants to. Rebel against it. So music was alway in those film, Lindsay Anderson cold if which sort of catch it, I think the emotion of the experience stand up dresses you. Dresses you. Something indecent about you. Try to the way you slide about you think we'd unnoticed with your hands in your pockets the way you just sit looking at everyone you have become a danger to the morale of the whole house. You can take that cheap. It'll grin feel knife. The movie if is an icon of British counterculture, and it actually came out the very year. Genesis put out there. I Alba nineteen sixty eight they produced it during their summer break from school and called the album from Genesis to revelation. But the joke was lost on record stores that placed it in the religious music Benz. It would take a few more years for Genesis to break. Did you yourself as a songwriter or a singer? I so myself as the drama I and some writer. Yeah, we were planning to be summarizes. We didn't really want to be a group. The harsh reality of dreams of writing hits. Is that no one is interested in recruiting? So. We had to stop playing themselves. And then that evolved we in at wanted to explore different types of music. You know, it was the beginning of the sixties and. Merging different styles seem to us to be exciting thing and revolution Rian. So that's what we were trying to do. They were called folk blues mystical or progressive rock, sometimes art house rock did anyone influence you in songwriting music. So many people, you know, I think you instinctively absorbed from whatever you're hearing. You know, which is why my ten year is DeJean away to school. So if my next record sounds like Justin Bieber, you know, what? But it was arm be blues. So and the beat boom, you know, the Beatles were I was thirteen in ninety sixty three when I had love me do on the radio in the back of my parents call and I it's people don't think of the Beatles as sort of rough and revolutionary, but at that time, it was also of shelling by seeing sweet sounding songs and this rough tough ban sound in love me. Do was very very different love love meeting. Yeah. So please, please me was what the fest record our boat with my pocket money. But Otis Redding was the king for me. And I was lucky enough at seventeen to. To go down to the ram jam club in Brixton here on to a maybe three white faces that was the best gig of my life still to this day. Well, it was like the sun coming out just this womb. And then this amazing voice band generosity. You know? I mean Springsteen gives a ton when he performs, but but Otis Pinson. In my opinion. So it was just. Something else. I mean, I guess I was right. You know, I think what hits us hard. When was seventeen stays with us for life. And that was that was it from the. Let's go back to costumes which were fantastic. Those those costumes you came out were stunning. What was the idea behind that psyche to but the idea was to get rich and famous? We were in a group that was sort of disappearing into oblivion. I mean that was one side of it. But there was another side, which was an evil Lucien. We love the sound of twelve string guitars of its was old days. So meant the one electron acuteness. You know, three guys with thirty six strings, they come on and would sit there twiddling Nobes and. I mean until they the tunnels in in chin and the so the long pauses between each song, and if you're in a small club and is not ins and bunch musicians. Just got something going and then sitting down all the energies been dissipated. They look to the mug behind the microphone to do something. So I started telling stories, and so partly the characters coming out and these stories and emerging an and we had on one of them a character with pointed created with folks head and readdress. So and I sat around with with pulled Conroy was working our record company time, he was saying why don't we get someone to ground the gig in the folks hidden readdress, also a mess with give go so. When my wife's wardrobe pulled out readdress, which at that point on could I was thin enough to get into it. And we got the sort of folks had made up. Remember the first gigs? Word was in this full Mable ring in Dublin, which was not exactly the most sort of enlightened transgender varmint. And. There was a shock literally. You could hear a pin drop when I will out his costume. And I thought oh, that's interesting. And the band, of course, didn't really know that I was going to do this. I've mentioned something with folks. But didn't discuss it. Because a new the who know be majority vote going my way. And the same, you know, when I came out with a whole lot more costumes rainbow. But. Well under following day. We got on the front page of melody maker. And suddenly, you know from fifty pounds of week the head we were on one hundred fifty so, you know, life was looking so they will practical advantages to to the costumes, but it was actually a lot of fun. And sometimes you know, when you come out, and this we're keyboard sound dry is in them. I'm wearing the sort of you the makeup and bat wings. It was a little like a Sifi moment and a new people to some other place and think the musicians in the band were both the pulled and delighted. Other people start copying them because they're quite a lot of people that started doing about Landis kind of wild things. Neil Bogart said he persuaded this group cool kissed Todd wearing stuff, but the stories very different from that. So. I dunno. But you know. On belly was always in would dress. So he was their head of us. We did one concert with him in the roundhouse here, and it was with the living theatre, and it was one of these hippie festival things the probably forty people on stage probably twenty two in the audience. With was miserable events. But. But it was interesting that was my first encounter with with Bowie. Genesis was so successful so young. But then you're only twenty five years old and you walked away. Why? You know, we were I'm quite fond of all to the state, but it's fan politics is as just classic. And you know, go to the point where to get something done you'd have to persuade. Tony not we will often best friends worst enemies, I would symptoms twin swayed in that what I wanted was his idea, and and he was very protective keyboard, even when anyone else getting near his keyboard. Whereas I wanted to express myself played with that. But then I think it was decisive thing when my first daughter Anna was born, and they didn't think she would survive, and there was a whole number of things. So she might wife Jill wasn't allowed to see her than she was in an incubator. It was the most traumatic experience in my life at that point. And the band were very unappreciative Phil had had a child then. But on the whole we were trying to get a lamb lies down on Broadway recorded at that time that was in fall, west Wales and drive was pretty hellish getting there, I'm back and. There was no question in my mind that family comes first. So I think things sound that point in certain ways, you could say Peter Gabriel was a reluctant rockstar, or at least been ambivalent one. Who was never willing to buy into all the trappings? He was never a heavy drinker drug user, for example, and for sure becoming a husband and a father so early in his career and living through that trauma. He just described crystallized what was important for him and truth were mixture of are higher and Loa niches. So there's definitely pardon me that wanted attention and goals, and the other part of me, you know, just love music and wanted to follow my heart. So. I think the truth is is always somewhere. You know, composite and. I always thought of myself as a weekend rockstar. A fun place to get your ego stroked, but took sick if it's your Ponant abode right around the time. He was thinking about leaving Genesis Peter Gabriel got a call from the film director, William freakin who just made the exorcist and the French connection freakin had read a surreal little story. Gabriel had written for the back of an album cover, and he wanted to collaborate on movie ideas with the young rocker Gabriel had always harbored a desire to be a filmmaker. So he jumped at the chance nothing really came to fruition from it. But Gabriel would some years later right songs for many films and soundtracks for birdie rabbit proof fence and the last temptation of Christ. When you listen to a soundtrack work, you realize that you can clearly hear some essential Peter Gabriel nece, even without its voice the atmosphere. The rhythms the influence and input of world music, the simultaneous feeling of timelessness and Moderna, although fans usually think first and foremost of his voice and lyrics. Peter Gabriel said in this interview with Jordan that is a songwriter would always felt best to him was melody harmony and rhythm, and sometimes it was will come easily. But for me, that's a slow. More difficult to get past the Samsa mine tunnel sensor and having owned a studio now watched many bands, come in euro from seeing a group of players sitting around what I would consider the poor unfortunate vocalist who's struggling to squeeze a few woods out. So trying to get something that you feel says main summing to you will mean something to other people is is work. You know, I think talent is hugely overrated. I think most of its how book so update success equation. How what percent is hard work. And what percent is talent? The way I look at talent is an any Beyonce is just languages. In other words, if I was dropped in any country in the world. And in order to survive had to learn some of the language. I would find a way to do it. Some people will be quick I'm better mode that than others, but everyone could do it. And I feel the same with writing music with painting. Whatever creative format is if you really believed some that you'd swallow the pill the would destroy you in twelve months time, if you hadn't proved talent in a certain area. You would be amazed. What she could do. And how good you could be, you know, and I think people, you know, we're creatures naturally most of us full of self doubt. And you need to have conviction that does something worthwhile that you can do. And I think a lot of people I know who end up to in creative stuff either. I think the visa shit. All they think the the best thing in the world. And possibly both at the same time. So it's to manage that sort of power way. So that you can actually keep on working hard is what you need to learn. Some people are going to get that foster. Find it easier and be more eloquent with it. But it should exclude. No one and everyone has their own voice. And the possibility of doing some as you know, let enthusiasm Beal compass. It's a message that was reinforced for him at the academy of chiefs London summit in two thousand seventeen one of the beautiful things that happens at the academy summit is that onerous from wildly different disciplines are able to connect in commune. Peter Gabriel found himself sitting next to the renowned biologist, sir. John girton over dinner. He told me when he was at school of all students in the. School of which two hundred fifty he was number two hundred fifty and signs, and he found a teacher afterwards who inspired him and allowed him to think actually I can do this. And you know, he's now go to Nobel prize and. So that's what I say to young people. Now is that don't let any obstacle on people discourage you from what you're passionate about. It should be like dogs going in the park. You know, you go in there. With your tail wagging, you sniff anything interesting and you jump on it. Peter Gabriel is passionate about a lot of things and has jumped at it all songwriting and singing, of course, family life, but also opening doors for musicians from around the world, and developing technology and campaigning for human rights. So if he had to describe his core talent, a think hustler. I'm trying to get things to happen. And I work hard. I think probably it's said I have managed to fool myself into believing slings a possible wearing what did you learn about getting over the hurdles to make something happen? It's that. Yeah. Win, but you need to put yourself in in the right place in. One of the people I was talking to about this said in the Kabbalah is in saying that if you get very sick, you change your name and change your address, and actually that's quite smart because you're putting your mental framework in a different environment. And I think to get something done allow yourself to be this other thing, and, you know, the baggage in the what the pasta syndrome, I'm not going to be able to do this. Or all these people saying this stuff about me, and maybe they're ripe and that allows you to show that out and say, okay, doesn't that? Actually, you know. Let's just give it a go and go for it. And a really I think the main thing for young people is going to be plenty of doubt and nays has. Trust. I have what I call my little voice. And it sometimes says things to me that noon rational and an I try whenever I can't follow. It. Little boys is actually more helpful than the big voice. Yeah. Little voice is is intuitive instinct in the and we I think we will have that intend to block it out very easily. Is there anything you can do to imply a little? My wife recently, come out of cancer and. So have spent a little time thinking about. How people function what makes them feel good? Keeps that health. And so on. And one of the recommendations for people is. Devised. Think of everyone, you know. Who makes you feel good and bigger who makes you feel bad and smaller. You know, where to go, and you know, who to exclude that helps it's seems city, but the same with I think a lot of activities in life. You know, it's it's we need just to analyze. What's working for in whole where we instinctively at ease. Fini were going with the flow where are we feeding reopen and he just do more of the right stuff? Well fed which pretty much brings us back to the moment that Peter Gabriel listened to his little voice telling him to leave his very successful rock band. Genesis for a solo career in case you need a refresher. I'm going to take two minutes here to play just a few of his biggest hits from the late nineteen seventies and the eighties and the night. The city light. Equal. Of the night. Will in. About. Without? You might have noticed a glaring omission from my montage. I thought it just needed its own moment in the sun. I'm talking, of course, about in your eyes. It would be very hard for any interviewer to talk to Peter Gabriel about his life and work without coming around to asking the in your eyes question and our interview or married. Jordan was no exception. What did Peter Gabriel thinks she wanted to know when he saw John cusak. Forgive me, Lloyd Doppler blasting the song from a boombox held high over his head to back the girl in say anything the scene is what made say anything the romantic teen classic that it is. And as I record these words, by the way, the movie is just days away from its thirtieth anniversary. I have no idea is going to become this Kohnic thing. But very grateful that it was chosen because it was it's one of the most parodied scenes in Hollywood. Is on it. So I'm happy for that. Such a great line. I want to touch the light the heat. I see in your eyes. You know, the the words they're right. But light heat your is these are the same words in a lot of love songs. What is it about the order or the Melanie behind why to some of these love songs like that one laughed? Well. I was in love with a lot of African music around that time and bits of written Senegal. But one of the ideas interested me in Africa music, is that a love song could be, you know, a love for a woman all love of God. And to could be confused with no problem that they could be about love. Whereas in our society, you know, spiritual was one side, so sexual romantic was another and. So that fusion was what I was trying to explore lyrically. And and in the music was definitely some African influence, and I think so it has a life too that. Flows effortlessly, and then, you know, as working with you soon who does amazing singing, it is an Djelic voice at the end. So I think a combination of of those things help to to to work. This song introduced you Sutin door to audiences outside of Africa inside Africa. He was already a superstar perhaps the biggest of all time. Peter Gabriel didn't just use that mesmerizing voice on the song. He invited indoor to tour with him when his mega hit albums. So came out in nineteen eighty six two years later, you Sutin door was one of the featured artists along with Peter Gabriel and Bruce Springsteen and sting entry C Chapman on the human rights now tour for Amnesty International the Philadelphia stop on the tour, by the way is the concert. I referred to at the top. Where I I saw Peter Gabriel live. It was one for the ages our interview or marriage Orden ask Gabriel how he made that turn from rockstar to political rockstar while I sort of fell into human rights for the I didn't. You know came from a comfortable background men. My when I put my calling card in. I think was when I wrote the song Biko and. You know, I've been interested in what goes on in the world when Steve Biko was arrested a lot of people felt that the public- surrounding his arrest would be enough to protect him. So there was a real sense of shock when we already was but he'd being murdered. Stephen Biko was an activist in South Africa during apartheid and was leader of the black consciousness movement. When he died at the hands of state security officers in nineteen seventy seven twenty thousand people attended his funeral. Peter Gabriel's song Biko came out three years later. It became one of the most powerful anti-apartheid human rights songs ever recorded an actually head pretty big political impact. Whoa. No hood, people would sing it in South Africa, and it was Houston rallies and so on so that. Stadiums. So that was it was great to hear. I mean, when we did the human rights now to fight it was towards the end of the apartheid government and the were interesting discussions. Whether we should go to South Africa or not because we being honest by the anti-apartheid movement, not to go cultural boycott yet Houston, do and Tracy Chapman. The blackout is with us. They actually know this is part of a process of opens things up liberalizes. Some we had those discussions and we ended up. Bill Graham was there used these two planes one full of gear and the other full of musicians and crew and and occasionally when gigs can't Soto people go scattered us in a we'd be there with a map of the world from where can we land our planes? That was some quite unlike any other tour. Sort of life changing experience for many of us because we human rights me, something, you, you know, you read about seeing the the guardian newspaper, but. We hadn't really met many people around the world that I've been tortured lost loved ones seventy that they were talking to us, and and it's very hard then at that point to walk away. And I found the very compelling. I was also shocked that people could go through something experiences, and then have the horrors totally denied buried, and forgotten it, it was I think it was important in the membership of amnesty was doubled around the world as a result of that tour and for all of us as musicians, I think it changed the way we saw a role and how did it change? Well, made us convinced actually, you know, you may not change the world, but you can have an impact you can be part of a process the questions and. Proposes something different. And you've said music is a universal language it draws people together and prove as well as anything the stupidity of racism. Well, we put together this festival which is still going now was nineteen eighty. We started work on it and eighty-two office dependents, wo matte world of music and dance. And. A bunch of us had really started hearing what we thought were incredible artists from other countries around the world were never going to get on our radio at that time and those maybe a couple of record stores where you could find them easy in London. And so we thought let's can event together and bring a lot of people from around the world. To extend the reach of these artists from around the globe. Peter Gabriel and the woman festival gave birth to a studio and a record label called real world. If you go on their website, you'll see over a hundred of their artists listed musicians from Africa Asia the Middle East Europe, north America, South America, Oceania, the Caribbean and the Indian subcontinent sometimes together on the same album. I really worry right now that we got this whole tied moving of politicians in many countries that are becoming elected trading on fear and hate and division, and and racism is underlying that and this of the immigrant as the enemy whereas in who was very few countries. Want built out of and by immigrants, you know, history. Our history is always moving and flowing and. Olis extremist hate filled anti then stuff is silent thing. I'll bet nature which I'm still convinced as. I would like to see a young young people many of whom still idealistic as they always own. Create some sort of movement, and you know, hippy movement was what happened when I was a kid. And I think we need young people to generate some sort of back to this extremist populist monopoly for media. Which is. There used to be so positive about the power of technology and a mobile phone in the hands of a poor person. Could give limitless knowledge are you as optimistic about the power of technology now one hundred percent? That the potential of technology, you know? I was at this price didn't deal the night. And and they have projects now to use technology to feed a billion people to get kids. But Conrado right reading and writing in any language within eighteen months. I mean, we have a project we're trying to kickstart about streaming medical treatment as because when the digital revolution hits medicine, not just in diagnostics and treatment. It's going to get access to people around the world in the same way that the phone gave people access to communication too, we compete Lia to Google, you know, that's it's very powerful. But I think people who I believe working for themselves using media much more effectively than people who. Working full for mankind. Peter Gabriel going back at least to nineteen Eighty-nine was finding ways to use technology for good that year. He founded an organization called witness, their slogan is see it film it change. It people often think it was inspired by the Rodney King incident when a bystander videotaped Los Angeles police officers as they brutally beat Rodney King during an arrest. But the truth is Peter Gabriel's organization witness was already in the works before that day. It grew out of the Amnesty International human rights now tour, what was very clear whenever someone had suffered a human rights abuse. And they manage to get on video or they got their experience. And they were telling the story on video. It was much tougher for those in power to bury that story and. You know, people would respond emotionally to to the video content, and so Reebok human rights foundation who had funded the amnesty tool had this. I made a proposal to try and bring in an entity either within the foundation separate would use video technology and trying on activists some people who find themselves and human rights struggle with video and. Eventually that took a while that was adopted a now, I think we have the same opportunity with data. That's an amazing group cold front sick architecture. They have amazingly detailed approach the data. But we are moving to the age when video can be faked much better. So what's next? So I think it's data rich. Okay. So they would look at for instance, save some work on Bohm's in Syria, and they've taken photos from everyone's camera around tomboy, the Bom was dropped and recreated three dimensional flow. Matt of the cloud created by the bomb that also been able to identify the Bom and the manufacturer suchlike. Forensic evidence in in supreme detail Nate create a time line. So it's basically like creating a three-dimensional version of. A bad event. I mean, they don't they don't get the they just present the evidence and the evidence speaks for itself. This is the next generation of human rights campaigning. Do you spend time on this? You know, you can sit at a beautiful piano in your beautiful studio outside bath and England. Well, if think it's exciting and always my dad was electrical engineer inventor, and he came up with some with an Italian sort of thing Donna program, which was so electric democracy home shopping education on demand, but this was nineteen seventy-one access through the rotary dial telephone. So it was a little ahead of his time. But his mission was sort of empowering technology. So that is part of what press my buttons is. When you see people that can use technology to great advantage. There's one other significant project we have to at least touch on before we go that's been a labor of love for Peter Gabriel and one of his proudest achievements. It's called the elders. The idea grew out of conversations that Gabriel was having with his friend the business. Magnate Richard Branson about the desperate need for wisdom in world affairs. An seemed that the were individuals around the world people respected at the same time as losing trust in governments institutions and politicians. They came up with a list of elder statesman. And we're trying to think of how they could possibly pull off getting such an illustrious, but far flung group to agree. Get on the same page and try moving the world a little closer toward peace Justice and human rights with both concluded that Mandela had more of a sort of moral currency having out of twenty seven years jail, trusted, his enemy to be build the future with him after they killed and tortured many of his friends, that's a pretty big leap that most leaders. On not capable of. It was a huge long shot. But in two thousand one they got their chance over lunch with the then president of South Africa. We did on page and dollar was really not very impressed. Again. He said, I'm sure people in power that wanna bunch of old times into fearing. But by the end of the meal, he said there was this time when they asked me to intervene with Hutus took zipping of slaughtering each other in Rwanda and the young generals on both sides. Actually, we only gonna earning going to negotiate with you everyone else he has gotten agenda, but with you it's like token to our dad, and we trust you, but you have no interest other than a good outcome for everyone. And so that was the sort of currency that persuaded him to take it on. But it still took another few years to to get it, you know, because he was being hustle by every well meaning person in the world who knew that Mandela magic. Spring crew some very Dustin whatever it was they were trying to do so met the hustler in Peter give no richest bad housing. And so, but yeah, eventually came around, and we had this launch in two thousand seven and show bug. In this Fulmer court building where in a lot of his black calling sipping sent to jail and so on. It was some amazing moment. The elders is now a full fledged organization that tackles arrange of pressing international issues and the elders themselves. They're sixteen of them come from almost as many corners of the world as the musicians on Peter Gabriel's real world record label one of the elders by the way is former US president Jimmy Carter who will be the featured guest on the next episode of this podcast. But I digress. A little. There are a lot of actors and writers musicians who get involved in political causes and charities and find ways to give back, but it's hard to think of many artists who've so deeply and consistently used their stature and their influence to help others as Peter Gabriel a couple of years ago. The singer Taylor swift told NPR that Peter Gabriel had a huge influence on her musically because his approach was so innovative in a head of its time. And that he was quote remarkable at giving people what they want. But didn't think they want it the same could very well be said of his work to make the world a better place. So you're only sixty eight years old as we fit here this London hotel room, not far from Notting hill. And when you look back, you're still have lots more to do. But when you look back is there anything you would have done differently. I think you know. When you get reflective. You know, always thinking my death bed. I'm not reading care about anything to do with work. It's the people you love treating them. Right. And I think I could have done some things better there. But I've had a really interesting life. And I push myself to do things that were go where I was afraid what I was in co- uncomfortable in and always got a lot back from it. So I feel very grateful very lucky and lots of ways that's Peter Gabriel. He was interviewed by Mary Jordan who by day is a correspondent for the Washington Post. Peter Gabriel has a new album out later this week April thirteenth two thousand nineteen. It's a collection of his songs from the movies called rated PG. Get it PG. Peter Gabriel the one you're hearing is down to earth from the movie wall e. Escaped. Changing the script and the scene. I'm L is Winkler. And this is what it takes from the academy of achievement. Will you can come by guest? We're. What it takes his generously funded by the Catherine b Reynolds foundation. Thanks to them. And to you for listening. Come up. Then we got out. We wanted. We missed. No. We got.

Peter Gabriel Mary Jordan London South Africa Elvis Presley Peter Gabriel nece Alice Winkler MTV Africa Amnesty International Mandela Lindsay Anderson Otis Redding Justin Bieber Trump Bruce Springsteen academy of achievement Dublin
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182 Climbing Up on Solsbury Hill

"Hello and welcome to misinformation a trivia podcast for ladies and gents of cool trivia and chicken too annoying teams at pub quiz. Where your hosts i'm lauren. And i'm julia schule lord so we are at episode one eighty two. Can you even believe it. Yeah we were saying the other day like we mentioned offhand. What number episode we on. We're like how honor there have. We done this. That's so many book report that so many things to talk about. I didn't honestly. I didn't think that i had that many things to talk about in me. Frankly and i can only remember. Maybe half a dozen of the last episode that we've done. Yeah it's funny though like when we watch like a game show or something. And i'm like you should know that josh because we did a whole episode on it. He's like even remember doing that. Episode is like no there was. There was one question the other night when we were watching. the first the premiere episode of the chase. This season and the question was the statue of liberty wasn't intended for it wasn't originally intended for new york harbor. Where was it originally built for her. And they gave you a trafalgar square suez canal and gibraltar. Like what was going to be the original location of the statue of liberty. And i was like i. Is this something. I talked about at the suez canal up to. I think it might be. I feel like there's a little thicker by brain that i did whole over suez canal and i thought this would be an interesting tidbit and i was like. I hope i'm right us guys. So yes if you missed that episode or that episode of the chase. The suez canal was the original intended site for what america has us the set of liberty. And that's a freebie folks. We're not even talking about the stuff that stuff that we've talked about that. I'm like i'm pretty We talked about that right. That's something i would have talked about. I would have done that eventually right. Yeah absolutely yeah. So one. Eighty two incredible And today is a music episode. Oh oh yeah. Is it going to be about eighty two. Yes because we are huge blink. One eighty two fans like that song all paying the only one. I could quick cyber. So i'm the last episode of the great british. Sorry last season of the great british bake off and the first episode when they had to make like the bust. Yes buster person. Cakes and dave whipped out the bust of his hero. Tom delonge we craziest. That was i beat. Everybody did like recognizable. Famous for the most part is gonna say this was that was some nailed it as shit and yet of great british bake off. Challenge but yeah. Yeah tom delonge and he's not tom. Delonge is not okay like he. He's becomes the alien alien guy and that's what we're talking about today right now. We're talking about how long is a conspiracy theorist no in fact. I had promised this episode for a very long time. Promise this episode in. I actually teased it in our previously mentioned trivia night that you may or may not have attended and but music episodes are such are a lot of work for us so but this can i tell you the amount of joy doing this episode brought me. I was like beside myself so excited to be doing this so today. We're gonna talk about my favorite musical artist. Peter gabriel now. You definitely shouldn't it's good for us. Enjoy the topics were doing especially when we did dictator was just like i gotta do an eight-page your book report about this guy. Yeah so. I'm glad the topic that brings you joy. Oh i've loved this if i could do peter. Gabriel every day. If i could do a different peter gabriel album for like an entire year. Maybe not that to see how. Tell me but the other thing is i. This is going to happen throughout the episode guys. I am going to say wait. I thought that was full collins. I don't get to confuse the heck out of these two guys and you know what i got. You covered okay. You'll you'll know the difference by the time. And i'll and i'll also tell you why you get them confused. Okay thank you so here. We go air here. We go here we go. Peter gabriel peter. Brian gabriel. In fact he was born on february thirteenth. Nineteen fifty in chaba surrey uk. I dunno if that's how it's pronounced but it looks like chabot ham so i'm going to go chaba. He learned to play the piano from his mother and he developed an interest in drumming. In fact he started off on drums of those teachers noticed his talent in singing as well he was a growing up like a huge fan of aren. Be and soul music american rb and soul music and he frequently says otis redding was his biggest influence such a huge fan of his. And so all and we'll talk about the influence of our envy and seoul on his music moving forward so he remarked of his early influences played quite a large part. He said oh they were the closest. I came to soul music before i discovered soul music. Time out sorry. I now realize that you're saying s. But sometimes when lawrence talking about like a dog or oh hymns is so cute. So i thought you were saying like hymns was so influenced. Just love him. he's so cute. Such a cute little man. no. I'm talking about him like like you. Listen to church singing church okay. He said there are certain hymns that you can scream your lungs out on and i used to love that. It was great when he used to get the old shivers. Down your back so at age twelve. He wrote his first song which was called. Sammy the slug which is adorable. Do we have that. Do no we. Don't we do not have a clip of sammy slug. I'm so sorry if you know. Peter gabriel please get in touch with me i so i can fan girl in into so we can get the original court recording of sammy the slug also around this time and gave him money for a professional singing lessons but he was not interested so he used it to buy the beatles album. Please please me so. He just did not have much interest in being a singer. Now so in. September of nineteen sixty three. He started at charterhouse which was a public school in gd allowing surrey. Another very there's gonna be a lot of british bulldog there there. He was a drummer and vocalist for his first band. Which is the trad jazz. Trad jazz in the uk is short for traditional jazz. We mentioned in cicero's at our tharp episode. That jazz was very big and you know. Southern american music was very big in england and so trad jazz was an offshoot of that in the uk. He was in a trad jazz band and they were called the lord's as in. Hello my lord. I know they also therapist cap probably and this was followed by a holiday band called the spoken word and i was like what the hell is a holiday band. Apparently it's just the british version of like like a wedding band or like like. Yeah like you hire them. Yeah okay so sixty five. Gabriel formed the band garden wall with school friends. Tony banks on piano. And chris stewart on drums and banks had started at charterhouse at the same time as gabriel and the two were uninterested in school activities but bounded and started to write songs At a final concert before they split gabriel dressed in a kaftan and beads showered the audience with pedals he had picked from neighboring gardens. So this was the beginnings of his. We'll call it theatricality in live performance. So is he the singer of this band. He was the singer in this band class. So in sixty seven after garden. Wall had disbanded. Gabriel banks and stewart were invited fellow pupils anthony phillips and mike rutherford to work on demo tapes of songs gabriel and banks contributed. She is beautiful for song that they wrote together and the tape was sent to former. Charterhouse pupil turned musician. Jonathan king who was immediately enthusiastic largely due to gabriel's vocals. And we'll we'll talk more about this and you'll notice it in the songs that i play. But peter gabriel has a very distinctive. Tenor has a kind of a raspy quality to it. He's got a lot of range surprisingly for someone who really just kind of ten to sing. And just like one area for the most part but Yeah he has a very like rich raspy tenor so this made an impression. This guy signed the group and suggested the band name of gabriel's angels but it wasn't popular with the other members and peter. Gabriel has mentioned. Like i really liked in gabriel's angels and i thought it was a really good idea but i guess everybody else didn't like it kind of joked around about it. So they settled on king's other suggestion. Which is genesis phil collins. Yes so yeah. Yeah yeah here. We got right so after king suggested that they stick towards more straightforward pop gabriel and banks wrote the silence son as a pastiche of the bee gees who was one of king's favourite bands. So they were kind of like playing to the sky and it eventually became genesis for single released in nineteen sixty eight and it was included on their first studio album which is called from genesis to revelation eighteen. Sixty nine hundred. They're just an eighties. Well i mean sorry. No it's okay. We'll talk about it. I'm gonna listen. I'm the audience. Yeah you're just avatar for the audience totally okay in that album. This is when we first see peter. Gabriel playing the flute so he just picked up liz. Do yes like lizardo lizardo peter. Gabriel and eliza both tests dire diagram. Flute is in the middle So after the commercial failure from genesis to revelation the band went their separate ways and gabriel continued studies at charterhouse in september of nineteen sixty nine. Gabriel banks breath. Aford phillips decided to drop their plans and make genesis full-time working band so in early. Nineteen seventy gabriel. Played the flute on mon mona bone japan. From nine hundred seventy. That's a cat. Stevens record okay. Mona bone jakonen. Yeah the second genesis album which is called trespass marked. Gabriel his musical output with the accordion tambourine and bass drum and incorporate his soul music influences and he wrote the lyrics to the knife which is a parody of a protest song. It's a nine and a half minute song. It's actually surprisingly good. I would say question. Mario much of that is words. A pretty good. He has kind of like a like a rap like cadence through the party of it. It's very interesting. It's not just a minute of singing in nine minutes of jam band. No it's it's pretty. I mean there's there's long stretches of noodling but yeah so. The album sold not very well and at one point. Peter gabriel secured a place at the london school of film technique because genesis quote seemed to be dying. The band recruited guitar. Steve hackett and peter gabriel's cousin phil collins their cousin. Oh hey so peter. Gabriel and phil collins our cousins. And they're still very close So phil collins took over as the driver. Okay because peter gabriel was now more flouted accordionist lead singer and so we played the accordion. Yeah so their next album was called nursery. Crime c. r. y. m. e. yeah From nine hundred. Seventy one. And this also featured peter. Gabriel playing the oboe so he was just like just picking up picking up stuff and things the blow in making it sound good. The opener is called the musical box. this was their first song in which peter gabriel inc a story and characters into the lyrics so his storytelling kind of comes and goes throughout his career. He tells like there will always be at least one song on an album of his either in genesis or as a solo artist where there's a narrative quality to the So that's another kind of highlight of his style is that he tends to be very literary and a lot of ways so live shows supporting fox trot which came out in nineteen seventy marked a key development in pierre gabriel stage performance. He started to recite stories to introduce numbers as a way to cover the silence between songs. While the band's tune their instruments or while technical faults were being so he just started like telling stories during a gig in dublin in september of nineteen seventy-two he disappeared from the set during the instrumental section of the musical box and reappeared in his wife's a red dress and a fox's head mimicking the album's cover so that the album cover of fox trot features like a woman's body with a fox and like a and he apparently kept the idea to himself as he felt like the band would have voted against it. So he just like did it. So they're playing the instruments and he disappears and they're like all right and then he comes back out pink big. He's got a full fox head and a women's dress on so despite initial doubts from his bandmates the incident received front page coverage in melody maker which was a music magazine in the uk which gave them national exposure which allowed the group to double their performance fee so right and also one of his stories was printed on the liner notes of their live album. Genesis live from nineteen seventy-three and by late that year. Following the success of selling england by the pound from that year which centered around english themes and literary references a typical genesis. Show had peter gabriel wearing fluorescent makeup. A cape and bat wings A helmet chest played in a shield and various costumes for different songs. So one of the things that he would do as he would like he had these alter egos that he would create for the stage show. It was very theatrical. he would wear different costumes. He would shave his hairline back a lot or shave his head completely and he would joke later because now he had lost his hair. Yeah the time. He was in his fifties. He joked that it was like his his hairs. Payback for shaving. All the time like creative ways. So he's he's like elton. This is reminding me of like elton. Yeah so this is so. Genesis considered a prog rock or rock Group and around this time. It wasn't so much like there was glam rock for sure in the seventy s mostly in the late seventies s. But this was kind of the beginning of like like baroque. You know different instrumentation kind of incorporating classical music incorporating like you know literary themes an ancient poetry as a very like return to kind of like arquette craftsy media. Not just like my girl. Yeah left me yeah. Yeah what else did they say. Mister sandman you know other dogs songs. The seventy songs the sixties and seventies just like best. It was a calmer time yeah. It's very and it was very theatrical. And he was somebody who really enjoyed the kind of theatricality of music at the time and really took advantage of it and also like it got them a lot of attention. So he's like no. I don't care i'm perfectly fine. Making kind of a doofus of myself on stage because people like it so the last album that peter gabriel made with genesis was called the lamb lies down on broadway from nineteen seventy four And he devised its story of the spiritual journey of rail who was a puerto rican youth living in new york city and the bizarre incidents and characters. He meets along the way. So it's a concept album about this character named rail so also tensions kind of increased during this period as peter. Gabriel wanted to write all the lyrics himself and he split with the band after direct director. William freakin had invited him to work on a screenplay that project unfortunately dissolved and gabriel return to work with genesis. But then you know. His first daughter was born in his wife had had a very difficult birth in it. You know took time away from the ban because he was always going home so in the was like you can't just wear all the songs may yeah so and also he was late to return like bring the lira the band because he is also known for being like very much a perfectionist on himself. Okay so the reason why. There's so many years in between his albums is because he works very slowly okay like he'll do the instrumentation on a song. I the lyrics like when he feels like it. And that might be years or mosque's george. Dr martin he is the george r r martin of seventies rock of seventies rock. Yeah for sure. So in the liner notes for lamb lies down on broadway. Gabriel is credited with quote experiments. With foreign sounds so anyway. I'm gonna play. The lamb lies down on broadway. Which is my favourite genesis song. And it in the song. You can hear phil collins's voice which is kind of cool but here. I'm going to start playing it now. Push ups so this song is probably their most. I'd say like commercial song. Okay of this genesis period. It takes samples from like broadway song and it's a tight five minutes long which sounds extraordinarily long but thinking that most prog rock songs were like seven minutes longer nine minutes long and like a lot of jammies also a side note. There's there's this pimple patch. Company called rail that i use and every time i go to use one i see rail and then steve wonders why. I'm singing like the entirety of the lamb. Lies down on broadway before before we go to bed. Because i like i'm it so i am an extremely cool person anyway. Lamb lies down on broadway. That is probably like when you think of genesis. Lamb lies down on broadway. It's probably the song that you would think if i've ever heard that s okay it's it's a prog rock song. You know what. I mean like it. I don't think it was ever like really played on mainstream radio at any point. Like you're really seeking it out. You wouldn't really know okay so during a stop in cleveland. Ohio early in the album's tour. Peter gabriel informed the band of his intention to leave at its conclusion. He was like i'm out. After the sky's music. Critics often focused their reviews on his theatrics and took the man's musical performance a secondary which definitely irritated the rest of the band. The tour ended in may nineteen seventy five after which he wrote a piece for the press on august fifteenth entitled out angels about his departure his disillusion with the business and his desire to spend time with his family. The news stunned fans of the group and left commentators wondering if the band could survive without him and his exit resulted in drummer phil. Collins reluctantly taking over the lead vocals after four hundred singers. Were fruitlessly auditioned. Oh boy yeah that's too many. It's too many people to audition. And the reason why you confuse them is because they have very similar voices like singing voice plated. Yeah and they're related. I mean there's you know you can say a lot about that. But i mean they both started in the same band. They both reached like pretty good levels of fame. I would argue. Like more. Phil collins morphine. I wouldn't say so. Peter gabriel's like tall and for a while. He had a lot of hair phil collins's kind of small and dark okay. But their cousins. So there's some family resemblance. I would imagine but if you weren't that familiar with either of them as musicians. If you heard a song on the radio you could definitely be like. Oh is that. Phil collins peter gabriel. There's nothing wrong with you being confused by that. So let's move on to a solo career. Which is when. I really got into peter out to everybody. Oh my god. I love this stuff. So he described breaker music. S his learning period which he took piano and music lessons during He had recorded demos by the end of nineteen seventy five which was the fruits of a period of writing about twenty songs with his friend martin hall so after preparing material for an album he recorded his solo debut. Which is just called peter. Gabriel in nineteen seventy six and nineteen seventy seven in toronto and london with producer. Bob as rin just as an fyi title his first four albums all were called peter. Gabriel and they all use the same typeface with designs by the same company called hypnosis and he said the idea is to do it like a magazine which will only come out once a year. So it's the same title the same lettering in the same place. Only the photo is different. So i'll be using the nickname for the album. May their given names based on the cover. Art okay So peter gabriel. One is also called car. Because it's a picture of him inside of a car all right. Okay yeah all right. There's there's some wheels click in my head. Yeah and the fans and everybody basically. That's how they refer to these albums. So there's there's car scratch melt and security but we'll get to them So car was released in seventy seven and reached number seven in the uk number. Thirty eight in the us its lead. Single was salisbury hill. I know that's on. Yes you do know that song. I'm going to be playing it. So it's salisbury hills and autobiographical song about a spiritual experience on top of salisbury hill in somerset. And he said it's about being prepared to lose what you have for what you might get. It's about letting go and many fans see it as his comment on kind of striking out as own after leaving genesis. Another interesting thing about this. Before i start playing the song is it's written in seven four time which is unusual time signature and it has been described as giving the song constant sense of struggle. Like you're walking off okay. A hill and this was the first song where i realized that i could understand what time signatures. I am not a musical person at all. But this was the time that i felt like i was like. Oh i get it now like this is what seven four time is and we'll talk about it after i i play it but here we go. So it's this idea of like. I bom bom bom bom. Bom bom bump bump bum bum bum bum bum bum. Bum bump bump at seven seven. Mary and i was like what i. I got that i was like. Oh my god i remember. I called my dad. Was like dad salisbury hill sudden seven. Four time he's like. Yeah like like bulgaria. I understand music. Movie editors love using that in the trailers trailers for for like quirky coming of age ron or like a parent's the story between a parent and their strange child. Yes oh yeah. They love like the peter. Gabriel music. once you start hearing these songs you're like oh. yeah. I've heard this before i've heard this in movies or tv or in previous or whatever like you said so. Salisbury hill was probably like the big song off of this album of car off of car. The other one the opening track is called more the burger meister and that is a very like very prog rock song. Like unless you're into prog rock you are gonna find more on the burger burger meister extremely weird. I mean it has its it. Has its good points. But it certainly not like salisbury hill was like commercial. People liked it and it was a thing so in late. Nineteen seventy seventy started recording the second peter gabriel album which is called scratch and He was recording this in the netherlands. Scratch is a photo of him and his like it. Looks like he's scratching the front of the album. So there's like all these drag marks from his hands it scratches not my favorite. It's fine. I mean it's also very prog rocky you can tell that. He's trying to figure out what he wants to be. The standout track is probably mother of violence which was written by him and his wife. Jill I'm not gonna play it. It's fine it's a nice quiet little track with piano. It's perfectly fine. It's just peter. Gabriel three is much better so this was released in june. Seventy eight the number ten in the uk and number forty five in the us and his tour for the album lasted from august december of nineteen seventy eight and on this tour. He and his ban shave their heads so again. He's touring alone but he's still maintaining this level of so. The third album is called melt. Peter gabriel three is called melt because it's a black and white photo of him and half of the the image of his face. Looks like it's melting. Okay record this england and nine hundred seventy nine and He had developed an interest in african music and drum machines and later hailed the record. S his breakthrough. So melt is definitely where he starts to incorporate. African sounds world. Sounds a lot of electron ika that he was kind of playing within the studio So this is when you really start to hear his later. Sound that you start to hear. Like the quintessential like peter gabriel album. This album has also been credited as the first to use gated reverb on the drums which created a distinct sound And i'll play what gated reverted sounds like for you right now. So you may recognize this. Because it's on phil collins's song in the air tonight that kind of like echo from sound. Yeah and he kind of peter. Gabriel kind of quote unquote invented. It was actually like his sound guy. Invented this But it's basically playing various rhythms without using symbols for several minutes which he used to kind of develop the song further peter. Gabriel hate symbols. He thinks that they're filler. Sounds he doesn't love them. So he had phil collins. Play this on the record. He he actually was the drums on this record and so he used it on the air tonight and that became kind of a signature sound of the nineteen eighties and beyond so there was a lot of artists who used gated. Reverb on the drums. Mary like duran duran. You hear it all the time. So atlantic records which was peter gabriel's. Us distributor had released his first. Two albums refused to put it out. The americans found it to be too esoteric. It was released to the uk in may nineteen eighty. The album went to number one for three weeks when it was finally released in the. Us it peaked at number twenty two There was also there. Were a couple of singles games without frontiers and biko and he toured the album from february to october of nineteen eighty in the tour mark. His first instance of crowd surfing so he likes to do is put us back to the audience. Put his hands in a crucifix position and just fall into the audience and this became a staple of his life shows. Can you match being the first person ever try this out like to to be like an. I'm going to have my year ago. I'm just gonna follow blindly into the crowd and you guys are gonna know exactly and you know what what's going to happen. Let's just see how this works to a show where they did crowdsurfing. Yes i went to a hello goodbye concert in college and the bass player who was dressed as a hotdog crowd surfed and i think i put my hands on his lower back as he was being. Put off its around passed around. Yes i at a edgy. W cake on sure of course and there were. There were more crowd surfers there than the entirety of all of the concerts. I'd ever been to in my life combined. you mean. No-one crowd served at taylor swift. Gold place weird. That's strange but yeah people would just like go up on the stage like while they're singing and then just into the crowd and then you just see all these bodies just like the passer so bizarre. I feel like as a woman to wear pants. You have to number one. Why only yeah. Although i have watched i have watched beyond say crowd surf which seems insane that she would do that. But i've watched like a concert film of hers and then she's so and i'm sure someone like cut off a chunk of her hair. You'd think they would right. Can i tell you something. She literally took a running leap off while singing. She was singing halo running leap off the stage into the crowd. They gently hand like hand over. Hand gently cradled her back to the stage. Like i don't know how. I'm sure they all hired. They're all hired people they were like okay. Research shows gonna jump into arms. Because if i know anything about rabid beyond say fans is that they want to tear her to pieces because they love her because they love her so much yeah exactly anyway. April crowd crowd surfing. So we listen to a little bit of games without frontiers. You may or may not have heard the song but this is. This is another like big peter. Gabriel song script without so. This is a song about war. This is a song about. You know it's it's a. It's a great song. I love it. a cool thing about games without frontiers i should mentioned is that it has a very famous misheard lyric okay. This lyrics are called monday. Greens i didn't know if you do that so i'm going to play this part of the song where you'll hear this but it's i tell me what you think. This sounds like it's tough because he's singing in a like she's so fucking there. Yeah so it's this that lyric people think it's either she says fuck you all okay. Or she's so punctual. Which doesn't make any sense. It's actually juice san's frontieres okay. Yeah yeah but it's a very classic like misheard lear. His does he sing other things in french. Yeah he sings a lot of things in different languages most often in funny you should mention that in the next single Which was biko so song about steve. Biko who was an anti apartheid activists activist couldn't tell a word you're saying because i can go. You know where you go get your beat. Yeah beat co but this is just a quick sample of biko. There's so much happening. Yeah there's a lot happening so bagpipes. There's bag pairs drums. There's in later in the in the song. It's a seven and a half minutes song later in the song. There is an african choir of of women there. He sings in in an african senegalese. It's like it's a lot and for a while. He would close his shows with it especially in the eighties when when anti-apartheid was was a big thing So that was his other like and this is also kind of a touchstone of when he started really getting into african music. Okay and using african musicians and singers on a regular basis so peter. Gabriel four which is also known as peter gabriel's security and we'll get into why it's called security but he took on a great greater responsibility over the production than ever before he recorded it in nineteen eighty one and nineteen ninety-two solely on digital tape with a mobile studio parked at his home which is called ash com house in somerset and he would also record. So they're this album release in september of nineteen eighty two hit number six in the uk number twenty eight in the us the second single which is called shock the monkey became gabriel's first top forty hit in the us reaching number twenty nine and to handle american distribution gabriel signed with geffen records which initially unbeknownst to gabriel titled the album security to differentiate it from the first three so called it security picture. The picture is of and i cannot tell you what this is of. I'll show you a picture of it. It's like a. I don't care for this very frightening Is there like a super villain that is like a metal face. Oh yeah it's like a children's cartoon something here's a scary metal faced villain like book a coach bus. Yeah like a security. it looks at him. It does look like security footage. And i think that's probably where that's coming from. Don't care for the cover. No it's very it's very freaky dicky. So yeah so. That's security so the ninety tour supporting the seldom lasted for a year and became his first to actually make a profit. So that's good. This is fourth solo album first was making money. He's been around since nine hundred and sixty eight so recordings from this tour were released on his debut libraries which is called plays live from nine hundred eighty three. So we're gonna listen to shock the monkey. So this who's who what is why are they going to do to the monk. Well some say that the monkey is actually a penis. Some say is just kind of like a kind of a flight of fancy commentary about war. You know shock spelled s. h. o. Z. cam like shock like like rush acute the monkey. Yeah some say it's like a commentary about like you know. Animal testing what about a man's inhumanity. Demands man maybe it's about man's inhumanity to man you know. It has a lot of unusual and hard to read things. We'll say but it has a funky beat and people really liked him. Also just as an fyi he produced versions of the third and fourth. Peter gabriel albums melt and security with german lyrics in one thousand nine. Three he developed the soundtrack for alan parker's film birdie he's done a couple of film soundtracks. That album consisted of new material as well as remixed instrumentals from his previous studio album. So a lot of times. When he does a soundtrack he will kind of remix songs that he has kind of in the. I guess in the hopper or songs and already has on an album all right. So after finishing the soundtrack to birdie he shifted his musical focus from rhythm and texture as heard on four and birdied toward more straightforward songs songs with three versus four courses and a bridge. So in one thousand nine hundred. He recorded his fifth studio album which is called so which he co produced with. Dan look len wa And he was more of a cult artist before this like he had a lot of fans but they were. They had like a cult. Following really. wasn't somebody who was like you know going to the grammys. All the time and like you know dating superstars and all this stuff so it took him a full year to make this record. So they did it at ash comb house and he had all his musicians and engineers and sound guys and everybody just hang out at his house and One of the engineers. His name is kevin killen he. There's a documentary about the making of so on amazon prime and you should definitely check it out. It's collect making the album so or something like that. And it's only an hour long and it's kind of like song explorer where they go through each individual song. Just kind of talk about how it was made and kevin killen said that he was picked up at the at heathrow airport from the driver and the driver was like. Oh so you're coming to peter's and you're going to record album and he was like yeah. Like how long do you think you're going to be here. This is in like march of eighty five. And he said oh. They told me like six to eight weeks or whatever and he went Okay you're going to be here till next. May and he was he was it was like almost to the date like he was there for ten months. And then. Peter gabriel hired the driver be his project manager exactly because he's just he works so slowly and he's such a perfectionist that and we'll talk about that but it actually was the shortest time it took him to make records so far which is just a year he didn't wanna title. He hasn't liked titles. He thinks he thinks titles make text album. Cover makes it look like an advertisement so what he likes. The idea of lucy think that books try to line them. All right also look good advertisement. I think he because he likes the visual of an album cover like a vinyl album. The square image. And he said. I like that. And i feel like tex-mex makes it. Looks like look like an ad but his producers in the man you got like you need to title this so he said i'm going to go with the best looking to letter word because the less letters you have the bigger you can make them and you get top billing so he really liked the the letter and the the letters oh like next to each other. He really liked how that looked so means nothing. It doesn't mean anything. It was just kind of the visual about. This is my favorite peter. Gabriel elba. it is top to bottom left to right and absolutely perfect album. It is phenomenal. There is not a clunker on the whole thing. It's amazing. I can wax poetic about literally every single song on this album. I could do an entire episode on. So i'm not going to but i want you to know it's very good. She's she's very patch. I'm extremely passionate about so and we'll listen to some. We'll listen to some clips from so and it was extremely hard to pick the songs to play on the show. Okay just so you know so is released in may of nineteen ninety-six. It reached number one in the uk and number two in the us biggest hit so far it remains gabriel's best selling album with over five million copies sold in the us alone it produced three uk top twenty singles sledgehammer big time. And don't give up. Which is a duet with kate. Bush and we'll hear at don't give was based on dorothy lang photos of the dust bowl and great depression. The the story of the song is a man has lost his job and he feels inadequate and that he can't support his family and so his wife played played by kate bush who sings the chorus saying. Don't give up. we love you. You have friends. It's it's the story of these couple who are in a tense conflict. But it's it's a very supportive song not a commercial artist singing about the dust bowl right. It's kind of amazed especially those in england right. Well the thing is he wanted it to sound like a country like an old fashioned country song back and forth with a man and woman originally he wanted to do it with dolly parton on it He was like. I love dolly parton. I love her voice. I want her on the album. And because no one had ever heard of him at this point oh she reached. He reached out to her people and they were like no. That's okay we don't know who you are like. They thought he was just like some guy. I bet if dolly would have gotten the actual requests she would have done it. yeah. I think so too. I like to think so to. The song has kind of a gospel piano like soul to it and will listen to it but it's interesting sledgehammer went number one on the us billboard. Hot one hundred. It's his only single of his career to do so It knocked off invisible touch by genesis from the top spot which was also their only. Us number one. Oh how about that. Yeah in the uk. The single went to number four in nineteen ninety rolling stone ranked at number fourteen on. Its list of top one hundred albums of the eighty s. It's very influential. Let's talk about sledgehammer in the music video for a second okay. So sledgehammer was particularly successful. As i mentioned it dealt with sex and sexual relations through lyrical. Innuendos it's famed. Music video was a collaboration between director. Steven johnson arden animations. Which are the wallace and gromit people. Okay chicken run. Yeah like chicken and the brothers quay at one a record nine mtv video music awards in one thousand nine hundred right if you haven't seen it. It's a very good. It's a stop motion a music video. It took them two weeks to do it and they did everything in camera. And because like you can animate objects around him but he was also like trying to make the mouth like shape of each of the individual phonemes of the song which is only three and a half minutes long and then they had to paint his face in the head of care and all this stuff so it's really intense and they touch on it in the in the documentary as as well in one thousand nine hundred. It was named. Mtv's number one animated video of all time so earned. Gabriel two wins in the nineteen eighty seven brit awards for best british male solo artist. Best british video for sledgehammer. He was nominated for four grammy awards. Best male rock vocal performance song of the year and record of the year for sledgehammer album of the year for so he toured worldwide to support so with the this way up tour from november of eighty. Six to october of eighty seven sledgehammer was not supposed to be on this album. He says that people are was like. Wow you must have really wanted to like you really nailed it with that like you were looking to write a hit with the song and he was like no i he. He's they were packing up. The studio and tony levin bass player. Who's who went to eastman. School of music by the way five a bass player was like we were literally packing up. The studio and peter was like. Oh hey do you guys mind. I want to try something that working on for the next album. Could we just like noodle this around for a little bit and the rest is history so it has like this aren be sole influence and tony levin mentioned that there were more women in the audience after sledge at this after the sledgehammer video got huge. So we're gonna talk about a sledgehammer chuck. If you walk through the think. I think i know this. Yeah this is if you're going to hear gabriel song like playing and target. This is one you're going to hear. In fact. I think i saw i. I heard his song recently in target so the other single. Don't give up. We'll play right now with our girl. Cape bush. I'm looking at the sledgehammer video. And there's a sperm be. Oh yeah starts with the sperm. Yeah starts with sperm. Yeah you see blood coursing through blood vessels you see like yeah. Microscopic see as eyeball. I mean the lyrics is show me round your fruit cage. 'cause i will be your honeybee. Open up your fruit cage where the fruit is sweet as can be. It's it's sexy. It's a sexy song for a guy who's just like a british guy. Here's don't give up with kate. Bush one Eighteen year get so it's very straightforward sweets. Kind of like the music is so eighties. I feel like i'm in the. I'm feel like i'm in montgomery ward. Oh yeah it's very eighty s and the music video is literally just peter. Gabriel and kate bush just clutching each other. And when he's singing the camera pans around his side and he sings and then when she singing the chorus a panzer onto her side and she sings. It's amazing you know kate bush's a an acquired taste. But oh that's i love that song so now we're going to talk about my not only my favorite gabriel song. This is my favorite song. Be all right. It's in your eyes. You've heard song. We've all heard the song we've all danced at a wedding to the song or watched people dance at a wedding to the song. It was not my wedding song. Because i didn't wanna be cliche but it's just so beautiful so so. This song has a lot of african influences in it. in fact You so new door. Who is an african artist saying several parts in the song and you can hear it towards the end of this of the of the album version of the song the live version is. This is the first time. I will say this about anything. The live version of the song is nominal. It is incredible. There's way more of like an anthem quality to it. It's beautiful it's moving. There's way more of sauna door like really taking it running with it. There's a whole verse. That did not make it to the album that he always sings live which is beautiful. It's just like an incredible verse but in your eyes is based around african music. That is both religious and romantic love. It's about both of these things and peter gabriel's really like really attracted to that. His is drummer who is a french. African man named men who he recalls him in the studio and he said he was dancing. Like an african. But you know. Peter british great face great smile but he was trying to dance like the african guys he was just going for it but that gave me the permission to just let go and when he performs this live and when he i should say performed live the man seventy now he's not really going for it anymore like he would bring these african musicians and artists with him on tour to play with his band and african dancers and he would just like let you so no door just kind of go like sing. Whatever he wanted to interact with the crowd and that kind of thing. So the thing about gabriel's music is that he's very influenced by african art artists and african music but he brings them into his fold and does not and let them do what they want to do. He gives them a lot of freedom to put their own mark on his music. And morris the better for it you know what i mean so this is something that is like very indicative of his working style very collaborative for someone who is arguably very famous in your is. There are ninety six different versions of the song that they recorded on tape. Oh my god and they had it all the versions on on pieces of paper in the studio and they literally chopped it up bar by bar and mixed it so they would say like okay bar one take thirty seven was the best version of this and they had to do this with like real tape like digital tape so it was crazy. It's wild but it's a perfect song. Another song on the album is called mercy street. that was based on an sexton the poet and poetry. All right that is also an extremely beautiful song. I mean red rain. the opening track is incredible. It sounds like that song sounds like rain. It sounds like a storm coming in like very violently. It's incredible so anyway. I could keep going about so. But i will not because in one thousand nine hundred peter. Gabriel became involved as a composer for martin. Scorsese's film the last temptation of christ scores. He had contacted. Gabriel about the project since ninety-three and wished according to gabriel to present the struggle between the humanity and divinity of christ in a powerful and original way Gabriel used musicians from wome add to perform instrumental pieces with focus on rhythm. An african middle eastern european textures using the national sound archive in london for additional inspiration. It soundtrack was released as passion in june of nineteen eighty-nine and at one him a grammy award for best new age performance and a nomination for a golden globe for best original score motion picture in one thousand nine hundred. He put out his first compilation album. Called shit the tree sixteen golden greats which sold two million copies in the us from eighty nine to ninety two. He recorded his follow up so entitled so this is the second of his two letter because he likes. Have s looks yeah. He loves once the vowel next to it. Yep exactly y- you'll see the third one. So this album saw him address personal themes including his failed first marriage psychotherapy and the growing distance between him and his eldest daughter at the time. Oh i should mention in. Your eyes is about rosanna arquette. Who like the guy from to- wrote the song rosanna her to like. She dated a bunch of eighties musicians and they like fell hard rosanna arquette. Yeah and gabriel's first wife. Jill had an affair with his like producer and she is quoted as saying. I tried to hurt him and he hurt me worse by putting out. The best album of his career was all about our breakup. So that was just like one of those things but us is very very much about psychotherapy about like inner turmoil about exploring that and also this idea of trying to connect with his eldest daughter aku. He didn't have a great relationship with at the time. And you know grief and longing and all of the stuff so us is also very very good and so his introspection within the context of the album us can be seen in the first single release which is called digging in the dirt So there was accompanied by this disturbing video featuring him covered in snails and various foliage and the song made reference to the psychotherapy which he had taken up much of his time. This throwback to his first song. Same the slug. Yes maybe it is. Maybe it was like deep in the recesses of his brain. That was all about sammy. The slog who knows so he also describes his struggle to get through to his daughter in. Come talk to me Which is another great song off the album. It features backing vocals by sinead o'connor oh she also lent vocals to blood of eden which is another song on the album and that was the third single to be released and once again dealt with relationship struggles this time going right back to like adam's rib from inspiration jeez The result was one of his most personal met with less success than so it reached number two in the album chart on both sides of the atlantic and made modest chart impacts with singles digging in the dirt and the funkier steam which steam is almost a clone of sledgehammer. It's very it's very similar. i don't find it. He played interesting. Yeah you played it backwards. It's definitely the same thing so he followed the release of the album with a world tour an accompanying double cd and dvd. Secret world. live if you can find that d- that documentary. It's so good and paula. Cole would fill in for sinead o'connor vocal role in chat with him and in the segment of secret world live where he's doing. Come talk to me. He's coming out of a phone booth but the and he's holding the phone and he's like being dragged back into the phone booth by the phone cord and he's trying to reach paula cole. And she seemed to him in. They're reaching toward each other is very like very theatrical way. She doesn't want away so he won three more grammy awards all the music video category because he was a brilliant music. Video conceptual artist. He won the grammy award for best short form music video and ninety three and ninety four for the video to digging in the dirt and steam respectively. He also won the ninety six grammy award for best music video for his secret world. Live video So we're gonna talk about digging in the dirt. I only have. I only have these two from this album. Again is also a very good album. Don't get me wrong. But i feel like so just has more like just solid. I don't want to say hit their bond have a fever. Yeah no. I know but i mean you know. It's like trying to talk about your favorite children. I guess too come. That's digging in the dirt and say that at all. Well wait hold on here. We go so like in parentheses the dirt this song and he does this a lot more in up but is this you know the the versus are very angry. It's about expressing yourself anger and pain and then the chorus will have more of a introspective. Yeah this is why i'm sad. This feel this way kind of thing. Come talk to. I think is an underrated song. Came can go yeah. It's it's a heartbreaking song. I mean it's it's really very like the the sound is very hopeful but it is like if you've ever had a difficult time with your father or it's just very like it hits you it hits home in a major way but it's it's excellent. I mean it. You know there's the bag pipes there's that kind of like drumline drumming. I love a bagpipe. Oh i love a bagpipe. it's great a love an accordion for me to learn these things absolutely not you can do whatever you want. I don't think maybe you're really good at the really good at the bagpipe. You might be. You just don't know whenever we do yard sales again. I'm gonna see if i can yes for yourself. It's sure myself sick and half beg bite. You can identify me the whole way across town. Yeah josh is gonna love that. So is your daughter okay. So ninety seven. He was invited to participate in the direction soundtrack of the millennium dome show which was alive multimedia reform stage in the millennium dome in london throughout two thousand he said that the team was given free rein which unfortunately contribute to the various problems they encountered with it such as a lack of proper budgeting he also felt that management while succeeding to get the building finished on time fail to understand the artistic side of the show and its content. I that you're gonna say. He said they were given free rein. When in fact they had so his soundtrack was released as ovo all caps oviedo in june of two thousand and he stuck with soundtrack work for his next project for the australian film called rabbit proof fence in two thousand and two with. We've heard about that. Yes from with zoe. We did and peter. Gabriel scored the the score for that movie. So the released in june of two thousand and two long walk home music from the rabbit. Proof fence received a golden globe award nomination for best original score. So at this point he's only one gram. he's only one grammys. Yeah he's only one gram up. Up gabriel's first full length studio album in a decade was released in september of two thousand and two. He started work on it. In nineteen ninety five before production halted three years later to focus time on other projects and collaborations and work resumed in two thousand by which time gabriel had one hundred thirty potential songs for the album. Oh my gosh. spent almost two years on it. Before management at virgin records pushed him to complete it aright. How did he get down to. He got ooh. I should check up up has ten songs. Yeah so one hundred thirty to ten. Oh my gosh. So up was tell you very influential on high school lauren. I listened to this album a thousand times a easily a thousand times. I listened to it every morning on my bus to school. And it's very intense like psychological like themes were very seminal for a very tumultuously minded teen lawrence classmates are listening to boy band. Yup and like like trying to be like edgy rock. Yes and stuff that their mom does to here. Yeah and there. You are blessed peter. Gabriel for your walkman on the bus. Yup yes and i loved every minute of it again. I was not a popular team number nine in the. Us number eleven in the uk and it was supported with a world tour with the band that included his daughter. Melanie on backing vocals. Oh so she came and talked to him. She came and talked to him. And now she sings backup in hispanic. That is great. Yeah the tour was documented with to live. Dvd's growing up live in two thousand and three and still growing up live and unwrapped in two thousand and five. I'm only gonna play one track of this album again. This is a very good album almost every song as phenomenal varied each one is like super different. But i'm just going to play. Every song is phenomenal. Like like like one thing is phenomenal. Lauren julia this album rules. Like okay all right. How about this. I'll mitigate this with every song on so rules. Every song on on up is extremely good. All right about that okay they're gonna think you're hyperbolic. We're our into the episode. You're just proclaiming that everything this does. I'm also nominee. I'm also like a huge fan. So you're going to have to take whatever i with grain of salt but this is probably the happiest i've ever seen her doing an episode. I love this more than the cheese long even more than we do fashion. This is like my entire like listening to music like life. This is peter. Gabriel has run underneath everything. I've listened to my entire life. This why don't you one hundred and eighty two up. Because it's i knew it was gonna be so much so anyway so up has a lot of like industrial sounds surprisingly enough and especially in darkness. So we'll listen to this streams and background limpest yup exc so this like dropout nine inch nails e nine inch nails for sure. I would agree with that So darkness this on the opening track. i remember this will be burned in my brain for the rest of my life. I bought this at fye andres and i was like can we listened to in the car because he picked me up. And we're listening to the car and the opening of this song is very like bing bing bing bing so we turn up the volume like i can't hear it and then when that thing dropped we both like thank god. We were in the parking lot because we both like. You're a truly practically grew drove into a tree but up has a lot. Okay so peter. Gabriel has struggled with clinical depression. Some people said that he has bipolar. He hasn't been to super open about his mental health struggles but so up and us have a lot to do with like introspection this fear and pain and anger and dealing with that and having like two sides to yourself darkness definitely has that were done like that opening salvo of like very industrial sound. It sounds violent and confrontational. And then that sound completely drops out. And he's basically like whispering because he is coming from place of pain and sadness so up is very interesting in that way that there's like this really huge dichotomy which is really interesting new metal. That's what i was very new mentally for sure corn. Yeah i mean you're not wrong so in november of two thousand six. The seventh world summit of nobel peace laureate chrome presented him with a man of peace award. The award was presented by former president. The ussr nobel peace prize winner. Mikhail gorbachev and walter veltroni was the mayor of rome. He wasn't acknowledgement of pete. Peter gabriel's extensive contribution and work on behalf of human rights and peace. He has a longstanding interest in human rights and launched witness which is a charity that trains human rights activists to use video and online technologies to expose human rights abuses. He also works a lot with amnesty international. He's very involved in that kind of thing. He also contributed to the wally soundtrack. In two thousand eight including the film's closing song called down to earth with the soweto gospel choir for which they received the grammy award for best song written for a motion picture television or other visual media and the song was also nominated for a golden globe award for best original song and an academy award for best original song. You may remember the song. But i'm gonna play just a little bit of it. 'cause it's very it's very sweet. It's you know as a children's movie but it's still has a little bit of peter. Gabriel lake weirdness to it. Which you know you know. Your girl loves speed. I know you're going to say the songs phenomenal. it's good but don't you think about wally. Wally was fine. It was sad. Yeah was depressing. I found i would rank it. I know the very controversial here. I would rank it as my one of my least favorite pixar movies that i've seen all right. Yeah i mean. There's something like i didn't see like cars to. Yeah well you know. And nobody said the good dinosaur yeah. Nobody's thought that's too bad. No i mean. I i like the song. It's sweet light. Nice pixar movie music. I like the song then. I liked the movie. that's for sure. So so we're gonna talk a little bit about his interest in world music It was first apparent on his third solo album. As i mentioned before melt according to spencer corn haber in the atlantic in two thousand nineteen quote when peter. Gabriel move toward world music for decades ago. He not only evangelized sounds that were novel to western up. He also said a radio. Template majestic with flourishes meant to read as exotic and lyrics meant to change lives. This influence has increased over time and he is the driving force behind the world of music arts and dance or wool mad movement. Okay yeah you mentioned that before. And i was like darker world of music arts and dance. He said quote. The first time i really got into music from another culture was as a result of the shifting of radio four which i used to wake up to i'd lost it on medium wave and was groping around in the morning on the dial trying to find something i could listen to and came across a dutch radio station who are playing the soundtrack from some obscure stanley. Baker movie called dingaka. That had quite a lot of stuff from i think it was gonna. I can't remember now but it really moved me. One of the songs i heard on that was a thing called shosholoza which i recorded on the b side of the biko single he also created real world studios and the record label called real world studios to facilitate the creation and distribution of such music by various artists and has worked to educate western culture about such musicians as young chen lhamo. Who is vietnamese artist. nusrat fateh ali khan and you sonos door And he also uses a lot of like french and african brazilian and lots of world musicians so it has nothing to do with what happens when strangers start getting real. Oh yeah nope has nothing attack to stop stop. What what are. They stopped doing being polite. Stop being polite and start getting real show. So that is my. That's my take on my favorite peter. Gabriel things. I also made a spotify playlist which i will link in our soc me good So that you can hear all the tracks that i talked about today but also a couple of my favorites. Then if anything you take anything away from it. It's that you should be able to identify peter. Gabriel peter gabriel overfill. Yes at the very least. That's all So my quiz today about progressive rock bands. Wonderful great zero for ten. Oh well i will give you lots of of hints right. Yeah question one. This ever changing prog rock band has been around since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and has a huge cult. Following with seminal albums. Such as in the wake of poseidon and lark's tongues and aspic. This royal band has influenced prog. Rock acts for over fifty years. Who is this band. Who's two word. Name involves an honorific and color question number two this oft mocked prog rock folk band got a lot of heat in one thousand nine hundred eight when they won the grammy for best hard rock slash metal performance over metallica's and justice for all. You probably know them best for their flute. Who is this band. Who is named after an eighteenth century british agriculturalist questionable three. This band was a favourite of my mother's growing up and was only active between nineteen seventy and nineteen eighty unlike many of their prog rock contemporaries their classical influences ranged beyond the romantic and incorporated medieval baroque and modernised for music elements. Most importantly their name is a phrase that you might use to describe a great dane or maybe the bf. Gee what band am i talking about. Question number four. This british. Prog rock band with tom of ton of president and former members. Wait look you don't know any of their songs elms except for one the song a whiter shade of pale from nineteen sixty eight. It's a classic rock trivia question. Who is the weirdo. Prog rock band behind a whiter shade of pale question number five. This former art rock band moved into a more commercial and pop oriented musical direction in the early eighties when they released the album. Nine au one to five in one thousand nine hundred three with the hit single owner of a lonely heart. Answer in the affirmative. Who is this three letter band question number six this canadian rock outfit head arguably the greatest drummer in music history in their lineup who sadly died last january. They reached the top of the charleston. Canada and beyond with their distinctive sound and singles. Limelight and tom sawyer. Take it easy and named this band question number seven. You really have to be high to enjoy this vermont. Jam ban that has been around since nineteen eighty-three band consists of guitarist. Trey anastasio basis mike. Gordon drummer jon. Fishman and keyboardist page mcconnell of whom performed vocals and were obviously inspired by the grateful. Dead named this band question number eight. This progressive metal band was formed in georgia in two thousand true to prague form. Their second album leviathan is a concept album. Based on the novel moby dick by herman melville. Who is this band. Whose name is an ancient elephant like creature question over nine aside from all these bands. I am the biggest fan of this. One formed nyack new york. Whose albums are mostly of the concept of variety based on a science fiction storyline called the ameri wars series written by lead singer claudio sanchez which has been transcribed into a series of comic books as well as a full length novel. I even walked down the aisle at my wedding to an instrumental come home. Who is this band. Whose name is the two main characters of the ameri wars and finally question number ten. I'm going to name four prog rock band and you're going to tell me if they're real or something. I made up number one spock's beard number to throw up number three and number four gabrielle's fists give you a minute to think about it. It'll be great search one who stabbed zero almost carbs and yours talking Right pro all right here. We go all right so similar to another time. we're. Lauren did a quiz all about musicians. That i didn't know about i'm going to do my best. And then if. I'm gonna call pon flight engineer. Josh i was of course in my in my household the music sure and you know what honestly i wrote this quiz just as much for him so great. All right i'm gonna try okay here. We go here. We go back to question number one. This ever changing prog rock band has been around since nineteen sixty eight and has a huge cult. Following with seminal albums. Such as in the wake of poseidon and lark's tongues in aspic. This royal ban has influenced prog. Rock acts for over fifty years. Who is this band. Who's two-word name involves an honorific and a color. It just came new. Good what is it hanging crimson. Yes king crimson. Good job twenty. Two separate people have been in king crimson at one point or another and we in king crimson might be in king crimson including tony levin. Who was peter. Gabriel's basis and has been is basis for like years and years and years. Tony levin rochester. I'm not going say rochester native but russia's connection ties question number two this oft mocked prog rock folk band got a lot of heat in one thousand nine hundred eight when they won a grammy for best hard rock slash metal performance over metallica's and justice for all. You probably know them best for their flute. Who is this band. Who was named after an eighteenth century british agriculturalist as death row tall. It is jeff. Only damn thing. I know about jethro tull is that they have a flute exactly so the award was particularly controversial. This grammy as many did not consider jethro tull. Hard rock let alone. Heavy metal on the advice of their manager told them they had no chance of winning. No one from the band attended the awards ceremony. In response to the criticism they received over the award. Their label chrysalis took out an advertisement in a british music periodical with a picture of a flute lying amid a pile of iron rebar and the line. The flute is a heavy metal instrument in response to an interview. Question about the controversy lead vocalist anderson. Quipped well we do sometimes play our mandolins very loudly. I didn't realize they were like folk. Och bad like a totally like nearly like medieval. Like do it's great question number three. I know this one tripped up. Josh band was a favourite of my mother's growing up and was only active between nineteen seventy and nineteen eighty unlike many of their progressive rock contemporaries their classical influences ranged beyond the romantic and incorporated medieval baroque and modernised chamber music elements. Most importantly their name is a phrase that you might use to describe a great dane or maybe the b f g. What band talking about all right. So the bef. G is the big friendly giant. Yes and a great dane is lake. Scooby doo yup. Or marmaduke scher big friendly giant dog a big friendly giant great dane. The big dane friend. Scooby doo me. This is my answer. The answer is gentle giant. The name of the band. So when i was a teen i asked my mom what she listened to growing up like. When you you're teen mom what did you listen to. She like. I like prog rock. I like gentle giant. Like little feet. Like genesis. And i was like. Oh did you like david bowie. And she was like david. Bowie was too mainstream for me. I was like how way manse. Wow she can still like if you if you start her off on genesis song. She'll she'll keep going with us in yourself. She loves it. So there's been a derail your quiz second. So there's an ongoing joke in in the novakovic family regarding christmas presents usually because people in my family are generally very bad about keeping shirts and so the one year Everybody was buying presents for each other. And billy is trying to ask you know. We'll hey. Do you like genesis. Cds like like wink at for my mom. Yeah and then another time. He bought her. He went ahead and he bought like a foot bath thing. Oh sure and he was like. Hey mom do you like do you like your feet. So that's generally like to the one two punch. We have in our or being handed gifts like just making sure. Do you like genesis. 'cause i bought those for you okay. Question number four this british prog rock band with a ton of president former members. Wait look you don't know any of their songs or albums except for one. The song whiter shade of pale from nineteen sixty eight. It's a classic rock trivia question. Who is the weirdo. Prog rock band behind a whiter shade of pale. I do not know this. You want to call on your lifeline. Here yeah and he is written down. Harem procra- harem. Is the answer ever seen that frayed in my life. Well good news. No one knows what the name means. There's a lot of theories that it's just bastardized. Latin for beyond these things. It's probably just more purposeful. Weirdness if you've ever heard the lyrics to whiter shade of pale it is just weirdness upon weirdness so there you go very prog rock. Okay question number five. This former art rock band moved into a more commercial and pop oriented musical direction in the early eighties when they are released. The album nine zero one. Two five thousand nine hundred three with the hit single owner of a lonely heart. Answer in the affirmative. Who is this three letter band. That's yes it is. Yes i know that song. I do know that if you would have named any other song. We would have been here for a while. Yeah i knew. I had to help you out. Question number six. This canadian rock outfit had arguably the greatest drummer and music history in their lineup. Who sadly died last january. They reached the top of the charts in canada and beyond with their distinctive sound and singles. Limelight and tom sawyer. Take it easy and name this band. This is rush is rush. noted jeopardy champion jennifer morrow. Who did her episode With a pair of signed. Neil pert drumsticks then. She showed them on stage. She's the biggest rush fan. I've ever known in my life. And so when he died her it was just people low yeah. I'm so sorry. Their condolences her and she's how i know concur the cream crimson. And that's eight. Yeah i mean. Speaking of neil pert he. He unfortunately died of blast. Obama which is a type of brain cancer last january january. Twenty twenty question seven. You really have to be high to enjoy this vermont jam band. That's been around since eighty three. The ban consists of guitarist. Trey anastasio bassist mike. Gordon drummer jon. Fishman and keyboardist page mcconnell all of whom performed vocals and were obviously inspired by the grateful. Dead name this band. This fish this is fish are for an andrew is oh android fish. Eggs fish head. Hey andrew gabi question number eight. This progressive metal band was formed in georgia in two thousand true to prague form. Their second album leviathan is a concept album. Based on the novel moby dick by herman melville. Who is this band. Whose name is an ancient elephant like creature. Oh i don't know this one. I call on your lifeline. Here was the only thing i get. It was mastodon. That's it you got it right. It's mastodon well you for the clue that good job question number nine aside from all these bands i am the biggest fan of this one form to nyack new york and whose albums are mostly of the concept variety based on a science fiction storyline called the azari wars a series written by lead singer claudio sanchez. Which has been transcribed into a series of comic books as well as a full length novel. I even walk down the aisle at my wedding to an instrumental of welcome home. Who is this band. Whose name is the two main characters of the ameri wars nyack. New york's biggest hit band is co heating. Kim it is cohen cambria. Stephen i on our second date ever. We went to quimby public house and got. You've heard the story like chicken chicken wings chicken wings and in the second date you always like. Oh i've got one sister these the music on lake and i was. He said something like well. I don't know if you've ever heard this ban. But i don't know i really liked this kind of like a new metal progress thing. It's called cohen cambria. And i said no you don't you don't because i like co hidden camera and so that was one of the first things that we bonded over. And to this day. When stephen i have had too much to drink we blast good apollo. I'm burning star. Four and we slam dance in our kitchen and it's a lot of fun again. None of those words anything. Good apollo burning star for is like the two thousand six hundred slated. Something wrong and babel fish. I mean i don't know what it means is just like the music anyway. Finally question number ten. I'm going to name four prog rock band names and you're gonna tell me if they're real or something i made up. Are you ready. These all right spock's beard. I'm gonna say that's real israel. There are an american. Prog band formed in los angeles number two fruit. This is my favorite one and if it isn't real i'm already. I'm going to name my end. That say it's not real it's real it's f. R u p. They were nine hundred. Seventy s prog rock band which originally originated in belfast northern ireland but developed a big fan base in great britain. Do they have an exclamation point at the nose. Okay i'm gonna reboot them with excellent. Yeah i mean they haven't been around throw numata over over something to. I think it's a good idea. All right number three. I'm guessing that's real. So it's it's not. I made it and the thing is the reason why i had to be sound was because i was looking through the wikipedia. Listen prog rock bands. I could not come up with something. That wasn't already. It sounds like might as well be sound. But okay and number. Four gandalf's fist essay. That's fake it's real they are. Uk neo progressive rock band from cumbria. Good job you did really good better than you did not need you. Wrote some good clues into their though. I those of us that are. Let's say musically challenged. Hey you know what not. Everybody is a prog rock fan. So i get it. I got it. Thanks for sticking with me on this everybody. I know this was a long one. And if you have a favorite. Peter gabriel song lease let lower and let me know you guys can start. Start a deep front pen pen pal. Yes let's start as a peter. Gabriel fan club like forty years. I know i know. I think the only person under the age of sixty loves peter. Gabriel that's probably not true fans out there. But i let lauren though. Yeah please please tell me. What your favorite. Gabriel song is in y. You can email us at info. Podgy jamila calm. You can tweet at me. At info pod on our facebook page julius in charge of that one. But you know. I'll pass it along. Yeah misinformation colon. A trivia podcast. Yeah thanks so much for listening guys. I hope you enjoyed this. Definitely check out. We'll put up my. I'll make my spotify playlist public and you'll be able to see that on our soc. It's perfect catch. You guys next time bye.

Peter gabriel Gabriel gabriel phil collins peter salisbury hill suez canal uk Tom delonge charterhouse julia schule Delonge Peter gabriel peter Brian gabriel chaba Gabriel banks anthony phillips us lizardo lizardo Aford phillips
128: In Your Eyes

How Good It Is

19:13 min | 4 months ago

128: In Your Eyes

"Hello and welcome to the next episode of how good it is the show that takes a closer look at songs from the Rock and roll era, and we check out some of the stories behind the songs and the artists who made them famous. My Name is Colin. I'm in the southern studio this week. But the northern studios in. Maryland. So it's pretty much all south isn't you remember to check out the website how good it is dot com and the twitter and instagram of course, the facebook page, which you can find over at facebook dot com slash. Could. Be. As five. And if you three or four, please consider supporting the show as patron for just five bucks a month, you get the weekly newsletter with the weeks music news a little bit of my opinions and the history calendar. In this week's issue, I give you a few hundred words of questionable brilliance about the new rolling stone list of the five hundred greatest albums of all. Click the link on the website or point your browser to patriotdepot dot com slash. How could it is? We. Did this brand of Trivia short back with Alton John So let's see how it suits ye for the rolling stones. So according to the sound of vinyl dot com, which rolling stone song has been covered more than any other, and once again, I will tell you that I guessed wrong on this although my guest does appear on the list signed vinyl list the ten most covered rolling stone songs which song has seen the most cover so far I will have that answer and the rest of the top ten at the end of the show. I know I know said that I was done with songs that had non-english lyrics in them, and I am it's just a coincidence that today song also just happens to have some non English in it. I should also note that this episode is based on a listener request, amy and Dana, from run eat drink podcasts they are two of the nicest people I've ever met they put it in this request a couple of weeks ago. How could I say? No So. And when I say so I'm really telling you the name of the abbots that Peter Gabriel was working on when he recorded in your eyes. So was Gabriel's fifth solo album and the one that pretty much turned him into a mainstream artists from his prior. Cult, Star status and it's also the first album that Gabriel release that wasn't titled Peter Gabriel Calling It. So was Gabriel's response to the label pressuring him to more properly market his music. He figured that by giving you a very short almost anti title. He could say he complied with the labels request without really giving them what they wanted. Let me talk about the album a little bit. Gabriel recorded most of it in a two room studio on his property. One Room was used for vocals and the other for assembling the music. The studio consisted of two analog, twenty, four track tape recorders, plus a modified studer, a eighty recorder that have been customized by technologically inclined friend of his. He also had a fairlight synthesizer which is not remarkably automatic and needs a lot of human input putting the music together turned out to be pretty easy task for Gabriel musicians he had brought in however. Putting the lyrics together was a little bit of a big problem oftentimes, engineer and mixer. Kevin killen would isolate certain vocal performances as the master track knowing that he would have to keep other tracks available so that he could edit new lyrics in it got so bad at one point producer Daniel Annoy destroyed Gabriel's phone and he knelt the studio shut to lock him inside until he could finish his writing but ultimately, he came up with nine tracks that combine artsy pop with a world beat music sensibility. The last thing that Gabriel struggled with was the sequence of songs on the album. He made cassettes of the songs in different orders to see which combinations work the best, and this is the interesting part. Peter Gabriel. Wanted in your eyes to be the closing track on the album, but there was a technical issue that made it difficult. You see on a vinyl l. pay the sound is transmitted through the needle. To the speakers by the grooves in the record creating a vibration well, in your eyes has pretty prominent baseline, which means the group needs some room to vibrate correctly, and that's not something you get when the needle is closer to the center of the album. So on the original vinyl release of the album's the song open side to. I I track. But if you purchase the CD when that became available short time later, well, you didn't have to worry about the mechanical aspects of the recording. So song returned to the closing track position. The L.. P.. Also only has eight tracks but the CD and the cassette have a bonus nine track cold. This is the picture which nowadays appears as track eight, and unfortunately if you think you have something valuable. None of this means the original album is worth much more than yard sale prices. Now something that makes the song in your eyes. Special is the backing vocal near the end of the song which is provided by USA our and is a singer and songwriter from fenny. And while he's still active in that regard also taken on political causes in that country even running for president in two thousand twelve, he didn't win but he was appointed Minister of Culture and tourism by the eventual winner. At any rate after the last chorus, we hear Dour chanting in a language called. Wolof. Which is the native language of Senegal and according to a couple of Internet sleuths. It's a rough translation of in your eyes the light the heat I am complete. What linear is is a very personal song for Gabriel. He's still willing to experiment with a little bit, his concert performances and the big question becomes who is the song about? Now, Gabriel's is explained numerous times that he was inspired by a visit. He had made to Barcelona when he visited a kit fedral there at that time, he wrote up some lyrics for another song called Sagrada which is Spanish for sacred but eventually, he scrapped that song and he used some elements of it in in your is. Given. The Gabriel was pretty immersed in the world beat sound on the African rhythms at that time. It makes sense that his songs follow the African tradition of maintaining an ambiguous relationship in songs where they can easily be about both a relationship with another person or a relationship with God however that doesn't really answer the question. The most common theory is that the Song is about Rosanna arquette with whom he was involved for a while and both Roseanna and her brother David had said this book Gabriel himself has never said. So but there is a website that has a discussion post from someone identifying himself only as Daniel. For Montreal who wrote and I quote. I'm so sick of this. I Will Finally Speak Out Regarding Rosanna arquette being the inspiration for is it was another young woman also an actress who was the inspiration for the song. I don't know if it's arquette's camp who is generating the rumor or the public. Her identity is not revealed because at the time Gabriel was still a. Married our cat and Gabriel didn't even meet until after the album came out I should know I co produced the album unquote kiss be Daniel, the noise saying this. I guess it's possible. I mean anything is possible. Right but before I drop it entirely, there's one more detail related to the song that I'm GonNa bring up in a couple of minutes. The single was the third one released from the so and it came out on September second nine, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six, it topped out at number twenty, six on the billboard hot one hundred by the end of October. But got all the way to number one on the billboard hot mainstream rock tracks chart, and it remains a staple of classic rock playlists across the USA despite the relatively slow tempo. The single didn't see a lot of chart action elsewhere in the world peaking at number fifty in New Zealand, and barely cracking the top one hundred in Australia. Something that's interesting about this song is that there are several versions out there the album version clocks in at about five and a half minutes, and that version is available on a seven inch records. Then there is a promo special mix which runs four minutes and fifty eight seconds. then. There's the twelve inch single mix which runs six minutes and fifteen seconds and yet another twelve inch special mixed, which goes for seven minutes and fourteen seconds. These longer versions are largely extensions of the ending with and dowers chanting in between Gabriel singing euros repeatedly, and that's also what tends to happen when Gabriel plays the song in concert. As I mentioned earlier, he experiments a little bit usually by improvising a longer ending with the backup singers, which when he was touring to support the album would include you. So our and there's also a version which has some of the words cut out of it. Specifically, the part about the churches, the leaving the line about the resolution of all the fruitless searches. Just kind of hanging out there without a rhyme. Now. I hadn't heard this version until I moved to Baltimore but it appears that clear channel radio which owned about eight hundred stations and is now part of Iheartmedia made the cut and nobody really seems to know why. Oh let me talk about the video for the song a little bit at this point Gabriel was also getting very well known because of the video for sledgehammer which a combination of strata cut animation and a filming technique called Pick Salaciously, which looks a little bit like bad stop motion animation big time the third single from the album had A. Similar. Style visually. But this video which fell in between was a little bit more straightforward in its style which shots of Gabriel. Singing the song sometimes in extreme close up and interspersed with some abstract images. But it also had some intercut with scenes from what appeared to be an old movie and if that's what you thought it was you'd be almost correct. The footage comes from sixteen millimeter industrial short film essentially a ten minute commercial. For General, motors, the film is called design for dreaming and it features a young woman played by dancer and Choreographer Tad Tad lock who dreams about a masked man taking her to the nineteen fifty-six General. Motors event called Motor, Rama. She is then taken to the kitchen of the future where she bakes a cake. Then she returns to the Motorola and she dances a dance of tomorrow and then finally she and the masked man who has now unmasked himself get into a firebird to to fall in love and travel along the road of tomorrow all of the dialogue song and it's the Voice of Marjorie Gordon. We hear rather than TAD padlock how about that And that would have been pretty much it for the song except, of course, for a brief resurgence in popularity that it enjoyed just a couple of years later when it was used in the nineteen eighty nine film say anything as the song that's coming out of John Cusak boombox as he tries to woo I owned skied near the end of the film. Now in an interview with entertainment weekly magazine, the film's Director Cameron Crowe said that scene was originally written with billy idol's to be a lover. You might not remember that song so allow me to illustrate. Doc. Imagine that coming out of Cusak boom box but crow knew that that song wasn't going to get the job done. So he and producer James Brooks began looking around for something that would work the even tried having original songs written for the scene and that was a no go. But finally one day crow was playing tape in a his car of songs that were played on his wedding day and outcomes, your eyes. And that's when he knew. He had the right track he and James Brooks called up David. Geffen and the asked to use the Song Geffen said he would try but he couldn't guarantee anything because a peer Gabriel wasn't in habit of giving up anything for movies and be Geffen wasn't sure about Gabriel's relationship to the song. That is how personal it was. In the meantime they held a screening of a rough cut of the film and someone from Geffen records was in the audience and didn't like the movie. So crow thought they were completely sunk however as the story goes, it was ready Rosanna arquette who put in a good word for them. So Gabriel called the studio to ask for a copy of the movie so he could see it and make a decision, and here's where the story is get kind of confused when you read about them on the Internet. So I'm going to relay this way. Cameron. Crowe told entertainment weekly. A few days later, he was told to call Gabriel in Europe. Now, he had to get extra early to do it because you've got European time and California time, and there's something like seven or eight hours apart maybe more. And Gabriel told him appreciate you asking for the song? It's a very personal song to me and I just hope he don't mind that I have to turn you down. Pros disappointed and said he understood. But at the very last second, he decided to ask why why not? Gabriel told him. When he takes the overdose, it just doesn't feel like the right kind of use of the song. and. That's when crow realized. That Gabriel had seen the film wired the John Belushi Biopic, not the high school movie with the guy in the trench coat. So Call Aska please watch the high school movie with the Guy and the trenchcoat, and that's how he secured permission. Most. Internet, versions of the story have Gabriel giving permission but not really understanding why it had anything to do with the overdosing but according to Crow Gabriel withheld permission until he had actually seen the correct movie. In an interview with Rolling Stone Magazine in Two Thousand Twelve Gabriel noted the cultural impact of the scene noting that it definitely gave the song a second life, and maybe even turn the scene into a Modern Day Romeo and Juliet Balcony seats, and finally in October of that same year two, thousand twelve Gabriel was doing a concert at the Hollywood bowl as he played the first few bars of the Song John Cusak came out on stage and had Gabriel a boombox. Then he took about and left, and as it happened Cameron Crowe was in the audience and tweeted that he wouldn't forget that ever. There are something like fifty cover versions of the song. But arguably, the most successful version is by Jeffrey Gaines from Nineteen Ninety, eight and other than having an acoustic sound. It's a very faithful cover and therefore not really worth playing here but go look for you might like it. And now it's time to answer today's Trivia question back on page two, I asked you what the most covered rolling stone song is according to the sound of Vinyl Dot Com. Well, here's their top ten. Number ten under my thumb has been covered twenty two times wild horses. That was my guess was covered twenty eight times. Honky tonk women also covered twenty eight times in the number seven position Ruby Tuesday was covered thirty times. Angie was covered thirty one times jumping Jack. FLASH IS IN THE NUMBER FIVE position. It's been covered thirty three times sympathy for the devil has been covered thirty four times. kimmy shelter has been covered thirty eight times, and at this point, we take a big jump. Satisfaction was covered ninety three times. Number one paint it black has cracked the century mark having been covered one hundred times. And, that's a full live on another edition of how good it is. If you're enjoying the shelves, please take the time to share it with someone and maybe even leave a rating somewhere. Now you can support the show over Patriot dot com slash how good it is I seen another couple of like really nice ratings over on. podcast republic. So thank you folks so much over there. If you WANNA get in touch with the show, you can email me how good podcast podcast, gene, DOT, com or Follow the show on twitter or instagram out beauty this you can visit like policy scholes facebook page at facebook dot com slash how good it is odd or you can check out the show's website how good it is dot com. Thank you as usual protest republic. For feature. You show a next time around we're GONNA find out how good it is when we have joy sawn and seasons in the Sun No kidding thanks for listening. I will talk to you next time.

Peter Gabriel Cameron Crowe Rosanna arquette twitter USA facebook Maryland John Cusak crow Daniel Annoy Colin studer producer fairlight Honky tonk Senegal New Zealand David Tad Tad Rolling Stone Magazine
The Invisible Miracle Sledgehammer Edition

Hit Parade | Music History and Music Trivia

1:25:57 hr | 1 year ago

The Invisible Miracle Sledgehammer Edition

"This episode of hip parade is brought to you by plug into the present a campaign raising awareness about electric vehicles, the future of driving is here. It's easier than ever to drive electric with a variety of models to choose from more and more with ranges of over two hundred miles per charge electric vehicles can take you just about anywhere you want to go. Learn more about electric vehicles at plug into the present dot com. Before we get started. I want to let you know about slate day which is a full day of live shows and fun experiences in New York City on Saturday, June eighth. We're closing the day with a hip parade dance party where all be picking all the music. There will be great company, and food, and drink will also be provided fans of hip parade might want to come for the live edition of the culture gabfest and stay for the dance party. For more information and tickets go to slate dot com slash live. Welcome to hip hurry. A podcast of pop chart history from slate magazine about the hits from coast to coast. I'm Chris Milan fee, chart analysts pop critic and writer of slates wise, the song number one series on today's show in the high stakes world of popular music bands break up all the time. You might call it an occupational hazard. And what's more solo careers and spin off projects are far from guaranteed prospect, front people as famous as Mick Jagger, Freddie Mercury, and Debbie Harry found it difficult to gain traction as standalone recording artists. But most unusual is when one group not only spawns soloists, spinoffs and super groups all of which score hits. But the original group stays intact rarer still is when that original group is actually strengthened by this side activity and scores. Bigger hits of its own rarest of all is when former members and current members of the group are competing head to head on the billboard charts. Friends, meet Genesis. While they are now largely remembered as a quintessential cynth- rock band of the nineteen eighties. The recording career of Genesis spans at least four decades, even that wouldn't be remarkable in a world where the Rolling Stones and the temptations are still recording and Torey but for chart followers. What makes Genesis unique practically singular is the sheer volume of hit making careers the band generated, and that came after nearly a full decade of recording that was largely devoid of hit singles. Maybe that was because Genesis started out with songs that were hard to confine on one side of a forty five. Fronted by art rocker Peter Gabriel. The first version of Genesis sprawling. Quirky highly conceptual was a leading group in the progressive or prog rock movement and a major early seventies concert draw and then after they had gone further than virtually any prog rock band had to that time. Their frontman in his own words walked right out of the machine. This should have killed Genesis. But a self effacing, drummer, named Phil Collins, improbably moved from behind the kit to the front of the stage and in a series of near accidents, not only made them more popular than they ever been. He stumbled into a solo career that would change the sound of pop in the eighties and beyond. Again, this would be on remarkable. If not for the fact that fills, solo career made Genesis stronger. And so did competition from former member Peter Gabriel? And seemingly almost everyone who ever touched an instrument in Genesis. Today on hit parade. We trace the roots of the Nadi family tree of Genesis, and they're improbable chart feats, including the moment when they're most cerebral. Former member decided he was a soul man. And that's where your hit parade marches today, the week, ending July twenty six nineteen Eighty-six when Billboard's hot one hundred was topped by Peter Gabriel's sledgehammer just one week after his former bandmates found themselves on top with invisible touch. This episode of hip parade is brought to you by away maker of premium suitcases for twenty dollars off a suitcase. Visit away travel dot com slash hit parade and use promo code hit parade during checkout away uses high quality materials while offering a much lower price compared to other brands choose from nine colors and four sizes aways, carry on sizes are compliant with all major US airlines, while maximizing the amount you can pack, and they are able to charge all cell phones, tablets e-readers, and anything else powered by a USB cord. There's a lifetime warranty if anything breaks away will fix or replace it for you for life and a one hundred day trial if at any point, you decide it's not for you return the suitcase for a full refund. No questions asked. Once again for twenty dollars off a suitcase visit away. Way, travel dot com slash hit parade and use promo code hit parade during checkout. That's twenty dollars off a suitcase when you visit a way travel dot com. Would you buy a t shirt for fifty dollars? If you knew it only costs seven dollars to make with ever lane. You never overpay for quality clothes, no matter your style or preference ever lanes closed. Look, better cost less and last longer, because ever lanes sells directly to you, their prices are thirty to fifty percent lower than traditional retailers ever lane only makes premium essentials using the finest materials without traditional markups. They want you to know what you're paying for and why. So they tell you their real costs and are radically transparent about every step in their process from the materials they use to the ethical factories. They work with essentials like there. Cotton crew t-shirt are exactly what they should be versatile. Simple, stylish and made from quality materials tread by ever lane is a new sneaker brand designed to last and built from the most sustainable raw materials available. Treads mission is to make the world's lowest impact sneaker, check out the leather trainers available now folks as I record this, I am wearing a pair of ever lanes, slim fit dark indigo jeans, and they are my new favorites high quality, comfortable, denim with polish and flare right now. You can check out our personalized collection at ever lane dot com slash parade. Plus, you'll get free shipping on your first order. That's ever lane dot com slash parade ever lane dot com slash parade. Before we talk about this unassuming supergroup. Let's walk through some billboard chart, trivia throughout pop history. It's generally understood that solo and side projects peak on the charts after the original group has had its day picture the solo Beatles scoring their chart topping hits only after the Fab Four had broken up. Or the solo Lionel Richie, breaking with the Commodores, and topping the charts on his own. Or Justin Timberlake, moving on after the dissolution of boy band, and sink. The fact is it's exceedingly rare for a successful side project to not only coexist with the original group, but to bring that stalwart act to new pop chart heights. In fact, in billboard chart history. If we limit our discussion to the top of the hot one hundred it's only happened three times. Let's take them in reverse chronological order going back a decade from now to two thousand nine the black eyed peas. I'll bet you didn't expect to hear about them in this episode top the charts with their electro. Hip hop jam. Boom boom, pow. Get get. What made that success for the Ps unusual was it was their first ever hot, one hundred number one, and it came a couple of years after one of their members singer and rapper. Fergie scored three solo number one. Oh. Oh, you moving back about another decade in the summer of two thousand the alt- pop group matchbox twenty scored. Their only hot one hundred number one hit with beds. Do we? The band had never topped the charts before, but about a year earlier frontman, rob. Thomas co wrote and sang lead on Santana's number one mega smash smooth. But the granddaddy of this quirky chart feet. The man who co defied how big a solo career could get without destroying his home base was Phil Collins in the mid nineteen eighties by the time Genesis scored their aforementioned chart-topper invisible touch Collins had already been to number one multiple times. And these were not small hits. How did this genial dude become one of the defining pop stars of his era to trace that story? We need to go back. One more decade really a decade and a half to a time when rock was more ambitious or at least more long winded. That's the return of the giant hog, we let me repeat that return of the giant hog wheat from the nineteen seventy-one album nursery crime. It wasn't the first Genesis album, the band had been together since the mid nineteen sixties when teenage schoolmates, Tony Banks, Mike Rutherford, and Peter Gabriel formed a band with two other attendees of England's Charterhouse school called garden. Wall renamed Genesis in nineteen sixty seven by their manager Jonathan king, the band recorded two albums of quirky, late sixties, art rock, then in nineteen seventy before recording their third album, the band hired to accomplished young players and up and coming Gataric named Steve Hackett. And an already busy, former child actor turned drummer from Greater London named Philip Collins, Hackett and Collins, made the band of fivesome and began to build Genesis following, as an ornate, uncompromising live. While Steve Hackett was a gifted guitarist Tony Banks, a virtuosic keyboardist Mike Rutherford a strong basis who doubled on rhythm guitar and Phil Collins, an adept drummer who sang harmonies and even took an occasional lead vocal without question the star of Genesis in its early. Seventies incarnation was lead singer and flamboyant. Frontman Peter Gabriel. Two two. Even fans of Peter Gabriel's whimsical, eighties, or nineties, music videos, might still be shocked to see how he performed as a member of Genesis in the seventies, Gabriel's, most conservative onstage outfit was a mask of white makeup. His hippy length hair severely party like a mad scientist. That was a blank slate upon which Gabriel. Wow, on stage would put on evermore outrageous outfits a Jesus, like crown of thorns a Roosters. Cocks comb, a bogus costume that made him look like a grotesque amoeba like alien and on the twenty three minute Genesis magnum, opus, suppers, ready, the head of a giant flower. Everything Genesis were not the only progressive rock band performing songs with elaborate titles, and absurdly verbose lyrics in an era of such prog bands as king crimson. Yes. Gentle giant and Emerson lake and Palmer, but thanks largely to Peter Gabriel's onstage antics, Genesis developed an even more devoted phantom of their live performances. Attendees knew they were in first show. I is pretend you. Tanya. This is my song. Called downsizing with the moonlit night. None of this live fame, meant much on the radio. But Genesis scored their first unlikely hit on the British charts in nineteen seventy four the psychedelic. I know what I like in. You'll would. That senior Genesis issued their most ambitious work, the double L P concept album, the lamb lies down on Broadway. A song cycle about a Latin American New York City character named rile, its narrative lyrics and concept were largely driven by Peter Gabriel. The lamb lies down on Broadway was Genesis, I album to approach the top forty in America, and it became their most acclaimed with critics, it had all the makings of a cultural breakthrough. And that was win in a move that stunned the rock press. Peter Gabriel announced he was leaving Genesis. Again. As far as the media of nineteen seventy five was concerned, this, spelled the end of Genesis just as they were hitting their stride to this point Gabriel was the focal point. And it was believed. The driving force of the group, the rest of the band seemed to believe this as well. Although drummer, Phil Collins had sung lead on the odd track here and there, such as the nineteen Seventy-three, deep cut more fool me. No one seriously believed, Phil Collins was capable of fronting Genesis, least of all Collins, himself, self effacing, and a devoted drummer Collins, enjoyed his side man status and by nineteen seventy five. He had already played behind such luminaries as Brian Eno, and John kale. At one point Collins, even tried to convince Genesis to continue as an instrumental combo and idea, they rejected, so the band started recording their next album, a trick of the tail with no permanent singer, the group placed an open add in the British music, weekly melody maker, reportedly some four hundred singers responded, and while they auditioned vocalists Collins, sang on the new album's tracks assuming his vocals, would eventually be replaced. But these temporary Phil Collins vocals became permanent unsatisfied with any of the singers auditioning for the group. Genesis wound up, giving Collins, the frontman position essentially by default Collins all, but looked down upon the gig. In interviews, years later, he would call the singers role in the band as he perceived it quote, cheap about looking good and wiggling your bum unquote, but not only did Collins have a similar vocal range to Peter Gabriel making him good fit for the band's older material on stage. Collins also soon found as a singer and songwriter that he could shape the Genesis sound in subtle, more melodic direct new ways. Your own special way, the lead single of late, nineteen seventy six album wind, and weathering. Bridged the ornate, prog sound of the Peter Gabriel era with the pop friendlier hooks of Phil Collins. It also helped break the band on the radio in the US. It was the band's first hot one hundred hit peaking at number sixty two in April of nineteen seventy seven that same month wind, and weathering reached the top thirty on the billboard album chart, the first Genesis album to reach such lofty heights. But it was also the last Genesis album to feature ace guitarist Steve Hackett, having already issued solo albums as early as nineteen seventy five and frustrated at the limitations of getting his material on. Genesis albums Hackett left the band in the spring of seventy seven and embarked on a fulltime. Solo career by nineteen seventy eight issuing singles fronted by such famed vocalists as Richie havens. Ladies and. The message. In short before the seventies were even over Genesis had already spun off to solo careers. Steve Hackett s- and Peter Gabriel's obviously, the one that the press and rock fans were keeping the closest I upon was Gabriel's. But it took until nineteen seventy seven two years after he left Genesis, before Peter issued material under his own name quite literally under his own. Even Gabriel's debut album was called simply Peter Gabriel eponymous debuts are common in rock, but Gabriel ever, the iconoclast wow, nicknaming his first, four LP's Peter Gabriel. And by the first track on the album, a seventies, prog rock fan could be forgiven for thinking Gabriel hadn't changed a bit since his Genesis days after all, that I track had the portentous title moribund, the Bergamo Stor, but by track to it was clear Gabriel had every intention of leaving Genesis far behind. See the city light. Salisbury hill was like a press release turned into poetry. It could easily have been titled why I left Genesis with lyrics like my friends would think I was and I was feeling part of the scenery. I walked right out of the machinery the song at times, even sounded a little vindictive wrappers of a later generation might call it a beef record given shady lyrics life. I will show another me today. I don't mean a replacement, but the gentle song, ultimately sounded more wistful and self actualising than spiteful. It was also the purest pop song Gabriel had ever written. Because this catchy song was a bit of a head fake, in Gabriel's career, it did modest business on the charts on both sides of the Atlantic in England, Salisbury hill. Peaked just shy of the top ten at number thirteen in America where Gabriel had no singles chart history. It peaked far outside the top forty reaching number. Sixty eight in may nineteen seventy seven ironically, just weeks after Genesis your own special way, had peaked at number sixty two but more than four decades later, it is Salisbury hill, that has emerged as a radio staple. On US terrestrial radio Salisbury hill is the second most played song appear Gabriel's career spun more than four hundred thousand times since nineteen ninety. Over the ports of his first two albums, again, both titled Peter Gabriel. The former Genesis front man, tried on a range of new musical. Modes gabriel. The solo artist was more accessible than Gabriel Genesis. But he was no less. Restless weather attempting, strutting rock on modern love. Hauer balladry on here comes the flood. Or nodding his head to the sound of punk and post punk on nineteen seventy eight's DIY aka do it yourself. Gabriel's Omar to the famous punk rock credo. At a time when terms like new wave only starting to come into being Gabriel was alternative before that musical movement had a name, but his former bandmates in Genesis now reduced to a trio of Mike Rutherford, Tony Banks and Phil Collins were following their version. Two point. Oh, frontman in ever-popular direction. Follow you follow me was the lead single from Genesis. I Alba as a trio nineteen seventy eight's appropriately titled, and then there were three it was even more romantic than your own special way, and even catchier so catchy that it was the band's first top ten hit in their homeland, and their first top forty hit in America. Casey Kasem counted down. Forty this week on eighteen forty? There are fifteen foreign accent account down, ten of meringue Lee. And here's one of those English acts at number thirty five second week on the chart Genesis their first top forty hit his follow. You follow me, the deeply romantically wrecks and melody of follow. You follow me would come to seem bitterly ironic to Phil Collins by the end of nineteen seventy eight it would be a pivotal year, but not just because his voice could finally be heard on the charts his personal upheaval, that year would unwittingly change the course of both his career, and that of his band after Genesis returned from its nineteen Seventy-eight tour Collins was informed by his wife. Andrea Bertarelli that she was going to file for divorce collinses workaholic and long months on the road had left her bereft caring alone for their chill. Trinh and she even admitted to an affair after she and the children, moved out Collins, found himself by nineteen Seventy-nine living alone and brooding around the same time by coincidence, Collins was given a prototype of the Rowland C R, seventy eight one of the earliest programmable drum machines, and he began, experimenting with it in his mostly empty house. Collins was not even trying to write formal music mostly. He was playing with the Roland to see what it could do as it was. He was a bit skeptical of this device that purported to replace traditional drummers like him. But he quickly grew to like it's spooky digital rhythms. And the fact that the machine allowed him to try out musical ideas on his own gradually. What started out as sonic experiments began to sound like songs, and hang on. We're not ready to play that song, yet it would not be heard by the public for more than two years. But it was one of several dark, brooding songs Collins wrote on his own while Genesis was on a break. And he was home alone during this period, Collins would wind up writing a string of heartbreak songs, and they would lay bare his feelings. Very publicly. Few? For example, please don't ask was the first of these songs to see release on the following years Genesis album, and it was heartrending with lyrics, like I cry obit. I don't sleep too good. But I'm fine. And I miss my boy similarly, wounded was the track if leaving me is easy, a future Collins album, cut. But in nineteen seventy nine Collins filed away, most of these home experiments, thinking they were destined to be nothing more than cathartic musical journal entries as the nineteen eighties began, he poured himself into other projects, both anew Genesis album, and an album for an old friend, that would prove sonically even more pivotal, the Genesis album came first. The album dupe continued to ratchet up the chart profile and radio success of Genesis. The LP was the band's first number one in the UK and in the US it peaked just outside the billboard top ten in July of nineteen eighty the album split the difference between the longer prog rock tracks for which Genesis was first known and more. Concise pop songs like the lead off single, turn it on, again in the UK. Turn it on again was a top ten hit, but the band's US label Atlantic records, chose an even radio friendlier track for the American market. Misunderstanding was Phil Collins, composition written during his nineteen Seventy-nine songwriting burst that presented. His still fresh heartbreak with beach boys style harmonies and a doo-wop inspired arrangement on the hot one hundred in a year when Rockstars like Queen John Lennon, and Billy Joel were reaching back to old rock and roll styles and scoring hits misunderstanding became Genesis. Biggest US hit to date peaking at number fourteen in August of nineteen eighty but Duke was not the only nineteen eighty album on which Phil Collins played a key role. Without. In the spring of nineteen eighty Peter Gabriel issued his third straight, Peter Gabriel album and his most acclaimed today. The cover featured a black and white polaroid of Gabriel's face with its chemical smear fans came to call the self titled album knelt on the radio Gabriel led off the album, release with the cutting edge single games without frontiers. A top-five UK hit that featured backing vocals by Gabriel's friend Kate Bush singing the songs, French refrained ju song frontier, but among the album's other guests was Gabriel's. Former bandmate, Phil Collins, who during his dark nineteen Seventy-nine period, had volunteered to help with Gabriel's album, mostly to get out of the house Collins wound up playing drums on two pivotal tracks on the third. Peter gabriel. L P, one track was Biko Gabriel's eulogy for South African anti-apartheid activist Stephen Biko. Phil Collins played the heavy Brazilian drum known as the pseudo on Biko. It was the closing track on the album, and remains a standard in both Gabriel's live shows and in protest music worldwide, but the album's opening track was for Collins as a drummer, arguably even more important. Some. Intruder the sinister song that opens nineteen eighties. Peter Gabriel album changed the sound of rock and pop drumming, the heavy sound Collins and his producer, Hugh pageant, achieved on the track was a total serendipitous accident pageant had placed a talkback microphone in the room with Collins's drum kit. The mic was meant only to allow Collins to communicate with pageant back in the booth, but when Collins and pageant heard what the drums sounded like feeding back on that heavily compressed microphone, they realized they had stumbled onto something new. It came to be called the gated drum or gated reverb. It was allowed reverberate drum sound that was then clipped making it sound both sharply contained and yet massive in his memoir, not dead yet Collins wrote, quote, with hindsight. I now know that that day or two I'd spent working on Peter's third album was life changing unquote already an accomplished and indimedia drummer by the nineteen eighties Collins, with the creation of gated reverb had found his alternate signature drum sound. He also found the finishing touch for that spooky track. He'd been working on in his empty house back in nineteen seventy nine. A word or two about in the air tonight and the myths that have sprung up around this. Soul. No in real life. Phil Collins never saw someone drowning the lyrics are not a true story about him witnessing a murder, and no, he did not call out the supposed perpetrator later at a concert, contrary to urban legend in his memoir Collins claims that the spiteful lyrics reflected and then only indirectly his wounded feelings in the wake of his divorce. Again, Collins had no intention to ever release in the air tonight or any of the tracks. He had been tinkering with in his house. It was only after he played the demos for legendary record. Impresario Ahmet Ertegun, founder of Collins's, US label Atlantic records that Ertegun implored Collins virtually. Insisted that the music must come out as a solo album Ertegun, even agreed to supply Collins with resources to finish the album with backing musicians and guests taking full advantage Collins asked his label boss. If he could invite one of the top RV brass combos of their day. Supergroup earth wind and fire had a horn section so renowned. It had its own name the Phoenix horns, they played some of the best hooks on E W F classics, like September Collins, brought them into the studio and had them at irresistible brass to half the songs on the album. He was now calling face value. They powered the Aren be flavored song that would wind up as the album's first single. I'm missed again. This. It would not be the last time, Phil Collins teamed on a hit song with a member of earth, wind and fire released in the winter of nineteen Eighty-one. I missed again, which despite its jaunty beat was again, about Collins rueful feelings about the dissolution of his marriage reached the top twenty in both the US and the UK. And what about that strange sinister song about watching a man drown? In the air tonight, was a transatlantic smash it reached number two in the UK. And in America, it hit number nineteen on the hot, one hundred and number two on Billboard's top rock tracks chart, as for the album Collins, never realized he was making face value, topped the UK album chart in February of nineteen Eighty-one and by may broke into the top ten in America peaking at number seven. It was the first US top ten album by any current, or former member of Genesis, what would Phil Collins do in the wake of this monstrous, and fully unexpected success. Recall that back in nineteen seventy five right after Peter Gabriel lead. Genesis two its most acclaimed album, the lamb lies down on Broadway. He promptly left the band to explore his own muse. Arguably, Phil Collins was now an even bigger solo star than Peter Gabriel and on his way to clips in Genesis, it would have surprised virtually no one if Collins followed in Gabriel's footsteps. But that's not what the worker, Hollick Collins chose to do before. Nineteen Eighty-one was over. He and Genesis were already back with a new album Abba, cap rather than taking away from Genesis Collins's, solo success seemed to provide rocket fuel Abba cab became the band's second straight UK number one album, and their first to break into the top ten in America matching face values peak of number seven in November, nineteen Eighty-one in other words, both on his own and with his old mates Collins scored two top ten albums in a single year. The album's title track Abba, cab was named for the common verse chorus and bridge lettering technique of pop. Songwriting. A. B. A C, A B, by the way, hold that thought because this would also not be the last time Collins would score a hit with an on Amata peak musical nonsense, word Abba cab found Collins, Tony Banks and Mike Rutherford turning their scintillating prog rock sound ever more poppy, the sonic line between Genesis and Phil Collins was starting to blur. And it would only get blurrier on the album's other big single. Collins invited back the Phoenix horns from earth, wind and fire to join Genesis on no reply at all, which gave Genesis number two hit on Billboard's rock tracks, chart and number twenty nine hit on the hot one hundred by may eighty to the ABA cab LP became Genesis first US platinum album, and it was still lodged in the US top forty their longest running LP hit today. It again, the question must be asked, what would Phil Collins do now with back toback platinum solo and Genesis albums take a break. Enjoy the perks of stardom think again. Abba cab had barely slipped down the charts when Collins began recording. Hello. I must be going his second solo album deepening. His connection to classic Aren be the album's lead. Single was a cover of the nineteen sixty six Motown. Classic by the Supremes. You can't hurry love. Reinforcing that everyone loves Motown, even when it's classics are played by thirty something white British man. You can't hurry loaf became Phil Collins's biggest hit to date in the UK. It reached number one in January nineteen eighty three one month later on the hot, one hundred it reached number ten giving Collins, the first ever US, top ten hit by any member of Genesis to be sure, Collins was still capable of brooding. The second single from Hello. I must be going. I don't care anymore reinvented. The spooky sound of the prior albums in the air tonight. But the sound of gated reverb added punch, and tempo to virtually all of Collins's material and it began to infect other Popstars material, as well, Collins was suddenly in demand, as not only aside man, but producer for other songs from current Popstars to longtime rock legends in the legends category. Former Led Zeppelin frontman Robert plant called in Collins to play on his nineteen eighty two solo debut album pictures at eleven. In a completely different vein. Flamboyant, new romantic pop star Adam ant brought in Collins to produce and drum onto of his nineteen Eighty-three hits strip and push in. And perhaps most memorably former opera singer on a free links that aka Freda hired Collins to produce the entirety of her nineteen eighty two album, something's going on the best selling solo album ever by any former member of the Swedish megagroup, the free album's lead single, I know there's something going on, was a top ten or top twenty hit in countries around the world, and the thundering gated drums on the single were unmistakably, the work of Phil Collins, his most potent drumming on a pop hit since in the air tonight. Phil Collins had developed a magic touch, and become a reliable hitmaker, his former bandmate Peter Gabriel with his more challenging material was always less of a commercial prospect, but even without Collins, drumming on his tracks Gabriel's material was getting more commercial, too. In nineteen eighty two Peter Gabriel attempted to release his fourth solo album with the same eponymous magazine like title as his last three Peter Gabriel but his US label Geffen records finally pushed back and insisted the album have its own title. They called it security, the American labels insistence on this more promote -able title may have had something to do with the fact that Gabriel was emerging as a music. Video star with an actual top forty. Shock the monkey was one of the earliest hits on the then new music video channel MTV, the visually striking music video was played around the clock and it memorably featured two versions of Peter Gabriel one a businessman in a suit gradually, turning man. The other a ghost, like figure dressed in white with white face paint, a throwback to the Genesis Peter Gabriel of old shock the monkey also sported, the most danceable beat of any Peter Gabriel single to date and by early nineteen eighty three it wound up crossing over on a range of billboard charts from rock tracks, where it hit number one to the hot, one hundred where it made the top thirty and even billboards dance. Disco chart, where it also broke into the top thirty. Shock the monkey peaked on the hot one hundred the same week in early nineteen Eighty-three that Phil Collins broke into the top ten with his remake of you can't hurry love, but Collins still had no intention of slowing down. Phil Collins's second solo album. Hello. I must be going had barely slipped out of the top forty when he regrouped with Mike Rutherford and Tony Banks to record the next Genesis album as if reflecting the band's evermore uncluttered pop friendly direction gone with the days when they're Alba had titles like selling England by the pound or a trick of the tail the new album would simply be called Genesis released in the fall of nineteen Eighty-three, the self titled LP was in the US top ten within a month. Genesis fastest breaking album to date in the UK the album's lead single shot into the top five mama, a sinister blend of synthesized rock. And as we told you in hit parades def Jam's edition, the spooky laugh. Which was inspired by hip hop. Grandmaster flash. And Millie mill in the US mama was a top five rock hit the first of seven tracks to make Billboard's rock. Tracks chart, but mama was a bit strange for American top forty radio to date. Genesis had yet to score a US top ten single on the pop charts the album's next track, however, would change. That's all was built for radio ubiquity a wistful, mid tempo love song with multiple layers of Beatles cooks. It was Genesis. Most straightforward love song since misunderstanding in nineteen eighty both Tony Banks and Mike Rutherford made key contributions, the former a classic keyboard solo on the bridge, the latter closing ATar solo, the put a button on the song. But with its open hearted therapeutic lyrics, that's all was a showcase for Phil combs when it peaked at number six in February nineteen Eighty-four, it became not only Genesis I ever top ten American hit get was also the first such hit written by Collins, his prior solo top ten hit, you can't hurry love having been a Motown cover again, this was a fairly unusual hit making strategy a so. Solo career that was not only thriving alongside aband- career, but making the original band, stronger collinses, bandmates had mixed feelings. Tony Banks would later joke interviews, quote, he was our friend and we wanted him to be successful, just not that successful, but banks also admitted quote fill became so big. But I think the two careers helped each other, that's all was just slipping out of the top ten in late February nineteen Eighty-four when a new solo, Phil Collins single debuted on the hot one hundred and this one would redefine, just how big Tony Banks bandmate could get. Just that you. Trees, more than a year earlier when Phil Collins was on his first solo tour, he was approached by filmmaker Taylor hack for'de director of the nineteen eighty to hit an officer and a gentleman hack furred asked Collins, if he would be interested in writing a song for his next movie, a thriller called against all odds Collins was loath to try to write a new song while on the road, but he did tell Halford. He had another demo from his prolific nineteen seventy nine homes, according period, yet another heartbreaks, inspired by his divorce that had the working title. How can you sit? This. Hack. Furred loved rueful, impassioned demo. And he only asked Collins, if he could somehow work, the phrase against all odds into the lyric Collins, who already had the main chorus of take a look now through one allusion to the film title into the refrains the phrase you coming back to me is against the and as per Taylor Halfords request the final single was given the title against all odds parentheses take a look at me, now it would be one of three songs on the against all odds soundtrack by current or former members of Genesis alongside tracks by Peter Gabriel and Mike Rutherford. Released as a single just a couple of weeks before the film hit movie screens. Phil Collins's against all odds was a monster hit. In fact, it went higher on the charts than the film did at the box office all the way to number one. The number one song is by an Englishman, who I started hitting on the album, chart, not as a singer, but as a drummer with the group Genesis, but now as drummer, who sings he has a solo hit that's gone to number one for a second week in a row, the most popular song. The land is the title song from the movie against all is, here's Phil Collins. This was a whole new level of fame for Phil cones against all odds not only top the hot, one hundred and was certified gold. The following winter, it would be nominated for an Oscar for best original song from a motion picture as Genesis continued to release singles from its nineteen. Eighty-three album, Collins kept working reflecting his longtime interest with ARIN be and his admiration for the band earth. Wind and fire Collins, produced the nineteen Eighty-four solo album by e WF, singer, Philip Bailey Chinese wall and fill even duetted and played his signature thundering drums on the album's lead. Single easy, lover a number two hit on the hot one hundred. That fall Collins was also given a showcase lot on the UK famine relief charity, mega single, do they know it's Christmas. The song credited to bandaid already had too many singers, from sting, George, Michael to Boy, George to Bano, but band-aid organizer Bob Geldof left, open a spot on the record for Collins to record and capture on film, a big drum. Inference. In early nineteen eighty five as both easy lover and do they know it's Christmas were peaking on the charts. Collins learned, he would not be invited to perform his Oscar nominated hit against all odds on the Academy Awards, telecast, perhaps reflecting fills still murky public profile in America, the producers of the awards in a move now. Infamous in Oscar Lor instead asked actress choreographer and Ryan came to record and lip sing Collins's song while she danced on the telecast. The performance was widely panned by critics and Oskar watchers Collins himself was in the audience as an Oscar nominee, and he felt mortified for both himself and Ryan king, he was almost relieved when against all odds lost the Oscar to Stevie wonder's song from the woman in red. I just called to say, I love you the greatest irony of all the very weak in late March. Nineteen eighty-five when Phil Collins, sat squirming in the audience at the Dorothy Chandler pavilion in Los Angeles, watching his song get butchered on live TV by Oscar producers, who didn't think he was famous enough to appear on their show. He had the number one single and album in America. One more night was the first single from no jacket required. Phil Collins's third solo album and one of the biggest LP's of nineteen eighty-five the lead off single took less than two months to reach number one, it, even prevented Madonna than at the apex of her first wave of stardom from reaching number one with material girl, although Collins, led off the album with lovelorn ballad and mind a similar theme on a few of the albums deep cuts. Taken as a whole no jacket required became famous. Not so much as another chapter in Collins's tales of heartbreak as for its shiny. Yup. Fide mega-pop sound, the Olten it album of what came to be called the big eighties. A decade later author. Bret Easton Ellis would satirize both the decade and Collins in his book, American psycho. It's preening shallow yuppie killer, Patrick Bateman, before, torturing, people would wax poetic about his love for both Genesis and the solo, Phil Collins, holding up his C D copy of no jacket required. Joy, phil. A big Genesis fan ever since the release of their nineteen eighty album. Duke. For that really didn't understand any of their work to Archie to electoral and the song, he liked. Best was Collins's summer nineteen eighty five number one hits. Souto was in essence a sequel to advocate by Genesis a nonsense word used by Phil Collins to describe the rhythm of the song that became the title of the song and in this case, the name of the girl, Collins was lusting after the track was also the furthest Collins had gone in the direction of state of the art eighties are in be indeed. Many at the time accused of borrowing its synthesizer hook from prince's nineteen eighty two top twenty hit nineteen ninety nine. In interviews, Collins owned up to the Omar and he wound up with an even bigger hit than prince. Souto went to number one on the hot one hundred in July of nineteen eighty five and in the wake of his recent smash duet with Philip Bailey. It even made the top ten of Billboard's Aren beach art, one week after Sudi reached its chart peak. Phil Collins affirmed. His status at Live Aid. The blockbuster transatlantic famine relief concert organized by Bob Geldof as a follow up to the band aid single from the prior Christmas took place on July thirteenth, nineteen eighty-five into venues, simultaneously Wembley stadium in London, and John F. Kennedy stadium in Philadelphia. Overextending himself even more than usual Collins, not only agreed to perform his own material. He also pledged to back up several of his rockstar acquaintances in their performances and those gigs were scheduled in both the UK and the US rather than bow out of any of these performances Collins chose to play both shows performing I at Wembley in London. Then getting on the Concorde supersonic jet flying to Philadelphia and performing JFK stadium by nightfall. It was a crazy stunt that was covered by the media that day almost as much as the concert itself in London, early in the Wimbley Live Aid show, Collins backed up his friend sting. Every. We stem using of it watch. And performed a pair of songs of his own. Later that day in Philadelphia Collins played drums behind his friend, Eric Clapton performed the same two songs he had played in London. And closed. The day drumming on a heavily hyped ultimately lackluster reunion by the surviving. Members of Led Zeppelin Collins had promised his friend Robert plant. He would play even though the band had been rehearsing for Live Aid with drummer, Tony Thompson, formerly of Sheikh so that night in Philly Collins and Thomson, both drums, simultaneously behind Led Zeppelin Collins later called it one of the most harrowing performances of his own. While the separate reunion was ultimately panned by both critics, and the band itself, and some pundits grumbled that Collins's dual city performances made a day about famine relief. More about his career all of the exposure, didn't seem to slow his momentum, no jacket required spent the rest of nineteen eighty five lodged in the top twenty and spinning off hits in the middle of the run Collins, even found time to record a standalone single. Another ballot from another Taylor hack. Furred film white nights. The Maryland Martin duet separate lives. It went to number one in November collinses third chart topper of that year alone in February nineteen Eighty-six as take me home was issued as the last single from his nearly quintupled platinum album, no jacket required. Phil Collins attended the Grammy awards in Los Angeles, where jacket was up for album of the year. Collins was gobsmacked when his album actually won the night's top prize over blockbuster. LP's by dire. Straits Whitney Houston sting, and even USA for Africa, no jacket required would eventually be certified twelve times, platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America fills, upset, Grammy win for album of the year in early eighty six kicked off the most action packed year in Genesis history. While Phil had been rampaging around the world and dominating the charts with his solo work his current and former bandmates were finding ways to keep busy. Genesis had never gone. So long between albums before it had been more than two years since their self titled nineteen Eighty-three LP, but guitarist Mike Rutherford had his own surprise success. Rutherford had issued two solo albums in the early eighties. He even sangam but he found the process, unsatisfying missing the camaraderie of a band. So in nine hundred eighty five during the long Genesis hiatus Mike, Rutherford formed, Mike and the mechanics as a kind of loose collective with instrumentalists and even vocalists shifting from song to song for its first single Rutherford, recruited journeyman singer. Paul Carrick who had sung lead on hits by ace and squeeze to Rutherford's. Happy surprise that first single silent running reached the top ten in America in the fall, nineteen eighty five. And the next Mike mechanic, single sounded completely different sung by a different vocalist. Former sad cafe singer Paul young. And it did even better on the charts. All I need is a miracle reached the hot one hundred's top five in June of nineteen eighty six. Meanwhile, former bandmate, Peter Gabriel was also in the process of ending his own long hiatus from recording from nineteen Eighty-three through eighty five Gabriel toward promoted his world music festival. Whoa. Mad and did soundtrack work while collecting material for his fifth LP the album would be influenced by his increasing interest in non western music. But he also built on the commercial success of nineteen eighty two's security, LP and shock the monkey more than on any prior album. Gabriel reached out to a who's who of current musicians. From singers like Kate Bush, Laurie Anderson, and Yusuf endore to instrumentalists, like Nile Rodgers Bill last well and the polices Stewart Copeland. The resulting album would be called simply so the first Peter Gabriel album, he chose to title with something other than his own name, and it would be a happy paradox more globally minded than any prior Gabriel album. And yet, more commercially potent with a slew of catchy songs, perhaps, the catchy song of all not only benefited from Gabriel's love of American arm be similar to his former bandmate, Phil Collins hit would be an even bigger hit on MTV. We talked about, Peter Gabriel's now legendary video for sledgehammer in our prior episode of hit parade about the rise of the music video. Suffice it to say the Steven Johnson directed clip the most acclaimed of MTV's first decade, featuring everything from claymation to pulsating, sperm to dancing, chicken rebooted, Gabriel's career. And it would go onto win record number of MTV video music awards, but even before the clip debuted on MTV. The song was already catching on with US radio programmers, given its irresistible Omar to the sound of sixties arm be, and Gabriel's cheeky, frisky thinly metaphorical lyrics about the joys of sex. So sledgehammer to began climbing the charts in the spring of eighty six alongside current singles by Phil Collins and Mike Rutherford's band, Mike and the mechanics. And that wasn't all even the quietest. Former member of Genesis was now scoring a hit. The short lived superbeet GT are came off as a fantasy league for readers of guitar world magazine. He teamed up Qatar is- Steve, how formerly of the bands, yes and Asia, and guitarist Steve Hackett, the member him the one time Genesis guitarist who'd gone solo back in nineteen seventy seven for a band that generated only one studio album, GT are didn't do badly on the charts. Their self titled album went gold and it's fond a sizeable hit single the prog gun pop guitar nudity when the heart rules, the mind it, too debuted on the hot, one hundred in the late spring of nineteen Eighty-six within weeks of the hits by Collins, Gabriel and Mike Rutherford's band. And finally, that same month. There was a new single from what you might call the mothership. Somehow amid all of this recording activity Phil Collins and Mike Rutherford had rejoined keyboardist Tony Banks to write and record. New Genesis album, invisible touch as its first single, the band issued the album's title track, the most shamelessly poppy pop song of its career as the summer of eighty six kicked off current. And former members of Genesis were on a billboard chart collision course by June the week that invisible touch entered the top forty at number thirty seven it was two positions behind GT ours, when the heart rules, the mind and five positions behind Peter Gabriel's sledgehammer all were on the rise. Phil Collins's own take me home. The last hit from no jacket required was still in the top thirty on it's way down from a peak of number seven, and Mike. And the mechanics all I need is a miracle was at its peak of. Number five as if all this wasn't enough, a sixth, single rising in the middle of the chart was also, a Phil Collins, showcase even though his name wasn't on it Collins had produced sang backup and played drums on Howard Jones's ballad. No one is to blame. By early July. No one is to blame would peak at number four, GTRI, only hit would reach a respectable number fourteen and the singles by the solo Collins and Mike. And the mechanics had fallen off. Mike Rutherford's group was already moving on to a new single the ultimate race for the top of the charts was between the two flagship acts Genesis and their former singer Peter Gabriel invisible touch, and sledgehammer will racing each other up the hot one hundred. Through mid June Gabriel was higher on the chart than his former bandmates when sledgehammer entered the top twenty it already became Gabriel's, I ever hit to reach that height on the American charts, but Gabriel was clearly, the underdog given Phil Collins's higher profile over the last five years. As the two songs entered the top ten invisible touch. Overtook sledgehammer, the Genesis song, rising to number eight the same week Gabriel rose to number ten a fortnight later as invisible touch leapt number two sledgehammer was just outside the top five at number six one week after that invisible touch made history for Genesis becoming their first and only number one on the hot, one hundred while Gabriel hurdled four places to number two. This gave current and former Genesis members of the top two songs in America had Peter Gabriel peaked in the runner up slot, he would already have come further than he ever had on the pop charts before. And then one week later. The unprecedented actually happened. Now we're up to the new number one song in the USA. And this song is part of to chart. I is see last week, the popular English band. Moved into the number one position right on -til at number two was a song by that English bands. Former lead singer and that particular situation at the top of the chart has never happened before ever. Well this week those two acts are involved in yet another chart, I because Genesis and their song invisible touch is not out of the top spot, and their former lead singer moves in the number one spot. And that's never happened before in the history of the billboard charts. The new number one song in America is sledgehammer by former lead singer of Genesis now. Solo singer. Peter gabriel. In truth Voth acts wound up winners, from their nineteen Eighty-six chart dual Peter Gabriel's sledgehammer wound up, the longer-lasting hit spending about a month longer on the hot, one hundred then invisible touch Gabriel's album. So would also peak higher reaching number two on the billboard album chart, while invisible touch peaked at number three Gabriel's album would go on to spawn. Two more top forty singles. His most hit packed album including the ballot. That is now his most played radio staple in your eyes. And another uptempo powered by an intricate. Steven Johnson video big. Meanwhile, the invisible touch album would make Genesis inescapable prior to eighty six they had only ever scored one top ten hit with nineteen Eighty-four. That's all but invisible, touch at last may Genesis aradio fixture spawning four more top five hits including the ballad throwing it all away. The turning rock track land of confusion, which, like Gabriel's hits benefited from an ornate, MTV friendly video. A poppy prog rock track that wound up in a Mickle beer commercial tonight tonight tonight. And one more Collins led lovelorn ballad in two d. The Genesis chart Matic universe of nineteen Eighty-six wasn't essentially unrepeatable phenomenon while future decades. See groups from the worlds of pop rock and rap spin off multiple soloists, with chart hits from the Spice Girls to the Wu Tang clan, never again with the hot, one hundred see one group spawned, so many simultaneous parallel hits this serendipitous. Genesis experiment had downsides, not least over exposure after so Gabriel receded from the spotlight for several years focusing again on soundtrack work for Martin Scorsese's film, the last temptation of Christ. And waiting until well into the nineties to even issue, a follow up album too. So the more brooding and introspective. Mike Rutherford to waited several years after his first hit packed, Mike and the mechanics album to issue, a follow up, and he scored one last smash in nineteen eighty nine with the hot one hundred topping the living years. But the man who found it most difficult to say no, who loved working and hated being idle was Phil Collins in the late eighties. He started a movie BUSTER. Recorded with more of his heroes, including legendary Motown writer Lamont dosier. And kept on topping the charts with his multi-platinum nineteen Eighty-nine follow up album, but seriously, perhaps appropriately Collin scored the last number one hit of the nineteen eighties with his lament about homelessness another day and Howard ice. By the nineties. However, all of this relentless activity made Collins something of a punchline. In addition to Bret Easton Ellis's, American psycho TV shows from Saturday night. Live to south park began taking potshots at the nineteen eighties. Most ubiquitous chart dominator. Genesis would wind up recording. Only one more album with Phil Collins nineteen ninety ones we can't dance, and while the album, sold well, the hits were somewhat smaller in the era of run the rock. Collins would finally depart Genesis after the we can't dance tour banks and Rutherford recorded, one last album with different vocalist before dissolving the group in nineteen ninety eight the year after that Collins scored his last pop top forty hit and his first Oscar with the song, you'll be in my heart from the Disney animated film Tarzan. The twenty first century has been a much quieter and at times darker time for the members of Genesis Peter Gabriel has issued only one album of new material since two thousand. But he has toured extensively. The original five-man lineup of Genesis talked into thousand four about reforming for a tour to celebrate the anniversary of Gabriel's. Seventies swan song with the band the lamb lies down on Broadway, but they amicably chose not to pursue it instead Collins, banks and Rutherford mounted a brief but blockbuster tour in two thousand seven. When Genesis was inducted into the rock and Roll Hall of fame in two thousand ten including early members Peter Gabriel and Steve Hackett Gabriel declined to attend, and the band did not perform P con behave. Thank you, try. I mean that was really convincing argument. As for Phil Collins, his activity this century, and his reputation have gone through numerous cycles, younger generations of musicians, particularly in the worlds of ARIN b and hip hop, have covered his songs, extensively. They. Stay Papa Doc in enough on rock. Drummers from Taylor. Hawkins to Jason Bonham have cited his influence Collins himself has issued albums of big band music, Motown covers and new pop material all of which have sold modestly, but respectable. For a time in the early twenty tens Collins retired for music in part to battle alcoholism and entering his sixties. He was compelled to stop playing the drums, citing a spinal operation nerve damage and years of bone degradation. But it seems the man who managed one of the most furious bouts of recording activity in pop history. The first person in chart history to bring his solo success back to his group couldn't stay idle for long in twenty sixteen Collins announced the not dead yet tour named after his memoir since twenty seventeen the tour has visited Europe South and North America with dates scheduled in the United States into late twenty nineteen Collins performs the show seated on a stool, leaving the drumming to others including on recent dates. His son Nick Collins, the tour, mostly focuses on Collins's solo material though songs he recorded alone that he didn't even think were songs. But he always finds time to include hits he wrote and sang for Genesis, including their breakthrough hit follow. You follow me, which more than four decades later, sounds less like a love song now and more like a prayer. I hope you enjoyed this episode of hit parade, my producer for this episode was Cameron Druce, and we had helped this episode from Daniel Hewitt, the managing producer of sleep podcasts is June Thomas. Our senior producer is TJ Raphael, and Gabriel, Roth is the editorial director of slate podcasts. Check out their roster of shows at sleep dot com slash podcast. You can subscribe to hit parade wherever you get your podcasts. In addition to finding it in the sleet, culture, gabfest feet. If you're subscribing on apple podcasts please rate and reviews while you're there, it helps other listeners buying the show, thanks for listening. And I look forward to leading the hit parade back your way until then keep on marching on the one. I'm Chris me. Most men experience, at least some hair loss, by the time they're thirty five that's why they started keeps the easiest most affordable way to keep the hair you have FDA approved products used to be extremely costly. But now thanks to keeps their finally inexpensive and easy to get getting started with keeps is really easy sign of less than five minutes. And you just have to answer a few questions and snap. Some photos of your hair. A licensed physician will review your information online recommend the right treatment for you. Then it ship right to your door every three months keeps his only ten to thirty five dollars a month. Plus, now you can get your first month free. It's a great deal. Forgetting to keep your hair to receive your first month of treatment four free. Good keeps dot com slash parade. That's K E P, S dot com slash parade. That's a free month. Premanent keeps dot com slash parade. Keeps hair today. Tomorrow.

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Hit Parade: The Invisible Miracle Sledgehammer Edition

Slate's Culture Gabfest

1:25:57 hr | 1 year ago

Hit Parade: The Invisible Miracle Sledgehammer Edition

"This episode of hip parade is brought to you by plug into the present a campaign raising awareness about electric vehicles, the future of driving is here. It's easier than ever to drive electric with a variety of models to choose from more and more with ranges of over two hundred miles per charge electric vehicles can take you just about anywhere you want to go. Learn more about electric vehicles at plug into the present dot com. Before we get started. I want to let you know about slate day which is a full day of live shows and fun experiences in New York City on Saturday, June eighth. We're closing the day with a hip parade dance party where all be picking all the music. There will be great company, and food, and drink will also be provided fans of hit parade might want to come for the live edition of the culture gabfest and stay for the dance party. For more information and tickets go to slate dot com slash live. Welcome to hit parade. A podcast of pop chart history from slate magazine about the hits from coast to coast. I'm Chris Milan fee, chart analysts pop critic and writer of slates wise, the song number one series on today's show in the high stakes world of popular music bands break up all the time. You might call it an occupational hazard. And what's more solo careers and spin off projects are far from guaranteed prospect, front people as famous as Mick Jagger, Freddie Mercury, and Debbie Harry found it difficult to gain traction as standalone recording artists. But most unusual is when one group not only spawns soloists offs and super groups all of which score hits. But the original group stays intact rarer still is when that original group is actually strengthened by this side activity and scores. Bigger hits of its own rarest of all is when former members and current members of the group are competing head to head on the billboard charts. Friends, meet Genesis. While they are now largely remembered as a quintessential cynth- rock band of the nineteen eighties. The recording career of Genesis spans at least four decades, even that wouldn't be remarkable in a world where the Rolling Stones and the temptations are still recording and Torey but for chart followers. What makes Genesis unique practically singular is the sheer volume of hit making careers the band generated, and that came after nearly a full decade of recording that was largely devoid of hit singles. Maybe that was because Genesis started out with songs that were hard to confine on one side of a forty five. Fronted by art rocker Peter Gabriel. The first version of Genesis sprawling. Quirky highly conceptual was a leading group in the progressive or prog rock movement and major early. Seventies concert draw. And then after they had gone further than virtually any prog rock band had to that time. Their frontman in his own words walked right out of the machine. This should have killed Genesis. But a self effacing, drummer, named Phil Collins, improbably moved from behind the kit to the front of the stage and in a series of near accidents, not only made them more popular than they'd ever been. He stumbled into a solo career that would change the sound of pop in the eighties and beyond. Again, this would be on remarkable. If not for the fact that fills, solo career made Genesis stronger. And so did competition from former member Peter Gabriel? And seemingly almost everyone who ever touched an instrument in Genesis. Today on hit parade. We trace the roots of the Nadi family tree of Genesis, and they're improbable chart feats, including the moment when they're most cerebral. Former member decided he was a soul man. And that's where your hit parade marches today, the week, ending July twenty six nineteen Eighty-six when Billboard's hot one hundred was topped by Peter Gabriel's sledgehammer just one week after his former bandmates found themselves on top with invisible touch. This episode of hip parade is brought to you by away maker of premium suitcases for twenty dollars off a suitcase. Visit away travel dot com slash hit parade and use promo code hit parade during checkout away uses high quality materials while offering a much lower price compared to other brands choose from nine colors and four sizes aways, carry on sizes are compliant with all major US airlines, while maximizing the amount you can pack, and they are able to charge all cell phones, tablets e-readers, and anything else powered by a USB cord. There's a lifetime warranty if anything breaks away will fix or replace it for you for life and a one hundred day trial if at any point, you decide it's not for you return the suitcase for a full refund. No questions asked. Once again for twenty dollars off a suitcase visit away. Way, travel dot com slash hit parade and use promo code hit parade during checkout. That's twenty dollars off a suitcase when you visit a way travel dot com. Would you buy a t shirt for fifty dollars? If you knew it only costs seven dollars to make with ever lane. You never overpay for quality clothes, no matter your style or preference ever lanes closed. Look, better cost less and last longer, because ever lanes sells directly to you, their prices are thirty to fifty percent lower than traditional retailers ever lane only makes premium essentials using the finest materials without traditional markups. They want you to know what you're paying for and why. So they tell you their real costs and are radically transparent about every step in their process from the materials they use to the ethical factories. They work with essentials like there. Cotton crew t-shirt are exactly what they should be versatile. Simple, stylish and made from quality materials tread by ever lane is a new sneaker brand designed to last and built from the most sustainable raw materials available. Treads mission is to make the world's lowest impact sneaker, check out the leather trainers available now folks as I record this, I am wearing a pair of ever lanes, slim fit dark indigo jeans, and they are my new favorites high quality, comfortable, denim with polish and flare right now. You can check out our personalized collection at ever lane dot com slash parade. Plus, you'll get free shipping on your first order. That's ever lane dot com slash parade ever lane dot com slash parade. Before we talk about this unassuming supergroup. Let's walk through some billboard chart, trivia throughout pop history. It's generally understood that solo and side projects peak on the charts after the original group has had its day picture the solo Beatles scoring their chart topping hits only after the Fab Four had broken up. Or the solo Lionel Richie, breaking with the Commodores, and topping the charts on his own. Or Justin Timberlake, moving on after the dissolution of boy band, and sink. The fact is it's exceedingly rare for a successful side project to not only coexist with the original group, but to bring that stalwart act to new pop chart heights. In fact, in billboard chart history. If we limit our discussion to the top of the hot one hundred it's only happened three times. Let's take them in reverse chronological order going back a decade from now to two thousand nine the black eyed peas. I'll bet you didn't expect to hear about them in this episode top the charts with their electro. Hip hop jam. Boom boom, pow. Get get. What made that success for the Ps unusual was it was their first ever hot, one hundred number one, and it came a couple of years after one of their members singer and rapper. Fergie scored three solo number one. Oh. Oh, you moving back about another decade in the summer of two thousand the alt- pop group matchbox twenty scored. Their only hot one hundred number one hit with beds. Do we me? The band had never topped the charts before, but about a year earlier frontman, rob. Thomas co wrote and sang lead on Santana's number one mega smash smooth. But the granddaddy of this quirky chart feet. The man who coda fide how big a solo career could get without destroying his home base was Phil Collins in the mid nineteen eighties by the time Genesis scored their aforementioned chart-topper invisible touch Collins had already been to number one multiple times. And these were not small hits. How did this genial dude become one of the defining pop stars of his era to trace that story? We need to go back. One more decade really a decade and a half to a time when rock was more ambitious or at least more long winded. That's the return of the giant hog, we let me repeat that return of the giant hog wheat from the nineteen seventy-one album nursery crime. It wasn't the first Genesis album, the band had been together since the mid nineteen sixties when teenage schoolmates, Tony Banks, Mike Rutherford, and Peter Gabriel formed a band with two other attendees of England's Charterhouse school called garden. Wall renamed Genesis in nineteen sixty seven by their manager Jonathan king, the band recorded two albums of quirky, late sixties, art rock, then in nineteen seventy before recording their third album, the band hired to accomplished young players and up and coming Gataric named Steve Hackett. And an already busy, former child actor turned drummer from Greater London named Philip Collins, Hackett and Collins, made the band of fivesome and began to build Genesis following, as an ornate, uncompromising live. While Steve Hackett was a gifted guitarist Tony Banks, a virtuosic keyboardist Mike Rutherford a strong basis who doubled on rhythm guitar and Phil Collins, an adept drummer who sang harmonies and even took an occasional lead vocal without question the star of Genesis in its early. Seventies incarnation was lead singer and flamboyant. Frontman Peter Gabriel. Two. Two. Even fans of Peter Gabriel's whimsical, eighties, or nineties, music videos, might still be shocked to see how he performed as a member of Genesis in the seventies, Gabriel's, most conservative onstage outfit was a mask of white makeup. His hippy length hair severely party like a mad scientist. That was a blank slate upon which Gabriel while on stage would put on ever more outrageous outfits a Jesus, like crown of thorns, a Roosters cocks code a bus costume that made him look like a grotesque amoeba like alien and on the twenty three minute Genesis magnum, opus, suppers, ready, the head of a giant flower. Everything Genesis were not the only progressive rock band performing songs with elaborate titles, and absurdly verbose lyrics in an era of such prog bands as king crimson. Yes. Gentle giant and Emerson lake and Palmer, but thanks largely to Peter Gabriel's onstage antics, Genesis developed an even more devoted phantom of their live performances. Attendees knew they were in first show. I is pretend you. Tanya. This is my song. It's called downsizing with the moonlit night. None of this live fame, meant much on the radio. But Genesis scored their first unlikely hit on the British charts in nineteen seventy four the psychedelic. I know what I like in. You'll would. That year. Genesis issued their most ambitious work, the double L P concept album, the lamb lies down on Broadway. A song cycle about a Latin American New York City character named rile, its narrative lyrics and concept were largely driven by Peter Gabriel. The lamb lies down on Broadway was Genesis, I album to approach the top forty in America, and it became their most acclaimed with critics, it had all the makings of a cultural breakthrough. And that was when, in a move that stunned the rock press. Peter Gabriel announced he was leaving Genesis. Again. As far as the media of nineteen seventy five was concerned, this, spelled the end of Genesis just as they were hitting their stride to this point Gabriel was the focal point. And it was believed. The driving force of the group, the rest of the band seemed to believe this as well. Although drummer, Phil Collins had sung lead on the odd track here and there, such as the nineteen Seventy-three, deep cut more fool me. No one seriously believed, Phil Collins was capable of fronting Genesis, least of all Collins, himself, self effacing and devoted drummer Collins, enjoyed his side man status and by nineteen seventy five. He had already played behind such luminaries as Brian Eno, and John kale. At one point Collins, even tried to convince Genesis to continue as an instrumental combo and idea, they rejected, so the band started recording their next album, a trick of the tail with no permanent singer, the group placed an open add in the British music, weekly melody maker, reportedly some four hundred singers responded, and while they auditioned vocalists Collins, sang on the new album's tracks assuming his vocals, would eventually be replaced. But these temporary Phil Collins vocals became permanent unsatisfied with any of the singers auditioning for the group. Genesis wound up, giving Collins, the frontman position essentially by default Collins, all looked down upon the gig. In interviews, years later, he would call the singers role in the band as he perceived it quote, cheap about looking good and wiggling your bum unquote, but not only did Collins have a similar vocal range to Peter Gabriel making him good fit for the band's older material on stage. Collins also soon found as a singer and songwriter that he could shape the Genesis sound in subtle, more melodic direct new ways. Your own special way, the lead single of late, nineteen seventy six album wind, and weathering. Bridged the ornate, prog sound of the Peter Gabriel era with the pop friendlier hooks of Phil Collins. It also helped break the band on the radio in the US. It was the band's first hot one hundred hit peaking at number sixty two in April of nineteen seventy seven that same month wind, and weathering reached the top thirty on the billboard album chart, the first Genesis album to reach such lofty heights. But it was also the last Genesis album to feature ace guitarist Steve Hackett, having already issued solo albums as early as nineteen seventy five and frustrated at the limitations of getting his material on. Genesis albums Hackett left the band in the spring of seventy seven and embarked on a fulltime. Solo career by nineteen seventy eight issuing singles fronted by such famed vocalists as Richie havens. Ladies and. The message. In short before the seventies were even over Genesis had already spun off to solo careers. Steve Hackett s- and Peter Gabriel's obviously, the one that the press and rock fans were keeping the closest I upon was Gabriel's. But it took until nineteen seventy seven two years after he left Genesis, before Peter issued material under his own name quite literally under his own. Even Gabriel's debut album was called simply Peter Gabriel eponymous debuts are common in rock, but Gabriel ever, the iconic last wound up naming his first four LP's Peter Gabriel. And by the first track on the album, a seventies, prog rock fan could be forgiven for thinking Gabriel hadn't changed a bit since his Genesis days after all, that I track had the portentous title moribund, the Bergamo Stor, but by track to it was clear Gabriel had every intention of leaving Genesis far behind. See city light. Salisbury hill was like a press release turned into poetry. It could easily have been titled why I left Genesis with lyrics like my friends would think I was and I was feeling part of the scenery. I walked right out of the machinery the song at times, even sounded a little vindictive wrappers of a later generation might call it a beef record given shady lyrics life. I will show another me today. I don't mean a replacement, but the gentle song, ultimately sounded more wistful and self actualising than spiteful. It was also the purest pop song Gabriel had ever written. Because this catchy song was a bit of a head fake, in Gabriel's career, it did modest business on the charts on both sides of the Atlantic in England, Salisbury hill. Peaked just shy of the top ten at number thirteen in America where Gabriel had no singles chart history. It peaked far outside the top forty reaching number. Sixty eight in may nineteen seventy seven ironically, just weeks after Genesis your own special way, had peaked at number sixty two but more than four decades later, it is Salisbury hill, that has emerged as a radio staple. On US terrestrial radio Salisbury hill is the second most played song appear Gabriel's career spun more than four hundred thousand times since the nineteen nineties. Over the ports of his first two albums, again, both titled Peter Gabriel. The former Genesis front man, tried on a range of new musical. Modes gabriel. The solo artist was more accessible than Gabriel Genesis. But he was no less. Restless weather attempting, strutting rock on modern love. Hauer balladry on here comes the flood. Or nodding his head to the sound of punk and post punk on nineteen seventy eight's DIY aka do it yourself. Gabriel's Omar to the famous punk rock credo. At a time when terms like new wave only starting to come into being Gabriel was alternative before that musical movement had a name, but his former bandmates in Genesis now reduced to a trio of Mike Rutherford, Tony Banks and Phil Collins were following their version. Two point. Oh front man in ever-popular direction. Follow you follow me was the lead single from Genesis. I Alba as a trio nineteen seventy eight's appropriately titled, and then there were three it was even more romantic than your own special way, and even catchier so catchy that it was the band's first top ten hit in their homeland, and their first top forty hit in America. Casey Kasem counted down. Forty this week on eighteen forty there are fifteen foreign acts on the countdown ten of meringue Lee, and here's one of those English acts at number thirty five second week on the chart Genesis their first forty hit his follow. You follow me, the deeply romantically and melody of follow. You follow me would come to seem bitterly ironic to Phil Collins by the end of nineteen seventy eight it would be a pivotal year, but not just because his voice could finally be heard on the charts his personal upheaval, that year would unwittingly change the course of both his career, and that of his band after Genesis returned from its nineteen seventy eight tour Collins was informed by his wife. Andrea Bertarelli that she was going to file for divorce collinses workaholic and long months on the road had left her bereft caring alone for their chips. Children and she even admitted to an affair after she and the children moved out Collins, found himself by nineteen seventy nine living alone and brooding around the same time by coincidence, Collins was given a prototype of the Rowland C R, seventy eight one of the earliest programmable drum machines, and he began, experimenting with it in his mostly empty house. Collins was not even trying to write formal music mostly. He was playing with the Roland to see what it could do as it was. He was a bit skeptical of this device that purported to replace traditional drummers like him. But he quickly grew to like it's spooky digital rhythms. And the fact that the machine allowed him to try out musical ideas on his own gradually. What started out as sonic experiments began to sound like songs, and hang on. We're not ready to play that song, yet it would not be heard by the public for more than two years. But it was one of several dark, brooding songs Collins wrote on his own while Genesis was on a break. And he was home alone during this period, Collins would wind up writing a string of heartbreak songs, and they would lay bare his feelings. Very publicly. Few? For example, please don't ask was the first of these songs to see release on the following years Genesis album, and it was heartrending with lyrics, like I cry obit. I don't sleep too good. But I'm fine. And I miss my boy similarly, wounded was the track if leaving me is easy, a future Collins album, cut. But in nineteen seventy nine Collins filed away, most of these home experiments, thinking they were destined to be nothing more than cathartic musical journal entries as the nineteen eighties began, he poured himself into other projects, both anew Genesis album, and an album for an old friend, that would prove sonically even more pivotal, the Genesis album came first. The album dupe continued to ratchet up the chart profile and radio success of Genesis. The LP was the band's first number one in the UK and in the US it peaked just outside the billboard top ten in July of nineteen eighty the album split the difference between the longer prog rock tracks for which Genesis was first known and more. Concise pop songs like the lead off single, turn it on, again in the UK. Turn it on again was a top ten hit, but the bans US label Atlantic records chosen even radio friendlier track for the American market. Misunderstanding was Phil Collins, composition written during his nineteen Seventy-nine songwriting bursts, that presented his still fresh heartbreak with beach, boys. Style harmonies and ado up inspired arrangement on the hot one hundred in a year when Rockstars like Queen John Lennon and Billy Joel were reaching back to old rock and roll styles and scoring hits misunderstanding became Genesis. Biggest US hit to date peaking at number fourteen in August of nineteen eighty but Duke was not the only nineteen eighty album on which Phil Collins played a key role. Without. In the spring of nineteen eighty Peter Gabriel issued his third straight, Peter Gabriel album and his most acclaimed today. The cover featured a black and white polaroid of Gabriel's face with its chemical smeared fans came to call the self titled album knelt on the radio Gabriel led off the album, release with the cutting edge single games without frontiers. A top-five UK hit that featured backing vocals by Gabriel's friend Kate Bush singing the songs, French refrained ju song frontier, but among the album's other guests was Gabriel's. Former bandmate, Phil Collins, who during his dark nineteen Seventy-nine period, had volunteered to help with Gabriel's album, mostly to get out of the house Collins wound up playing drums on two pivotal tracks on the third. Peter gabriel. L P, one track was Biko Gabriel's eulogy for South African anti-apartheid activist Stephen Biko. Phil Collins played the heavy Brazilian drum known as the pseudo on Biko. It was the closing track on the album, and remains a standard in both Gabriel's live shows and in protest music worldwide, but the album's opening track was for Collins as a drummer, arguably even more important. Some. Intruder the sinister song that opens nineteen eighties. Peter Gabriel album changed the sound of rock and pop drumming, the heavy sound Collins and his producer, Hugh pageant, achieved on the track was a total serendipitous accident pageant had placed a talkback microphone in the room with Collins's drum kit. The mic was meant only to allow Collins to communicate with Pam back in the booth. But when Collins and pageant heard what the drums sounded like feeding back on that heavily compressed microphone, they realized they had stumbled onto something new. It came to be called the gated drum or gated reverb. It was allowed reverberate drum sound that was then clipped making it sound both sharply contained and yet massive in his memoir, not dead yet Collins wrote, quote, with hindsight. I now know that that day or two I'd spent working on Peter's third album was life changing unquote already an accomplished and indimedia drummer by the nineteen eighties Collins, with the creation of gated reverb had found his alternate signature drum sound. He also found the finishing touch for that spooky track. He'd been working on in his empty house back in nineteen seventy nine. A word or two about in the air tonight and the myths that have sprung up around this. Soul. No in real life. Phil Collins never saw someone drowning the lyrics are not a true story about him witnessing a murder, and no, he did not call out the supposed perpetrator later at a concert, contrary to urban legend in his memoir Collins claims that the spiteful lyrics reflected and then only indirectly his wounded feelings in the wake of his divorce. Again, Collins had no intention to ever release in the air tonight or any of the tracks. He had been tinkering with in his house. It was only after he played the demos for legendary record. Impresario Ahmet Ertegun, founder of Collins's, US label Atlantic records that Ertegun implored Collins virtually. Insisted that the music must come out as a solo album Ertegun, even agreed to supply Collins with resources to finish the album with backing musicians and guests taking full advantage Collins asked his label boss, if he could invite one of the top Aren V brass combos of their day. Supergroup earth wind and fire had a horn section so renowned. It had its own name the Phoenix horns, they played some of the best hooks on E W F classics, like September Collins, brought them into the studio and had them at irresistible brass to half the songs on the album. He was now calling face value. They powered the Aren be flavored song that would wind up as the album's first single. I'm missed again. It would not be the last time, Phil Collins teamed on a hit song with a member of earth, wind and fire released in the winter of nineteen Eighty-one. I missed again, which despite its Jonty beat was again, about Collins's rueful feelings about the dissolution of his marriage reached the top twenty in both the US and the UK. And what about that strange sinister song about watching a man drown? In the air tonight, was a transatlantic smash it reached number two in the UK. And in America, it hit number nineteen on the hot, one hundred and number two on Billboard's top rock tracks chart, as for the album Collins, never realized he was making face value, topped the UK album chart in February of nineteen Eighty-one and by may broke into the top ten in America peaking at number seven. It was the first US top ten album by any current, or former member of Genesis, what would Phil Collins do in the wake of this monstrous, and fully unexpected success. Recall that back in nineteen seventy five right after Peter Gabriel lead. Genesis two its most acclaimed album, the lamb lies down on Broadway. He promptly left the band to explore his own muse. Arguably, Phil Collins was now an even bigger solo star than Peter Gabriel and on his way to clips in Genesis, it would have surprised virtually no one if Collins followed in Gabriel's footsteps. But that's not what the worker, Hollick Collins chose to do before. Nineteen Eighty-one was over. He and Genesis were already back with a new album Abba, cap rather than taking away from Genesis Collins's, solo success seemed to provide rocket fuel Abba cab became the band's second straight UK number one album, and their first to break into the top ten in America matching face values peak of number seven in November, nineteen Eighty-one in other words, both on his own and with his old mates Collins scored two top ten albums in a single year. The album's title track Abba, cab was named for the common verse chorus and bridge lettering technique of pop. Songwriting. A. B. A C, A B, by the way, hold that thought because this would also not be the last time Collins would score a hit with an on Amata peak musical nonsense, word Abba cab found Collins, Tony Banks and Mike Rutherford turning their scintillating prog rock sound ever more poppy, the sonic line between Genesis and Phil Collins was starting to blur. And it would only get blurrier on the album's other big single. Collins invited back the Phoenix horns from earth, wind and fire to join Genesis on no reply at all, which gave Genesis number two hit on Billboard's rock tracks, chart and number twenty nine hit on the hot one hundred by may eighty to the ABA cab LP became Genesis first US platinum album, and it was still lodged in the US top forty their longest running LP hit today. Again, the question must be asked, what would fill Collins do now with back toback platinum solo and Genesis albums take a break. Enjoy the perks of stardom think again. Abba cab had barely slipped down the charts when Collins began recording alot I must be going his second solo album deepening, his connection to classic Aren be the album's lead. Single was a cover of the nineteen sixty six Motown. Classic by the Supremes. You can't hurry love. Reinforcing that everyone loves Motown, even when it's classics are played by thirty something white British man. You can't hurry loaf became Phil Collins's biggest hit to date in the UK. It reached number one in January nineteen eighty three one month later on the hot, one hundred it reached number ten giving Collins, the first ever US, top ten hit by any member of Genesis to be sure, Collins was still capable of brooding. The second single from Hello. I must be going. I don't care anymore reinvented. The spooky sound of the prior albums in the air tonight. But the sound of gated reverb added punch, and tempo to virtually all of Collins's material and began to infect other Popstars material as well. Collins was suddenly in demand, as not only aside man, but producer for other songs from current Popstars to longtime rock legends in the legends category. Former Led Zeppelin frontman Robert plant called in Collins to play on his nineteen eighty two solo debut album pictures at eleven. In a completely different vein. Flamboyant, new romantic pop star Adam ant brought in Collins to produce and drum onto of his nineteen Eighty-three hits strip and push in. And perhaps most memorably former opera singer on a free links that aka Freda hired Collins to produce the entirety of her nineteen eighty two album, something's going on the best selling solo album ever by any former member of the Swedish megagroup, the free album's lead single, I know there's something going on, was a top ten or top twenty hit in countries around the world, and the thundering gated drums on the single were unmistakably, the work of Phil Collins, his most potent drumming on a pop hit since in the air tonight. Phil Collins had developed a magic touch, and become a reliable hitmaker, his former bandmate Peter Gabriel with his more challenging material was always less of a commercial prospect, but even without Collins, drumming on his tracks Gabriel's material was getting more commercial, too. In nineteen eighty two Peter Gabriel attempted to release his fourth solo album with the same eponymous magazine like title as his last three Peter Gabriel but his US label Geffen records finally pushed back and insisted the album have its own title. They called it security, the American labels insistence on this more promote -able title may have had something to do with the fact that Gabriel was emerging as a music. Video star with an actual top forty. Shock the monkey was one of the earliest hits on the then new music video channel MTV, the visually striking music video was played around the clock and memorably featured two versions of Peter Gabriel one a businessman in a suit gradually, turning man, the other a ghost, like figure dressed in white with white face paint, a throwback to the Genesis Peter Gabriel of old shock the monkey also sported, the most danceable beat of any Peter Gabriel single to date and by early nineteen eighty three it wound up crossing over on a range of billboard charts from rock tracks, where it hit number one to the hot, one hundred where it made the top thirty and even billboards dance. Disco chart, where it also broke into the top thirty. Shock the monkey peaked on the hot one hundred the same week in early nineteen Eighty-three that Phil Collins broke into the top ten with his remake of you can't hurry love, but Collins still had no intention of slowing down. Phil Collins's second solo album. Hello. I must be going had barely slipped out of the top forty when he regrouped with Mike Rutherford and Tony Banks to record the next Genesis album as if reflecting the band's evermore uncluttered pop friendly direction gone with the days when they're Alba had titles like selling England by the pound or a trick of the tail the new album would simply be called Genesis released in the fall of nineteen Eighty-three, the self titled LP was in the US top ten within a month. Genesis fastest breaking album to date in the UK the album's lead single shot into the top five mama, a sinister blend of synthesized rock. And as retold you in hit parades, def Jam's addition a spooky laugh. Which was inspired by hip hop. Grandmaster flash. And Millie mill in the US mama was a top five rock hit the first of seven tracks to make Billboard's rock. Tracks chart, but mama was a bit strange for American top forty radio today. Genesis had yet to score a US top ten single on the pop charts the album's next track, however, would change. That's all was built for radio ubiquity a wistful, mid tempo love song with multiple layers of Beatles cooks. It was Genesis. Most straightforward love song since misunderstanding in nineteen eighty both Tony Banks and Mike Rutherford made key contributions, the former a classic keyboard solo on the bridge, the latter closing ATar solo, the put a button on the song. But with its open hearted therapeutic lyrics, that's all was a showcase for Phil combs when it peaked at number six in February nineteen Eighty-four, it became not only Genesis I ever top ten American hit get was also the first such hit written by Collins, his prior solo top ten hit, you can't hurry love having been a Motown cover again, this was a fairly unusual hit making strategy a so. Solo career that was not only thriving alongside aband- career, but making the original band, stronger collinses, bandmates had mixed feelings. Tony Banks would later joke in interviews, quote, he was our friend, and we wanted him to be successful, just not that successful, but banks also admitted quote fill became so big. But I think the two careers helped each other, that's all was just slipping out of the top ten in late February nineteen Eighty-four when a new solo Phil collen single debuted on the hot one hundred and this one would redefine, just how big Tony Banks bandmate could get. Just you. Trees, more than a year earlier when Phil Collins was on his first solo tour, he was approached by filmmaker Taylor hack for'de director of the nineteen eighty to hit an officer and a gentleman hack furred asked Collins, if he would be interested in writing a song for his next movie, a thriller called against all odds Collins was loath to try to write a new song while on the road, but he did tell Halford. He had another demo from his prolific nineteen seventy nine homes, according period, yet another heartbreaks, inspired by his divorce that had the working title. How can you sit? This. Hack. Furred loved rueful, impassioned demo. And he only asked Collins, if he could somehow work, the phrase against all odds into the lyric Collins, who already had the main chorus of take a look at now through one allusion to the film title into the refrains the phrase you coming back to me is against the and as per Taylor Halfords request the final single was given the title against all odds parentheses take a look at me, now it would be one of three songs on the against all odds soundtrack by current or former members of Genesis alongside tracks by Peter Gabriel and Mike Rutherford. Released as a single just a couple of weeks before the film hit movie screens. Phil Collins's against all odds was a monster hit. In fact, it went higher on the charts than the film did at the box office all the way to number one. The number one song is by an Englishman, who I started hitting on the album, chart, not as a singer, but as a drummer with the group Genesis, but now as drummer, who sings he has a solo hit that's gone to number one for a second week in a row, the most popular song. The land is the title song from the movie against all is, here's Phil Collins. This was a whole new level of fame for Phil cones against all odds not only top the hot, one hundred and was certified gold. The following winter, it would be nominated for an Oscar for best original song from a motion picture as Genesis continued to release singles from its nineteen. Eighty-three album, Collins kept working reflecting his longtime interest with ARIN be and his admiration for the band earth. Wind and fire Collins, produced the nineteen Eighty-four solo album by e w WF singer, Philip Bailey, Chinese wall and fill even duetted and played his signature thundering drums on the album's lead. Single easy, lover a number two hit on the hot one hundred. That fall Collins was also given a showcase lot on the UK famine relief charity, mega single, do they know it's Christmas. The song credited to bandaid already had too many singers, from sting, George, Michael to Boy, George to Bano, but band-aid organizer Bob Geldof left, open a spot on the record for Collins to record and capture on film, a big drum. Inference. In early nineteen eighty five as both easy lover and do they know it's Christmas were peaking on the charts. Collins learned, he would not be invited to perform his Oscar nominated hit against all odds on the Academy Awards, telecast, perhaps reflecting fills still murky public profile in America, the producers of the awards in a move now infamous in Oscar lore instead asked actress choreographer and Ryan came to record and lip sing Collins, a song while she danced on the telecast. The performance was widely panned by critics and Oscar watchers Collins himself was in the audience as an Oscar nominee. And he felt mortified for both himself and Ryan king, he was almost relieved when against all odds lost the Oscar to Stevie wonder's song from the woman in red. I just called to say, I love you the greatest irony of all the very weak in late March. Nineteen eighty-five when Phil Collins, sat squirming in the audience at the Dorothy Chandler pavilion in Los Angeles, watching his song get butchered on live TV by Oscar producers, who didn't think he was famous enough to appear on their show. He had the number one single and album in America. One more night was the first single from no jacket required. Phil Collins's third solo album and one of the biggest LP's of nineteen eighty five the lead off single took less than two months to reach number one, it, even prevented Madonna, then at the apex of her first wave of stardom from reaching number one with material girl, although Collins, led off the album with lovelorn ballad and mind a similar theme on a few of the albums deep cuts. Taken as a whole no jacket required became famous. Not so much as another chapter in Collins's tales of heartbreak as for its shiny. Yup. Fide mega-pop sound, the ultimate album of what came to be called the big eighties. A decade later author. Bret Easton Ellis would satirize both the decade and Collins in his book, American psycho. It's preening shallow yuppie killer, Patrick Bateman, before, torturing, people would wax poetic about his love for both Genesis and the solo, Phil Collins, holding up his C D copy of no jacket required. Joy, phil. A big Genesis fan ever since the release of their nineteen eighty album. For that really didn't understand any of their work to Archie to electoral and the song, he liked. Best was Collins's summer nineteen eighty five number one hits. Souto was in essence a sequel to advocate by Genesis a nonsense word used by Phil Collins to describe the rhythm of the song that became the title of the song and in this case, the name of the girl, Collins was lusting after the track was also the furthest Collins had gone in the direction of state of the art eighties are be indeed. Many at the time accused of borrowing. Synthesizer hook from prince's nineteen eighty two top twenty hit nineteen ninety nine. In interviews, Collins owned up to the Omar and he wound up with an even bigger hit than prince. Souto went to number one on the hot one hundred in July of nineteen eighty five and in the wake of his recent smash duet with Philip Bailey. It even made the top ten of Billboard's Aren beach art, one week after Sudi reached its chart peak. Phil Collins affirmed. His status at Live Aid. The blockbuster transatlantic famine relief concert organized by Bob Geldof as a follow up to the band aid single from the prior Christmas took place on July thirteenth nineteen eighty five into venues, simultaneously Wembley stadium in London, and John F. Kennedy stadium in Philadelphia. Overextending himself even more than usual Collins, not only agreed to perform his own material. He also pledged to back up several of his rockstar acquaintances in their performances and those gigs were scheduled in both the UK and the US rather than bow out of any of these performances Collins chose to play both shows performing I at Wembley in London. Then getting on the Concorde supersonic jet flying to Philadelphia and performing JFK stadium by nightfall. It was a crazy stunt that was covered by the media that day almost as much as the concert itself in London, early in the Wimbley Live Aid show, Collins backed up his friend sting. Every. We stem music of it watch. And performed a pair of songs of his own. Later that day in Philadelphia Collins played drums behind his friend, Eric Clapton performed the same two songs he had played in London. And closed. The day drumming on a heavily hyped ultimately lackluster reunion by the surviving. Members of Led Zeppelin Collins had promised his friend Robert plant. He would play even though the band had been rehearsing for Live Aid with drummer, Tony Thompson, formerly of Sheikh so that night in Philly Collins and Thomson, both drums, simultaneously behind Led Zeppelin Collins later called it one of the most harrowing performances of his own. While the separate reunion was ultimately panned by both critics and the bandit, self and some pundits grumbled. That Collins's dual city performances made a day about famine relief. More about his career all of the exposure, didn't seem to slow his momentum, no jacket required spent the rest of nineteen eighty five lodged in the top twenty and spinning off hits in the middle of the run Collins, even found time to record a standalone single. Another ballot from another Taylor hack. Furred film white nights. The Maryland Martin duet separate lives. It went to number one in November collinses third chart topper of that year alone in February nineteen Eighty-six as take me home was issued as the last single from his nearly quintupled platinum album, no jacket required. Phil Collins attended the Grammy awards in Los Angeles, where jacket was up for album of the year. Collins was gobsmacked when his album actually won the night's top prize over blockbuster. LP's by dire. Straits Whitney Houston sting, and even USA for Africa, no jacket required would eventually be certified twelve times, platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America fills, upset, Grammy win for album of the year in early eighty six kicked off the most action packed year in Genesis history. While Phil had been rampaging around the world and dominating the charts with his solo work his current and former bandmates were finding ways to keep busy. Genesis had never gone. So long between albums before it had been more than two years since their self titled nineteen Eighty-three LP, but guitarist Mike Rutherford had his own surprise success. Rutherford had issued two solo albums in the early eighties. He even sangam but he found the process, unsatisfying missing the camaraderie of a band. So in nine hundred eighty five during the long Genesis hiatus Mike, Rutherford formed, Mike and the mechanics as a kind of loose collective with instrumentalists and even vocalists shifting from song to song for its first single Rutherford, recruited journeyman singer. Paul Carrick who had sung lead on hits by ace and squeeze to Rutherford's. Happy surprise that first single silent running reached the top ten in America in the fall of nineteen eighty five. And the next Mike mechanic, single sounded completely different sung by different vocalist. Former sad cafe singer Paul young. And it did even better on the charts. All I need a miracle reached the hot one hundred's top five in June of nineteen eighty six. Meanwhile, former bandmate, Peter Gabriel was also in the process of ending his own long hiatus from recording from nineteen Eighty-three through eighty five Gabriel toward promoted his world music festival. Whoa. Mad and did soundtrack work while collecting material for his fifth LP the album would be influenced by his increasing interest in non western music. But he also built on the commercial success of nineteen eighty two's security, L, P and shock the monkey more than on any prior album. Gabriel reached out to a who's who of current musicians. From singers like Kate Bush, Laurie Anderson and Yusuf indoor to instrumentalists like Nile Rodgers Bill last well and the polices Stewart Copeland. The resulting album would be called simply so the first Peter Gabriel album, he chose to title with something other than his own name, and it would be a happy paradox more globally minded than any prior Gabriel album. And yet, more commercially potent with a slew of catchy songs, perhaps, the catchy song of all not only benefited from Gabriel's love of American arm be similar to his former bandmate, Phil Collins hit would be an even bigger hit on MTV. We talked about, Peter Gabriel's now legendary video for sledgehammer in our prior episode of hit parade about the rise of the music video. Suffice it to say the Steven Johnson directed clip the most acclaimed of MTV's first decade, featuring everything from claymation to pulsating sperm to a dancing, chicken rebooted, Gabriel's career. And it would go onto win a record number of MTV video music awards, but even before the clip debuted on MTV. The song was already catching on with US radio programmers, given its irresistible Ammash to the sound of sixties arm be, and Gabriel's cheeky, frisky thinly metaphorical lyrics about the joys of sex. So sledgehammer to began climbing the charts in the spring of eighty six alongside current singles by Phil Collins and Mike Rutherford's band, Mike and the mechanics. And that wasn't all even the quietest. Former member of Genesis was now scoring a hit. The short lived superbeet GT are came off as a fantasy league for readers of guitar world magazine. He teamed up guitarist Steve Howe formerly of the bands. Yes. And Asia, and guitarist, Steve Hackett remember him the one time Genesis guitarist who'd gone solo back in nineteen seventy seven for a band that generated only one studio album, GT are didn't do badly on the charts. Their self titled album went gold and it spawned a sizeable hit single the prog gun pop guitar nudity when the heart rules, the mind it, too debuted on the hot, one hundred in the late spring of nineteen Eighty-six within weeks of the hits by Collins, Gabriel and Mike Rutherford's band and finally that same month. There was a new single from what you might call the mothership. Somehow amid all of this recording activity, Phil Collins and might Rutherford had rejoined keyboardist, Tony Banks to write and record a new Genesis album invisible touch as its first single, the band issued the album's title track, the most shamelessly poppy pop song of its career as the summer of eighty six kicked off current. And former members of Genesis were on a billboard chart collision course by June the week that invisible touch entered the top forty at number thirty seven it was two positions behind GT ours, when the heart rules, the mind and five positions behind Peter Gabriel's sledgehammer all were on the rise. Phil Collins's own take me home. The last hit from no jacket required was still in the top thirty on it's way down from a peak of number seven, and Mike. And the mechanics all I need is a miracle was at its peak of. Number five as if all this wasn't enough, a sixth, single rising in the middle of the chart was also, a Phil Collins showcase even though his name wasn't on it Collins, had produced sang backup and played drums on Howard Jones ballad. No one is to blame. By early July. No one is to blame would peak at number four, GTRI's, only hit would reach a respectable number fourteen and the singles by the solo Collins and Mike. And the mechanics had fallen off. Mike Rutherford's group was already moving on to a new single the ultimate race for the top of the charts was between the two flagship acts Genesis and their former singer Peter Gabriel invisible touch, and sledgehammer will racing each other up the hot one hundred. Through mid June Gabriel was higher on the charts than his former bandmates when sledgehammer entered the top twenty it already became Gabriel's, I ever hit to reach that height on the American charts. But Gabriel was clearly the underdog given Phil Collins's higher profile over the last five years. As the two songs entered the top ten invisible touch. Overtook sledgehammer, the Genesis song, rising to number eight the same week Gabriel rose to number ten a fortnight later as invisible touch leapt number two sledgehammer was just outside the top five at number six one week after that invisible touch made history for Genesis becoming their first and only number one on the hot, one hundred while Gabriel hurdled four places to number two. This gave current and former Genesis members of the top two songs in America had Peter Gabriel peaked in the runner up slot, he would already have come further than he ever had on the pop charts before. And then one week later. The unprecedented actually happened. Now we're up to the new number one song in the USA. And this song is part of to chart. I is see last week, the popular English band. Nisus moved into the number one position right on -til at number two was a song by that English bands. Former lead singer and that particular situation at the top of the chart has never happened before ever. Well this week those two acts are involved in yet another chart, I because Genesis and their song invisible touch is not out of the top spot, and their former lead singer moves in the number one spot. And that's never happened before in the history of the billboard charts. The new number one song in America is sledgehammer by former lead singer of Genesis now. Solo singer. Peter gabriel. In truth Voth acts wound up winners, from their nineteen Eighty-six chart dual Peter Gabriel's sledgehammer wound up the longer-lasting hit spending about a month longer on the hot one hundred than invisible touch Gabriel's album. So would also peak higher reaching number two on the billboard album chart, while invisible touch peaked at number three Gabriel's album would go on to spawn. Two more top forty singles. His most hit packed album including the ballot. That is now his most played radio staple in your eyes. And another uptempo cut powered by an intricate. Steven Johnson video big. Meanwhile, the invisible touch album would make Genesis inescapable prior to eighty six they had only ever scored one top ten hit with nineteen Eighty-four. That's all but invisible, touch at last may Genesis aradio fixture spawning four more top five hits including the ballad throwing it all away. The turning rock track land of confusion, which, like Gabriel's hits benefited from an ornate, MTV friendly video. A poppy prog rock track that wound up in a Michelob beer commercial tonight tonight tonight. And one more Collins led lovelorn ballad in two. The Genesis chart Matic universe of nineteen Eighty-six wasn't essentially unrepeatable phenomenon while future decades, would see groups from the world of pop rock and rap spin off multiple soloists, with chart hits from the Spice Girls to the Wu Tang clan, never again with the hot, one hundred see one group spawned, so many simultaneous parallel hits this serendipitous. Genesis experiment had downsides, not least over exposure after so Gabriel receded from the spotlight for several years focusing again on soundtrack work for Martin Scorsese's film, the last temptation of Christ. And waiting until well into the nineties to even issue, a follow up album too. So the more brooding and introspective. Mike Rutherford to waited several years after his first hit packed, Mike and the mechanics album to issue, a follow up, and he scored one last smash in nineteen eighty nine with the hot one hundred topping the living years. But the man who found it most difficult to say no, who loved working and hated being idle was Phil Collins in the late eighties. He started a movie BUSTER. Recorded with more of his heroes, including legendary Motown writer Lamont dosier. And kept on topping the charts with his multi-platinum nineteen Eighty-nine follow up album, but seriously, perhaps appropriately Collin scored the last number one hit of the nineteen eighties with his lament about homelessness another day and Howard is. By the nineties. However, all of this relentless activity made Collins something of a punchline. In addition to Bret Easton Ellis's, American psycho TV shows from Saturday night. Live to south park began taking potshots at the nineteen eighties. Most ubiquitous chart dominator. Genesis would wind up recording. Only one more album with Phil Collins nineteen ninety one's we can't dance, and while the album, sold well, the hits were somewhat smaller in the era of run the rock. Collins would finally depart Genesis after the we can't dance tour banks and Rutherford recorded one last album with a different vocalist before dissolving the group in nineteen ninety eight the year after that Collins scored his last pop top forty hit and his first Oscar with the song, you'll be in my heart from the Disney animated film Harza. The twenty first century has been a much quieter and at times darker time for the members of Genesis Peter Gabriel has issued only one album of new material since two thousand. But he has toured extensively. The original five-man lineup of Genesis talked into thousand four about reforming for a tour to celebrate the anniversary of Gabriel's. Seventies swan song with the band the lamb lies down on Broadway, but they amicably chose not to pursue it instead Collins, banks and Rutherford mounted a brief but blockbuster tour in two thousand seven. When Genesis was inducted into the rock and Roll Hall of fame in twenty ten including early members Peter Gabriel and Steve Hackett Gabriel declined to attend and the band did not perform P con behave. But thank you, try. I mean that was really convincing argument. As for Phil Collins, his activity this century, and his reputation have gone through numerous cycles, younger generations of musicians, particularly in the world of ARIN b and hip hop, have covered his songs, extensively. They. Stay Papa Doc in enough on rock. Drummers from Taylor. Hawkins to Jason Bonham have cited his influence Collins himself has issued albums of big band music, Motown covers and new pop material all of which have sold modestly, but respectable. For a time in the early twenty tens Collins retired for music in part to battle alcoholism and entering his sixties. He was compelled to stop playing the drums, citing a spinal operation nerve damage and years of bone degradation. But it seems the man who managed one of the most furious bouts of recording activity in pop history. The first person in chart history to bring his solo success back to his group couldn't stay Eitel for long in twenty sixteen Collins announced the not dead yet tour named after his memoir since twenty seventeen the tour has visited Europe South and North America with dates scheduled in the United States into late twenty nineteen Collins performs the show seated on a stool, leaving the drumming to others including on recent dates. His son Nick Collins, the tour, mostly focuses on Collins's solo material though songs he recorded alone that he didn't even think were songs. But he always finds time to include hits he wrote and sang for Genesis, including their breakthrough hit follow. You follow me, which more than four decades later, sounds less like a love song now and more like a prayer. I hope you enjoyed this episode of hit parade my producer for this episode was Cameron Druce, and we had help this episode from Daniel Hewitt. The managing producer of sleep podcasts is June Thomas. Our senior producer is TJ, Rafael, and Gabriel, Roth is the editorial director of sleep podcasts checkout. Their roster of shows at sleep dot com slash podcasts. You can subscribe to hit parade wherever you get your podcasts. In addition to finding it in the sleet culture, gabfest feet if you're subscribing on apple podcasts, please rate and review, while you're there, it helps other listeners buying the show. Thanks for listening, and I look forward to leading the hit parade back your way until then keep on marching on the one. I'm Chris Melinda. Most men experience, at least some hair loss, by the time, there, thirty five that's why they started keeps the easiest most affordable way to keep the hair you have FDA approved products used to be extremely costly. But now thanks to keeps their finally inexpensive and easy to get getting started with keeps is really easy Sitex less than five minutes, and you just have to answer a few questions and snap. Some photos of your hair, a licensed, physician will review your information online, recommend the right treatment for you then ship right to your door every three months keeps his only ten to thirty five dollars a month. Plus, now you can get your first month free. It's a great deal. Forgetting to keep your hair to receive your first month treatment four free. Good keeps dot com slash parade. That's K E P, S dot com slash parade. That's a free month. Premanent keeps dot com slash parade. Keeps hair today. Tomorrow.

Zeppelin Collins Genesis Peter Gabriel Gabriel Genesis Phil Collins Mike Rutherford US Collins Tony Banks America UK Genesis Collins Steve Hackett New York City Billboard Phil England Gabriel rose Genesis
The Imbalanced History Of Rock And Roll: Peter Gabriel's So- A Collaborative Masterpiece

Rock N Roll Archaeology

49:50 min | 5 months ago

The Imbalanced History Of Rock And Roll: Peter Gabriel's So- A Collaborative Masterpiece

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So keep that in mind you go to one CB DOT COM. That's N. E. DOT COM, and they're at one. CB Life on twitter if you WANNA follow him there CBD in All Forms Liquid Gel, cavs, and they give you the choice all you have to do is hit their website one CBD dot com it's one cbd manage your pain and achieve a renewed sense of balance. Recoup. Checking in on the melons history of rock and roll. Hey Marcus how you doing man I'm doing fantastic. How about yourself? You know we've been doing a little traveling on the podcast. Can I talk you in the jumping into the imbalance time machine and gone back to the eighties with me? Totally I am totally game with going back to the eighties you want to bath England where there was a burgeoning recording seeing going on because of home recording basically, I've never been to England. So. Yes. I am all about gone to bath and I might need a bath, but we're going to start this episode of the amount history of rock and roll. Anyway we're talking about going to bath England because that is where Peter, Gabriel set up shop. When he started going Solo, he converted Asham House into his studio away from studios. He had the house right and he had that old barn that we saw in the documentary both just watch. We'll talk about that a little bit. and He created his musical universe in a converted barn with the studio that he built right there at his house in bath. So that's why we're going to bat see Peter Really it's not surprising that Peter Gabriel built a studio in a building on some property. He's totally the type of person and musician that would do something like that. And you get that vibe from him because of how he's been over the years with not only is genesis music titled Solo Albums, and each one of them conceptually awesome and very different but you can tell that he put a lot of time into. All of those records you're heading in the right direction. Bro, that's all I'm GONNA say and the way we get the head in any direction is because of our sponsors one CBD Check Amended O. E. CBD DOT, com, and by crooked Iberian, the heart of hamper online crooked eye brewery dot com but we always tell people to check him out on facebook because that's where you can find out what's going on over there. Crooked I well, folks we are definitely talking about Peter Gabriel this week on the podcast and specifically we want to focus. On one of the greatest albums of the eighties recorded at Ashkelon House with Daniel and Wa and a cast. That is amazing. We're talking about so the classic Peter Gabriel Album here on the imbalance history of rock and roll you know Ray I still remember hearing this album for the first time I gotta be honest with you. I cannot remember the first song I heard I, remember heading over to wax Trax records in Denver Colorado. Buying the album and playing it from start to finish over and over and over it's still is Mr. Man. Very end it reflected everything that Gabriel had been doing solo up to that point basically said look I'm putting it all together here, and this is the best stuff I have. Now Dan did an amazing job. We should talk for a second about the documentary you turn me onto, which is a classic albums I guess it was on access I, cut it on Prime Video And it's basically a documentary of the making the album. So I don't know man I learned so much. I. Felt like I didn't know anything when I started watching I, know the the amount of knowledge that was thrown out and just the amount of cool information that everybody's shared about the behind the scenes work and how it all flow together and how it all came together was incredible and to hear it from Daniel Anwar's perspective as well as like Tony Levin and Modern Caccia came in and spell other people. And Yeah Yeah. So some great people really spoke about their part in this masterpiece of an album it's one of those albums that's as close to perfect as it gets, and there are many of those in the rock and Roll World I. I really really am looking forward to digging in and talking about this and just all of their cool perspectives and who's on this album because I think a lot of that gets overlooked when you think about this album, people don't go into those details as much because there's a lot man that's all. A Lot look at Peter Gabriel before we get into talking about so look at where he came from Genesis of course, the early days of genesis he gets to the lamb. Feel, something, different happening, and in the documentary David Frikkie from rolling stone talks I don't always see eye to eye with him when he's on these documentaries and stuff. But the one thing that he said was absolutely true when you look at it and think about the first four solo albums are more of a continuum rather than individual concepts records. It is a continuum of something that Gabriel was working on in together they are pure genius individually they are amazing records that set a career in motion that takes us to nineteen, eighty, six and one of the. People that I actually know that was in that documentary Gary Gersh was in the middle of that he worked for Geffen records at the time they'd had them for a couple of records and they were looking forward to a new album from Peter Brian. Gabriel but they had no idea what was going on what was taking so long over there in the country and bath England right from what everybody said in the documentary the one year to make that album was the fastest album Peter Gabriel had made at that point this home recording at the barn in the. Backyard taken you know a pot of coffee and some lunch in walking across the yard with the dog and going to work it. Kind of gives you that opportunity to do it or not do it work in the middle of the night or whatever you want to do, and that became his norm out there. There's connections to this man in Philadelphia the support in love that he got on the radio in Philadelphia for those first four solo records unbelievable because it wasn't happening everywhere. So we got a different perspective here and that was before you came to. Town what was Denver thinking a Peter Gabriel going into the so record I know his earlier stuff from the self titled Albums was getting played on like k. z. y., and some of the Rock radio stations because they had that a oh, are five that not vibe but they were aor radio stations just like w Amar was. So we got to hear a bunch of the songs they went very deep on it at that time it was before so before so they d I definitely heard Biko on the radio I definitely heard Games without frontiers on the radio. That I feel are amazing in that everybody should know and I'm glad to hear that another major cities like Denver got to hear some of them on the radio, which is how we got exposed music for the most part. In. Salisbury Hill another just brilliant song. Yes we can D- were wrecked. We really could yet, but can we talk about the album so I don't WanNa talk about how many it sold them, where it charted and all that we talked about the music and who helped put it together and how and that's where the documentary really really gave us a lot to go one daniel landlord lived in that bar. Pretty. Much for a year and P. wouldn't Peter Gabriel reach out to them and said, Hey, do you wanna work on the next album with me after Lan wa did the Birdie soundtrack with them? He told him much. You're going to be here for a year Sherman I LSU and there was thought of going with a different producer but having done birdie they really felt like. They had a connection there. The other people that spoke in the documentary also spoke highly of their chemistry in the booth as well, and you heard that throughout the entire process and with the engineers to part of the discussion was the song. Sledgehammer. Which Peter Actually had written for what would be his next record he wasn't planning on it being on. So that kind of. Surprised me because you think it's the first thing. Most of US heard from the album it hit you in the head like a sledgehammer. It just had all the elements that you needed to go. Wow this is exciting stuff. Right in almost didn't make it onto one of the biggest outside of the eighties. That's my point about that shoe another one of those few who? I now, who knew moments think about it and that video is absolutely groundbreaking they changed. The video I mean what they did with the claymation and how they put it together and they talk a little bit about it in the documentary is unbelievable Peter one of the many fantastic and and just really cool things about him is that he likes to bend everything in a way that it hasn't been done before he likes to try new things and the way he. Makes a beats into his pop music and his rock and roll music on this album is fantastic and he took so many different styles and put them together to make this album. I can only imagine they were knee deep in tape on the cutting room floor because it was done with two inch tape. The funny thing is they were GonNa have sledgehammer on the next record and That turned around as soon as they started making it because there even though it was done at the end of the sessions towards the end of the sessions, they realized that they were short even in the age of CDs you know they didn't have enough really to make a two sided vinyl album. So they talk to Laurie Anderson, they bring in. This is the picture the excellent. Bird song and it's very different than a lot of the stuff on the record, but it is compatible if you think about what that song does to balance textures, add things to the album. So there's another case where it wasn't going to be on record and ended up in there because they went. Hey, what about that we need we need something we we have room for that. It was great to see Laurie talk in the documentary. I'm a huge fan of her and her music but let's talk more about the songs on so that everybody knows I mean we got hit with so many hit records off of this I. think that was the thing that surprised probably even Gabriel he had like we've discussed pretty good air support from the people who who liked him and loved his music in the radio world in April they released sledgehammer that just takes off. We just talked about it was top of the charts, top the air place drive in sales the Khulna yards. then. They come back with don't give up a beautiful song that I absolutely adore it's one of my favorites and Dan explains in the documentary. Kate. Bush just poured emotion out. New. So they quickly change gears and come out with in your eyes. You talk about you. So Indoor Remodel Kaci and all those guys having a major influence on Gabriel sound. It's right there in it's unbelievable after hearing you door and learning about him from this album. He also did a song with Neneh Cherry called seven seconds and I ended up buying that album and his beats and his music and his songwriting is really beautiful. Could. See in. Nick the. Up We should. You GotTa Watch the documentary to get the full impact of it because they show you sue and Gabriel onstage together as brothers dancing feeling the music. Doc. And there's a Lotta Nice things that he has to say in there too. But one an amazing song in your is a huge hit for Gabriel and it keeps the tide rolling with this album. Here's something I learned during the documentary as well that they did ninety six takes or versions of inure is before they were able to cut and paste them all together to make one out of them. I. Saw that and actually had a note to talk about that and since you brought it up, most people were thinking what's the big deal? Well, in those days you didn't. You know terabytes did a data storage. You had physical two inch tapes that held twenty four tracks probably then right so you take each one weighed. Five ten pounds somewhere in there and they had ninety six of the fuckers in a wall how to decide how to put it all together like a Frankenstein right again, knee deep in tape in that studio from all of the workday did and they they laughed about the fact that Peter Gabriel would sail. That's fantastic. Do it again I? Want another take we're. Getting into talk about my new because the funny thing about him getting into the project I found was his friend kept calling him and tell him mccollum back and he thought he was being punked. So we never caught him back. So eventually Gabriel's like so what's up with your friend? You know he's not returning calls so they call them together it was one of those. Unreal. He almost blew the session because he wasn't calling him back. And his feel on these tracks. Dan does a great job of describing what they were looking for what is concerned was with bringing them in Kenny do this and he just comes in and really flavors the tracks that he's on I mean Miranda played a lot of the drums. Manute Kaci brought, and then later brought to the stage for capable is pretty incredible. I was watching the documentary my son came in and he was watching parts of the with me and he kept asking who monitor was and he loved the way he spoke and he just loved his energy I don't know what it was but out of all the people in the documentary that he saw, my son was most Ron, D'Amato Josiah. So yeah, because you something about Bonnie man that Dude's amazing. But Ninety six versions of that song. And I've heard about some crazy studios stories but that's what you have. First when you have resources, Zach, you have a bar and. Store tapes and stuff that there was no dubbing like Oh let's up this this eight bars over to an because you'd lose quality that the depth of everything so that it was literally cutting and Ken Scott talks a lot about that in his book from Abbey Road Dizzy Star about the physical part of producing those days. I can only imagine it was pretty physically grueling especially when you were. Under a lot of pressure and you had a lot of tape to go through I can only imagine how physically grueling in stressful. It was holy cow. The next track they release is in early eighty seven comes out in February and we were talking a little bit about the video technology for sledgehammer they really dig into when they talk about big time and that's another groundbreaking video from this album. When MTV was really still playing a lot of videos the way that they show you how did the Stop Action and how they did. The frame by frame painting of things that were in shot how they had a direct Gabriel the stuff about the dancing chickens all that and how they pulled it all off is in the documentary we were talking about. So that's something you want to check out if you get a chance yet, it's called classic albums. I think it's on Amazon prime or access TV. So you check it out. They have some incredible albums in that series I, think they did like ten seasons of. It but there are a lot of good albums that have been put together and rock and roll. So it's a good series to check out if you WANNA learn a little bit about some of that incredible music you're listening to. It'll tell you how they got the beginning of Red Rain, which is the next single from the album comes out in summertime somewhere in there between don't give up it in your eyes and the release. Red Rain actually met Peter Gabriel it was so cool. Did. You have a conversation with him. Well, I had to look it up marcus because there was a long time ago but it was November Thirtieth Nineteen eighty-six Peter Gabriel was in town for the so tour and I was working with John Developing Mr. he was there then and I kinda got the word that I should come to the back room of the press box at. The spectrum, the Old Philadelphia, air conditioned spectrum, which is no longer there, and when I walk in the door, there's John Sitting casually chatting with Peter Gabriel and I got to spend a few minutes with them. I just found that being around him made you feel more peaceful or relaxed, and it was really nice and he was very nice. But that was an incredible night and. Just love shows we can talk about that. Maybe in the second half, we could talk more about that because I'm still digging into the singles. We're talking about a lot of records that were released a radio and you look at it one, two, three, four major chart-topping airplay records for Peter Gabriel on the so record and that's what drove the sales and made it legend. In a documentary one of the things I really enjoy and we were talking about it a little bit before we crack the Mike's when they got to the point where sledgehammer was almost done they realized that it might sound better if they put some horns on it. And they could use the fairlight I suppose but they actually went and contracting Wayne Jackson and the memphis horns and his part in there is really funny. Actually that's who's playing those horns those trademark horns on sledgehammer. It's so funny when Wayne Talks about his participation in the recording of sledgehammer and how he was told what they wanted and he's like I can do that. We can do that no problem we got it but he was like man, all these guys are so. Weird and different, and we're good at talking to people and he was really warm and friendly. But he was like I've met basically I seemed like he was saying I've met so many musicians that are so unique and so different that I've had to learn how to adapt, adapt and be able to talk to all of them and to be able to relate to all of them and he did, and if you listen to the horns the horror, they're ferocious on that album. Read. When you're a muscle shoals studio musician and you played on hundreds and hundreds of exceptional songs become hit I think you get a feel for what's going to be a hit or not? You know what else I learned in there that I did not know before. Because of Peter's affinity for Country Music Dolly Parton was actually their first choice to do the woman's part on. Don't give up I was like. I was so shocked when I saw that on the documentary as well and the story behind this inspiration for the song is just as fascinating you know those old pictures of poor Americans during the depression and stuff they're beautiful pictures that are both sad and powerful in the same way because of the emotion that they captured and it says a lot about Peter's person and about how he cares about people funny how that Song really could apply in a broad sense right now in the world her. People need to hang in there. We know you're listening from all different points on the globe and the situation is different everywhere. But our friends and family here in the US are very concerned. Don't give up we can do this right mark. We get through it in good humor you can, and if we help even just a little bit, we're glad to do that. You know what else about that song that I thought was really fascinating was Tony Levin talking about his quote unquote unconventional string dampening method using his kids diapers to get that bass sound any different things he had like the the deadened bay sound and then he would use the the. FRETLESS. Olympic. Over Tony Levin I love that Man Tony Levin Daniel Landlo-. Monte. Caccia. Favorite parts of the documentary without a doubt because Tony Eleven in his work with King, Crimson some of my favorite in that time period his work on this album is absolutely brilliant. His just one of those musicians that you should learn about when they were doing the record Peter and. Dan decided they needed some different sounds in some different fields. So Larry Klein, and this is my reference to the recording scene in bath England Larry Klein, who at the time was married to my girlfriend Joni. Mitchell was actually doing a session nearby and got word that they might be looking for somebody to do some base work. So he went on. By, to Lasko and brought his wife with him and he laid down, Alana lines on Mercy Street 'cause he also loved poet Anne. sexton. Witches who that's on was four. So that's kind of a cool way to tie together to Larry and Johnny go to the sessions. How is it that Jones? Voice is an added somewhere in there in the layers. Of all the amazing voices, the help the comprise the vocal parts of Peter Gabriel. So she could have been on their offering that a unique sound that she has no wonder why not you know that's a very good question because a good thought to wonder because having somebody like Joni Mitchell right there near studio wall, her husband's land down some slick base. Burns. Up at the house. While you're down in the born bring jody born give me a little something for red. Rain, you know Joni there's no way. Johnny was up at the House having tea when all these musicians ernest studio please she's definitely in the midst of it. All these talking about Peter Gabriel so marcus, it's making me thirsty man I know I'm parts to we definitely spoke a lot about Peter time for a beer on the imbalance history of rock and roll. You know one of the things that I appreciate is anytime I go into crooked eye brewery right there York in Montgomery in the heart of Hafbro always feel good and that includes feeling safe about where we're hanging out you know what I'm talking about Marcus I definitely what you're talking about as during the covert pandemic, it is important that people feel safe when they're going out and about very important and crooked eye has that warm safe five and they're doing everything according to the governor's directions there the they know dance what's in everyone's best interest but they're still serving Markus that's right. Take out your growl or your crowder, your sixteen ounce cans all still there all. The wonderful flavors that you love about crooked eye brewery and don't forget when you stop in to get your take out bruise wear mask absolutely and I think one of the things that Pete and Paul and Jeff and everybody and we're learning to is that it's a constantly changing landscape when it comes to what's going on. So I would urge all of you to follow crooked eye brewery on facebook and you'll find out just what's going on there today tomorrow next week and as things change, Cook it I- brewery right in the heart of hat borough Poran the cure for what ails you since two, thousand fourteen, and we thank them for their support of the podcast. Are you refresh dre I am Marcus and ready to go on part two of our classic album dig on Peter Gabriel's. So here on the PODCAST, I wanNA talk about the songs that are on here just kind of go through them a little bit and the way that they sequence them. I thought it was interesting in the documentary and I guess this was a more common practice that I was aware of what they did because they weren't sure what order to put these songs. They recorded the front and back ends last five ten seconds of each song, and then took the clips in dubbed the monkey sets in all different ways so they could hear what? It is sad going into sledgehammer in ways that didn't end up as the secrets. So they finally go through that I. Guess they must have had a bunch of cassettes by then dad over a hundred did something like one, hundred twenty or something like that how to fuck you keep them straight that's what I'm saying I. Know It's like it's like when you get demo tapes for something you know and you put the ones in the Yep consider that this one will think about and goodbye, and so you have one hundred cassettes and there's like twenty five thirty of them in the middle and there's ten over here and. Over there. Know. Put, look it was the eighties not fully digital technology. That's why the videos that we talked about in the first half of the podcast today or even more amazing when you think about it because they couldn't just l. let's put a Pastel. Watch over them. You know what? I mean. They had actually do it. They settle on this run order and it becomes iconic classic and certainly his most successful album and he seemed very happy about it. He never really cared about commercial success. He just wanted to make the music he wanted to make. So he starts with Red Rain in they're trying to get a specific sound and they can't quite get it all from what they're recording. So who did we get sewer Coppola come in? Do some hi hats But the funny thing is is at the very beginning of the record Peter Gabriel wanted no symbols. No Hi hats and Daniel. Landlo- had the talk him into that because he was like, what are you talking about? You're GONNA need it. And the thing is that's the way Gabriel had operated all his self titled out that there was no big high end. He didn't want that as far as the sound goes, and if you think about some of the sound you get on those first four solo records explains a lot. But here the beginning he's blown away Daniels, talked him into it when they do the part where they show you how all the parts flow together when they put it together on the board for you, it's an amazing part of the documentary. So you start there it's very dramatic. into the big one that almost didn't make the records lead have right. And that opening song read rain is extremely dark extremely heavy, and then it lightens up a little bit with sledgehammer but sledgehammers still definitely has a little bit of darkness to it and boy what a booty Shaker that one is I think that's one of those songs like in black that everybody knows everybody knows sledgehammer those of us who love Kate Bush I remember seeing her for the first time on Saturday night live in the seventies and gone, Oh yeah I'm GONNA to be checking in on this one and keep it up with her career. There she is doing don't give up which we talked about a bit in the early part of the podcast. It's a song of hope one of my favorite performances ever live was Peter Gabriel in the round. I believe this may have been at the new place in South Philly Marcus and it's a phone booth on stage. It can't see the band light on the the old fashioned increase phone booth any walks up and he Uses the phone as a microphone, and he played all sides of the house, the whole things turning. so He's played all sides of the house but when it starts really getting to the dramatic part, you know he he starts walking away from the phone with you wonder how long is the cord they made it to the he could stand insisting at the end of the stage leaning on it leaning over the crowd with singing. His part into the phone own like goodness before that this was always one of my favorite songs that nobody talks about much from this album after that it became a stone cold favorite song and nobody really talk much about is that voice again co written with David Rhodes who didn't really talk much about in the documentary roads and Gabriel work together for years that's a great song. It shows you the consistency of that album. and. How song after song it stays at a super high level and doesn't let up throughout the entire album. If everybody knows sledgehammer Marcus when you flip the vinyl over and you put on in your eyes, everybody loves that's on I. Don't know anyone who has ever had a bad word to say about in your is I have to agree with you on that and say anything helped keep that big a few years later but. That song is fantastic everything about it just makes you. It hits you right in the fields. Again that whole album hit you in the fields it's the unit that he put together firing on all cylinders Tony Levin Right. You've got David Rhodes Motto Kaci. You have the extra flavors of Larry. Klein Yusuf door also on backing vocals that no one talks about much. Jim Kerr from simple minds. Yeah. No. I saw that when we were doing our prep for this and I was like, Oh, my God. Simple minds holy cow. He's like a gym drive down do the vocals. Okay. I wonder how many takes he did and it's all those little things that when you add them up, you can see it in the documentary hell Limo adds up including I never heard of Ronnie Bright, but he does the real low part on in your eyes in your And that's part of what makes the song locked in your brain. That's true. Those vocal harmonies are fantastic. The way he layered all of the voices to make it flow and to make it just move through and then Richard Tee on piano the piano is beautiful. That's. All over that. You know what? What's really great is we're kind of updating the research department. So we're developing things on the fly I actually got a proactive text from the research department while recording this podcast. Yeah. What they say, Ronnie Bright the BASS vocalists that we're talking about owning your is yeah. Any of these groups ring a bell for you the coasters, the cadillacs, the Valentine's he also sang with Jackie Wilson? We didn't even ask for help and they gave us some that. Right there shows you Peter, Gabriel's knowledge of music inside and now to be able to pull from so many different various areas there really are some places on this record. We can see his movement towards wall mad and his his own explorations of world music beginning and taking commercial shape and after that. You have. Mercy Street, which is another beautiful song from the record that I don't think enough people pay attention to. It's definitely considered a deeper cut. But again, this is an album like you should do with all rock and roll albums listened to it from front to back listen to it all the way through you get a feel for for the album when you. Listen to it all the way through and the special way especially that first time you hear at four some perspective and support Marcus my brother in his position these guys went to the trouble to make one hundred cassettes to figure out what order to put these songs in to make an album. It meant something it means something and you know what I found even. If you're a spotify person, he just listened a lot of music on on stuff like that. You can get the album and listen to it in order. So do it yet don't don't hit it on shuffle the album on shuffle listen to it one through nine. All the way through gives you artistic intention this public service announcement from the imbalanced brothers here the history. Big Time Time brother, and I want to thank everybody for their support of what we've been doing on his fucked up. But somehow our getting there that song is another one. It's more like sledgehammer than the other songs on the album we talk debate about the video and stuff but beyond that, it's him exploring different sounds again, the lineup on that song alone is pretty solid and Stewart Copeland played the entire drum track on that song as. And that Dude's wicked I mean you've you've heard him in the police and his other stuff that he's done over the years including a lot of studio work in movie soundtracks as well. He is an incredible drummer fast as lightning and in that time that dude was lightning fast and he hits really well. So part of the crew on the next track, we do what we're told and also on that voice again is l Shankar. The violinists everybody goes because L. because is his full name is pretty amazing. It's lack Shimin Narayana just call him L. Shank. Easier again, a small player in a big production whose contributions and make a difference in hell, the album sale and how it feels. Who else came in for one Song Nile Rodgers he's a legend one song he came in and played on all these musicians came in and did that with Peter Gabriel so that tells you that some of these me what these musicians knew about Peter Gabriel and how much respect they have for him as a musician and for who he is in for what he does. So to be able to get these these kind of top tier players to come in and do this on a once you know just come in pop by do a song and then buggy pretty incredible and it says a lot about you as a musician. Now, Peter Gabriel I've been recording at the barn for a number of years right knew that it was their people. Knew if he was recording in the local community, right? Yes. Do you think that there was an element of Holy? Shit hear Gabriel's got going on over at the house you got to go over and see what's going on and when you get there and go. Oh Jim Kirkum on. We got a part for you. This was coming by Hey, can you L. Shankar over? Here Kate Bush, how are you love you hunt come on him you and spend an hour or two in the vocal booth things like that were going on against the backdrop of what they've been creating. It's so cool back to the seventies remember there were festivals and all kinds of stuff and bath. It is kind of like its own unique little community within the overall. British community. So let's talk a few minutes at least about the success of this record worldwide I realized I did copy down all the charts in US only hit number two but it was number one in the UK which when you're thinking about a man, that's probably the big thing for him and them a lot of the people who put the record together giving was. Happy with what was happening here they were selling multi-platinum and it had done something that they'd hoped would happen when they put Gabriel on the Geffen roster a couple albums before that, and that was him becoming an international superstar and along the way he got to be a spokesman for a lot of the causes, a musical styles that he was fond of just because of. What he had just achieved gold and platinum and countries like Spain and new. Zealand. In the Netherlands Hong Kong Germany, France and Belgium. It's sold everywhere on scale big time. So to speak that's on par with albums like back in black and rumors and some of those, and I know it didn't hit those numbers and sales but that kind of world domination on the charts. Is Pretty incredible I know that a lot of people like the measure that stuff like by sales, international sales and all that numbers. But when you look at an important album, the did something while giving us all joy great music and so if you at the same time, it's hard to top. Peter. Gabriel. So and that's why we're talking about it here on the podcast. One of the many great things that we discussed about this album is, is that it related to so many people of different musical backgrounds and that is the power of Peter Gabriel's world beats and understanding of putting them together to make the sound that he made. Well, think of it this way. Okay. Mentioned Dibella earlier, right? Right. He's older than me by bunch of years and then think of me where I was at an eighty six and then we're you were turning twenty right yet three different slices of American. Rock. And Roll, life as far as our ages go years apart and yet we all could agree that this was amazing. fucking record to the highest level ever people like John who were part of Peter's career path like what boat supporting the with airplay and interviews and all that stuff. This is validation of everything you believed about this man, his mass appeal, not only generational, but across the world. Gargantuan and this is the kind of music that is still not only relatable but relevant songs like give up or even more important. Than when they were written and the importance of that song because you can feel the pain and the suffering, and still the light at end of the tunnel make a big difference and that resonates strongly you know what else that song does and I think it's one of the most positive impacts it has. It inspires empathy for the people who were in the store. You're right and one other little Peter Gabriel factoid that I heard from that little amazing documentary is one of Peter Gabriel's biggest influences was Otis redding because like Peter Otis was a drummer before a Sam I saw that house like That shows you how much of a student of music. Peter. Gabriel is and we've mentioned him throughout this whole thing the man who pulled all this together we haven't really talked much about Daniel Lamont genius. He really is if you look at the wide variety of people that he's worked with from the new artists to the legends Willie Nelson Emmylou Harris he were to Neil Young Bob Dylan right you most famously produced the Joshua Tree and Achtung baby my two favorite youtube records. But he also produces bands like sports who are on the newer edge of progressive music. So he's an amazing character and when they made all this, he was still young. Bach and I didn't realize and you don't really get the picture from his look in the video but he's like late sixties now really is I think as you pointed out worth digging deeper into an might be a good reason for doing a producer series series of podcast within the podcast where we just focus on the producers just talking about what they've done and in getting. It on people's radar. So they get the bigger picture, which is part of what we're doing here growing this family tree I love learning about music and I love learning about the people behind the scenes because they all have interesting tales to share and they all have interesting stories about what was going on inside their heads at the time this music was being made. So to hear all that and to have them share all that hopefully as inspiration for people moving forward so that the next generation can create great music by learning from their predecessors Just learn research department is working overtime here. Threw me a note that says, Daniela wrote and performed the music for Billy Bob Thornton Movie Sling Blade. Did Not know that also in the making of so Daniel Anwar spoke openly about how red rain took the most out of how much of himself he put into the record you feel his side of this as well. So. down. Hey news coming down all. Connie down. A. Combing. Ono. see. and. An icon in his own right Peter. Gabriel. So this has been an interesting conversation and hopefully informative for our audience. If you've got some questions for US anytime about anything call your mother and then send us an email at. History G MAIL DOT COM. It's always there and it's a good way to stay touch and people are finding other ways. Thank you for your comments online on facebook lot of people starting to make comments about the five favorites and things like that. Give us feedback on stuff and that's a great way to stay in touch with this in real time or Israel's with you and me right? Yeah. No kidding. So check us out on facebook and balanced history rock and roll on twitter at imbalanced his stowed they never did give us the. Never will hear right and soon to be on instagram. So good ways to stay in touch. You can always find all the episodes wherever you get your podcasts including our website imbalance history, dot com. So one were plenty so so and we're ready to go settle you ready to go thanks to our sponsors. One CB tie. Thanks for all you do for us here at the podcast it's. CBD Dot Com and to the fellas at Crooked Iberian the ladies to it's a fun place to go and have a fresh trustee cold one brewed on the premises at crooked I in hamper we thank them both of their support as we head out the door for this episode of the of history of rock and roll. Everyone loves it but who listens to the lyrics we do? Spread the word around yes. WHO's back in town? Why is this my? Wires this on me. Now I didn't even like those guys. Story. Song podcast is the comedy podcast that reviews the lyrics of your favorite songs exploring the details only hinted at and speculating wildly about the plots to almost reckless degree and the boy has picked up the nickname patches because they're very poor and all his clothes of patches on it and he thinks well. The kids make fun of me but I get to go home and be with my loving family Anna. No, his dad all she calls them. Comes to peer pressure I don't want do. But if I don't go you patches, all the other kids are GonNa to be fun to me. The cool kids are coming shut up pagis loser any punches him in the arm go class join Dan Rachel and Michael. As we break down the lyrics, you've heard a thousand times but I've never thought about just leave it to us because we over think everything. Are. We also do a deep dive into the history of the song and the artist we explore the colorful backstory, the WHO, what, and where of the songs you can't get out of your head. Show of hands who here new that Rick Springfield was Austrailia. wikipedia articles started with you guys. You're not going to believe the story song podcast. We tell the story of the songs tell a story, find it wherever you listen to podcasts. The Story Song podcast is a member of the Pantheon podcast network.

Peter Gabriel Peter sledgehammer Marcus Tony Levin Daniel Landlo Dan Rachel US facebook Tony Levin Kate Bush Larry Klein John Sitting Gabriel sound England Ronnie Bright S. A. M. Peter Actually Joni Mitchell twitter Red Rain
3 Ways To Gain Creative Focus

The Accidental Creative

17:03 min | 2 years ago

3 Ways To Gain Creative Focus

"Today's episode of the accident created podcast is brought to you by fresh books. Joined the twenty four million people who've used fresh books. Try it free for thirty days with no catch and no credit card required. This good afresh books dot com slash accidental. Looking about the production at the beginning mix. Doug agenda at the beginning. The luggage. Dunkin hugging everyone. Welcome to the accident. Chris podcast. My name is Todd Henry, I am your host. There are four finite resources at your disposal that you spend on behalf of things that you do. And how you spend those four finite resources determine your success or failure. And this is by the way, true of individuals as well as organizations how an organization chooses to spend these four resources will ultimately determine whether or not they deliver the value. They're supposed to deliver to their clients to their stakeholders and these four finite resources are focus assets time and energy focus is about how you allocate your finite. Attention assets are your finite resources. We all have finite resources that are disposal time is obviously time. It's the currency productivity. But many of us spend our time efficiently, though, not effectively. And finally, we have energy and energy is about how we bring ourselves to our work. It's about managing our ability to re. Really bring ourselves emotionally to the labor that we do. Well, the one resource that I often hear people struggling with the most is time. We've talked about time recently on the show, and I've talked about some methods for blocking your time managing your time. But we haven't really talked a lot about focus today. Let's talk about three ways to gain creative. Focus. Maybe you feel like you're overwhelmed. Maybe you feel stuck maybe you feel like you just can't make progress on a project, and it's because you're having difficulty with your focus. And so today, I want to talk about three very simple ways that you can gain cre- the focus and gained some traction on your project before we dive animal let you know. Today's episode is brought to you by fresh books. So do you remember when you started your small business, and we have a lot of small business owners who listen to the show? It's no small feat. It's really difficult to start a small business. It takes a lot of late nights. A lot of early mornings and the occasional all nighter in the bottom line is you've been insanely busy ever says. So why not make things? A little bit easier on yourself our friends at fresh books have the solution fresh books invoicing and accounting software is designed specifically for small business owners. It's simple. It's intuitive. And it keeps you way more organized than a dusty shoebox filled with crumpled receipts, you can create and send professional looking invoices that are perfectly on brand, by the way. So one of the things I love about fresh books is that the invoices, I send are on brand they use our logo or colors, and you can make those invoices. Look like they came directly from you right directly from your company, and you can get paid up to two times faster with automated online payments. So if people say hypnotist pay you online pay with a credit card. Yeah. Absolutely. You can you can do it with fresh books. You can file expenses even quicker. You can keep them perfectly organized for tax time. And the best part is that fresh books grows, right alongside your business. So you'll always have the tools you need when you need them without ever having to learn the ins and outs of accounting. Nobody wants to do that. So fresh books has you? Covered. Join the twenty four million people who've used fresh books, you can try it free for thirty days with no catch and no credit card required. All you have to do go to fresh bookstop com slash accidental and interactional creative. And the how did you hear about a section? That's fresh books dot com slash accidental and interactional creative in the how did you hear about the section with fresh books for sponsoring this episode of the accidental crave podcast. All right. Let's talk about three ways to gain cre-, the focus. So again, when we talk about focus, we're talking about your finite attention now most people don't think that they have finite attention. They think that they can just bounce from idea to idea project to project that they can absorb all the stimulus that's their field of view without any penalty to anything else doing. And that's not true. You cannot multitask you can rapid task switch, but you cannot multitask at least not with your executive brain. Right. So how we allocate that find that? Attention becomes really really critical to our success, if we're focusing on the wrong things if we're spinning our attention in the wrong areas, then it's going to be really. Difficult for us to gain creative traction if we're spending our attention in the wrong areas. We may not have the stimulus that we need to be able to combine come up with ideas for our most important projects, we make it into creative. Ruts we've talked about the importance of having a really broad and intensive stimulus Q on past episodes. Stimulus Q is essentially a well of resources that you're drawing from to help you stay creatively. Inspired and stimulated by giving. You some dots to connect in your creative process again. That's how creativity works, right? It's about connecting dots about exploring. A Steven Johnson calls it, the adjacent possible the area around a problem playing with ideas, combining ideas and trying them against the problem that you're solving. Well, if you don't have things to play with ideas to play with dots to connect. It's going to be really difficult to explore that adjacent possible right into play around with ideas. And so that's why our attentions really important because where we put our attention often determines the scale and the scope. Hope of the stimulus that we have in our environment. But let's get to the three ways that we can gain creative focus. The first way is to redefine the problems. We're solving now creativity at the heart of it is problem solving. That's what it is a designer Salzer problem by creating a design that solves whatever it is that the customer wants or the client wants, right or the organism wants that's a form of problem solving and design is the tool that we're using to solve that problem in the same way. An engineer solves the problem. Could be a mechanical engineer solves a problem to help design a product or build something that's going to solve a problem for someone else. That is a creative act in entrepreneur solves the problem by filling a white space in the market sees the white space and creates a product that fills it and great that's an act of creativity. Marketing problem-solving, so creativity is problem solving. But the problem is that sometimes as. We're working on the project, we iterative. We we try things we experiment. We learn we fail and we often fail to then reassess the problem, and we get stuck meaning that as we're learning as we're iterating. Sometimes we have to stop step back and say, okay, are we still solving the same problem here? We've learned a lot are we still solving the same problem that we were solving last week or last month or has our understanding of the problem chains. Do we need to redefine the problem? So that we're working on it in a more meaningful way. Now, I know this may be sounds a little bit like navel-gazing rate. If we spend so much time thinking about the work are we actually going to be able to do the work. Are we going to have the resources we need to do the work? Well, I would argue yes. Because here's the thing often a poorly defined problem or an imprecisely defined problem is the very hurdle. That standing between you and breakthrough. It's because your mind is trying to wrap itself around something that's either poorly defined ill defined defined in the way that represented yesterday's knowledge. Not today's knowledge or it's defined in such a way that it's really not solving the problem that your gut is telling you you're trying to solve is your definition of the problem that you're trying to solve right now. Reflective of what you're really trying to do is it precise. Is it does it really help you allocate your attention in the right way or you trying to solve something gets to conceptual again that is Representative of yesterday's knowledge instead of today's knowledge. So the first way that encourage you to experiment around this concept of gaining cre-. The focus is to step back into redefine the problems that you're solving. So if you're working on a design project right now, and maybe a working on it for a couple of weeks. Step back and think okay, if I were to define the problem solving today after. Everything I've been through so far. How would I define that problem now taking into consideration all of the things I've learned over the last couple of weeks of working on this project? Right. Or if you're maybe launching a business, and maybe you set out to do a specific thing or specific set of things you have a problem set, you're working on step back and ask. Okay. If we were to redefine what we're doing today. How would I redefined it? Sometimes we feel stuck because our problems are poorly defined in our minds are wired to solve problems. But they need to have those problems clearly defined in order to be able to do their best work. Okay. So redefine the problem. That's the first very simple method. I encourage you to experiment with in gaining creative. Focus the second is to set some boundaries. Now. I know this sounds and creativity. Right, isn't creativity about wide open spaces and freedom and no boundaries. And let's just explore. And let's what's that phrase get outside of the box, which I hate that phrase. Okay. But let's go outside of the box was think outside the box just experiment wide open spaces. No, actually, that's not terribly helpful to you and your creative process. Orson Welles said that the absence of limitation is the enemy of art. What do you mean by that is that you need some bounding ark? For your creative process in order to focus your creative energy in the right places. If you lack those boundaries than it's often the case that your creative energy will wither and dry dry up on the plane because there's no bounding arc to channel your energy and says sometimes what we really need to do is just set some boundaries. Give you a couple of examples. There was an artist that I read about who at the very beginning of her. I think it was a it was a sheep the beginning of every new canvas that she would paint. She would put just some sort of arbitrary line on the campus. I mean, just take a brush and just and just make a line on the canvas in an arbitrary place. And it was there together started because a blank canvas is very intimidate. But a canvas with a lion on it or a canvas with some Mark on it suddenly gives you a starting point. So it was a kind of artificially imposed boundary that she would set for herself in order to help her create ardor to get started on her art instead of just staring at a blank canvas. I was watching recently a Peter Gabriel documentary about the making of the album. So it's a fascinating documentary. I think it's on Netflix. Maybe it's called classic albums or something. And they were talking about how they were working at Peter Gabriel's country like an old cow barn that have been turned into a studio, you know, and all of these people basically came to the countryside in England, and they were working on this on this project and Peter Gabriel said that he had arbitrarily decided that they would not use a hi hat or symbols on this record. And he was asking why why did you decide that? And he said, well, I just needed some creative boundaries for myself. I needed a creative challenge in order to channel my energy in the right place. And even though his producer later talked him out of that. That and said, no, we need to have high. We need to have symbols of there were other boundaries. They put in place instead of that in order to sort of channel creative energy in the right way. So if you impose some sort of boundary on yourself, right or or take away something you've been overly reliant on it. Instead push yourself to try to express yourself in different ways in new ways. If you're working on a long arc project, and you've been sort of going about it the same way try to take a different course of action today or tomorrow, try to stretch yourself use different muscles and see if that doesn't unlock a new kind of creative focus because you have to you have to engage a different part of your brain in order to do that. Right. Because it's not going to be as natural and comfortable as be like second nature to you. So try to set some sort of artificial boundary. Another thing you can do is impose an artificial deadline. You know, say I'm going to try to accomplish X by Thursday, right and set a boundary that maybe it's an artificial boundary. Nobody's telling you it has to be done by Thursday, but set an artificial boundary for yourself. So that it brings a a measure of intensity to the work right and urgency to the work, and it's a self imposed deadline, but it's something that can help you channel your focus more effectively. So that's the second practice is to set some boundaries. It could be some sort of artificial boundary that you said, it could be some sort of arbitrary deadline that you said, but some sort of creed of boundary that you set on yourself can be really helpful in channeling your focus. The third is to break. The problem down shallan you to deconstruct the problem into play with it a bit. What I mean by that is sometimes what we're trying to do is simply to conceptual and too complex for our minds to really gain traction. And so if we're dealing with a really complex problem that we're trying to solve creatively or solve for creatively. Sometimes it helps to step back into break it up into smaller problems or just to deconstruct the problem and play with it a little bit. And to see if there are different ways of putting the problem together or to see if there's a problem set instead of a problem and instead break it apart and then attack one problem in the timer. One part of the problem at a time instead of the problem as a whole, right? So. So for example, let's say that you're building a website for client. Well, it's easy. Just to say we're going to build XYZ website. Well, there are a million problems have to be solved in the midst of that, right? So build XYZ website is not a terribly helpful way to define the problem. Instead, you have to break it down into trying to reach with his website. What kind of platform we're going to use? What is the visual? What's the user interface going to be like, what are the visual elements? We're going to use. We're designing the website. You know, is there something new that hasn't been done before their way that we can maybe sort of break the wall, and sort of bring people into the experience some in some way, there are a million questions and problems that you can ask challenges you can break this down into. But if you just run with the we're building a website problem, then it's too conceptual. It doesn't really allow you to gain traction. So break it down deconstruct it and play with the problem. See if there's a new way of defining what you're trying to do. And another way to do. This is to force a metaphor onto the problem case to ask what is this like your whatever wherever I seen something like this before. And it could be a metaphor that you try to force onto the problem. So let's say you want to compare it to something you want to try to turn it into something. Even more, hyper conceptual than the problem in its current state often by doing that, it will open up new avenues of thinking about the problem when you when you try to force a metaphor onto it. It'll begin you thinking. Down a different path. And would otherwise go down if you were just trying to think about the problem itself because there's another way to break it down deconstruct play with it, really? This is all about play. It's about trying to make things more manageable by breaking them into their constituent parts, and then sort of playing around with them and combining them in new ways and seeing what happens. So those are really the three strategies encourage you to experiment with this week. If you're struggling with focus, even if you're not number one redefined the problems that you're solving make sure that you're defining the problems based on today's knowledge, not yesterday's knowledge. What are you really trying to do today? Not what did you think you were trying to do when you started the project number to set some boundaries? Right. Watch that Peter Gabriel documentaries actually, really good, right? Remember Orson Welles said that the absence of limitation is the enemy of art set some artificial boundaries for yourself helped channel your focus more effectively. And then finally break it down break the problem apart play with it deconstructed fours, a metaphor onto it. See if that opens up new ways of thinking and channeling. Your focus on the work that you're doing. All right. They I would love to hear thoughts. Your feedback. Your comments about this interacted accidental creative dot com. My Email address you can reach me there or an accidental creative dot com. Join the conversation at collective accidental creative dot com. That's what we talk about all of these episodes. Remember friends cover band, still change the world. They'll be a cover band, and you can find your voice if you wanna throw we'll see you next time. In the in the documents nugget.

Peter Gabriel Orson Welles Dunkin Todd Henry Doug Chris Netflix executive Steven Johnson engineer Representative producer England thirty days
Volunteered to get interviewed on a podcast about music that is important to me - Number 20

Broken to Brave

06:33 min | 5 months ago

Volunteered to get interviewed on a podcast about music that is important to me - Number 20

"Broken debris episode eighteen number twenty volunteered to get interviewed on a podcast about music that is important to me. Well this is significant in many ways first of all, I don't volunteer to do things secondly, it's personal and thirdly, I don't volunteer to do things. The way the show works is that someone picks a song from each decade they were alive in. There are no rules regarding how to pick your songs and no specific criteria just as long as there's one from each decade, you've been a life I was born in nineteen, sixty eight. So I started with a song from the sixties. Set out with a theme in mind when I picked my songs, it just sorta happened. The first son was sweet thing by Van Morrison I picked this one because it describes a little bit about how I feel about rob. My second son was Kooks by David Bowie for the nineteen seventies and this one was about parenting molly. I starting to see the pattern. The song I chose from the nineteen eighties was Peter Gabriel's don't give up I chose the song because it encompassed teenage years and I shared on the podcast how I survived those difficult years. My next song was tonight tonight by smashing Pumpkins for the nineteen nineties. It represents our move to Minneapolis, I describe what was so significant about that time next up was the two thousands and the song bloody mother fucking Astle by Martha Wainwright. This was about my desire to live in truth and my break from my family of origin. The last night choice was brave by Sara Barilla's for the twenty towns. I was knee deep in my list at this point and the song said it all with list in hand I skype with Jesse and Terry I shared a lot. We went deep we laughed and we even cried a little it was supposed to be an hour. It was not they had to split minded into to episodes. I'm a podcast or and I like to talk what can I say? It was very healing for me and fun and holy rap people were going to hear this. What have I done? I talked about my list too. So there's that this was the precursor to this project. This was the first time I really talked about my list in detail. I was the only number twenty when I volunteered for the podcast. But by the time I guess did I was a little further end but still very far from having the confidence I have now but much braver than when I started at number one and this was me fall on this was me flat open and honest? This was me learning how to do this? Sometimes bravery as being vulnerable. Episodes of broken debris are released every Tuesday and Thursday. Thank you so much for listening and for joining me on this journey of healing and growth. If you want to go deeper into the story and hear it from UH spouses perspective my husband, and I have a Patriot only show where we haven't extended hind the scenes discussion of every episode, which also post twice a week. Here's a sample of our latest, Patriot only companion podcast. Welcome back to the broken brave companion podcast. This episode Nineteen Number Twenty Oh. No, it's not. I pre- highlighted. Some. Last time, but you did do that Oh my God i I've been doing better. Okay. This is episode eighteen number twenty on the list volunteered to get interviewed on a podcast about music that is important to me. Okay. So personal music means so much to you does and the words especially means so much to you. This is a really personal things. This took an incredible amount of bravery because this is like opening your soul. This was a precursor to this project. Really wants like it was my. Toe in the water it was, it was a way for me to show. I can S-, play myself open and and share from the deepest parts of me and be. Okay. SPLAYING TO DO I sp- I played. All right. Just you did. It was supposed to be what was supposed to be an hour. It was not know. It was pixel two of the so I went down in history as being there one doubleheader. Okay. So I had to start to do a song from each decade I've been alive. Really. Cool. Yeah. So the nineteen sixty s born in sixty eight. So the nineteen sixties I did van Morrison sweet thing and I tell all about why that is significant to me and lyrics matter to me really do and so that song I go into our marriage I, talk all about our relationship and and that is a really really really powerful one. On the on that. It's interesting because your songs and your descriptions here. Yeah. They are about us but there are a lot of it when you really break it down there about. This journey that let us to hear exactly whereas when I was on the show, how mine were all about my relationship with you and then molly. It's really interesting. There are no rules to this other than pick a song from. Each decade you were alive. Yeah. So my first one I did was about. That was sweet thing from Van Morrison than the seventies I did Kooks by David Bowie, which is about to hear the rest of this episode and get other exclusives become a patron to broken debris at Patriotair Dot Com. You can also follow my blog at broken debris dot com for even more insights and engaging content links in the show notes broken to brave as a production of southgate media. Group hosted and written by me Martha Southgate. Thank you so much for listening. Now. Go do something brave.

Van Morrison David Bowie Martha Wainwright Martha Southgate Peter Gabriel Patriotair Dot Com southgate media Sara Barilla rob Jesse Minneapolis Terry I
The 2010s: The Globalization Of Music

All Songs Considered

33:12 min | 1 year ago

The 2010s: The Globalization Of Music

"From NPR music. It's all songs considered I'm Robyn Hilton. We're looking back at the past decade Joel Oh hey there on your show and right here in DC with me in pure music Stephen Thompson hello eighteen just last year when the K pop band bt 's had its first number one album in the US four zero had been on the rise in the US for a while and we'll talk about some of their other yeah I mean love yourself which is what that song is from really established fifteen through last year had already been huge in a lot of parts of Asia really establishes this notion of shifting epicenter I think in global music a group Black Pink really establish itself in the West as well and so allot more English speaking artists which is really exciting and I saw somewhere that like a staggering number army which is the name of its fan group and it's sort of fan service the way army internationalization not only just so porting BTF's but also in translation floor free such that the label doesn't have to do it themselves love yourself tear came the name that came out earlier jess aw the most people in the United States the we know of small groups of our members in places like Tennessee and Texas who decided yes and so they wrote these scripts for other members of army all over the country to call the radio station the at Grass Roots Organization of army is really meticulous just self and I I kinda just go around the table and talk about some of the other examples like you can't talk about pop music without talking about them food analogy but there was sort of like here's a little thing that you even thinking about like hiring artists who are representing their own backgrounds their own traditions and but people sort of embraced it unless you're a little bit of it that that and now in crisis I I do and owns wrong just get rid also features drake the Canadian Rapper Drake a really big hit for her on I mean j Galvin is one of the biggest stars in the world who is an experienced massive sometimes it's harder I think for American record labels to ignore the massive got notice yesterday Oughta they say one thing I hear common with all of this music is just insanely you just have this mash up of multiple different languages multiple different styles of on genre they're not going to the record store and looking in one section for one style of music everything right at the very beginning of this episode that actually mixes elements of acid jazz yup it's amazing to me even saying anything accessible at any time and more in the world eventually the algorithm is going to serve it up to you in the world people who sold like a hundred million records each but they did so in silos in France or wherever like if if that artists were coming up now it would bleed all over yeah this is called chicken noodle soup is Rian you're hearing English you're hearing Spanish all in one song that's already a popular mixing and Melding of Cultures and cultural influences and language that is the Dow clamber back the Va and this just came out in September there's mixing and getting to know one another I love this whole notion that for the clout shifted that power shifted that power has shifted to where bts of Old Town road like I think a lot about tick tock and how much that has sort of transformed daughter was showing me what felt like endless talks involving Taki Taki the song was singing along and I think about this omnipresence of songs that years reused in so many ways let's talk more about social media and its impact because I it's not a billion views on gun talk you all Miss Apiece Bobby on crucial to K pop and the way that K pop communicates Culture Korean present a place right and make them seem heightened and desirable to visit and so uh-huh Korean dramas that you can catch on Netflix that are subtitled and Korean music in and around grandparents new back in the treasure that nobody else knew about if I just wanted to learn about a topic I literally was there a k Tel compilation with like ten songs from around the world like what even Ktar on Norwegian Wood and how mind blowing that was for for people at the time Yeah Art British charter at the same time let's talk about streaming which is another way that people have had access something has become a phenomenon somewhere if you look at Youtube and you see not just Gangnam You suddenly see that you remember that old saying about it was at how many Elvis somewhere loves this and that's sometimes that's impetus enough to check something out and at least brought up of songs and you had to know about the music to find the CD or find a community a huge issue right now or among the army community because run bt 's is there bts's labeled the kit they're saying big hit give us the subtitles but fans and it's kind of a wrenching cycle right because then if I were big hit I'd say well no I don't t- status it like it allows the kids and people in fans who listen to it to make a anything other than the Mo the Melody Nice I like the beat yeah and we should remember so doc and so their albums discography is really told a story of them coming to age and all breath which is true in Ingong which is the Ricci Ritzy district in Seoul been particularly important for the popularity of Lat next music is certainly in the US Omar Ho in sometimes personally edible so we've talked about streaming and social media and access to lyric translations to disseminate it right because like you think about we talk a lot about bedroom make music on the cheap in your room you can make music and disseminated lots of countries in Africa that sort of skip generations technological generations and that was true for music to became very possible for underrepresented and they've become stars and putting putting music players in the hands so you would just have constant access to music no matter what provided is being a Jurassic era kind of that's how fast technological Abba cheap phone with that phone you have access to the world I know I mean I don't mean just by signing the juggernauts like bts yes well I I said this to Stephen for several years I think in south by southwest picks that they really feel there's money to be made that they're the artists there on me Babe Miguel's chase style bike on Meena they on this cut come closer i WanNa talk about where globalization has sort of gotten us and we're offers intellectual stimulation and a place to socialize with smart people like yourself or qualify using one of two hundred other supervised tests that are accepted visit we're looking at the globalization of music as one of the defining trends of the past decade an artists who could have never have found a large audience a decade ago are really popping right and that's a tricky question. I always say cultural appreciation not appropriation so well how do you us like puts Americans at the center or Americans exceptional than has these is one sort of positioning thing that I think about the other is I expect that if you we're getting educated on the context from which it comes you know I think that is a show think that as we're watching international groups or acts become Ah American are hip hop culture being appropriated I think it goes both ways let's hear an example of this is the golf gosh performed this on Saturday night live I mean I I was kind of make it sound appreciation is it wasn't really any kind of collaboration wasn't a cross cultural collaboration exactly like either thing as opposed to saying well my new stick is I'm GonNa put Chopsticks you know at for flavor exotica or or whatever but exactly board of a a major moment when artists like Peter Gabriel and Paul Simon they were there to present their art and create something new right let's them and then Beverley Cole smell the trailer fair when I hit him anytime Komo named Otto Rich Brian Indonesian Rapper and he was go both ways yeah a Russian girl recently debuted as a k pop singer in Korea take our your culture so that's been an interesting conversation because at the same time shaw media play here I mean social media can be used for so many awful things but it feels like on so on artistic impulses and sometimes that can be a bad thing and sometimes it can it can be when you misstep when you when you were appropriating other cultures in inappropriate I mean I think Nicki Menaj probably jumped off the Charnley train entries or features to kind of bring some authenticity To The music yeah I mean filming Kuti who is one of the sons of the great fellow Kuchi so next personal background cultural background and draws in literally taming to that like a life raft Because I love him so much Senorita j Galvin and Daddy Yankee have a have a hit called China from Osaka and bad bunny and tiny their song Qaida is on again tiny all right thanks everybody on your syllabus in our New York bureau ties talk too the.

NPR Robyn Hilton Stephen Thompson Peter Gabriel Osaka Beverley Cole New York Nicki Menaj Korea j Galvin Otto Rich Kuti China Kuchi Paul Simon
Mini Crush #80

Movie Crush

33:07 min | 1 year ago

Mini Crush #80

"Have you ever wondered how far people would actually go for klondike well. That's why on affairs is going undercover in a new snacks. I series you can watch on a disguise herself. How fun is is that and go undercover with a hidden camera to find out what crazy things real people would do for their favorite ice cream. You can see the full videos everyone at klondike bar dot com com slash videos and share what you do for a klondike bar using hashtag before klondike. That's hashtag the number four the letter a. and klondike and show them what you do for a bar welcome to movie crush a production of iheartradio <music>. Hey welcome to many crush. We nolan are just having good combo and then we started rolling in media say. Is that the term. I think that's literary term his when things start in the middle oh it's like in progress and we'll just jump in. What is it call in medias. Ray s might be silence might be in media ray uh-huh. I think it's a greek the drama term that refers to dropping in right in the middle of something already. I'm a big fan of that's what we just did. Wow because you literally we hit record while we were still talking and you heard a little bit of that that was that was the real shit right there. Chuck yes a quick recap. We were talking about music <hes>. I've been listening to a lot of <hes>. Here's here's my genesis deal. Ooh i just told you love the peter gabriel stuff of course but i've been really getting into the like four albums post. Peter gabriel pre invisible touch right realize unusable touches when they really leaned into the eighties. You know excess senator poppy poppy where shoulder pads dynevor array so you know what i think is really funny though i think peter gabriel phil collins are artists in an in their own right. I'm more of a peter gabriel guy. He was the weird one azure. His solo records fucking weird. Yeah collins was way more into the commercial stuff but i swear to god man after peter gabriel left the band. Phil collins is doing his best. Peter gabriel brill impression singing wise. They sound like identical. It's a little weird i do. Oh seattle idea early on specialty early on that's just my opinion uh-huh <hes> and i just dropped that i've been listening to a lot of punk music because we did a study should now on park never got into it. Now turns out. I'm really into it. So your hair's spike cute. I am <hes> getting into punk rock music at the age of forty eight in the first time ever too late never too late. <hes> you wanna break some shit araya no man i'm. I'm one of those good parks chill punk what <hes> what are some some rex for the people at home well. I've been listening to the misfits the damned yup the circle jerks and the saints out of australia and if you like there was one more there was always a student loans but i listen to more remote saturday yeah and we were saying off air. How those those are the ones that maybe elevated the form a little bit like where there's a little more melody do a little more interesting compositions whereas some of the more hardcore thrash she punk bands or not really your bag not my bag yeah. My six pistols record is great. Oh agreed you know. I think they kind of straddle that line as well whilst sort of leaning more towards the rashy rashy snotty side but they're still they're really clever songs. Yeah clever lyrics really cool arrangements. I agree good stuff. We were also talking about podcast movement. Which <hes> for you you know assume you might know about it but people outside the industry that is sort of has been <hes> weeded itself out is the best conference industry the i want once in orange county <hes> in in california several years ago and this year is under that one race right yeah this year it's in orlando that's right <hes> and we're both going uh-huh and this will come out. <hes> i think we will have already been oh. It was terrible. No there's no way of knowing i'm mainly looking forward because all of the the the h. W. crew <hes>. I'm not sure about you chuck. I don't catch you in that bunch. We're staying at the <hes> the orlando hilton and it has a lazy river. Oh you're not staying at the place where the thing it was sold out that that place was sold out <hes> everyone was like we're staying the orlando hilton because it has a lazy river any reese who does save her. <hes> stefan told you how that she's is an accident so she knows what's up and she's like lazy river hilton orlando hilton. Gotta go mad well. Maybe you can come over and laser. She can't the i'm there for an eighteen hours a while and i've got like four things scheduled pretty much going hitting hitting it running. Although tuesday night i get then look to get a drink. One hundred percent i get into as well okay. Great perfect sealed signed sealed delivered everybody. I'm yours for drink on tuesday anyway all right. Nobody we're gonna start it off with the poll truth to have done some polls in a while. We're gonna pull it up. The tarantino you know a dish because he is on everyone's mind right now yep <hes> we are going to crush that movie out which will have already come out says. I hope you guys enjoyed that episode. <music> enjoy looking forward to recording that i am to all right no and i want your your answers here to you. Got <hes> poll truth. Yeah hold on my phone's ringing. Here's your that guy. That's very clever shuck. That's my voice. How'd you make that happen. That's that's and i got emily. <hes> 'cause i wanted her to have her own ringtone to yell at me and so when she calls is just her screaming. Coming in people are always to hand. It's obnoxious. I'd like it all right here here. We go here better movie jackie brown or reservoir support dogs. Yeah i mean i'm gonna read. We're dogs. Jackie brown kicks yeah. I it got reservoir. Dogs is won in a landslide four thirty to fifty seven hundred and fifty seven people that like jackie brown jackie brown just such a classic movie uvi yeah just the way it feels so intentional and it's less stylized and i like that about it. It's it's a it's a nice. It's a good movie so oh. I would vote for reservoir dogs. I guess it was probably not a fair way to kick off the polls. That's okay but i'm sorry all right next one. No <hes> better screenplay this tough pulp fiction or true romance. One of the best scripts to me ever is true romance so this is a tough one. Yeah i mean i i would say pulp fiction by how can you i mean i put it against the biggest heavyweight for reason no i. I like true romance but i i don't really remember much about it a lot a lot about it. I remember the gary. Oldman has faked gold teeth and in andretti in an address wig yeah that happens right. You got everything here from adela joe too damned. If i know that's pretty funny i mean that was a big movie for us. Maybe it's slanted in my mind breath on the couch with the honeybear because we watch to romance forty times in college. I need to revisit it all right pulp fiction one three three ninety eight to one zero seven. I'm glad hundred seven people out there appreciate the brilliance of that script. Totally is what i'll say and that was also like he was. He was a screen writer for that and not the director correct. Yeah the great great late great r._i._p. Tony scott right tony so sad about that. What would you do for a klondike. Akbar is back in a new snacks. I series starring on a ferris watch on a disguise herself and go undercover with a hidden camera to find out what crazy things real people would do for their favorite ice cream. You can see the full videos at klondike bar dot com slash videos and i'm telling you guys my favorite klondike bar. Dr is the old standard klondike vanilla in the center. It is so delicious and i'm gonna be checking these videos out for sure you can also share what you would do for a klondike bar using the hashtag at four the number four the letter a. klondike hashtag for klondike. That's hashtag the number for the letter a klondike and show them what you do for a klondike bar and you know what i would do for bar <hes> just about anything all right poultry. If everyone poll truth kills <unk> bills should have been one movie better to movies well. He's talking about making a third movie. Of course he is and he's also like an he's saying he only wants to make ten movies movies. He's counting kill bill as one movie. He's getting a <hes> sort of a mulligan again. I think it it it it it it. It's in our best interest sure. He didn't release it. That's my whole point. That's so tarintino. I love him. Any bugs me so we wanna watch the five hour movie. No watch a tight three hour movie from that four and a half hours of material. I liked both of those movies very much. Let it too. I just remember thinking man that would have made a tight three hour movie he right most people like to film three eighteen to one forty eight. You're winning. That's not competition. It's just the pulse also just the poultry. My daughter said that the other day when emily not usually you know let her win in a stupid like race you to the door because we're parents but the other day we both just dug in in one and she went. It's not a competition. No amazing the poll truth death proof awesome loved it or give me a real movie gimme removing a lot of people get mad been say it's very much a real movie but i remember feeling a little cheated and being like this was a fun exercise in oman to a certain john ruling come on now much beyond that he's counting that as part of his vra bro he shouldn't. I don't think so either yeah. People are mad right now. Who loved that movie. I get it and they wind out but i will say no. This is pretty close us. Two hundred and twenty people said awesome loved it one hundred and eighty six gimme a real movie. It's pretty close curious about some of these comments here our <hes> our old pal ethan says i'd love clinton a bit nostalgic. Perhaps but death proof just ain't my speed. Aaron crabtree says death. The proof is so bad ass that climactic car chase is an absolute knockout in great soundtrack. I sure add some great stuff. <hes> it was a great sequence bailout <music> out when he like forces the bailout or whatever and <hes> somebody get their legs. I don't remember even it's made such little impression on me. I thought thought twice because i saw it was part of that whole grind house thing with <hes> <hes> slant at either. It was whatever the whole thing. I remember the time i thought it was really i find i think i saw it in the theaters twice but i have not given it much of a second thought since i thought oh school that they did it. They did this cool grind house thing and like i get it. I like the trailers trailers super fun. It's all like i'm glad they do that stuff. It's cool that someone's out there doing that stuff but i just didn't think like movie wise. I need story story man all right paul truth pulp fiction clearly his best or not his best certainly the high watermark watermark for him. I mean that's sort of established all of his tricks. You know like a took what he'd started in reservoir dogs and just pumped it up now to the next level and that was sort of the tone that he set where he either had to like double down on that stylistically back away from it the jackie brown wwl sometimes he did back away with jackie brown. I would argue that that's much more of like a laid back kind of like simpler picture. You know yeah yeah for sure it was i mean most of his movies are all modules to his his forebearers sure cinema forgot. I can't wait to talk about the new one. I'm holding everything back as older bacchanal plug that whole <hes> four thirty-six had clearly his best best. Three nineteen said not as best so a lot closer than i thought interesting. I wonder what they i mean. I think that's the thing too because he has you know pretty pretty pretty big <hes> catalog of films but not like a massive catalog of films so it's like enough to there's enough to see some shuffling of what your favorites yeah yeah <hes> our old old pal gale kuhn said <hes> inglorious bastards but pulp fiction the second alex glasnovic shero pals jackie brown is leagues above any any other tarantino film. He's a big jackie brown fan. It's a great flick interesting. Christian binchy says hateful aid is a very very close second for me and some people pooh pooh hateful a pretty hard. I am one of them. Yeah i just he said to me. It's a western version of the thing and now i'm kind of like thinking about that and he may be right but the thing and i didn't love eight yet tapes late though is like he did a interesting interesting thing where he something that i always appreciate what artists do where he limited himself to a space and yet insisted on shooting in this massively wide format y- <hes> <hes> thought was really interesting. It looked amazing amazing but like he used that to great effect by making this claustrophobic space kind of you really inhabited with the characters you know for sure but it had it did have that like walzer closing in effect especially because it was nineteen hours long all right most bad ass woman woman the bride or jackie brown. The bride is bad ass but pitting against pam grier. You know the differences what the bride is like a cartoon character. Yeah and jackie brown is like a real. Ask woman yeah yeah yeah so i would say jackie brown wins. Jackie brown is not win. The bride winds and i think bad ass you know. She fights jackie. Brown is like you know woman surviving. That's what i'm saying that i think it's i agree and i i r l jackie brown. John is clearly a bigger bad ass. Yes you got one hundred sixteen votes to three forty eight for the bride all right poultry with no once upon a time in hollywood. This is going to tip your hat. At least i can answer okay a new masterpiece. We've already heard the yeah but i don't wanna now now. Okay cool. Yes don't answer once upon a time in hollywood a new masterpiece good at not great and you know. I got these binary choices. People are so mad for everyone listening. That's upset. That's the only way that an admin can do opole is with two <hes> two options so weird. This is very close. <hes> one hundred seventy five seven new masterpiece one eighty said good not great. The crushers have spoken interesting. You dislike you can say say words right. You can't read my poker face. Booker base poll all truth tarantino the director one of the best ever or overall overrated a lot of people come in at both <hes> three hundred and forty one says one of the best ever one hundred forty six say overall overrated. This is really interesting. This is giving us a pretty clear clear picture of the movie crushers and how they feel about. I think you're binary. Choices are fine because they are you know they're extremes but then we see where people fall on that spectrum abbott abbott people want to be in the middle on the middle for these poll. You need all right tarantino the writer distinction no one of the best or overall overrated. <hes> three nineteen saved one of the best ever one hundred sixty five say overall overrated interesting. He's pretty great overrated but pop culture wins me over nine out of ten so i also love him. That's from david massey <hes> matt mccullough greater dialogue but i think there are better screenwriter's like paul thomas anderson and aaronow ski. I can agree with that and the charles pal for both of these said both so one of the best but also overrated. I guess it's possible <hes> it absolutely especially with tarantino because there's so much hyperbole when it comes to praising guy like that and i agree that anderson persson historians are more subtle therefore you could argue that he's better. He's got a lighter touch whereas <hes> you know tarantino sort of uses like a fucking sledgehammer yeah. He's tarintino tarintino mastic. He's gonna cutie it up exactly which i respect. I respect it too. It's his it's his thing all right final poll truth movie length too long indulgent or let demand do his thing because you know that's always my gripe depends on how if the movie's any good one one hundred sixty eight people think movies are too long indulgent and four hundred and sixty let them into his thing. They have gotten longer over time haven't they. Oh yeah they pulp fiction wasn't three that was a i feel like it was supposed to change to two and a half. I'm curious. Let me look that up here. No keep everyone entertained forgotten gosh so so here's the thing that <hes> came up. Oh actually geez to fifty eight. I really have for some reason. I thought it was like a two twenty interesting that is that is pretty long. That's the word dogs was one forty. The okay jackie brown was to forty yeah. He's always got a lot of story a lotta stuff in addition to the great story. I stand corrected all right me too. I wonder what his longest as inglorious bastards <hes>. I dunno i dunno. Maybe once upon a time was quite quite lengthy. I think that was to like two fifty yeah but that's what pulp fiction was apparently yeah. I mean maybe that's wheelhouse had no idea that pulp fiction was almost three hours boy. It really moves really does yeah. That's the one that did not feel baggy to me. No not at all the stuff not at all in glorious dead dead air. No hey man listen <hes> so i was sitting at the <hes> question our table we have youth you know what let me finish the story if you want i'll all i wanted to say is that <hes> chuck walks up and i start having conversation and every time he shows us me and the daughter telling us to save it for the for for the podcast brown and i'm like we'll zoom zoom okay all right chuck. That was pretty funny. As you said yeah 'cause we can't talk like real can't suck like real people off. Mike and mike save that too and you laugh. I did well here. We are inglorious bastards and all to thirty three. Oh my goodness so pulp fiction is on the longer end of his <hes> certainly is his his his his films interesting all right. Let's move on from that. Let's consider the secret life of the innermost nesting doll living most of her life in the dark inside the other nesting dolls. He has plenty of time to think if could sadly she has no brain however however when an inner most nesting here's the geico not only saves people money but also has been providing great service for over seventy five years. She thinks it's obvious you should switch because yes switching to geico is a no brainer pity the innermost nesting doll and her lot in life and let's move onto. Let's move onto a social studies and all social. I asked the crushers what's your favorite animal movie and what i mean by that is like the animal has to either be a main character or very very heavily feature is the revenue evident count. No at bear was cavalierly beecher actually all right sure the revenue. That's no what about mid. Somare does that account. The bear gosh all these bear bear appearances so like a homeward bound. You know whatever you get your turner's huges journalist interesting who just got a dog's life or marley and me and so doesn't necessarily have to be talking animal. The black stallion got black beauty well. There's two blackout. I didn't know that all right. We're gonna start off with shannon. Marie you think about your answer. <hes> nago not now goal with an l. Null okay you g._o. L. e. n. a. You novel now. Go yeah now. Go naga like nautical. That's right n._a. You it'd be probably like this is the conversation of heard my entire life probably all rights. She posted <hes> the emperor's new groove. I bet there will be some animated in here. In specify old pal in top in caroline guests and says homeward bound <hes> kevin herbon says jaws k. It's great point movie. Yeah so that's mine. I guess accounts even though they don't really show the shark fair yeah <hes> oh buddy jimmy mallory says turner and hooch <hes> bo hale says the animated robin manhood certainly better than robinhood prince of thieves elissa galvin says does jurassic park count for sure animals yeah right uh-huh. Maybe no or they we are lizard. People and other animals okay. They're they're theoretical animal. I thought they might have been lizard. Humans <hes> <hes> probably turn turns down. They probably didn't look like that. They probably had feathers in real life. That's right so that would have been less terrifying. I think if these creepy gangulys right bird creatures actually that would have been my hell if they'd had feathers anti-bird. You know that's about me right. Are you afraid of birds. My friends stepdad is afraid of birds birds and i always thought that was interesting so that what's the phobia called. You know probably a phobia okay. Wow did you ever bird incident yeah. Yeah i think so <hes> it it it. It's like a very far in my past hood when i was a little kid. My grandpa take near the beach and throw breadcrumbs in the seagulls with swarm from a little child's perspective. I think that probably sherifi yeah. Wow thanks graeme yeah. I am not like so scared of birds. That won't like look at them or they freaked me out but if one comes at mean walk the other way that's for sure what about this new york city pigeons they will strut up to your herath. They'll swarm as well. Yeah all right good to know explains. A lot actually doesn't explain anything <hes> all right. Let's go on that was really interesting. Karl gafni says babe good movie. It's very true. <hes> maria maurice says chicken run ashley white says the last unicorn church. That's an animal make believe but why not truly just a horse with a little hat jason rees rise top fan an old palaces the last unicorn as well jeez what is going on with that you kind of unicorn is an animal yeah man all right mythical animal sure you say it had to be a real animal. I guess you're right <hes> bonnie blondeau boy. That's a great name. I blaney bondo. That'd be fun to gray. Spooner is it <hes> homeward bound to not vote for homeward bound my loan otis from eric keith. I haven't heard of this this movie toothless how to train your dragon gosh agan yeah. Monique cassie says that those movies good people really enjoy them. I have seen them but i've heard nothing but good things. Thanks from people whose opinions i value gotcha. Rob dixon says zootopia. There's a lot of things in here are animated. Things not exactly what i was going for but i get it didn't specify ant man come on. There's an aunt in that he rides the it's got a name shraga his aunt pal that he rides around his name was it anti his main aunt your mammalian ads right all right and let's finish up here with william angus r. o. pal from from way back with hooch from turner in huge how long we been going no twenty two zero five six. Oh seven point the three that number keeps going super fast. I can't you buy we're gonna finish up in with the return of trope time. We haven't done trope time in a long time because i think we burn it out early on because i had no other material but we're getting back in our. It's been like many many many weeks. I think so we're gonna bring it back. All dust it off. We're gonna to start off with david mills. One of our pows also my cousin's name. He says i always love the dramatic pause possibly accompanied taking off the glasses looking distance and uttering my god yeah that's a good thing for scientists characters to do right right got to have those glasses yeah exactly because that means business take them all the way off and then you kinda wipe your brow or sort of like i'm doing that. We get pinched your temples. Thank god what have they done. Yeah there's <hes> the other big move. That's for sure. Trope is the <hes> the turn in the chair around backwards when he got to do some straight talking. You know like the teacher. Oh yeah listen. That's been kid with that chair around sleaze roll up. This is not teacher teacher time. This is from allen all right. Tim campbell says look a distraction. The big will always fall for the look over there. That's true. That's an old bit that i'm surprised so many movie character fall for you. Gotta read the one from my my buddy steven. You'll tools. It's in there. I don't know if you're planning on getting too but i do. You know what it is. Yeah it was about. We'll just gordon's car races <hes> yes so it's like you someone falls to to their knees like accidentally trips and traffic and they look up see the headlights accompanied by the horns. There's always a car is always a car right there. Somebody should take the piss out of that one for sure and just angle it like where you know it's coming and the guy looks up and dislike. You hear crickets. There's like a baby carriage or something like that yeah but stephen. It is an old pal from my hometown of augusta georgia. Oh cool is a newspaper writer when i was younger and in bands and he was always very kind to my bands in the music scene in augusta relax really sweet guy hi stephen very nice. He listens to this show cool. He's in the crushers. Is he really he he he he wrote that thing about that. <hes> vanessa lopez part of the squad the nasa squad. I like neces- squad when people have a gun pointed at someone but no one takes them seriously until bipolar amer back to indicate that they really mean business yeah that is funny. It's like you gotta face. What are you going to do with that click. Oh oh shit. <hes> let me see here. Rick swain says walkie talkies working perfectly fine all movie long until the climax of the film. It's right when that static comes in oh you hear bits and pieces just enough of what they're saying right yeah just enough for the audience to know that you're are missing. Something really fucking important gets up gun die good exactly dinosaurs. That's it <hes> matthew. Flynn says the accidental discovery of the master plan yeah for sure. He said good example independence day david david. You're gonna catch a cold. Dad your genius yeah i remember being. I didn't like independence day. I had so many problems with me. I was very young when it came out. I was just said it's stupid fun for me. Yeah <hes> there's this movie on netflix that i would love to crush with you sometime. Maybe not it's too stupid. It was just like a lifetime kind of like <hes> mm thriller style movie and basically it's about this woman because it gets called secret obsession and local idea <hes> spoilers. I guess if you haven't seen secretive secretive center but <hes> this woman is in an accident and ends up in the hospital with or she lost her memory and there's a man who claims to be your husband but it turns out. It's not really her husband but the funny part is his whole scheme is banking on the fact that she lost her memory which like when when does that ever happen like no one could predicted that and she discovers his master plan by noticing all of the photos in quote unquote their home. <hes> uh have been badly photo shop. She notices that there's a reflection of the back of his head whereas hairs difference. Oh photoshop fail is worth it. Reveals reveals his master plan and then it all goes downhill. It's a really fun badge schlocky piece of shit. I love it love. Watch those <hes> man when they when it's such a tenuous or you know just convenient thing. It's always like that. <hes> our old buddy adam peltier says chinese food takeout when a family is somehow down their luck or in disarray absolutely and it's always eaten out of the takeout containers. That's how that works. It's very easy. <hes> i think prop trucks keep chinese food takeout stuff just on the truck <hes> because you know what are you going to do well. They're eating chinese food. That's one of those things to maybe you're right. Maybe it is a product of like actual availability or convenience of production type stuff or maybe it's also just like we're keeping the tradition alive to. We're all we're just kind of. Were slumming at home or eating out of the containers. There's usually during a part where people are sad or something how people are like there for each other and kind of like back in each other up and it's like you know. We don't need any fancy food. We can take us right who got orange chicken. We both simultaneously. He did <hes> our old friend melinda by carlo when the really really bad guy drags out the torture or killing of the good guy of course allowing ample time to escape or to be rescued yeah and she said ed <hes> they actually made fun of this one in austin powers for sure all right drink everyone. Let's go with oh here. It is your friend stephen tools. You'll use have made that mistake before as well. Here's another one found the one that i found the one go. Did i mainly something. I do it justice. Yes you did a justice so when falls in the street. Here's a horn-blaring looks up before well. He says no one he indicated to though no one ever gets hit by that car right and it's always a near miss yeah and he says the same applies to trains very true all right. We'll finish up jennifer sawyer. She says every dying person in an abed reaches out and grabs an arm and says just make me this promise and it's usually promise you look out for flank. I promise you look out from my daughter. Make sure she gets a good education. Don't let her grow up republican. That should be an movie limit sugar intake. She has a tendency to get dehydrated. Oh man all right. I guess we're done all think so. Definitely were cancelled. Okay <hes> it's thirty twenty twenty one twenty two twenty three it for more podcast for my heart radio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Wherever you listen to your favorite shows in the montgomery county maryland courthouse there are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific murders <music> of three innocent people soon as i heard the details i knew my dad was involved right away. Instantly assumes lawrence but at the time of the murders lawrence horn was clear across the country. I'm jasmine morris from iheartradio and hit home media. This is hitman. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

jackie brown tarantino peter gabriel writer iheartradio stephen emily phil collins seattle paul thomas anderson John Chuck director Ray s nolan australia turner orlando hilton Tony scott Akbar
Return Of The Saints?

Around the Horn

09:00 min | 9 months ago

Return Of The Saints?

"Around the whole Media Cons Sarah Spain and Pablo Tori truly madly deeply in his savage garden. I love it. Pablo the first word goes to Cam Jordan. How he feels about drew brees coming back with the good as one would and also as one knows the division is now ended. The Guy named Thomas Edward Patrick Grady. Well that doesn't impress Georgia's much because he has and he asked the question that I'm GonNa ask you Tom. Brady Talk Radio Without Bill. Belichick's meaning what you say. Now will be documented for history forever. I have received once you say this and ask ten more time so I'll have like a CBS receipt. But who you what twenty drew brees? Tom Brady and what do you think what Jordan said about Brady? Who you gotta go with brees. Anyway you slice it. He's been a better quarterback recently. You could say Tom. Brady was in a more difficult situation in terms of the lack of weapons offensive line injuries last year but over the last three seasons. Tony drew brees ranks second. Qbr I in Passer Rating Brady his tenth and sixteenth. Now I do think Brady is going to be good this year because he is walking into a better situation so I actually George Go. It's not going to age well because he's GonNa look better without Balata. It has nothing to do with bill. Belichick Pablo Talk. You could answer either question here you got brees or Brady and what did you think of Jordan saying what he said about Brady questioning. Brady give me. The box. Says a team over the saints team. Give me breeze over Brady individually but I mostly here for the pettiness and the potential there in Tony because over this next season. We're going to get to quarterbacks angling for the career record and touchdown passes breezes currently number one six ahead of Brady. I just want the saints to be as petty as possible when they are trending spots both teams. They should be stopping games. Bring up weird denny's placard with like a number of using new Bob. We're not doing that. Every game alternate gay. Pablo to pick the bucks over the saints. Requires you to believe a lot of things that a forty three year old quarterback still has the skill that the offensive line can protect them. That the bucks will figure out the running back position that they haven't yet and allows some depth to that offense. They got a ton of weapons but they need to be able to establish the run too especially with braids mobility and then just learning a whole new system after two decades somewhere else. I think it's going to be a fun challenge but I'm taking breeze as a quarterback and I'm taking the saints as a team and I think it's totally fine to ask who is without Brady Brady without village. That's question all right. I'm going to reward that. Take Give you a point Sarah Spain. You're in the lead right now. We go to buy or sell by herself. Wanted to being he's working out in Houston and I'm wondering whether you're buying including a cloudy doesn't have a job right now. He told the local Fox affiliate in Houston. He's ready and all those injuries yet last year or last year and he will be ready to go is even open to returning the seahawks. So there's some question whether that's possible Meena. Maybe you could shed some light on that and by herself cloudy physician I'm buying. I'm selling the idea that he doesn't have A. I'm selling the idea that the seahawks who desperately need pass rush aren't bringing him back even though there are legitimate questions about his health his pass rush productivity has waxed and waned over the years. And I do think that contributing to why he doesn't have a big contract but aside from Seattle. Cleveland could use them. Tennessee could use them on. He doesn't have a deal yet. Pablo I am also surprised. And I know he's inconsistent. I know he is off injured. But if I'm clowney agent and standing outside of Carol's House with a flat screen. Tv over my head that just playing highlights of me against the forty niners. In we've ten touchdown I had a fumble. Recovery fumbled force. Ten disruptions of Jimmy G. I played like Godzilla in that game in the end. The seahawks to do that potentially against my biggest rival really okay. And how about you Sarah? I'm so tempted to sink. Peter Gabriel right now but I know the rules to stay away my career with. I think he absolutely should be on the seahawks. I think they could use my the issue. Here is obviously how much money he thinks he deserves right now. And maybe how much teams are worried about injuries and the durability so maybe you get an incentive laden contract where if he does the things he believes he can he gets the money he wants and if he does then the team that would be like. They've overspent that might be the best way to go at this point. Probably you said it'd be a flat screen TV. We don't need that anymore. And just hand somebody a tablet like we saw with Jordan in the last dance. And then you get the point yet but little talk you. Pablo buy or sell to is to look how clean this look number. One is New Jersey number with dolphins for guys drafted five. This was damage to us thirteen in college. Miami's thirteen Pablo five or sell that numbers matter. I know you have an interesting. Take years the please give it to me. Yeah I really care about. Jersey numbers is sell the notion that we are constantly sold Jersey numbers because it feels like the big industrial complex is around jerseys. Any of US really I mean. I don't really pay attention to them. I know Oklahoma select historic ones. But like I don't care what number you take. I don't care of two players have the same number as long as they can distinguish each other from each other on the field. Come we really. I completely agree. But here's why it's because we've run out of numbers so unless people start wearing twenty three and a half or one hundred eighty five. We already know the people we with certain numbers so it mattered to me. When Jordan was twenty. Three at PIP was three. It doesn't matter to me who my favorite player where he now because I already associated with it so we need new numbers. I guess we can do Elon. Musk's kid right. Do you like Alpha. One is objectively the best quarterback number. I'm sorry like good for you. Guys are wrong. One is definitively better than ever contracts to him by very slender. Warren Moon I remember was a good one. All right. Don't care about numbers you don't care. You have zero points in the breeze themselves into photo a lady showed up Sarah Sarahspain. Let's go short Chicago area. I think you were out the documentary on Michael. Hurt really really hearing now. Barclay worried that he will never be able to repair the relationship with Jordan. And this ripped well. There's nothing he can do about it. Sarah Start with you. Have any advice for repairing the Jordan relationship or any relationship. Really give it to US my advice. Freddie relationship is to go genuinely and honestly to someone and say how much you care about them. But he's done that and unfortunately Mike looks real petty in this one. I don't know if it can be repaired. I agree look criticizing Jordan over his and Charles right and if someone can't forgive you for being honest and transparent with them it's not a relationship. Maybe that you want anyways. This is this is news. A lot of people are going use especially in quarantine. By the way I sourced this story from Sarah Spades interview with Charles Barkley broadcast I guess android goes to Sarahspain. Good job on that and take thirty. Seconds of feeding Kelly's yesterday was go to many of us celebrated and Adam Jones decided to celebrate with some tacos. They look like almost a hamburger TACO. There was some ground beef some tomato ketchup. I guess catch up. That's what I said and people were hating Ford. It was like a Burger Taco. We make Tacos out of everything stopped. Condiment shaming people. And I don't care whether you're a TACO expert. Let people do what they do? Okay especially quarantine full on no mayo person team anti male. Guess what I'm mixed with some sauce I put it on a Taco and it was delicious and now I've completely swift own will do that to you. I'll give you a boy there. That court scene people are eating all sorts of things during Coursey. Catching-up is against nature. I say that the commission. We'll take a break right here. Twenty Three Hour Fifty Minute Break Sarah. Today's champion and that date eight bit on the Sports Center.

Tom Brady Jordan Pablo Brady Brady brees seahawks Sarah Spain Belichick Sarah Cam Jordan Pablo Tori Brady Thomas Edward Patrick Grady CBS Sarah Sarahspain Georgia Pablo Talk saints Peter Gabriel Cleveland
11 Trivia Questions on 8 Bit 80s Songs

Trivia With Budds

11:45 min | 5 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on 8 Bit 80s Songs

"Do you love. Eight bit nintendo versions of all your favorite popular songs than this episodes for you because I got eleven questions for you on eight bit eighty songs. This is trivia with buds. Burn. What it be and welcome to another episode of the Trivia with Buds podcast I'm your host Ryan Buds. Thank you for checking on my show and thank you for helping me spread the word. We have record number downloads going on right now let me read you just a couple of stats. We are overall at eight, hundred, sixty, two, thousand downloads since the show started around two, thousand seventeen, which is very exciting. I think we'll be to a million by the end of the year easy which will be very, very cool. We took the whole month of July off for me to kind of recalibrate and get back into the podcast recording mode in May. We had forty seven thousand downloads in June. We had forty one thousand downloads in July we had twenty six thousand downloads with no new episodes and now in August halfway through, we are already up to thirty three thousand downloads. So thank you. Thank you. Thank you for helping show, grow bigger and better every single day. It means the world to me if you want to interact with everyday jump on my facebook, live at seven pm Pacific and play different. Rounds at Trivia, just like you are with your friends at brewery except you don't need a DVD, you can drink as much as you want at home and you could play along with the Trivia Fund every night at seven. PM. Pacific. I hope to see there on facebook dot com slash Ryan buds or slash trivia with buds also streaming to YouTube dot com slash trivia with buds as well. These days. All right guys. Thank you for listening to this intro. Thanks for telling a friend about the show and get ready for eleven questions on eight bit music from the eighties. Here we go. All right for all of these, I'm GONNA play a portion of an eight bit version of an eighty song and you'll tell me the name of the song and the artist here comes number one. And number two. Good. Right and here comes number three. And and Song Number Four. Bit Song. Number five. Number six. Here's number seven. Bill. and. Don't forget about number eight. Couple more to go. Here's song. Nine. and. And Song. Number ten. And your bonus question for a bit music songs I want to know the name of the song who it's by and what movie it was featured in. All. Right. Those were all of your eight bit eight hundred songs I. Hope he had fun blasting back to the past with not only the. Feeling of those songs but that also digital eight bit Nintendo we Arcadi Kinda version as well. Hope your ears are ringing too much. We'll be back in just a second with the answers. We are back with the answers to eight bit eighty S. we've done this on the show I think once before this is the second time I've prepared a batch of these and you can find these on Youtube. If you search eight bit music, you'll find hundreds and hundreds of channels and pages that have these. Old School sounding songs, and they have modern songs and eighty, seventy, seventy eight and you want. So go look for it. All right here was number one. And the answer there was shocked the Monkey by Peter Gabriel shock the monkey by Peter Gabriel number one here was number two. Number two was come on. Feel the noise by quiet riot come on. Feel the noise by quiet riot and here was the third song. Just. Like Heaven by the cure just like heaven by the Cure I. Hope you are rocking out in your car or on a treadmill right now, listening to these portions of these songs again, number four. Lick it up by kiss, lick it up by kiss I don't do nearly enough kiss Trivia on the show and I'm GonNa do something about that. Very so here comes number five. Lucky star by Madonna. That's my favorite Madonna songs. You don't hear it as much as or other hits and I think it's good. Number Five lucky star here was number six again. She. Blinded me with science by Thomas Dolby. Me With science number six here was number seven. That was Rio by Duran. Duran Rio by Duran Duran and number eight. Rock with you by Michael Jackson that's actually late seventies song. So it is a little bit earlier than eighties, but I wanted to include it because I thought it sounded so Dang awesome number nine we had rush. In. Tom Sawyer there you go rush in Tom Sawyer that was number nine and number ten. Jungle Love Oh we. Think I. WanNa know you know yet number ten jungle love Morris Day and the time. And number eleven this one you needed the name of the song, the artists and the movie it's from. Song was danger zone by Kenny loggins in the movie top Gun Mary. Goose. Gang playing some almost naked volleyball. That is the last one there to if you're playing along with that one at home and that is today's episode you guys. Thank you so much for listening. Remember go search eight bit music on Youtube you'll find a bunch of different channels and you can sample tons more eight bit music I. Love Him Eight Bit Universe is one of my favorite ones if you want to go check them out and We have one more thing for you. It's called the fact of the day. The fact of the day before today is that snakes unable to close their eyes they can't blink and they must sleep with their eyes open. You know somebody like that in real life where is kind of open while they're sleeping? Isn't net creepy go tell them they're creepy. All right guys. Thank you so much for listening to the show. Thanks for telling a friend about the PODCAST and we'll see you next time for more trivia, with buds cheers. In your. Own. Mark.

Ryan Buds Youtube Duran Duran Peter Gabriel Tom Sawyer Trivia Fund facebook Duran Rio Kenny loggins Thomas Dolby Morris Day volleyball Michael Jackson Madonna Mark Old School eight bit Eight Bit Eight bit
Episode 359: Illuminati Update

Last Podcast on the Left

1:11:16 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 359: Illuminati Update

"April. Fifteenth is common in hot. Hey, but relaxed credit karma taxes here for you. Because they make doing your taxes fast, easy, and best of all free credit karma taxes, a premium online tax product that is always free for everyone for both state and federal taxes. Some free services don't include things like mortgage interest deductions property tax deductions, rental property income or self employment tax amongst other things. So you may end up paying to file your taxes with these services with credit. Karma tax free means free. Just go to credit karma dot com slash tax to get started. Filing, your federal and state taxes is one hundred percent free. Plus you get free audit defense. This means they'll set you up with pros to help guide you through the audit process for free, and they also have an accurate calculations guarantee. So get the refund you deserve in not a penny less credit card. Mm attacks has helped millions of people by offering tax violence services for free that they'd have to pay for almost anywhere else. Credit? Karma tax is the smart easy and one hundred percent free way to do your taxes. Go to credit karma dot com slash tax and file for free today. That's credit. Karma dot com slash tax credit. Karma dot com slash tax. There's no place to escape to this. Who's the loss? Talk on the left. Cannibalism started. So I'm listening to the radio, of course, Rockin all the classics. Yeah. You knocked on the classics number twenty five Sirius XM love it. I love. Peter Gabriel on ironically. Okay. Hold on a second. Listen to me. Did we did we agree to make this another grandpa podcast when we're trying to be young and hip nuts? A this is how you get back around you go all the way back around. But what is it with like Peter Gabriel and staying and I'm going to block Paul Simon in there because all the same shape? Yeah. Point what record producer is like, hey, guys, go out there and buy a bunch of African people and make them play with you. Why do they go through that period of time where there's a bunch of people were I don't know if they're even thrilled to be playing with them or not, you know, that was the diversity of the eighties music. There was what was it Live Aid or the song this aside stories, by the way, I am Ben Kissel, Henry's Nebraska, we're joined by Marcus barred. Hello when they sting that song. I forget the piece of crap that did it do they know it's Christmas, and George Michael, I think no it was it was I always tobacco was in charge of it. I wanted to ask at orange of live eight known in charge of do. They know it's Christmas. It was another guy who was a scam artist. He had like blond hair is a total D bag. But I wanted to ask them I just wanted to shout or responsible. Do you know they're Muslim because they don't have to celebrate Christmas. You gain more. Do they know it's Christmas? Do they care? I don't think. So I never expected George Michael Debbie like, Elon Musk. I don't think he's a genius in design is right. He go. He's got a beautiful apple bottom. And he knows how to pump out the songs and now he's dead Kissel. How I actually feel horrible. I love George Michael big fan. And there was one guy who is able to actually incorporate the African influence incorrectly. That would be David Byrne David nailed it because actually dance to it. Starbucks music at all turn. Happens with that. All of the good stuff out of the culture. And then they just add marimba as we learn with Hollywood gets woke the green book wins honor. So it's almost like they they missed the Mark every time all I know is that there is a man in my neighborhood who keeps blasting Peter Gabriel from his car loud enough for me to clearly hear it in my apartment every two to three day, God, Peter Gabriel does your neighbor because you know, Peter Gabriel. He's like that dude who I told that story about him. This is a good tune abide playing. Missiles, very hill. Sing this. It's the same. Peter Gabriel song and the only plays at thirty to forty seconds at a time. But it is the loudest car stereo that I've ever heard in my life, and he just drives around the block. I don't know. I just know it's Peter Gabriel honest to do the. Phones of who owns he. It's called whole I legitimately think. He's just trying to get a girl back in your apartment building and goes out there and he's doing the what's his name John cusak. John cusak. And now he is not listening. No, no. It doesn't work the same. It doesn't have the same payload that he'd used to have an eighties and the nineties will I have to ask Carolina looking out the window sort of beginning to cry drives by perhaps as an extra partner of hers English along to him. I wish he was my fiance's. You're talking to yourself. I'm trying to right in here. He's two blocks over for some. But that's how loud it is very good. I can't I can't judge. I can't judge him too much. When I was in college. I had an REM tape automatic for the people stuck in my yellow geo metro tape play. Now, we know. Yes. All of my neighbors. I got called a hard f- word white regularly. And then it would get out of my car. And unlike the Simpsons interpretation of what big guys act like when they get out of a yellow geo metro, I wasn't nice. No, I imagine after you spend old days, slinging Jimmy Johns. Oh, yeah. It's covered in schlitz unfolding yourself. Dr. I would I would have my little one. Have you drink then drive that? No, I took my Jimmy John's delivery very seriously. We were fast. We were the quickest delivery in town. I was very good at it. And I got paid a lot of times in marijuana. And I would tell them I need money for rent. All right, everyone. We got a couple of fun little stories here. What's going on buddy? Saying you can't just give your landlord pile of weed and just be like like a native American deal here. Like, let's go. Let's work something out. Let's barter. You hate my body. You love. We'd no, no, my landlord. He particularly liked money. So very cute Asian couple as a matter of fats, Pete. He was a very nice, man. I'm alright. Well, as you know, he really wants weekend, as you know, we will be going to the beautiful other side of the world muster alia. So the first story I want to talk about tonight or today or this morning, whatever you're listening to this scaring your family Kissel. No, I could never scare. Puff and puff. And actually draws blood. Every time he bites me. Yep. Okay. So this is a funny little store. The headline is court appeal blow in one point eight million dollar fart bullying case as men vows to take fight to the high court. A Melbourne engineer who claims the colleague repeatedly farted near him has vowed to go to the high court after losing his bully in case on appeal, David Hingst. He's fifty six years old. He saw one point eight million bucks in a suit against his former employer, obstruction engineering. He wanted what forty million bucks for farts? Well, this dude his ex colleague demand who was supposedly the farther has them was Greg short. And the engineer claims this is David Hanks, he claims flatulence was a form of bullying her short. And then he goes on to say and Mr. ship, and Mr. short was a cereal fodder. Yeah. If. You getting crop dusted. Every five minutes, I would say that's a form of bullying. I don't know. If it's worth one point eight million got a point you hope this sixty bucks. Okay. I'm on his he owes you a lunch or week. If even third in your in your cubicle because you'll honestly you can move number one you can move or you number two. You know, you can do you kick them into nuts? Be like get away from me. And you find you dirty boy, your cereal, Marcus. Okay. I this is my thing. And I don't know if this is going to be a controversial this is construction workers. Now. This isn't a cubicle. This isn't what. Mcdonald's isn't a restaurant. This workers these are constructed. So I'm just going to say, I don't know if this is controversial. But it's. Construction workers far net. Mas Nayyar they're bending over there, working hard. You tend to be an outdoor space. They eat a lot of heavy foods they have to because they got to build heavy buildings. This isn't just on the site. You know, further further reading of the story says this guy that's got the suit he worked in a small windowless office because you have office workers when it comes construction, and this guy this boss would come in to his small windows office far behind him and walk away. And he'd do it five or six times a day. All right here, we go. This is a breakdown from David Hanks to his picture leaving the Australian courthouse covering his face in shame. He's leaving. He's literally going like this covering this. Mason, no one could see it. I'm sorry. I'm acting. You know, you can't see it. It's a podcast. Hang sued the firm for bullying in two thousand seventeen accusing supervisor Greg short whom Hanks referred to as Mr. stinky. Of being a serial fodder who regularly thrusted his bum. And this is a quote from Hengst all will be seating. With while. I finds to the wolf I mean, he would call them in the room, which was when head new windows need thought behind me and he away. He would do this five six times. And would sled the engineer to spray deodorant at his boss. The recurrent gas passing Hanks claim was a part of a conspiracy to end his employment and cause him quote unquote, survey eth- stress. Bloodlines other by fellow employees because at resist bullying phone calls. What we have here. It's got a serial mom or something. But what we have here is a company culture, and this company culture was a far culture, for example, they used to do within called forward offs. This is in the article. So Mr. short, he brought it in another employed in Phil Hamilton, and they would do a thing. This is according to Mr. he said this. He said the two would actually do a fart off you come over to him and drop your guts. And then when he went over to you, and then he would go over to you and drop his guts, which is I guess how Australia and say fart. So it was I mean, I don't know it just seems like when you're applying for the job you just have to be like this is a far job a far zone company culture reporter. I mean, you rent a podcast network. It would be like if someone got offended for us for talking too loud or something like this. The podcast network. We talk now the they were I think they specifically used the farts as a way to drive this man out of business if it's of the hours chew on the side of the farther. No, we'll I I am channeling my little Jeremy Piven from PC you like, but no. Honestly, this also in some ways nothing he's asking for it. But he said no loan in that office. You know, constantly complaining about the farts. When you arrived, I'm certain again, I'm with Gisele all that interview day. There was probably at least one guy walked in the room and went. As everyone and everyone was as I got all. Doing about it all fucking. Hi. And Hanks's like, oh, I hope assault like that every day. And they're like, nah, just on Wednesdays. And he hasn't like oh corporate himself in there. I mean, you got to catch up with the group. Well, anyway, the judges patients and four Barnes and four barons are evidence in this case. So the judge took a lot of time in in saying that this is not gonna work out for this, dude. His one point eight million dollar claim included compensation for injuries and for lost earnings having previously earned his salary of one hundred thousand dollars for his design and engineering work. So he was the brains of the operation and the beef of the operation was just like the big old boys who just came in and farted. Well, honestly, he's probably trying to do some quite difficult calculations to make sure buildings don't fall down. Yeah. Design, an engineering, Hugh is know what this is is that this is the jocks coming in barn all over the bucket near sometimes Jackson funny. Dickhead with time. Jocks are funny. Sometimes am my a we offer. Our it's our response really supposed to be like, 'i stand with the victim. To make sure that his rights are heard his story is heard. It's ideal understand. I I am. I am just dying. This funny. I don't to is world animals. Yeah. And there's an animal kingdom. And so you just must have are you arguing dominance just saying there as a more intense show of dominance and a posture of dominance going into your tiny windowless office at farting in it. And leaving. It really is. It's it is the pinnacle of a male dominance in a construction workplace. Anyway, we'll at least you're not because you know, what will be our true show, dominance pin them down and sticking things up as s. Do it. But that's what happened to me. And it's not good. Henry got. Well, I got farted on all the time. You got forwarded on all the time. Yeah. So this is the person. Yeah. I was wondering why Marcus was coming at us so hard to get farted on all the time. What's your story? My brothers. Lisa. Hold me down bar on me constantly. Well, that's what brothers do. And also the kids at school would fart all the time as well. Zoa kinds of Barton everywhere. Everyone's just going around like, oh, Marcus 'cause low far Magneti all its markets. Just love to get started on deadening. It's not fun. Honestly. I know. Your abuse. I'm sorry far on all the time. We all knew that kid that got farted on all the time. I just didn't know it was best friends with them. Yeah. Yeah. Hey, the little one always gets farted on small child. Okay. Well, mentally strong. You've come. You're doing great. Yeah. That is true that has hack educates. The pack can educate it can motivate because look your small business owner, but we're a lowered by fucking fart, spike. But we're only like eleven kids in your class. Yeah. And they all just fart on. There was like a whole, but not all of them would fart on me. But you know, all the entire elementary school. You know, each other, you know, every kid there's like fifty kids in the whole elementary school. So maybe seventy who would just walked by and crop dust. Yeah. Just far. There's just farts is does that have anything to do with you being Marcus sports? Well, that was definitely nickname. Yeah. Wow. Arts four, we learned at the time because the way you incorporate it's like why when people used to make fun of my weight, and then I just incorporated into my quote unquote act with kids, and then you just you make goo- on. They laugh with you. And then that's how you fix it. Where I were like next one doing in my mouth and like. Not farting on, you know, my actually my older, brother. I'm not sure if he would want me saying this. But it's fine. His name is actually Barthelme his name is actually Berthiamue. And so, of course, it was Bart for short anyway, Bartha fart. Yeah. And it traumatized him. He didn't go by Bart. The far. Yeah. They called him Bartha fart and it traumatized him so much switched to his middle America Eric ever since. I was nine years old. So I understand Bart is hard name. Yeah. I know. It's biblical. My parents did not think it out at all Bartholomew, Christopher and Benjamin all tribes of Israel. I think I I can't keep up. Oh, yeah. Get Marcus can be hard to you got mucus. That's that's just right off the fucking tab is far. Yeah. Oh, you got it hard. It's all the the picture is being painted. Now. Of course, I was a huge giant. And so that did not help overweight. So how about you choice? I was just chase down the street and called free Willie. I didn't have the funny name who. Oh, funny. Name. I was just chased down the street. I was just. Literally just beaten up and call fat kid, and hey, you're not at least you still had those suite Avs and that button and the arms of yours the drummer body that you got at least you've got a good body. Now, not back then see back, then I was five inch five to six inches shorter. But still had the same size hands and feet that I have now which are already too big for the body that I have for you put it on you put those on someone that's like five five five four literally. You're the Loveland frogman is. It is Zach sergeant. So so far parts. Yeah. Wow. All right. I didn't know that we stepped on a psychological minefield here. No, no. That I now and thinking about all the times, I was bullied in them if you're bullied out there. Hang in there. Yeah. And there are bullying people unless it's really really fun. Be nice. So it's me, it's our kids. What they do. My dad's advice was real. He's like sometimes with the bully. You got a bunch of in the mouth. They are really like you have to fight the bullies of your being bullied. You have to have to come at the bully. You have to make and for me. It was like Gulliver's travels. So there's like forty of them. Yeah. That's it was the little one. Why little spears like our picking into your legs still traumatized forever? But you know, what we're making up for it now. Yeah. I just learned the skill of psychologically, traumatising insults. See, hey. Yeah. And then they just went away. Eventually. Yeah. That'll that'll plug those butts retired out. Absolutely audio save these farts for home, then oh. Never again, you know, there was someone who really had a bad home life. And the only thing they gave them joy was far on you also gave I was well aware. I I figured out the psychology find it pretty young age. All doesn't beat me. Never went that far. No, that's good. That's good. I think it's because all of our fathers beat us. We didn't really have that like a ball. North one of the most important things we do for our health. Every day is brushing our teeth yet. Most of us don't do it. Properly. Quip is a better electric toothbrush. Created by dentists and designers quip was designed to make brushing your teeth more simple, affordable and even enjoyable of to ninety percent of us. Don't brush our teeth for the full two minutes or don't clean evenly. That's why the quip comes with a built in two minute timer that pulses every thirty seconds to remind you to switch sides that way, you're sure to get a full and even clean, and did, you know three out of four of us are using old worn out or just plain ineffective bristles. So quip automatically delivers brush heads on a dentist recommended schedule. Every three months for just five dollars whip is one of the first electric toothbrushes accepted by the American dental association and has thousands of verified five star reviews. I personally love Mike whip. I love that. They said new brush heads right to my door. And I loved it. It runs off batteries one charge lasts up to three months, and you never need to use tangled wires or a clunky charger. When we go onto her. I just slide on the cover and toss it into my carry on. That's why I love quip and why they're backed by over twenty thousand dental professionals quip starts at just twenty five dollars. And if you go to get quip dot com slash last pod right now, you get your first refill pack, four frayed with equip electric toothbrush. That's your first refill pack free at GT Q U IP dot com slash last pod. But Henry you're saying that on our Schumacher episode with Joseph calendar, shoemaker Schumacher, someone totally different. I know I was just trying to state in a fun accent. Let me take you maker. Joe calendar was a very interesting man, and we covered him for two weeks. And it was a harrowing for many entertaining for us. I am not scared by Joseph calendar anymore unless the thing is now it's walking around and always the same thing. With reason. Why Mark David Chapman haunted more than I? So specifically because these guys are walking around and they look normal, but they are having full on vivid hallucinations. Mum your murder while you're walking down the street. I'm not trying to make sure annoyed, but sometimes it's healthy to be paranoid. But what didn't we forgot to include in last episode winning forget, it was just we didn't we didn't pile and into the information as at Joseph calendar left a series of poems, a four floor Reta Schreiber that I would love to read in the voice of Joseph calendar suit could see more of his interior dialogue. Now, what I've had a lot of people ask me to question this week of why does Joseph calendar sound like Bernie Sanders? Right. An answer is I do not know when it comes to building a voice. I don't know if it's interesting to talk about the quote, unquote, process of the work. But when it comes to making a voice sometimes for me, it was the I saw the picture. I didn't see the early picture of Joe calendars. I didn't see the younger ones. I only saw the ones when he was post jail when he had the big beard, and the first thing that came to my mind, which is how I sometimes do this is like he looks like Bernie Sanders was an offensive. Linemen and I wanted to. So I just went that way before. And so that's just what you do. And then it slowly turned into Tony Clifton because the accent slides because I'm not Darryl fucking Hammond. All right there. It is inside the podcasters workshop. Because like L R H. I try to do depression of rates because there's so much of his voice that is recorded. So you can hear it. You know, like Charles Manson, it's funny to just make him sound like a desert spider like you, make him sound all crazy. And then there's certain ones that there's no. And then pans Rams spoke for itself, right because he's just fucking too. Big jacked horny, powerful, man. Yep. Yep. Absolutely American legend. Kind of. Yeah. Animal rapist. Yeah. Late games woods in a move that James woods before. James woods Twitter is phenomenal. But on sites phenomenal. I would say it's awful. Yeah. It's real hair. One of the reasons I don't go on Twitter because all its old people that ruined it once again, baby boomers baby baby boomers ruined. They manage to ruin Twitter every they managed to ruin everything they touch, I know we have some baby boomer listeners out there. Good ones. You're what are the good ones? Good ones don't ruin podcast, please. So our job. That's yeah. That's what we're going to do. So you got some poems from calendar here that you want to that you want to read it, and I just have to ask what have we got as far as poetry? We've got BT K was a poet Biak. It was poet David Berkowitz or go is now this actually for Marcus. And I don't really know because this isn't the time period routine like the encouraged them to write poetry to express themselves. Well, I know that a Dennis Rader always wrote poetry. He wrote poetry for the first time when he first got a hold of the police when what was a Shirley locks. I think was the name of his first pawn that he worked on for weeks and weeks and weeks before he sent it in. And then when he finally did send it in to the Wichita eagle. They just threw it in the crank pile because they thought that it was a Valentine because it was right around Valentine's. Day, and he didn't include any money to put it in the classifieds or like this guy's fucking nuts. Just put it in the crank pow who gives us yet. But I think it's just it's an easy way to express yourself. It doesn't take much talent to write poetry. It takes an enormous amount of talent to do poetry. Well, when you do poetry, well, like, it's it's absolutely. It's it's astonishingly beautiful. When poetry is done. Well, so it's any old asshole can just write a couple of lines of poetry. Sometimes it becomes very like outsider already. Right. Where going to be so crazy, right? Incredible poetry because just you're kind of the way your mind works as a word jumble. You're creating these crazy pictures or or vodka tting of oh king certain motions. Civic way. But it seems like this is also the time period where a lot of the mental health way they dealt with especially with killers as it was them. Just like we've in baskets in your room. It's like all four z and out like doing crafts. So this is a poem called the unicorn in the garden Joseph calendar the unicorn in the garden while I was a little boy, I thought the parents aren't on statement kale. You'll a hole in my garden. Now Nightingale died poll and the lilacs on rose has perished. I wanted to be an Octo playing unicorn in my garden, but they said you will be Shumeiko like a follow dumb cough. And if you don't you will be a bomb. So I grew up on my top the father shop hearing the cutting of level smelling the owner on glow. My news boring machines idiot's delight exiled on the street. I'm sorry from all children. I lived among shrews anonymous and HAMAs. I'll no I'm not I love our lung the shape foles replace hails drought. Nells my own soul was hidden from me, but the shops that wild. I'll. Robot? Will I thought unicol am I gone? Honestly, I had actually go. Strangely moving. It is no that's not bad. At all. Really? I mean. And that's as far as row killer, poetry, go. I mean, it's definitely better than David Berkowitz's poem about the F train. Yeah. That's very true. But is it less geographical? But is it less? Geographically, correct. Yeah. You know, one thing we didn't mention in the episode was Joseph calendars obsession with butterflies. Really? Yes, he had a deep fascination with butterflies from a a small child that he imagined that he himself was about her fly that was one of his early delusions. Of course. I mean, there was a lot that we had to leave out of the episode otherwise it would have been five in parts long. But really if you really want to get like, I recommend the shoemaker. The shoemaker is such a great true crime book, just alongs you just kind of gloss over all flora Schreiber's. I would say like lazy, psychological? We'll cheat their ancient psychological breakdowns. Yeah. Poem. He wrote a poem. He wrote about Charlie. Can I do one here? Just to contrast that because I Dennis Rader, truly sucks. Poetries the worst. So this is a poem that we did read just to because honestly that the unicorn in the garden working he did one maybe did want to be an actor. He made again Alger is a horrible horrible. Nothing can explain away. What he did know? But the. But this is Dennis Rader. Oh, death this. Live show. What is this that I can see cold icy hands taking hold of me or death has come? You. All can see hell has open. It's gate to trick me. Death. Oh death. Can't you spare me for another year? I'll stuff your jaws till you can't talk. I'll bind your legs dole. You can't walk. I'll tie your hands till you can't make a stand and finally a close your eyes. So you can't see a bring sexual death onto you for me. That is so much worse. It's often calendar. Oh, yeah. And that was a rip. It was a rip off of the old folk song. Oh death. And the reason why raider wrote is because he after the tarot murders his first murder spree in which he killed four people in one afternoon. He started taking classes and criminal Justice at Wichita said, he's right city. So he could essentially become a better serial killer. So he could learn the craft can hate. Yeah. He's the worst. Because he he chose to be a Ciro more than anyone else. He chose to be a serial killer Cray. And he. Essentially to started taking literature classes, he read oh death in one of his classes and decided yet. That's that's the one. I'm going to do. That's the one that I'm going to copy great eared alka cover, really good, so bad. So I'll re this one unless poem Charlie hers. Thumbing writhing their cori- like on angry bowling floated pace longhouse Potter in front called McIntosh highlights. His mean Braun is statically pen may tell a wall where I- rental I cannot free myself from Chali he has full body and below his is just faceless face is just a casual love scandal. Rob thumb around jawbones rounding on a flush chin. That's just a face are not free. Marcel from Charlie bought LS wider. Hey arrives thunderbolts in hell with the devil. Sings doom songs through his mouth us face. Then come to me with bloody instructions his favorite world is Cal. But Chali as wheel like you on me, something I'm going to waste some day. I'm going to kill him. Some I'm going to punch him with hill swivel on airless, willow. But my way Charlie's going to kill me. I I li- with one eye open. I care. I'm not free myself from Charlie. Eerie once again, very good and a totally different styles or poem. That's the dismembered head that would compel him to kill that. He just wrote a poem about well now, I wouldn't say that Charlie necessarily compelled him to kill he delivered instruction sometimes. But mostly he was there for encouragement. He wasn't telling him to stop no damn when calendar committed his third murder yet Charlie was screaming for him to stab her again stabber against ever again. But mostly Charlie was I would say Charlie was more there to assist the delusions that calendar believed were coming from God. Well, you know, sometime I mean artists like an archangel like an arcade artists. Artists minds. We can go either way to be true creative. You kind of got to be a little wackadoo till, and I think Beechy K proves that as Marcus said, he was not crazy. No. He was doing all of this purpose calendar, just by the quality of his poems. I think he might have. I know. He was absolutely nuts. Yeah. He was. Well, Dennis Rader was just such a loser. He he did all of this. He he make constructed his whole identity. Nothing was on accident because there was no real him. Right right in the puns the puns. Oh my God. No one really has time to go to the post office. We're busy. We hear an LPN are always buried up to our eyeballs in research and work. So it's hard to make time for traffic. The lines the hassle of lugging Oliver, mail and packages to the post office. That's why we use stamps dot com. One of the most popular time saving tools for small businesses stamps dot com eliminates trips to the post office and saves you money with discounts that you can't even get at the post office stamps dot com brings all the amazing services of the US postal service right to your computer. Whether you're a small office and Dingaan invoices in online seller shipping out products. Or even a warehouse, sending thousands of packages a day stamps dot com can handle it all with ease. Simply use your computer to print official US postage twenty four seven for any letter any package any class of male anywhere. 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And obviously, I know exactly what it is in no way today. Forget what you wanted to talk about. This is a perfect perfect tease at setup. Well, it was trolling through some of the conspiracy message boards this week. Good. I thank you very much. Well, and I came upon a post from twenty fifteen. Okay. A good old fashioned illuminating update. Yeah. Luminosity update. And this is what conspiracy used to be like twenty fifteen was trying to win it. Twenty fifteen was around the time the conspiracy the conspiracy bowl kind of tipped over into the mainstream. This is back when this is back when a conspiracy was truly fucking nuts and truly fun. This is before people like took it literally seriously when Alex Jones was just asking questions questions here. I got more people. Okay. We're going to go on the aluminum update has a little bit to say about. All right. All right. Well, the luminosity update it was originally posted on anonymous MAGS which no longer exists. It is now click bait site, but it was written by a guy who had gotten out of the aluminum after forty seven years in service, and he was able to leave through the departure ritual. Okay. The departure ritual is I eventually found out after a little bit of digging. Is it when you? Tell the aluminum I wanna leave what they do is. They bring in front of the council, they bring your entire family. And then they murder them in front of you got to really, and then after that, they do mind experiments on you for about a year. And then they throw you in a hole underneath Denver, Colorado. I'll just stay guys. I honestly, I didn't even realize what would be what it would what would be entailed in me trying to leave. I like the luminosity like my family. This is fine. But they don't the idea is that this is also where the conspiracy theory has come about the Denver airport, right? Which is essentially they are constantly under construction because they are constantly hiding the bodies of illuminate defectors. Right. Whoever designed the Denver airport. Definitely was like with any luck. People will think this is four and made by the aluminum, they have the horse the Denver Bronco that is outside of that stadium at night. The is light red yet. It's great it makes you feel like you're going into more doors. At school shit. This guy said that he was recruited into the along luminosity when he was nineteen years old after he had gotten approached by a couple of men in black suits when he was a student at Harvard. Why didn't get this shape? Why didn't know? To try to scoop us up you serious. They wanna get toll goof. They want fort in Free Willy. We're not mix. That's that's the fucking. We're the best team in the world. We're the expendable. Oh, you think the aluminum body was monitoring the Florida State University theater program. I mean that we want the we want the fat one in the sheiky does need a new we need a new man for the Wanda movement like for me to go to Africa. Oh, yeah. With me. There were definitely keeping an eye on the Texas Tech university English department because if there's one thing Texas Tech is known for its English. Yeah. Exactly. What's the one that super tall and just drunk enough to fall over? But never does. This guy escaped from Denver airport through a series of underground tunnels that were shown to him by a fellow defector because the fell defector his great grandfather had built those tunnels who'll this is a great movie. Yeah, it's an amazing movie. It's great. So what this guy is done him and the seven others all escape they all got new identities. And this man who escaped in June of twenty ten he is risking his life to tell us the secrets of the aluminum. Yes. And this is just on web forms. This is just on web forms, and it's been. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. No, no. It wasn't a published anywhere was as one of those ones that was like a leaked on like on A B chain like beat. No, no, it wasn't. It wasn't back back in the old days four and all that. Now. This was on anonymous MAGS. Okay. Yeah. Well, this guy says that there are fifty seven undergr-. Round basis in bunkers around the United States that are used for illumination purposes. But there are four hundred thirty nine bunkers all over the entire world with the largest one existing and Sao Paulo Brazil holds. Yep. So far. Yes. Yeah. I've seen all that. I've seen the rating. That bunker is able to hold up to five thousand people for a period of up to ten years because of course, when World War three comes all, the world's leaders. Gotta have somewhere to go to got to and all the world's richest. People are going to be there as well. Bill Gates, Warren Buffett oil tycoons, they're all going to be living in this bunker with their families. They deserve that and their tax breaks for how well they've done for the US economy. Oh, thank you. Just a magin the farts in that buffet. This constantly brags about how the only food. He eats his egg mcmuffins from McDonald's. What are you? What are your khakis smelling? The. Make eggs shits. But one thing about the oil tycoons that they will be murdered in the bunker. Yeah. So the that the takeover of the Middle East will be much easier for the new world owner. Well, then they better not go. I guess they don't know that they don't know that this knows that. But they don't know that it's like one of those. It's the is the what's it like in the mob? When they do the thing where it's like, you think you're about to get made. Like, hey, no. We gotta meet Joe yadi. It's like by the ducks. Yeah. We'd like why are we going to the docks? I thought all the made guys go to the club. And he's like, nah is especial. Shit. I killed them. Now. Yeah. That would I don't think that's good. I think it's better. If you don't trick them like that. I see I would be just like, honestly, if you were going to kill me don't make me think that I was going to get made. I was so excited. Yeah. And now, I'm gonna die. Look so disappointed now. Well, I don't know. I mean, if you get shot in the back of the head you at least die with a smile on your face. By the way, these bunkers this guy that wrote the article he was in one of these bunkers in China in the nineties, and he said, it's pretty much like staying at a five star hotel rarely luxurious ocean. Why would he even escape? He. Well. No, this was after this is before he decided to leave the aluminum is in the aluminum. Yeah. This is when he was in the because member using the aluminum for forty seven years, okay? Well, you want to hear some of the other people that have stayed in these bunkers over the years. Five stars these five star bunkers. Yes. Leon Trotsky stayed in a bunker for a while. Of course, he did when did he die? Oh, these puckers have been around for a while. How you vide- a long time ago for thirty sporty must have been something like that. Yeah. I mean got he didn't he get stabbed with an ice pick and Mexico. Yeah. Geico. Tonight, C two forty. Yeah. Forty four now after Stalin defeated Trotsky and secure power on the Soviet Union after Lenin's death Trotsky was moved to an underground bunker, just inside Switzerland and Stalin didn't know this because if he did not follow the orders of the aluminum, the Trotsky was going to be reinstated as the leader of the Soviet Union, and it was important to have Trotsky place in this bunker because Stalin was going to kill him. Otherwise now Stalin eventually fell in line with the aluminum plants and Trotsky was executed because he was no longer needed. Okay. He was he was in. He was insurance in case Stalin didn't fall in line are then we'll kill stall and put Trotsky back in its place, but Stalin fell in line, and they just killed Trotsky. Can you imagine knowing knowing that would be though just to be stuck with Trotsky at a five star hotel? Oh, you eat is everything just like just like the second active, whereas that free to Kalo movie. I didn't just about that. Yeah. It's like Mexico hotel that they were all at where they like everybody that you loved and you could name from the nineteen thirties. That was like a famous artist is all hanging around drinking weird like cafe Lecce's and. And and difficult and then slowly getting picked off one by one. I imagine with Trotsky all day would get pretty tiresome. Oh is getting. So the same thing about Neil young. I think the same thing about Neil young. I love Neil young. Yes. But I I never want to meet him. Never because I just think, you know, it's all about him yelling about his sky miles yelling about his fucking how he needs new shoes about how he hates soundcloud, because nobody music just like each new thing 'cause you start off being like, man. It's so cool to be with you today is so called funding. Neil young, man. And he's like my feet hurt. No. Honestly, I do think Neil young would talk about the benefits of elkridge shoes. It'd be like, and he would just be like I was so dumb for so long. I was just using the ties look at the velcro shoes. Like, those are nice velcro shoes. Mr young. Over and you just slap them to gather your own half to take them in at your day. Now's me of a song. Of the day. All my new music today. Potty. Mr young. What inspired the song old, man? You have did was. I know it's a great song about you taking over someone's farm because you had a lot of money to kind of kicked him on their arm. But it was about ruining old people's lives. And now that I am an old person. I see just existing does that. I'm gonna go hang out with David cross. Else was in a bunker for awhile will let me guess politicians celebrity politician politician, what era we're going to say way back way back. Taff now President George Washington. No, not too far back in American president American president ABRAHAM LINCOLN neighbor ham link ABRAHAM LINCOLN. I was going to say it as a joke. Well, actually, Henry you already read it. No, I didn't know. Okay. Good. I don't think honesty would be a part of the aluminum Lincoln was not murdered by John Wilkes booth in the office of the presidency as a palm because the aluminum they knew that if he was in the presidency than the south would soc- because the civil war made the aluminum body, very very rich. And that was the only reason why the civil war was allowed to happen. The aluminum had not seen the opportunity to become rich of the war than slavery would still be an American institution. Or so this man says so Lincoln was put an office to start the war, and he made the deal that once the war was over. He would be removed from office. That's why Lincoln was out of there. As soon as the war was done. But what did the fake assassination and ABRAHAM LINCOLN was sent to live in a bunker in Mexico. So it was a fake assassination. Casaus inasion flag. It was always like, well, I don't know if that's technically a false flag. I guess a false flag is an actual action done. It was just faked which is. It just seems like a lot of work. Could be a false flag. But because the the murdering of ABRAHAM LINCOLN definitely led to the punitive measures that were emplaced on the south during reconstruction, which of course, benefited the aluminum, and obviously none of the easy. It is. I don't understand how easy it is. None of this is real, but also John Wilkes booth who would you get to work on something that is false an actor. He was an actor. He was the first crisis actor, do you people? See how easy to? With actually having Shakespearean training. See that's how I think. That's what these crisis actors don't have the same training as they used to. And it's a part of the volume down of conspiracy culture as that we totally that time to put these crisis actors into I mean conservatories so they can really played run for characters where the you could put a beard on him. And he could look something different. They really blend in make them late. Yeah. I don't know why you would make put a beard on him. And then make him Milady. How can you be can you act the way around your own beard and show off the tits? Using your words. Honestly, that's a good point. We talked about this unable to stop at this week. Alex Jones, recanted all of his false leg stuff. Yeah. No, not your stuff. Yeah. He said psychosis that he said he was this coast for three years. And because he said he was traumatized by the media because he was. So anyway, so all those people that he convinced that he that was that we're convinced he was telling the truth once again folks, do not believe Alex Jones immediately shifted back. He went right back onto 'cause then he had Joe Rogan on info wars, and he does his whole like he goes to court and says, I oh, I'm crazy. I'm crazy. But he goes right back on Infowars is so crazy I'm saying, and then he just says the same shit again. And again. Monster this man, right here that wrote the article he's got a little bit to say about Alex. He said Alex Jones is not who he says he is for years Jones has been working to uncover the secrets of the aluminum body and the new world order, right? Sure. In reality. He is a member of the former and we'll be in power in the latter. Of course. In the world. And he's been placed our defeat false information to throw through trackers off the trail. Do not believe anything that. The man tells you what this aluminum member says there is nothing more fun than conspiracy theorists. Arguing with other conspiracy theorists. Bill Cooper and Alex Jones actually had one of the best feud scrapie in radio history. And they're both crazy. Although Bill Cooper, we'll see this not as nefarious as Alex Jones. I think Bill Clinton's he did, you know, obviously, you you get what you want in life. And I think you want to be shot by the police aid it man, it's the ultimate way us that's the ultimate conspiracy. There is way to go out. Do that's how that's what you want. He got it. He made it for himself. And he got it. But they are all a fucking mess. But I actually believe that that that's one of those where I love seeing the conspiracy theorist lens into their own people. It always happens. They always cannibalize themselves like a bunch. Democrats. And as soon as he fell on him 'cause it's true. You the one who fucking friends with the president? I never understand any of these conspiracy theories that are going on now saying that the president is a vulnerable powerless like he can't do anything. And he's fighting for the truth were legitimately always the president's always on the opposite side of what is happening because they know enough. They are the information chief of the whole thing is to spread honestly their message. And and unify the government. That's what they're supposed to do that. Nobody more inside than the fucking president. That's the great irony about Trump because every I don't know why presidents ever leave the White House political nerd, it'd be like I'm just going to stay the going every room. And the thing is Trump doesn't even take the meetings anymore. Usually a president wakes up around seven o'clock, you got your generals in there. He doesn't even do those. They give him a portfolio full of pictures. Yes. That's his he doesn't even have the he doesn't have a thirst for knowledge. So. Tech. We have we have no of. Yeah. Now. But you know, if you're a believer in Cunanan, that's because Trump has been an all of his time working with Robert Muller and conjunction with the military to take down the new world order that is run by Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton of and George Soros. Yeah. The Cunanan stuff is getting particularly fucking nuts lately. Well, the guy flashed a Q I forget what show I forget which shooting that he had this. I have this story here. So a really good with the conspiracy theory. I mean, there's plenty more to get through. We'll let you can believe me. I mean, this is I mean, we're just generally talking about conspiracy theories, you know, where it used to be where it is now. So we can let's continue talking about conspiracy theories. And then let's talk just kinda ties into this true crime story this fellow. He's a twenty four year old guys. Name is Anthony camello. He was a big believer in far right conspiracy theories like Cunanan. And of course, he also had a. A bit of an Oxycontin habit. We're. Sometimes ends which is the chicken in which is the eg in that scenario. I don't know, but he shot this mob, boss. This fellow Callie. He had to result this drain us. I thought it was just a straight up hit. Talking about the mob head out in Staten Island. Really? I haven't Q as soon as he got in court. He drove a Q on his hand as a message to the I guess to four Chan or to his followers or some shit. Yeah. I really don't know. But he so he was born and raised in Staten Island, south shore. He's accused of gunning down Gambino crime family leader Francisco, Frankie boy, Kelly. They always sound like boxers always Francisco, Frankie boy Kelly on a quiet street in taught hill last week the shooting had rocketed Mr. Khumalo in otherwise unsensationalised young man who was struggling to launch his adult life into true crime infamy. This dude Kelly was shot ten times and the police have not explained how Mr. camello even crossed into mister Kelly's orbit let alone why he allegedly decided to kill him. Well, when I ever motive the Gambino crime family has not been forgiving, and it looks like this guy is going to. Facing life in. We'll be looking at life in prison, and it looks like it's probably not going to be a very long life in prison. The Gambino crime family had some people on the inside. Yeah. What I had read about was that he the word is that it was a very domestic shooting as that. It was a dude he the guy that shot him was trying to date his daughter, and he said, no. And then this guy just flipped out essentially, he put the clamp down saying, you can't take my daughter. And this is this is over. And then he just you just cut right through like a knife through butter where it's like if you're not a made man, and you're not some kind of like a goon for the mafia you're not on any of their lists. So he just showed up and he was outside the house. He walked out of the house, and he shot him ten times. And so he is writing Q on his hand in court now, he's big into Cunanan. He's big into all these conspiracies. So a lot of people were like does that tie into the killing. But maybe it doesn't at all. It was so. Just a Romeo and Juliet type situation, but he used the opportunity to show off or kill to show off for you. Okay. Because I was afraid who was going to be one of those things where he had some sort of delusion where this guy was a mob boss in the mob. Boss is related to the entire. What is it the new world order that was well doing all the pedophile rings and all that super Chad? Like, it's the penman already the pizza joint, and they don't have dogs in pizza place. But sure a pedophile ring spied now. And now the last q and on update that I've read was that they actually have already executed Hillary Clinton. She's that she's executed and Brock Obama's being held on an island somewhere. Cunanan is. I mean, it is getting bigger and bigger and bigger, and it is getting more and more and more followers. Like, I watched a video couple of days ago where there was a guy with a video camera out of Trump rally, and he had written make noise for Cheonan. Unjust was elected. Was it the famous black, dude? I don't know if it was a it was just a guy had written make noise for Q on a sign and Trump rally, and he went it's a twenty minute long video of him going down the line. And just everybody's like you. Fuck yo. I am more fucking into it. Here's excited. They are excited to yell. Yeah. They are. I'm not going to say that we should ever do this. I there's a lot of racial reasons why there's a lot of lot of systemic issues in this country, but a poll test when it comes to boating in the only question is do you believe in Q, if the answer is yes, I understand we have a constitution. But it's just their vote matters to scare you say follow up questions after. So this dude that that killed the Gambino crime family member he made rambling statements and evidently, this is according to John Miller, the chief of the New York police department's intelligence division. He said he wanted to make a citizen's arrest of Maxine Waters, congressman Schiff. He blamed Nancy Pelosi and all kinds of other people for stealing the election, which I'm assuming is the mid-term election the motivation for Mr. Camilla's February stunt became clear Monday when he was arraigned in jersey Corp, as he entered the courtroom, he raised open a poem where he had Q scrolled on it. So. Kind of got you can look at it here. It's not nearly as neat. As Richard Ramirez is Pentagon. Looks like there's quite a few other doodles on that hand as well that aren't quite. So that aren't quite so clear, but I mean, but that's that's the weird thing is I know we've gotten a couple of comments here, and there from people, you know, saying that we're we're talking about politics on the show. But the thing is that we've been talking about conspiracy for ten years. Now, it just so happens that conspiracy is now apart such a gigantic part of American politics. But on his head. We say it says United we stand mega forever and mega forever. Good for him. I guess that's good. That part of it is it it's weird. It's weird that it's become a part of the mainstream so mainstream that we can't even talk about anymore because we're supposed to be talking about fringe topics, and you talking about Q it on and they take deadly seriously that it's hard to to broach it because it's the it's we're now in the world of it's becoming a real conspiracy. Because of how many people are talking about it. We're generating the reality of it. Every single time brought up every single time. He flashes. The new every time he does this stuff it basically, it makes it real or unreal. Unreal. Or, but it's really just more deeply connecting a group of people that are they are just ruining their own lives. Try to try to chase the sense of what's happening right now. Trying to fig- piece it all altogether. You really think Brock Obama's got time to fucking to run the deep state. He's got movies to produce. He's we know what what do we know about producers all they do is work work. Viz? He certainly doesn't just put an Obama stamp on a bunch of shit and then leave, but I I really don't unders-, you know, that's where I am bitter being like, so we are all now struggling if try try to fix this country, do whatever and Bronco. Bama has decided to go make content for Netflix like every other fucking every one of us. This is what we're doing. But did you guys know that the moon landing in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine was real what? But it was not the first moon landing because seven years earlier the Russians actually landed on the moon, but they kept that a secret because that was really just a test because it was the aluminum plan to have the capitalist win the Cold War. But the Russians had the same technology that we had, but they sit the Russians their first to make sure that the Americans could actually do it. So they were our test dummy like what was the title can again Crash Test Dummies. Well, that's what they this is the whole Russian revisionism of all conspiracy theory. This is this. Weird thing that we're in this other spot where Russians did everything they did Roswell. They did Rendall Schimdt forestay did everything they actually did it. We did nothing. We just quote, we observe we freak out, and we take credit for and we do not it's a very strange almost like I wonder I saw talk by KGB officer a longtime ago, they was uneasy tube. And he was talking about how we and this was in the nineteen ninety s and he said, we've already deeply infiltrated the United States of America in terms of changing shifting the thought from the inside out of the this concept of essentially flipping American exceptionalism like doing that thing where we start to really doubt, our ability, and you slowly hack away at our ability to take care of ourselves. And excel like understanding that we can do era of everybody vilifying socialism from within so much that we don't wanna take care of anybody anymore. And all we. Due shovel money up to less and less people. And then we have nothing, and eventually we are just going to be ground into food for the rich. But Henry how nice is it to give say giving is better than receiving. What are we doing? If we're not giving. Yeah. That's what makes us feel so good doesn't it feel? Good good. I feel like we were giving so much so many weapons we're getting a lot of weapons which. I think that's that's important. That's important. I guess that's part of our economy. Well, speaking of capitalism without capitalism. We would never have one of the greatest inventions of all time, which is the telephone. Yeah. Also without capitalism. We would never have one of the greatest cartoons of all time. Which is Garfield. I understand you Marcus is actually wearing a Garfield shirt. And evidently in France, these two things are combined and Garfield phones have been washing up on the shores. But like a lot of them. Now, it's been very strange French coastal community is finally cracked the mystery behind these Garfield telephones that have plagued the picturesque beaches for decades since nineteen eighties. The tr- the ear off the ROY no. No sauna. All words that it's all letters and French. You're not supposed to say. I r I s e okay host and Brittany has received the supply of bright orange landline. Novelty phones shaped like a famous cartoon cat. They keep washing up and it's been going on since the eighties. These constantly's weird asked the Garfield phones, keep a like landing on the beach, and they've been trying to clean it up. So last year compaigners from the air Velu anti-litter group made the novelty phone a symbol of the plastic pollution on the beaches of the Phoenix Durra region part of which is a designated marine park. Now once a common household item. It's is open in the land. When the win the landline. Receivers picked up you guys ever have Garfield phone. Oh, yeah. Always wanted one. I did love him. My brother. My brother had a full Garfield themed room until he was sixteen or fifteen and then one weekend, it was overruled Paul and delight posters. It went from Jim Davis posters and Garfield post. Tres? Jim Dave is actually signed a letter to my brother, Eric. He was very nice nice. And then and then Eric said I want to be an adult now. And he and then he got into rupaul. And then that I used to think she was quite attractive. And she's that's that. That's that. But they for a long time. They thought we'll maybe there was some kind of suspected that. There was a long lost shipping container. And they couldn't find it. But they kind of figured out where it would possibly have the media attention on the news and the new campaign. However, drew the eye of a local farmer who remembered the first daily won't go fuel appearing after restore and the early nineteen eighties. Which sounds like the beginning of a weird crossover between Jim Davis and Stephen King storm that all of these things start showing up at least like he knew said he knew the location of the container. It's like you had to noodles area. Wale, he told France Info, which had covered the pain. We found it continual aground inefficiential. It was Ben manuals girl. But zehr. Steeler was a stack of foods. Do you love the you are turning into Charles Ingham? Charles. Is he found a shipping container loading a bunch of rocks? So they got so no more. So the they get at it. They said, basically, they can see it is this thing as managed to insinuate itself down into a Fisher. And they can see it from the top of the Fisher. And it's still fill. Garfield phones, all the bottom of home. I have to wait for them to dislodge could come up one local said, quote it never stops. Than gore field bugs. Actually, this article is that written really this articles written grades from the San Francisco gay just the first line is to gear he came. Jimmy Davis is by Katie doubt. At this. Ooh garfield. Final revenge. I definitely had the Garfield phone it works. I kinda missed the landlines. We also had the that's not a football that's telephone which Sports Illustrated. Once you got a subscription to Sports Illustrated. You we get a football phone. I miss the good novelty landline phone, you know, it's the one with the cellphones ill. Look the same. You get the gigantic novelty phone case. Now, the Bill foam cases, but you can't fit it in the pocket, and then was a phone have to have cat ears. I don't know you could still get a landline. I know, but they still package it. They always the zoo. They always say like if you want the internet you can have a landline and you get five dollars off. I'm scanning the walls of my apartment in my brain. I have to clean up some have to rub wipe off some some of the some of the tomato sauce there. But I don't even think there's a plug in for it. Where have you ever have you had one behind the couch? I know you have one behind the couch. I remember it. God, that's creepy. -partment? So well for fifteen years, the no I remember murder. Fist used to every night. Ten murder phys members would come and you know, what they would do Marcus far. Right. And they would they would fart. Absolutely. They would right which also was like had a lot of forties involved with it, by the way, Henry speaking of local Williamsburg, naive area there who mood are Delhi guy died. I saw that post. It's incredibly sad. Yeah. He was so sweet. He was. Yeah. When I was all dead broke would go in there and a Monday and be like, I don't come money until Friday. And they'd be like, get whatever you want pay on Friday. If you let me get beers, and sandwiches, Gips, whatever I wanted. No. He was a door whole group. We were always sweet that's such a shame. And I'm so, you know, God, I wonder what he died of visit like Delhi cancer. Ask about that. No, no. I actually did ask it was it was a a heart attack. It happened. I'd of the blue himself to death. He literally worked and he was at his cancer twelve hours a day seven days a week at least. Yeah, he was he was just awesome anyway are at Pima manhood mood and anyway, take care of yourself, folks. Elliptical man cardio's would keep your heart strong. And if you'd like to sit do what I got I got a rower, and it's nice. You know, actually have on it though. It's not just a chair. I know I've been rowing. I talked to my therapist. I'm doing a lot of things a lot of things that is great. All right. We'll thank you all so much for listening, Marcus. Thank you for coming in and sharing your aluminum knowledge. Yes. Henry grape poetry, it would Nitzan my poetry Joseph calendars poetry, so thank him. Yeah. Thank you for the material. Thank him for two episodes material. I guess we have to do that. Now. Do we have the thank this real killers gave us we don't know. Oh, I'm just wondering. No, that's a good. Good check. And I don't think we have to and I would prefer if we ran out of content quite. That's the one about this life is that we will never run out of content. Yeah. Sad unfortunate. But if you want to be a subject that we cover on last podcast. No violence. Find us an alien find us a cryptic. Yeah. You do one of those two things, and we will talk about you. And also Senate decide side stories L P O T L at gmaiLcom. We always go through those letters. We've just time. It was just fun to talk about what we had prepared. But we love reading what you guys have to say in reading the letters on the air at same much fine to die. All right, everyone. Thank you so much religious live every day man live every day. No live every other day. Now, you that. No. You don't get to. Unfortunately, you don't wanna live on Tuesday. You got two and they're gonna make you live on Tuesday, unless you stopped because then you can't go to work, and that's all they care about anymore. Laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh, like it's the first time you're seeing John Turin brain donors we've seen that. That is a deep cut. It is it is. I was thinking about it quite a bit. And love love for the way. You look at me. It's L. That's let it break down the letters and make them fucking make it up yourself than what the others fucking stand for holy shit. You Gary Busey at least feels you know, if his acronyms, well, it's because he's got nothing else to do all day. Got to build the acronyms. Of all right, everyone. Thank you so much for listening hail yourselves, hell Satan. Again, Gustav show had me if you would thank you for listening again that you for listen, thank you. We wouldn't be here. If not for you, this show is made possible by listeners like you. Thanks to our ad sponsors, you can support our shows by supporting them for more shows like the one you just listen to go to last podcast network dot com.

Marcus Henry Dennis Rader US Peter Gabriel Alex Jones president murder Leon Trotsky Charlie David Hanks ABRAHAM LINCOLN David Berkowitz Ben Kissel John cusak George Michael Joseph geo metro Sirius
127: Foreign Influence

How Good It Is

12:30 min | 4 months ago

127: Foreign Influence

"Hello, and welcome to the next episode of how good it is the show that takes a closer look at songs from the Rock and roll era, and we check out some of the stories behind the songs and the artists who made them famous. Mine is Claude Colin. I've been kind of. Pop In my head to the theme music this week remember to check out the website how good it is dot com and the twitter and Instagram, and of course, a facebook page, which you can find over at facebook dot com slash. How how good it is bad. And if you can afford it, please consider supporting the show as a patron for just five dollars a month you get the weekly newsletter with the weeks music news a little bit of my opinions and history calendar just a diversionary a little. Thank you on my part click the link on the website or point your browser to. On Dot com slash how good it is. You know it's been a while since I did this let me give a shout out to the folks over at podcast republic, which is had this show in its featured selection for very long time, I and the responsible for a bunch of you finding me. So podcast republic, it's one of the more innovative APPs out there for listening to podcasts your podcast is. Frustrating you or if you just in the market for one, well, bio means checkout podcast republic by clicking the link on my page. I have no idea whether you're going to find this week's trivia question to be easy or hard but here we go. What do the following musicians have in common and we have Paul Rogers Eric Burden Graham Nash and Paul Charac what do all of those guys have in common. I will have that answer for ye at the end of the show. I've been on a little bit of a kick lately with the songs that have foreign lyrics in the not like I did back episode fifty which focused on songs that were entirely or nearly so not in English but on songs worry line or verse isn't in English and today we're GONNA peak at a couple more songs than that. John Mara. Genre. is now I guess and I'm willing to bet that for a couple of them anyway, you're going to be a little bit surprised. So I'm going to start by telling you a little bit about a movie from nineteen sixty called lay us vs large. It's a horror film, but it's not a gory one. There are a lot of humanistic themes in it. It's about a gifted plastic surgeon who is involved in a car accident which badly disfigured has beautiful daughter. The surgeon begins to kidnap young women so that he can remove their faces and graph them onto his daughter to restore her looks, and because the graphs keep failing, the daughter is forced to wear a plastic mask with very plain features so that only her eyes are visible meanwhile, the doctor keeps obsessively kidnapping women and stealing their faces. The daughter has become essentially is without a face and the doctor having blinded himself to the monster he's become is a face without is. It's a truly chilling film and even if you're watching it with subtitles. You will be genuinely riveted by it. Now, this film and the title in particular were the inspiration for billy idol's nineteen eighty-four song is without a face, which is the English translation for they use on be Saggio. Now, the Song's lyrics don't echo the plot of the movie. It's one vital softer and more introspective tunes in the song. Idol is basically wallowing in guilt for having ruined the relationship, and now he's coming to terms with just how petty he's being and the female voice you here during the song, which is provided by his girlfriend at the time backup singer and dancer Perri lister and she is singing. Use. All visas. Asked. Instantly, a woman appears in the video for the Song Bitch. Very clearly, and Perri lister isn't credited for the video. So I don't think it's her. But on the other hand, I don't know who it is. So maybe it is maybe it's not. Incidentally, Billy Idol had himself a little horror movie scenario while making the video. It took about three days to shoot the video which involved a lot of fog and some fire sources and right after the shoot idol fluid Arizona to perform in a show and he fell asleep on the plane he woke up to discover that the combination of the fog and the fire plus the dry air on the plane had caused his contact lenses to fuse to his eyeballs he had to check into a hospital. Get the lenses removed. He had to have his corneas scraped and his eyes were bandaged for several days while the corneas grew back fortunately is do he'll quickly when stuff like that happens isn't that a weird parallel though billy idol singing about eyes without a face becoming the face without is all right. Let me tell you now about a game show that ran in Europe from nineteen, sixty, two to nine, hundred, ninety nine, and I hear it was actually revived recently now in this game teams from various. European countries would dress in crazy costumes to complete bizarre tasks. Each game is judged by a pair of international judges. That's what they're called and the winner is determined at the end of each session. It's truly weird in a fun way and it's very physical stuff and I will include a couple of links at the website. So you can see what I'm talking about the show is typically known by its French name just on frontier yeah. In Nineteen Seventy Peter Gabriel took the show's concept of different countries battling over small matters and expanded to encompass the idea of world nations and their displays of territorialism nationalism, and all the little pettiness that nations can go through. He gave the lyrics and overlay of children playing games, Hans plays Lodhi Lodhi plays Jane King plays with wealthy and so forth. But when he gets to the next verse, the tensions are ramping up. Entree. Hazardous flag. Pay All. Except for. City. Hiding out. Shout. And the title of the Song of course is games without frontiers, which is the English translation of juice on frontier, and it's the phrase that Sung repeatedly at the beginning the middle and the end of the song. Incidentally, that's Kate Bush singing just on frontier in the record. So No, she's not singing she. So popular, which is what most people assume it is, and while I'm at it, I should note that the whistling is Peter Gabriel along with producers Steve Lillywhite and Hugh Padme Oh. And there's one final connection between the song and the TV show while most people refer to the show by its French name. In fact, the show's logo involves the letters J S F Jess on frontier. For some reason in England it's called it's a knockout. All right. So here's a quick one for you, and for this one, we jumped back to nineteen, sixty nine and a group called the tea set which puts the foreign phrase right there in the title. My Bella mean just means my beautiful friend and the spelling indicates that the friend is female. But wait there's a little more French going on. Massing what he's singing, there is play to labels your ged male see mousy which translates to after all the beautiful days. I say to you. Thank you. Thank you. See Easy One and you already knew that it wasn't in English self. All right everything we've talked about today so far has been French. So let's move on to another language Spanish Sure. I'm skipping over the fact that the title has a French word in it, but let's move past that. Okay. Did you know that Sweet Judy Blue Eyes had Spanish lyrics in it? If you like so many others weren't listening closely. There's an entire verse of the song. Being Sung in Spanish near the end Stephen Stills put this part of the song in Spanish partly because he didn't want it to be easily understood and partly because the words don't really have a lot to do with the rest of the song and finally he added in because he felt that the ending was just kind of lying there and it needed a little bit of parking up. incidentally while crosby stills, Nash All sang on this record of the three. Only Stephen Stills is playing any instruments and there is some percussion provided by Dallas Taylor. So let's listen in and I will translate for you. Nice it would be to take you to Cuba. The Queen of the Caribbean Sea. I only want to visit you there. and. How sad that I can't damn see not much to do with the rest of the songs every once in a while he will change the lyrics when they perform live. And now it's time to answer today's Trivia question back on page two. I asked you what these five men have in common and once again they are Paul Rogers, Eric Burden, Graham, Nash and Paul Carrick, and the answer is they all sang on hit songs that for more than one band Paul Rogers was the voice of free and bad company Eric. Burden was out front for both the animals and war Graham Nash. Sang. On hits for both the hollies and crosby stills and Nash or Crosby Stills, Nash and young. And finally, Paul Carrick was the lead voice for ace which you might remember the song. How long has this been going on and for Mike and the mechanics and while he didn't sing, he was also a key part of Roxy, music and squeeze for a while. That's a full lid on another addition of how good it is. If you're enjoying the show, please take the time to share it with someone and maybe even leave a rating somewhere, and now you can support the show over at patriotic dot com slash how good it is if you're so inclined, please be inclined if you WANNA get in touch with the show you can email me at how good podcast at mail dot com or you can follow shows on the twitter machine or the instagram. At how good it is. You can visit like and follow the show's facebook page at facebook dot com slash how good it is pod or you can check out the show's website how good it is dot com we might find a few extra bits and this week you're GonNa, find a few extra bits go watch some of that juice on frontier. That's crazy show. Thank you as usual two podcasts republic for featuring the show and next time around we're gonNA find out how good it is when we look in your eyes by listener requests. Thanks for listening I'll talk next time.

Eric Burden Graham Nash billy idol facebook Perri lister twitter Paul Rogers Peter Gabriel Paul Carrick Crosby Stills Stephen Stills Claude Colin John Mara Arizona Europe kidnapping Instagram Kate Bush England Cuba
The Coral Courts Radio Hour:  Daniel Corey

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

2:57:28 hr | 1 year ago

The Coral Courts Radio Hour: Daniel Corey

"It has been a long time since I have been back behind the microphone, but finally after flood and the holidays and everything the coral courts radio hour is a back, and we are returning with a very special guest. Today. Think we really gonna like this show the premise of the coral courts radio our function of the dish radio podcast is basically I get to relive my glory. Jackie days to play I play music for you. So we try to keep it about an hour, but we always fail and bring along against more often than not very good friend of mine who has who has music tastes that are different than my own. And we kind of walk through a playlist that such a friend has put together today is is no exception. One of my dearest, friends and someone with fantastic ears that are very very different than mine. But fantastic, nevertheless, always turns me onto something new musically. Growing. These gentlemen, comic writer up lay right fan, boy musician, and dear friend of mine. Mr. Daniel Corey, Dan, welcome to the coral courts radio. Our ancient, sir. Have cited the here man to be fun. I am so glad you could do this. Because you you were you were, you know, one of the folks right at the top of my list when I put this together, I'm like. Because we have sat behind Mike's together for years. We've done it. We've done we've done some interviews. Yeah. We we've done interviews for your books, which would get to, you know, and we've hung out with done Comecon panels, together and stuff like that. But then when you and just hanging out or a couple of guys we're playing music for each other. And when I have you heard this. Hey, have you heard this? And I'm like, why don't we just do this for everybody? Yeah. Great. So after after a little prodding a little nudging. I got you to put together you list of ten I'd imagine probably took awhile knowing you. Yeah. But we've narrowed it down we've got eleven tracks to walk. Cheated went over. I'm sorry. What are I mean? I don't I don't get on your last minute. I found another one is that. Okay. Skip it if you want I don't have sponsors. And I'm my own program directors down here. Whatever I want and gosh, pay what one of the things that. I would love to know before we dive into this is. We've talked about how you grew up. You grew up in a lack of a better trendless called a church home. Now. That's that's exactly what it is. And you know, we're your ruby younger than me. But you know, I grew up in the mid west handle lot of friends who grew up in in terms, and that he'd been rock and roll was not always right? So, you know, as as we go through the list, and as the music that you played for me as we've known each other who ten years, plus. You know, how did how did the rock and roll bug? What's what's your story? Oh, gosh. Well, okay. My origin story. Well, I mean, I grew up in a home filled with music, you know, there's a lot of music at home and. Yeah. They stuff where they plan though. Well, it was mean, my parents were like strict about like, you know, certain like the the new rock at the time and stuff I we weren't. We weren't listening to a lot of that. But there was like older music like oldies, we listened to a lot of oldies and stuff like that. And listen to a lot of gospel and a lot of Christian music, you know, but I did here. A lot of like Chuck Berry and fast domino. And like the platters like, my, you know, my dad grew up here in LA listening to lot of soul music, a lot of old soul stuff. I was very very very familiar with. And you know, I knew of I I didn't have extensive knowledge of everybody's catalogs. But I knew of people like Aretha Franklin, and you know, Otis Redding. And I knew a lot of those a lot of the hit songs from those artists. So I guess that rock and roll as far as rock and roll goes, it was like, you know, it was oldies and old rock and old soul from fifties. And sixties mainly acquainted with you know, and yeah, yeah. You know? And then there was you know, I was born right at the time when Christian music was becoming a thing, you know. So, you know, I I also grew up listening to a lot of these like, the rock bands and the contemporary Christian artists striper. Yeah, I wasn't really into striper. But like there was groups like White Hart and Petra that did like arena rock the Christian teenage kids crowds that I listen to and my sister was really into Amy grant like she still is fan. You know, she stayed in. You know, the. Yeah. The thing is. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, the thing is Amy is like she's like a been a fixture in the Nashville scene for years. So right want like, you know, you know, a tried and true proven songwriter. Work person on the Nashville seeing that gained national prominence. You know, she would be like right there. You know? So I mean, some of these artists they got a bad rap at the time and baby now, but like the, you know, these were all really legit like really tried and true Nashville artists that did this did this music in while they weren't doing their own albums. They're doing sessions with Eric Clapton, or whatever you know, what I mean. So, you know, like the guys from White Hart where writing songs for Clapton, you know, you know, in their off time stuff like that. That was the story. I heard once. And I lived in central Florida Orlando going up, and so like all the it was a huge market for church music. Instead of all these artists came in like there was free or cheap ten dollar concerts every weekend that my friend. I could go to their all age. She shows, and you know, it was fun Christian rhinos great place to meet girls. Yeah. Teenage boy, and you wanna talk to cute girls. It was like not bad thing. You know in, you know, anyways. We'll we'll censor that part from my wife listens. I guess, but but she's yes. But anyway, it was it was a fun place to go and meet people. Yeah. In general. And you know, there is that. But. I don't know when I got into high school. You know, I started listening to like you to and RAM, and I got into rush and stuff like that. And that was with my my buddy, Brian Brian Mitchell. His name we listen to a lot of music together. And really got me a really got into YouTube at that time, and you know, and they're basically a very like Christian roots band. Anyway, you know, there's things we want to talk about coming up. So this is what early you two would be nineteen eighty three four. Yeah. The first album boy was eighty one. Yeah. They got together like in seventy seven when there was sixteen writing in the you know, they released like an EP few singles. But then I l p boy came out and eighty one eighty or eighty one eighty one, but yeah, so and that was like, you know, and those things like this albums released by the seventeen year old kids, and it was a concept album about. The journey through youth and adult scence and hitting maturity, and you know, the first song was a big hit song. They still played all their shows. I will follow. It's a song about you know, like Bano. It's it's a song about him losing his mother as as a young child and continuing spiritual journey through life trying to like have this journey through life with God in the absence of his mother. I mean, this is a seventeen year old kid. If you hear the songs Lear lyrics this song. It's simple heavy the whole album is really heavy, and I'm like these guys are seventeen. So there was like there was something to these guys from the very beginning. You know, they were very soulful in thoughtful songwriters from the very start. You know, and they could barely play their instruments at the time, you know. So anyway, I, you know, I really got into that. And I really specially got into the two albums that are really got into at that time were forgettable fire and Joshua tree. Right. And and those were produced by the team of Brian Eno and Daniel. Len Wein, we got some Daniel in while on the list coming up here in a little while. And so, yeah, I mean, I think we can get into that a little bit more. We get into list, but. Yeah. There's like, you know, I'm a spiritual person as it, Christian, person spiritual person. So I always connected to the spiritual aspects of rock and roll, you know, and even the, you know, the secular stuff, you know, because, you know, you look at the original star now like with Elvis and Jerry Lewis, and these guys they, you know, they all came from Churchill save out of the church amount of wire. Yeah. Yeah. Little Little Richard. Yeah. Dade minister. Yeah. Yeah. I know. And that's, you know, so there is a spirits rooting everything. They did you know and Johnny cash, you know, we can't leave him out. Right. I mean, there's so many, you know, great, you know, of that of that tradition Perkins. And all those guys they came out of that tradition. And even you know, what they would sing about the real stuff of the world and what they're going through. And you know, they would get, you know, get even when it got corrupted dirty. It was rooted in you know, this is what I'm from and this. But this is what I'm experiencing, you know. So there was an honesty there. That was shied away from later, you know, as things came a little more sanitized, you know, but you know, but that's kind of like what you two dozen brace that, you know, that's part of like, you know, why I still listen to them. They're they deal with honestly deal with some of the, you know, the grittiness and real reality of the world, and some of the things they go through and some of the things that perhaps they've done that they're not proud of they'll they'll sing about it. But. It's rooted in what this is coming from. But this is what I experienced, you know, and that kind of honesty, I appreciate and wish we could get a little more of that in the conversation. Just in the you know in the church, Rome. Sometimes it's it's frowned upon. But outside of the church. Exactly. All right. Well, cool that that shines a lot of light and sets a really good foundation for the eleven cuts that we're going to go through today. Let's let's hit the first one the very first one is the take off and landing of everything. Tell me about now to be fair you sent me this list. And I made a point not everything I'm going to hear his fresh to my ears. So well, and because I mean, you know, me, you know, I can be a rock and roll stop sometimes horribly afraid of of my judgment. And and frankly, you're you're taller than I am an in better shape. So you could take a fight. So we're not gonna go there. It's not going to get to that. Don't worry. But you know, what I wanted to do was come into all of these cuts with absolutely freshers. Probably ninety five percent certain. I haven't heard a single one of these tracks and the title to this very first one is completely unfamiliar to me. But when we were planning the show, you're like, let's play this first, and it's a long one. But you know, tell me tell me about this cut. Okay. So this group elbow, I was introduced to pry five or six years ago. I was taking voice lessons with Karen Whipple. Schnur who's a a what are you? Really? Sure. Yeah. You know? Karen? Yeah. Yeah. Wonderful. Yeah. A lot of people know our Kosice sings and a lot of she sings in a lot of groups around town as Caroline now now, and she and her husband Ray of have have moved up to northeast and their working in churches and stuff up there. But and he was terrific. Anyways. Karen told me about this. She's like, you should check these guys out elbow. They're really good. And I immediately got hooked. I'm you know, really big Peter Gabriel fan, and that would be the only thing like you say describe Elbaum like, well, I guess they do something akin to what you'd hear PD. Gabriel do which you can't really describe Peter Gabriel either, you know, so, but it's really big huge production kind of wall of sound and some in some some of the stuff. Okay. And really interesting. Good lyrics and singers got a great voice. It's a kind of thing where like it just all comes together in a certain way this band, you know, when they play, and it just sounds respectful, and it's not, but it's not like weird or Esa teric or anything it's hard to describe. It's not strange esoteric. It's very palatable is just you got. We gotta hear it. We got to hear it. But then that's exactly what we do. And then we'll come back, and we'll talk about the track. So here is elbow Spanish for the bow. Or is it elbow? It's just the part of your arm. I don't the name. But yeah, here we got enough. It's elbow mccraw courts radio hour. She marshall. Shoes. Scare. The band is called elbow, and that was take off and landing of everything right here on McCoy court three hour. I'm Tim powers. My guest is danger cat Daniel Corey, and we're going through through a list of music Dan has program for us today. That is an interesting six and a half minute cut. I had no idea what to expect you. You said wall of sound like a lot of people say that. But not everybody knows what that is at wall of sound. Yeah. That's such a big sound right with that with that super mumbling base. Right. I mean, it's there's a lot of bass drum a lot of floor time in there just lay down this foundation. And then that the the literal Finn. I guess it's a Fender bass comes in and just lays that yet really cool foundation defending being. Yeah. That's then the counter melody from what are those keys, right? Yeah. That lilting piano. Did it? Yeah. Right. And this wasn't so much a song as it was a tone poem. I think. Yeah. A lot of this stuff is very wordy like that. And kinda chantey that you know. Yeah. In that way. But you also has a wonderful Cincinnati. But that one was very where he won the it was it was where the melody is fantastic. Yeah. To me to my ears, Dan. The the lyrics were lost in the mix. So I. I was more listening to the melody and the and the musicianship, and I completely missed the lyrics. So this something. Yeah. So tell me what I missed. Well, the the words actually go along with the feeling the music's giving you okay? You know, I mean, the title take off and landing and everything it's like this is a song that like I listened to like when I'm in the car, and we're about to drop a lot more money to do a new project and possibly go to the poor house. Or going off to a con- dragging off, you know, eight tons of books to Akon to try to hopefully, sign some books and try to get somebody's attention. Right. You know? And it's like, it's the takeoff. And landing of everything is like, you know, it's like the the the refrain into the song says over and over is a prayer for the take off and landing of everything for the take off landing of everything. Good. You know, it's like the song the songs like a prayer for what it is. You're trying to do with your life. You know? And there's like some of the some of the Lear are so wonderful like gets the guy. Garvey is the name of the the lead singer, writes writes, the words, you know, like the second verse he says, he kissed the wrist of the hand that has twisted at self all into your hair, you close the blinds doors behind me in clear all obstacles on the stair. You are an open book, I'm on the bathroom floor. Yours is an open door. I'm throwing ballast overboard. Wow. You know? It's just like, we're. The house ready for something something's going to happen. And he's like saying, I'm stuck here on the bathroom floor. But you're you know, assume he's talking to his wife because I'm thinking about my wife taking care of everything while I'm just stuck on the factory floor. And you know, I also love that uses the word balanced in a song. There's only one of the song that has used the word balanced. I know the Catherine wheel sparks are gonna fly got ballast in my brain. He says in that song. So I just think that's a really cool word that is under used in song lyrics, but. Yeah. So that song is it makes me feel good. And it makes me. You know, it's a kind of a thing in though, it's like what I was saying before about what was great about. So many of these roots gospel singer where they they know where they're from. But they their knowledge in the truthfulness where they're going, and this is this is you could call this a happy song. But it's also a song about okay, we're getting ready to stumble into the unknown here. You know, there's trepidation about it. Right. But then there's like, hey, this is thing feeling about, you know, we're burning the bridges, and we're we're making something happen. The take off landing of everything. And another special thing about this song for me is a while ago. I wrote this I wrote a script and hasn't been produced or anything, but it's called craftsman. And it's an adventure story. Science fiction adventure story about I say that the pitches, inter dimensional capper Googlers, but you know, so's people slide into other realities in stealing things slide back into t to another reality to escape, and it's, but it's a lot of fun. It's almost of like it's got the kind of joyous romp of like, a marvel movie. The feel of it. And I always imagine this song being in credit song. Oh, cool. Yeah. So you know, that we'd have those wonderful animated titles like they have. You know, move with this song plane, you know, showing guys jumping off buildings and soften swinging from wires and doing a Beijing. Feats of heroism daring do with this song plane in the background because that's kind of like the motivation in the life of the character in that story. And then embraces kind of an abrasive kind of that romantic adventure inside myself. You know, dad at scores story and the song. So that that gopher broke. Yeah. Sometimes literally go for broke, which is pretty much exactly every time. But but yeah. Yeah. So that's why that songs on the list special. That's very cool. I'm glad that. I'm I'm glad we started with that one. Yeah. I really am. I think that a great place to start, and I and I love the energy behind our second cut. Where will I be? All right. What do I what do I need to know? So this is by Daniela and. I'm a huge huge huge fan. And I mentioned him earlier because he produced his produce a lot of YouTube albums with Brian Eno. Okay. You know, there's unforgettable fire and Joshua tree. Which is probably the two biggest, you know, and Achtung baby also one of their biggest and another one of their biggest being all that you Can't Leave Behind and they won the Grammys for beautiful day and stuff like that. So those are some of the the the huge hit songs albums of of you to. And it was it was there was like he told the story of how he came to work with them like to gone to Brian Eno about wanting to produce an album. And so, you know, it plays some of the demo tracks for Len wise, like, yeah, I don't want to produce any more records for other people on when do that. And he's like, well, do you think that you could hear me these guys I'm really interested in this? He's here in the music, and they ended up going to Dublin together. And he said they were driving, you know, in Lenoir in the car with Bano Bano driving, and he had a cassette tape in the player of just the the band playing music as he drove he was singing the songs with them. That's how. That's how and the interviewer says. Well, you know, I guess eventually came on board. Apparently and Lenoir says will Bano could be very persuasive. So you can imagine the charisma and all that. But anyway, yeah. So he's done so much work with them. And that's wonderful. Peter Gabriel so and us albums, and but you also worked with like Emmylou Harris. And so he did this album wrecking ball that he produced for her that one a lot of Grammy's, and he wrote this opening track call where will I be and the track is it's the credits on it. Simple. It's I was just looking Lander notes on the vinyl the other day, and it's EMMY Lou vocals, and he plays mandolin in based Daniel while plays that and Larry Mullen junior of YouTube plays the drums, right? And it's really beautiful. And that's it. That's all the musicianship on this. Yeah. Yeah. On that particular track. But then he ended covering the song his own song on his two thousand nine album here is what is and he did a much different Rendon of it's him singing lead. And I picked I picked this version of it because it's the one I can sing too in the car. All I listen to EMI Leuwen just as just as often can't lose. No. Yeah. I don't have her range. But but the version is very interesting because when he plays the mandolin he has running through a lot of affects. It sounds very edge with Qatar. I didn't realize it was a man to land until I was looking it's just very -ffected mandolin. It sounds like Atari does that a lot like. And here's the interesting thing was I recently got to go to his home for a party. Yeah. And go into his studio and his band played for us a little private concert. And I got to see this Qatar that he had is. But I've been seen in videos for years, and he has this like old metal Resonator, right? And the which one was flown on ahead. Memphis, national or Gibson. I don't recall, but is this old metal Resonator that I seen him play. He played it on Peter Gabriel's track. It's the opening track to the us album called come talk to me. And when he plays sounds very affected sounds like an electric guitar, but it's this old metal Resonator, and he's got a special bridge over the strings where that you installed pickups and all this, and it's really cool. Okay. I saw this guitar sitting on his piano and DO and his bass player Jim told me there's a big dent in the side. Is like, yeah. That that tends from a fight out of Bob Dylan. So but anyway, so yeah, this is so yeah. Daniela Noi singing where will I be in just like with elbow? I had a hard time picking picking a song this one. Does we could talk about the specifics, I guess lurks after but this one this one means a lot to me with lyrics such and the production on this one is very interesting. And you know, with this one is a lot of instrumentation that kind of blends together on overuse wall of sound. But a lot of stuff I picked, you know, has that has that quality to it. And it's it's a little more subtle in a little quieter than last one. But but yeah. And all right. Yeah. Let's give it a listen. Oh, the streets crash. This last seven. We're the mothers. Arms. In on. From. Cold. Will. When. Sure, all omitted. You said you'd be. Glenn don't wish your. Joe issue. Dome. While and Dr. True. Yeah. I like. Of your body land to me. Urine Jansher laughter. Draw? Talking video. The steel. Tracks. Well, that's wrong. Fulla heart opens wide. It's never seen. Anna did sons zone time. Like learn. Oh. The coral courts radio our with my guest, Dan, Corey as we as we go through music that Dan has programmed. Where will I be I love the production on that record? It's so good. It's wonderful soundings. There's so much because yes, if you're listening in headphones, you got a super treat because far far left in the mix and far far. Right. It sounds like there's two different drummers. Right. Totally syncopated but playing a different pattern, and they both just work beautifully. And then mix street front and center are these are these vocals that are nice and tight, right? He got you got your base on your on your far. Right. And then you've got this this funky. Keyboard not having B three, but just is the sustained chords right up mixed with the with the vocals, and he does an interesting thing. With the vocals where they they. They start out clear they get distorted in the middle. And they end clear as a bell with those drums. I love the production on this, man. Thank you for turned me onto this. Do you know about about that is it is it really to drum kits on either side left, and right or is it just well miked one kit. I'm not sure. Okay. Sure on that. But you know, you know, he is he is a producer. So it's like the production quality on his own songs as yeah. It's going to be good. Yeah. But you know. You know, he did, you know, working with like Peter Gabriel and working with you to like on October baby album. You know, this is guy. That's very well works with percussion in instruments and beats really well. You know, he I've seen a lot of watch Lada interviews with them. So, you know, he collects he has a he has some digital boxes. He calls like a beat orphanage rehouse like sound beats stuff. So. Yeah. You know, so he'll mixed it. He will mix together other elements. You know, you know, maybe he had a live drum kit with some beets mixed over it or he had to junkets, really. Well, Mike went I'm not sure. Yeah. But I did see I did see drum kit in in his in his place in his studio. And there was a guy there with me. He was drummer. And he was telling me about this snare, and the name is gone on my mind because her that's a really rare like hard to find snare that that dry and had this like really nice inlays on the side. Like brass facing? So, but but yeah, I know I I've also heard interviews raise like when people come to my studio. I just encourage them to play my drums. We have them set up the way I want them. You know, you know, so, but yeah. And I love the way it begins. It begins with that beat kind of a steady beat a sound. There's a sound generating that kind of sounds like it's almost coming off the snare because it's like in tune with the drum. Yeah. That tone, you know, that's going, and then the base comes in kind of carry in a melody. And then you hear the tar come in very subtly. Plays a like A Gibson. You know, and it's like his Gibson sound is always like a very clean tone with some of the some of the effects laid over it. So like in the case of the song, y'all revere clean tone with kind of like a little bit of hair a little bit fuzzy clean tone that comes in and really just kind of informs the rest of the sound rather than dominating it. You know? So yeah, we the production on the song. And I hadn't heard it in headphones awhile. Honestly. So it was really nice to hear that films. But yeah. And just lyrically and I love his singing. And I love the lyrics are wonderful. And you know, and it's just again, it's it's a spiritual message of where will I be, you know, and you know, in that last verse is like talk in feeling Hugh in the skies, all the way, though, still bars. Calm down calling in the cracks on all the way down and come all the way back up in butcher them. But you know, that's a that's a lot of struggle there. A lot of metaphor for struggle. But he's like where will I be, you know? So again, there's kind of like a acknowledgement of spiritual journey, but an honesty of where you are. And where you're going. You know that I really connect with that song. Yeah. So. That that song always makes me think I've heard hundreds of times. But I always think every time I hear I mean, that's that's what it's that's what good art is supposed to do. Yeah. I mean, there's there's your pop songs there's, you know, do run run and do the locomotion or whatever which are just are fun. But the stuff that that really gets under people's skin is stuff. Like this. You know? And and what we've what we've learned is. You know that the anxiety the struggle that as artists we go through every day, especially, you know, trying to walk the line between art and commerce as you are both doing right now, it's not an easy thing to do and stuff like this keeps us grounded because otherwise we're spending plates going. What are we gonna do manager this book done? You know, all this stuff to do. I don't have time to do a podcast with powers. What am I doing, you know, and and the spiritual element of music like this allows us to get grounded. And and realize that it's a process it's a journey. You know, we're slugging it out as long as we as long as got breath in our lungs. You know, and we're not hurting anybody. We're we're moving forward, and you keep in mind. You're like, okay. This is why do it? Yes. Man. I just I'm so knocked out by the production on that. And the way that the drums are Mike throughout that. I'm gonna play that again sometime. Yeah. Good. Good. Glad you like it. Is there anything else? You wanna you want to mention about it, you you're literally in the room where this record was recorded. Not at the same time recorded that you were in in that room. I'm not sure where he recorded that songs that was several years ago. But it might have been at that home. I don't know how long it's been at the at the the home here in LA, God, he's had like like, I know you took a lot of photos of his home in New Orleans where you're rewarded for so allow a Coty. Okay. And so he had a studio set up there. But but yeah. So I've looked I've looked at a lot of interviews and stuff studios on it. But I have been in the studio where he recorded a lot of stuff you may require that song there. I'm not. I'm not one hundred percent. But yeah, it was I saw all the instruments stuff and all the boards. I'm sure that we're used to record this arm for sure. Yeah. Right. Tell me about Hartson bones the next cut. All right. Well, this is a this is a musician that everybody knows Paul Simon. So him. Yeah. I'm a I'm a huge fan of Paul Simon. So again, it's a similar sort of thing. You know, it's like, it's interesting. Simon and Garfunkel when the their first album Wednesday nine AM, you know, it's the the the first song on that is go tell it on the mountain. You know, it's like kind of rewritten reworked version, but it's it's a gospel song, you know, and, you know, I, you know, and they come from Jewish backgrounds. I don't know what they're you know, what their convictions are what have you? But Paul Simon throughout his career is always been very spiritual in his lyrics, and he talks about talks about God. He talks about Jesus a lot, you know. And in ways that make you think you know, it's like usually when he talks about Christ in a song. It's really interesting and kind of satirical and funny, but respectful way, you know, which I always really appreciated about him so Hartson bone. So this was and this is connected to how I started writing for the first time. So this is kind of personal story that I hope people find interesting, but so Brendan I finished is my wife. For those of you haven't met her. She's wonderful. But we were living in Orlando's is we're from Florida. She's from Miami originally, I'm from Orlando. We met in college at UCF, we've got married pretty soon after college. And so we were in Orlando, and we were studying workshop theater with Kenya. Lows from New York produced playwright New Yorker Woodward playwright in author and actor and acting coach into so we were a member of his workshop for four or five years producing workshop theatre plays acting and writing direct. It was a really wonderful time of of training. And that's how I learned how to write was mentoring. With with Ken mentoring me. So I went to his writing workshop for the first time, and I was like, okay. I wanna write a movie, you know, I'd written some plays short scenes and stuff on what I want to write a movie now on start writing movies, right? Right. In so. I I was reading a lot of plays at the time. And I was reading a lot of tense, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller and stuff to kind of really get involved in knowing about the theater, and I actually just watched the old black and white film of night of the Guana. Starring Richard Burton. Yeah. Let's Tennessee Williams at tation. And you know, it's about this defrocked minister who goes down to Mexico kind of on this bender and up at, you know, a monastery, and, you know, a lot of soul searching and heavy I it, it's it's very transient dental, which is you know, what Tennessee Williams did, you know, but like the the monologue and the oh after I should look this up before we start talking about, but the the female star of the film and who's a very famous actor. And I forget who she was she has his monologue. At the end that I haven't gone and looked it up since I'm not going to watch the movie again some day watch it acted. I'm not gonna go read it because it was just so dreamy and transit dental about just the spiritual condition where they're going what they're doing. Lives and the language and the performance were so amazing. So neither Guana was about going down to Mexico. Right. And then Paul Simon had the song, which I had heard for the first time called Hartson bones. And it's a very sad song about apparently when you listen to it. It's about him and his wife are in trouble, you know, a troubled marriage, and they go down to Mexico on a whim to, you know, spend some time together and try to fix things. And you know at the beginning of the song, he says sangre de Cristo and blood of Christ down in Mexico. And there was something that that that particular that song interwoven with having seen that movie that it was like somebody's down in Mexico looking for the blood of Christ. It was pretty heavy you know, and trying to fix their lives at the same time. Richard Burton, you know, who's defrocked priest and he was drunk and he's life as a mess now you've got Paul Simon. And I think Carrie Fisher, probably down in Mexico. Trying to fix things, you know. And you know, the thing about this song that makes it so difficult. So hard is like our souls are intertwined, but we are falling apart. So how can this be you know, he's talking about Hartson bones? Like our bodies, our one our souls are one, but we're in big trouble. You know is kind of the crux of the song. It's very sad. But anyways, so all this just spiritual journey down in Mexico. I that's what prompted me to write my first film script, and it was called Hartson bones. And. Ended up being kind of this kind of light hearted adventure story about this guy. Who's at gangster who has to go collect this package and ends up being the woman that he's supposed to take up to this other drug Lord who's going to marry her, but he doesn't want to do this. And you know, he pictures her as his muse, and all this sort of thing, and they ended up on this crazy thing where they up in this like inside this mountain monastery with all these surrounded by monks and smoke in mystical weirdness and having visions, you know, it was a strange script. And you know, it wasn't perfect. But anyways. Yeah. So that that was kind of like the real start of a journey was seeing that movie the ninety on a hearing, the song parts, and bones that writing the script hearts and bones. And the funny thing was I was like twenty five and I was living in Orlando. I didn't know anything. And this is crazy. I I put it in the envelope. And I sent it to the endeavor agency before they merged with ROY Moore's, right? It to Patrick White's at de. Whatever agency. It said, hey, I think that's David should star in this movie because he was like just really big at the time. You know, I think David just in this movie, but a week later, I got a phone call for Petric white Sola differ agency. Are you ready to make Matt an offer? They read it. They liked it that much. That was amazing. And of course, completely fell apart very quickly. And then like, you know, the script early never moved from me other other than that afterwards. You know, I had a lot of bad criticisms on it after. But I'm like, you know, what that's just the way it goes over the hump, man. David lighted are David's agent liked it. So that was that was pretty insane. So, you know, and then I ended up writing another kind of story gangster story. It takes took takes place in Mexico right profit, which I which was my first graphic novel. I did with Anthony debt. You do. A we doing more together got that published by image. So anyway, so very long story. But Hartson bones was kind of the start of this big journey for me huge chapter in my life. Just as it writer because eventually ended up making comics ended eventually getting published by image comics, and that did well for me. So I guess that's all I can say. Yeah. Let's listen to to what kicked off. You know, let's call it Dan's literary career. Here's Paul Simon on the radio. One one half loaned to. To one that you. Are traveling. Sangra decrease the blood of Christ mount to Mexico. Last leg of journey. This started load. The are the fan. Rainbows in the desert. Mountain passes. Hearts. Parts. Thinking back to the season. Looking back creeks. The two people will the act was outrageous. The bride was contagious. Brian. Events may have had some on the man with the girl. The arkle. Hands rolling down and. Lag shaping too. Hearts. Cards. Hearts. Heart. She said why? We drive to the night we wake up down. No nothing about nothing. School until me. Won't you love for who? I am wear. He said 'cause that's not the way the world is. This is how low the. This is how on the. One in one half wandering Jew. Returned matchel. Tourism cleans step out cage. Speculate who had been? Time will determine if these consultations will be there reward. The are. Waiting to hear stole. You take to these twirl them. Their heart. Won't come on. Hearts. Hearts. Parts. Hearts. Title cut off Paul Simon's, nineteen eighty three album, Hartson bones. Interesting time to be Paul Simon nineteen Eighty-three. Yeah. Because this the inbetween or just prior to this album coming out just a little research while while it was playing the concert in central park with art Garfunkel had just taken place and one trick pony was the prior album and have you seen the movie? One trick pony. Now. I haven't seen the film. But but the soundtrack is incredible. Yeah. And I saw one trick pony because it is one of the few filmed appearances of the love and spoonful he hired the spoonful come in and play a play the ban in a party scene in the spoonful hadn't hadn't spoken to each other in probably eight or nine years, really. So the guys, you know, got together, and and and played the band in in the scene, and that was the whole motivation for me to go and see this movie, which you know, the the soundtrack albums grade. It's you know, it's it's a Paul Simon album. You you get all the fingerprints of Paul Simon album, you're out and just you know, it it just didn't land. But but oh, and then the the concert in central park was such an enormous thing. Right. And then this album, there's no hit single off this album, and it I checked billboard and it peaked at at thirty three. On the billboard chart. Yeah. It wasn't one of his big albums. Not a big album and then Graceland boom. Yeah. Right. Oh, yeah. And there's little elements of Graceland in the production of this. You know, the marimba, and and the harmonies and stuff like that as I'm listening to it. It's it's like, it's it's it's like reading Hemingway through Paul Simon's. I that's an interesting take on it. Yeah. You know? It's it's there's there's a lot of element in the story. The context of the story of the song. There's there's there's a lot of Hemingway themes, there's redemption, and and Mexico, and you know, the the very subtle interplay between two people who are very intimate, but disconnected. Yeah. Right. Which is something Paul Simon knew very well and continues, I suppose to know very well based on his current songwriting, and this there's a lot. There's a lot in that cut, man. Yeah. And and I can see how as a as a twenty something who doesn't really doesn't. Knows his arm from a whole McGrath. Yeah. You. You know? Attend to view the outside world based on what you consume, you know, and you, and you've you the outside world based on other people's experiences, and this is such a great this really summarizes the that that on we of being disconnected with someone that your intimate with. Yeah. You know, there's I mean there's there's that. That disappointment and emptiness that that's their that's reflected even in the voices that Paul Simon affects as he sings in character throughout this. So I mean, really what what an interesting six minutes of of music. You know? Yeah. Yeah. It was wonderful. I got to hear play live back in twenty twelve to because the first time I saw him you wanna tour staying, and they did a show together where they would swap songs and stuff, and it was wonderful show and the bowl that would that one was at staple center. I think I saw the bowl I saw him at the bowl last year for the farewell tour, and it was completely sold out a packed out show. And they're both amazing shows. But was the first time I saw him he played hearts and bones. I I was thinking, oh, we're going to hear some of the big hits because he's sharing a concert with staying in. You're going to hear the boxer, and you know, and certainly we did, but he came out and sang Hartson bone. And so to him one of his big songs, and I guess maybe to maybe to his hardcore fan base. That's a big song. But like it wasn't a hit song to the general public for. Sure. I don't know if you're going out if you're like, this is my farewell tour. Yeah. Right. The the people who are gonna come to your farewell to are your hardcore base. And if I were in that position, I would play the songs that are important to me. Yeah. Yeah. So maybe there's more to this song to Paul himself than either. You are I who are completely outside of any sphere of influence would know. Yes. This may resonate with a point in his life that because there is an uncharacteristically large amount of soul in Paul Simon put soul and just about everything he does. But there's a lot of soul. Yes. In this one. A lot of confession. Yes. I mean, it seems almost too personal movie. Just another song. Yes. Very much. So, but then, but yet it speaks to me, you know, it's his personal. It's spoken to me in some way, you know. So and by the way, I looked it up during the song it was Deborah Kerr. Who is the co star wanna who did that wonderful wonderful monologue that really helped get me down this road. Inspire me to start doing. I do. So there you go night of the Guana. Look it up on on Houston directed directed. So so look it up on on whatever streaming service. You subscribe to this is the coral courts radio hour, and we're going through an itinerary of songs list of songs assembled by my dear friend, Dan Corey. And man there there's I mean, we're not even halfway done. Man. We have we have covered a lot of ground here today. I'm kind of excited about the next cut about get out. Yeah. Yeah. Again, not knowing anything about it. What do I need to know about get out before it here it? Okay. So get out is the new single by bat farm that farmer. Dear friends of mine, so Alex Colinas and Dennis Morehouse. So there do oh. And they play live Alex plays guitar and sings and Dennis plays drums, but they kind of just do everything on their albums. They play all the instruments and seeing all the parts and everything. And they're wonderful friends. I met Alex probably about four years ago. Minaret Halloween party marine house pet it. So I met her there, and we just clicked and became friends immediately. But she's like one of the most insanely talented people. I know and she is like a decade plus younger than me, but is currently working on her seventh studio album. So that will give you an idea of that what this lady does, and she's an amazing musician, and she helped me out a lot like when I was when I was working on my blood worth comic. Like, we were kick-starting that like she let me some of the songs to us as as a soundtrack titles for the comic and helped promote that. So, you know, we have a connection in the comic, she became a character. And one of and blood worth we drew around as the character jammer. So you'll see her with when you read the comic and she's done. So many amazing things like there's the show called. Dance moms that our audience here probably hasn't watched. But whenever songs got on their like she got picked up for licensing for one of her song. Cry got picked up for licensing that ended up being like the start the all-time star that show this girl. They Mattie who who's a wonderful dancer did a dance to Alex's song. And like it was kind of like overnight after years of work thing. Sure, she was getting all this attention. And then she ended up going on the song on the show performing the song. And she's currently like like ten million views for the song on YouTube pres. Yeah. Yeah. So, but Alex is is pretty amazing and a really good friend. And so she and Denis together are bat farm, and this song has not we are debut lead it here. It is not been released yet. It's releasing March twenty fourth it's going to be on all the streaming services, and I tunes and it's going to be on the new album that they're working on right now. It's coming up. I actually last night spent I was up all night photographing them filming the video for the song. So I'm like, really? Tied into this song. And actually, Alex called me to come sing backup vocals on it. But I was really sick. And had no voice and couldn't do it. I was like, oh, no almost on the track. So just pretend it's me. But you wanna leave your mic open? You can you can leave. Your backup background vocals on. Let's not do that. Let's keep the integrity of the song. So this is Alex Kalisa and Dennis Morehouse as bat farm singing get out, and it is a rating through so the girl courts radio hours first world premiere single. Here's bad farm. Terrible. Really, do you see the sun? Only. Rosewood? Cross you you you don't even wanna know that both. Seven just to keep my Philps. Yeah. Dan that was ending and my old district training comes in. I'm like this is going to end cold. This is going to ensue pursue pursue per coal. And I hope it does. And it just bam right on the downbeat. You know, and I'm like, oh, yes. Cool. Excellent. All right. So that is that is the coral courts radio hours first world, premiere single, bad farm. This song is called get out. And in my old, Casey ninety five days. I would say that song kicks my ass. She for this woman is is roughly thirty I suppose, let's let's let's say she's twenty nine. And she's got this maturity in her voice, which is so good. You know, it and the the fuzz through the guitars is is really nice grabs. You it doesn't hit you over the head. The hook is nice and solid all the way through the drumming. The son of a gun who's playing drums on that? Man. That Phil at the end we out of time like comes back in. Oh, what a what a nice. And I, you know, we're listening to it. And I'm like, you know, on one hand you want to say it hearkens back to the late nineties when there were stations. Like, there was a format called Alice, which was female Centric, the the Alice station in Saint Louis assaults played Ruka salt. They had to do they had to do on a weekend. And on one hand this kinda gets in there. But definitely stands out stiff out because there's there's some there's some rock and roll heart. Yes in here and just like like a snarl that you don't get. Yeah. A lot of in a lot of what is commonly heard in female, fronted rock and roll. Yeah. She's like go ahead and being being it's okay. You know? Yes. She's got she's got stuff to be angry about and she's going to express it, you know, but she's also the nicest per the nicest people ever known. So that's there's that whole thing of you know, -nology where you know. From where you're going. You know? Yeah, she. Yeah. She wrote this. So it's you know, it's reflective of of her heart of of her soul while she maybe a sweet and relatively well adjusted. Anybody is in our universe. You know, there's you don't get to be beyond eighteen years old without some disappointment. And especially in the arts, right? You have to have some sort of life life experience, even you know, twenty five year old Dan Corey right in his movie there. There was some experience, you know, little bit that you drew on comedians are the same way that the great comedians, and even some that aren't so great like me. Right. Thank you. But they wrote their material based on on their life experience that truth. Whether it's in your music or your painting or your screenplays or your standup resonates better with an audience, and it tends to bring about a cleaner and more impressive. Art. This was not a manufactured cut. This isn't the hearts and flowers or anything that or it's not, you know, it's not it's not a jewel song. And I don't mean any disrespect to jewel. It's terrific. Does. Right. But this ain't in this just has this has. Yeah. This has fierceness to it that I really liked like. Yeah. Right from the right. Alex does with vocals and just with the way she expresses herself in last year. She she works for GHS strings, jazz like social media, and such for them and last year that she produced GHS showcase for women's month to help battled depression and gave the proceeds to write love on her arms, and she's really made a good way for self, and she's helping people in disapproved of her and she's pretty mazing. Well, then let these guys is there is there a bat farm website. And how will this new record be distributed? Okay. Yeah. So yes, you can find that farm on Instagram and on Twitter, all this all show, Facebook, and all the social outlets. It's one word that farm. So it's easy. And this they they are on streaming. They all they released a single from the new album already called six underground, which is a cover the speaker pimps it from the ninety. Right. So they they did a nice really interesting totally unique take on that and video on YouTube. If you wanna check it out just go to six underground about farm search for that. And this new song get out is going to be March twenty fourth. It's going to be released and all the streaming outlets Spotify whatnot, I tunes, and and if you're in southern California, they're gonna be playing the viper room on March twenty ninth. Nice so go see them. They are wonderful live. I don't we don't have release date for the full EP record right now. But it's going to be some time. Not too long jump on the band way because the most hipster. The most hipster thing that a coral courts radio, our listener, you know, this, you know, about this band way before anybody else, and if this cut is any indication of the talent and the product of this band at their young age, they're gonna huge this is going to be great. So we look forward to to hearing more from our friends at at bat farm anything else. You wanna you wanna say about this before we move onto the next cut? Gosh, you know, the production is great. I know that the friend Charlie way Meyer have met Charlie produced it, and I love the baseline on especially the opening like starts off that Keno sound then it comes in with Alex the base like raging. I heard the song for the first time at the benefit last year. They played it live. And I was like you guys that baseline has special. This is I think this is my favorite song years yet. So it's always nice. It's always nice. When the latest thing you've done is the best thing, which means because you've got so much more to go. So, but yeah, Alex, Dennis Batt, far men. Just just be on the lookout and go see what the viper room on the twenty ninth and download the new song. Download their song. I tunes right now. The six underground. Yeah. Go get the new one this one March twenty fourth they go suppose part with your three dollars. Believe me. An Alex has a ton of social or of solo albums on. I two Seuss. Look, Alex Khalil is Alex to Xs Kelly C A L S E on itunes. Download all albums. Yeah. By the mall, by them. All yes. All right. Let's move on from bat farm. Painted woman. Dan. Yes, that is cut number five on on your list kind of an unusual title. But this is a different source. Okay. Kind of thing. This is a film soundtrack. Okay. Yeah. Them sound dress to give you a little idea, historically, Dan. And I we don't do it every year, but more often than not we we have found ourselves together on record store day. Right. And we've had we've had a ball just hitting up some some neighborhood LA record store. Yeah. And every time, you know, I'm in my bins. And I'm poking around. I'm looking for stuff and every time I'm like, I wanna show Dan this like I wonder where he is always in the soundtracks, right? Then you're always you're always like, look, I found I found this cool weird weird weird stuff. And and those used record bins in the soundtrack section. I never did this movie existed. You know? So so there's always like this weird sub current of soundtrack records, or you know, what are you listening to right now on a soundtrack to this movie? Okay. All right, cool testing. That's how I sound. Yeah. Okay. So painted lady. What movie is this? It's called painted woman. Okay. And the film is called the title track. The film is called painted woman. And so my friend James cotton produced wrote and directed this film, right and stars. Steph Dawson who was in the hunger games movies. And also, my my friend. Laurel Harris is in it plays, a really wonderful part in the film Ellie, and Laura laurel is if you follow my Instagram social media, I I did a comic called blood worth which has about a female detective protagonist goes into people's minds to solve crimes, right? And we did a photo project with laurel as blood worth. So you'll see laurel all over my Instagram as my character blood worth in the rain, which imager Instagram handle at the danger cat danger ATT one word. Hey, go. So laurel stars in the film as well. And she's just wonderful. They they both did a wonderful job. Now, the soundtrack is by Corey Allen Jackson and James corden worked together a few times. Corey's a really cool guys local here, he does a lot of films, actually. Award winning composer has been nominated for a lot of awards. He won recently for he did the soundcheck to film, starring Leah Striber boxing film, called Chuck K. And that was set in the seventies. He did licata doors style rock and roll soundtrack for that. Right. And anyway, Corey did this now painted woman is is western film. And and it was James came on board the project, and you know, it was it was a small budget film. They're doing a western for small amount of money. So he made this miraculously happen. Right. You know, and he gets in there. And it's like it costs seventy thousand dollars just to ensure the horses on a Wester that's out. Everything's expensive making western he just pulled off a beautiful movie. Now, you know, he sent the script to me it was based on a novel, dusty Richards. I got the name, right, dusty Richards and. And based on a novel. So he wrote the script based on this novel. And, but he did it did it in a way that he knew that they could afford to shoot it and make it beautiful and make it a words worthy and ended up winning awards for it. But it's a it's a very transient dental film. You know, it's almost like Terrence Malick type thing, you know. And like James both Michael man fans, you know, so. And he did a movie called LA Alenia, the line wish gangster movie starring Ray Liotta and Andy Garcia, and that was that was kind of James's heat. You know? Okay. You got Danny trae. Oh. And there and he's like any got he got his many. Cast members from heat into the film as could. But you know, that has a very like angst ridden like transcendental slow quality to it. You know, ponderous quality to it Alenia does any brought that to painted woman with the, you know, we got a female protagonists that it's a it's a it's a it's about female empowerment about. This woman was basically escapes slavery and prostitution to discover you know, what life really has to offer when she meets the sky is a Mustang tamer. But the man doesn't save her life. She no, she she does it herself. But she does discover this relationship and this new community and what goodness in life can be. But then the bad element is fault follows her from former life into the town and has trouble. But like she ends up. She is solve to room problem. So and I don't want to say too much. But it's like it has a very good ending. Like, you don't see it coming the Indiana's very special and interesting. It's a wonderful film, and it's on itunes, and it's on do and all of the services right now. And it's vailable at WalMart on DVD. But okay, I'll say a little bit about what what I'll talk about the style of corey's composing after maybe after we listen to it. So this is the theme. So let's go ahead. And listen to it. Let's do the theme from pain and woman from the film by James cotton. Starring Stef Dawson, laurel Harris. That's for lack of a better term. Let's call it. The theme song the title cut on the soundtrack to a movie called painted woman. There's the. For the coral courts radio hour. We don't play a lot of orchestral stuff. And I'm struck by the power of the droning woodwind section throughout from being so evocative. I mean, clearly, this is the, you know, this is the opening credits. This is the and I would imagine through and I don't know this. But I would imagine through the course of the movie that that loping counter melody continues throughout the yeah. But, but what really caught me was you don't hear a lot of oboe on the coral courts radio. That's not a criticism. It's just it's an interesting will an unusual sound. Yeah. Right. And as the the woodwinds drone through that cut it. It's really vodka tive is is it a good indication of what's what's in store for the film. Yeah. I mean, the the song that this the song track itself tells? It tells kind of a story starts off very ominous. Yeah. And you know, kind of dangerous it kinda, you know, coy did a wonderful job. And again, composing Corey Allen Jackson. He did a wonderful job in composing this in that it sounds like a period piece in that were using all clock sound and we're using acoustic instruments, right? But it's got a very modern field to into that is very minimal in a way, you know, there's a minimalism repetition to it. That's very, you know, it's like you said that lows U N, but he starts off at the very minor key thing with the strings and the piano comes in kind of setting the mood. It kind of comes to a kind of a hopeful swell on the bridge where it kind of develops really kicks in it gives you the sense of hope that kind of comes back to the main theme of well, this is what we're dealing with an ends on a very dark minor with the cello. You know in a very dark minor the sound so yeah, there's like it's there's this path to redemption. But there's having to deal with. Where you've come from again, which has been the recurring thing to everything I've picked here today. And that's yeah. Every every single time. Yes. You learn that about yourself when you pull this list, my listed exactly the same thing. I think it's interesting that this song begins and ends on the same point and the same note. Yeah. So that you could theoretically loop together forever. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Really weird and James, the spiritual guy too. And he thinks in those terms and his filmmaking. And that's why he does this kind of trend dental kind of pace and style to his films is because you know, it's what happens in between what they're saying. That's the really important stuff. Yeah. Gives a life to the movie. But yeah, but yeah, just be on look from where from Corey Allen Jackson. He's a wonderful composer. And he's working constantly. So you'll see name on credits. More and more right on we love that. And and the painted woman is available wherever you get your movies everywhere ever movies available. Yes. On man L, and I'll just say they won one while bunch film festival. Best actress for staff, and then best film and James went best director at that festival. He also invest director at the Manchester, film international film festival for this film. And I mean, that's that's impressive in and of itself. But the fact that this is a western which is a genre. That most people don't take very seriously. You know? Yeah. That's that's really cool. Yeah. That's really cool. There's a lot of lot of export territory. I think in the western John. Yeah. All right. Well, we are at the halfway point of this. So why don't we take a real quick short short break? And we'll be back with yet. More from Daniel Corey goodness. Hopefully right after. Stage. Just. The album is called stage fright. The. You wanna start? The group is called the band. Stagefright the third album by the band. Stagefright the band on capitol. All the and the band plays on. Welcome back to the coral courts radio hour presentation of deep dish radio host and producer. And all around knucklehead. Tim powers in. This is my radio show today, we are joined by my dear friend and music aficionado musician, himself, writer, Comecon personality and. All around swell fella and early adapter of all kinds of great technology. Mr. Daniel Corey, Dan, thanks man for being a part of this. You know, I've known you know, dozen years or so, and we sat across microphones many, many times discussing your various books your projects and stuff like that. But when the mics are off you and I are talking about music, right? And we're always like we're like we're swapping songs like baseball cards, and I love that about us. Yeah. And and so when the idea for the show came up like I gotta Dan on this. Awesome. And you're like, okay. I got a list is gonna be a hundred songs lung. He got a pair it down. But if I could. Compare it down. So here we are going to love the way you make talk, by the way. Occur. All the time. She hates it. She's gonna be. Yes payback. By the way, that we miss you. And and you know, the next time that next time dance here. I hope you will sit in and chime in. The lovely. Mrs Corey is his is just as charming can be amazing. She really is. Let's let's go into the sixth track that you have you have picked for us. This is the river the river unbroken track by Russ Taff. Russ Taff was is one of my favorite might be my favorite human singing voice. You know, and he was a really popular Christian singer in the eighties nineties, and he's still around. But he's like a really big heyday at that point. Right. And he came out of reel gospel rooted, you know, type music and traditional southern gospel. Yeah. But he ended up kind of moving into more pop type stuff in the eighties, and like the, you know, the record labels like had him doing lots of different types of things. But he at some point he came back. He's like this is what I wanna do. And he did this album called the way home, which was very blues rock. It's Goss bowl blues rock southern rock and of a sound, and he did for most of what he did after that was all mainly just like hard, you know, kind of gospel southern rock type stuff because that's what he really wanted to do after kind of going through like being doing a lot of pop songs stuff. But when he one of his early things in the seventies. Now, you'll know the imperials. Yeah. Because of their connection to Elvis and. Yeah. So he was an early member of the imperials. So really, yeah. Yeah. Maybe you can fill the audience little bit imperials connection to Elvis, well, they sang with Elvis with Elvis on on a lot of the kings gospel albums, you know, the Jordan ears were great harmonize IRS. But when when the king cut Goss ball albums, right? It was those guys were behind him. Yeah. And then they. You know, I I saw an interview one of the founding members on it was a documentary on PBS of probably about twelve years ago. It was really wonderful about just about Elvis's gospel music. Yeah. I saw that. Yeah. Oh, yes. Wonderful wonderful. And and so he was saying how would Elvis did like his first gospel record with the imperials how it would that? He's like he credited that with the beginning of the Christian music movement as far as what we become contemporary Christian music because like the imperials came out that and did their own stuff. And we'll restaff came out of that, you know, but this is kind of like him kind of coming back to route gospel music and the album the way home, I've been listening to it for twenty seven years. I think now I still listen to it all the time. And this this particular track the river in broken when I picked because I thought this would be it's it's pleasing to general audience. I think you know, it's the gospel too. But it'd be very pleasing to general audience in that. It's just musically. Very solid and lyrics are about just, you know, it's kind of metaphor of waiting at the station for the train to come and says, where's the river on broken? So always assumed that was the name of the train. I'm not sure it was actually what that metaphor is. But I've always loved it. And the song takes on a neat. I always love it. When a song we get to the bridge section. Yeah. How it can take on a new life. But still same song the choir kicks in. And he sings it gets really soulful listened for that part coming up. But yeah, it's four four and a half minutes. Here's for the first time ever on the coral courts radio hour. Here's tap. Keep all the trend. Dream. Can. In the home. The. Russ path. Portuondo? Our verse time and probably not the last couple points dead. First of all. An incredible. Yeah. I mean, what an incredible voice, and I agree with your point that the middle eight bars in that song is where it really comes to life. It's a great record throughout. But those middle eight is really where it takes us. Interesting turn. Yeah. Right. There's larry. There's there's a choir. There's really another verse after that kinda hits. It's stride right there in the middle eight, and then just kind of goes on. Yeah. You know? And it's I thought it was lazy music appreciation to compare one record. You know, one artist with another saying sounds about this. But that record sounds very Springsteen. It sounds it sounds very the river. You know, the first three Springsteen albums right where he's got kind of a little bit of that Phil spector production. There's but there's some depth to it. And the the band is really tight and he's got at tambourine buried far backing in the mix. Right. And then there, and then the the the course just keeps rolling through the song. And it reminded me of what a Springsteen record would sound like Springsteen where a better singer. Well, again, this is one of these entrenched Nashville guys, you know, and everybody in that band is going to be like, the probably the best hardcore Nashville studio musicians, you know. Yeah. So this this is some of the really good quality stuff. That was coming out at the time that a lot of people probably didn't know about you know. Yeah. Because I mean, it could have been played on any any rock station. Absolutely. As a record. It's a great rock record. It's a good contemporary nineteen ninety two three four. Yeah. You know, rock and roll record. It just came out on the dove label or whatever. Yeah. Yeah. I think it was actually. Yeah. So program directors like that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I was fortunate. But yeah, you know, I I was I was happy to kind of expose this to a wider audience. You know, 'cause I love it. I love him. And he just recently. Had a biography come out, and there was a documentary film that I haven't had a chance to watch yet. They did fathom events about of a few months ago where played in some theaters stuff about his time at during his heyday, and he talks about hey, decades, long struggle alcoholism that was all going on at that time and how he's trying to reconcile trying to reconcile this kind of sort of. I guess double life from what they were saying, you know, what he was saying in the trailers, and such so, yeah, so stories continuing in interesting when he's out of that. Now, he's he's come out of the alcoholism. And all that. But he's he's had some real struggles. We hear that in the song now. So he's he's of that generation. Right. So he's in his his probably late sixties seventies something around. So he's been through some stuff, and he was part of the Nashville scene in the nineties. He saw something. And and and at a matching there's there's a journey way beyond what what his press people would like to think. Yeah. But the. Again, there's some some deep conviction and soul in this record. Tell me about where it resonates with Daniel Corey. You know, I I'm not sure how I connected to it. As like, a fourteen year old whatever I just really liked the sound, you know. And there was there was a sense of the struggle. And all that that you know, when you hear that stuff as a kid, you think that sounds cool. It gets you thinking in those terms. There was a thing that I knew about the life of head of me, especially the life of, you know, Christian person in a spiritual person that was going to be going to be tough. And I knew that and the song the songs were really expressing that to me, but also really cool almost kind of Neo soul southern way that I just love hearing. And but it's one of those things when you grow up with this record, it it starts having more and more. Meaning like, oh, this is the thing that I was enchanted with that. I'm now experiencing. That I understand. Yeah. We could we could build a whole show around songs like that. I got to meet Mike Peters of the alarm awhile few years. And yeah. Such a wonderful sweet guy. Really nice, dude. And he wrote he wrote all these songs of the struggle Keats. The song strength is sunk spirit of seventy six which is about all this friends their struggles. And how somebody died ended up in jail and how he's trying to everybody trying to fight through life. You know, I love that song when I was a kid and now forty four I'm like, oh, I've experienced this. Now now told him that when I met him like your songs like I loved them when I was young. But really making sense to me now, I just want you to know that I grow the songs grew up with me. And I grew up with the songs, you know, he'd liked hearing that I think cool. So, but yeah, that was the I that's the experience with this rust half record here. You know, it's good record. Probably not the last time. We'll hear Russ Taff. I'm sure someone else will program it. Upcoming episode. Trek number eight the maker. Okay. Yeah. We got the maker this by Daniela. And this is we talked a lot about him previously. We played one of his songs previous at the beginning of the show. But so the maker is his big song. That's the that's the one. Like every time. I've seen in performing always ends the show with the song. This his American pie. This is American pie. Yes. It's a wonderful song. And a lot of people will know it from you know, he did the soundtrack to the film sling blade. Okay. The Billy Bob Thornton the one that really put him on the map and the credit song is the maker the song had been around on his nineteen eighty nine album Kati. It's the second track on that song on that album. So. And it's been covered by Willie Nelson did a cover of it with Emmylou Harris backup while tro album, which Daniel produce I believe in definitely plays guitar on that and one of the after after having seen sling blade. One of the first times I after that that I heard the song was I saw Willie Nelson on Letterman singing, the song Daniela while I was in his band guitar. Yeah. Just because he's just like going to play with Willie Nelson. That's pretty RAD. But. But it's wonderful song in the lyrics to the song. Again. It's about the spiritual path in life, and it's like tongue talking about the maker. And how we know the make our how am I strange to the maker do I know the makers the Nacre no me, and it's about a struggle with God, you know, but. But it good way in a good way. Because I think the resolution of the song is positive and good. Well, let's check that out get to that point. So here it is Cork's radio hour. Oh. Deep. Blogging. Stat. With. I. Twister. I'm a stranger. The maker. I could not see. My. Good enough. The fear in my line. From. Great. This. I saw bet. Law came to me. Make. And bro. Bothers law. This dangerously. The fees. Head. Strain to. Maker. Brother, john? Dada. Stand. Bro. I have seen. The. You'll see. You'll sleep. Cuts called the maker on the coral courts radio hour. Really? I love doing this so much because these are, you know, we've listened to ten zones I've never heard before my life. And you know, it's interesting kind of dreamy kind of existential, you know, questioning your place in the universe. Kind of kind of thing and tremendous musicianship Qataris on either side mixed far left and far. Right. Are really good. So while I'm listening to to the tires, Dan. What did I miss? Because there's obviously a theme in the in the Liles. Oh, oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And something I should say that I meant to say before this is actually the original version. The original version is actually the production on it. It's a little more like the the first we heard from him. Yeah. The where will I be with a full band, you know, and it's also wonderful. But I picked this version which is off of a self released album called rockets where he basically covered his own song. Again, he did ruin dishes on some old songs, and it's a new songs on this rockets album to really cool album. But this one it says in the liner notes that he recorded this in his apartment in New York. I think he just did everything. So he tracked everything detract everything. Did it always single? It sounds like him seeing the back. He singing in a slightly lower key than it. Usually does something. So he could sing harmonies. That was my my thinking on that. So he did I think you just did everything it's no percussion just a little bit of base, and it's all stars and slide and he plays the the lap steel. It'll feel. Yeah. And, but yeah, the song is you know, it's about it's about a lot of things, and you could it's really open to say what it's about. But it's really, you know, I think it's it's mainly about his relationship with the maker about a relationship with God. And you know, the the second last I it's my favorite lyric says my body is Brent and broken by long dangerous sleep. Which is really always strikes me says back in work, the fields of Abraham and turn my head away. I'm not a stranger in the eyes of the maker. There's so much in that, you know, there's so much in that so heavy, you know, and another point in the song and earlier Versi says across the great divide in the distance. I saw a light. I saw Gianbattista walking to me with writer, and he's French-Canadian. So you talk about John the Baptist. Right. You know, that took me I had to put that together. Yeah. Oh, he means that zone that. Yes is like Esau Gianbattista walking. Me with the maker. You know from the cross the great divide. So he's kind of invoking this biblical vision in the song. So where it's pretty open into what the song means. I don't know what it means to him. Never heard him speak on it publicly. Can mean a lot to you. But to me, and I think I mean, I I would say probably a lot of the song Dan has to do with your relationship to God and your place in the world. I think is probably what it's mainly about. And just folks so much biblical imagery. And I like I love this version of it because it sounds like the the western version, and I remember my Brinda, and I were driving Phoenix a few years ago. Visit our fin Vivian and Dukan, of course. But we were driving across the desert, and I had just gotten this album K. Here's this new version the make you you haven't heard yet. We gotta play this. Okay. While we're driving across the desert, and it was just and driving. And we're just like, so, you know, you could hear a pin drop other than music plan. You could hear a pin drop in the car listening to this with the desert scrolling by eighty miles an hour listening to the song. It's you know. So I like to listen to this like drive on a highway or driving on the highway during dusk or something. Listen to the song, very of Akayev. It brings me into it brings into a moment. Yeah. Yes. Sounded like if you strip this song down, and it was just him. And a six string, right. Six string acoustic. This song could be one hundred twenty years old it the kind of spiritual. Spiritual existential thing that like a civil war soldier. We would would sing while he's you know, in between battles going where do I where do I fit in? Yeah. How do I how do I make sense of of what's going on in fact, as I was listening to it? I thought. I wondered if this was actually a century-old song. This was you know, some old early American folk church song. That's how he writes. He writes, like rights rights him style heard him speak on a lot, you know, plays the pedal steel. But like he said once an interview how he the pedal steel tuning has a lot of six nights in it. Right. Which is with jazz is so he'll tune those up to like unison with other strings. I basically write hymns, and I want to do something with fortune fits mainly. I guess seventh. Right. Which would be more him like in quality, which is a big influence on me. And my songwriting, you know, what what little long done, but you know, you know, kind of writing and stands as more than verse chorus bridge. You know, very him, Nick. Yeah. Very very very him. Like, and I've heard him do a lot live heard him do it with like gospel singers. And actually when I was at. Home. Yeah. He had a Hammond b three setup in in the in the foyer, and he somebody from his in his ban, Johnny shepherd this gentleman's name. Shreveport, had just moved the towns. The party supposed be celebrating welcome party for him. And so Johnny was playing the tree and to them sang the song together. Harmony just with just to be three back in it up. Cool is really cool edition might have video on fought. I'll show. Of all the things we don't have permission to play. I think that's probably one of the bright ones that we won't get into. All right moving moving on through Dan, corey's, existential on we. Finding his place in the world, which is admirable. In fact, I love the theme that has come through throughout this number seven is is deep in the heart, and again, another I haven't heard so. I'm in seven today. And so what we? Let's see. How does how does this? First of all how does this fit in with the rest of the playlist so deep in the heart. This is YouTube song. So I'm like, you know, we I spoken a lie about YouTube, and what would a big deal to me. Right. So, but I'm like, I gotta choose something that people probably haven't heard from them. We can't play when the big hits. So when they recorded the Joshua tree album. So this would be another track is produced by Mr. Lenoir, right and Brian Eno. So we're gonna hear something kind of an similar vein to what we just heard just executed in the U2. way. So this the Joshua tree was originally to be a double album. So they had a lot of songs that like twenty songs they ended up trimming it down to a single album, and then all the other songs ended up being besides. So you know, I whenever I can find this single LP's from Josh SRI L take him. I'll take one home because I can get this. Nice. Besides on vinyl, right? I wish we just got this on final which I was very happy to find. But they when they for the twentieth anniversary of the album about twelve years ago. They did a release where they released as double record know so Joshua, Josh too. Yeah. So the Joshua tree to albums. They call it. Then completion the besides. And it was kind of like restored to what the. Vision of the record was so deep in the heart was. Probably my favorite that. There's another one called Spanish is a lot of a lot of people. That's that's their favorite beside was both of those are b sides to sylling found what I'm looking for which is their hit song. So we'll have I'm looking for has besides Spanish is a cover. No now that as far as I know they wrote that. Okay. Yeah. There's a Spanish leather boots. Maybe that I was thinking of the the old Elmore Tino. Like, it's almost like a Sinatra e kind of song. No, it's not size. Yeah. Oh, because I know that I know the guys appropriate songs and. Yeah. Over them in their own way. Right. Every single time. I just wondered if they did do some Frank Sinatra stuff done. Some Motown covers and stuff. But this one is pretty original. The that Spanish is that they did is original song. They probably procreate the title and kind of did their own take on that. But so that Spanish is and deepen the harder both besides looking for and their two favorite besides from the Joshua tree collection. And so. Going back to the experience. I had when I was able to go to lend was home and hear him play with his band when we're in the studio we went to the studio and heard him play with his band. And he said what what about playing here is. We can really bring out the raindrop quality of the songs, you know, which is kind of like what we heard in this previous of the maker, right? It's different than the album track version, which is great too. But we got kind of the raindrop version of it. And you know, and so we're getting here here is kind of a rain YouTube kind of raindrop rendition of YouTube song, does it does Bill to this big wall of sounding and Jacquet climax, but it's very sparse. And there's a lot of space in the song. And you know, we socio you too with these giant anthems, you know, you know, these big celebrate Tori, anthems do do some quieter songs. You know, and this, you know. An album track that made it onto the main album for. For Josh, which we would be running to stand still, which is a piano ballad, which is one of two piano ballots that got released on album, the other would be like the first time which was on zero Pia album with Brian Eno on piano. So, but yeah, so that one the that that one is a quieter song that really stand still it's a quieter songs wins on the playlist. It's really known to fans and so deep in the heart would be to be an invasion of that in as far as the Josh retreat hip goes, and it has that rain tip quality that raindrop quality. You'll hear the bass come in and kind of carry the melody and the ATar is very just like it's Larry sound in the back. And when you get to the solo you'll hear like, it's almost like a cry cry. There's a lot of a lot of space. So we just give it listen. Speed is rose every. Still see? It's Joshua tree era U2.. As you sold the song to me, then I was expecting to have my mind blown hear something that sounded absolutely nothing like you too. And that was that was. I don't wanna say a typical U2. song. But it very much sounded like like, very raw. You know U2. song. What what I was expecting was kind of a basement tapes. You know, here we are not going around in our in our basement, right? And. Dawned on me as I was listening that maybe you to is not capable of sounding like a garage band. They just have their they have from nineteen Seventy-nine on. Yeah. They've had that that sound right. That has propelled their career. And they just they can't sound like a garage man is something to that. Because they got the talent to do it. But having not heard this record before. And you if you handed it to me and said all right where does this fit in? It'd be like this Joshua tree album. Isn't it like, no? But. But it's it's it's interesting. What sets this cut apart from the from the album tracks and from the from the bonus tracks what what is it that made you pull this one out of the out of the archives? Well, like, I said mainly because a lot of people haven't heard it. And I wanted to I didn't wanna I didn't wanna play still haven't found what I'm looking for on your show because you can play Philadelphia freedom in China, grow those make fun of but. But this this gets a pass because it's stuff. I haven't heard before. It's awesome. Great. Great. Yeah. But. Like, I said though, from you know, it stand apart in just kind of it has this mournful sound. And you know, it has this space in it. It's still, you know, it's especially listening to the headphones right now. Like, this is sonically. Let's bigger than I was selling it. But still I don't know just like that solo like the guitar bounces all around like like does. But. There is a lot. There's a lot of space. It's not that regime. You think of like we're streets have name where it's like this raging wall of sound with that, where's that term again, right or desire, just grabs? You by your holler. Yes. Really fast with lots of facts coming at you. This is like, you know, edges just like Lil teen around the edges of the. To be a pun there. But he's lilting all over the song and sonic wavy net. Yeah. All around your head spe. Yes. Yeah. As you're listening in headphones that those harmonica. They're I guess they're not really harmonic. But but you hear them move in space around your head, which is kind of an interesting. Yeah. Interesting production and something about an personally to me this song. Yes. The thing. Like this. This could soundtrack my dreams because without getting we've already gotten all existence pretentious on this already. So I'll just keep going suppose. Never. Okay. We've played we played three U2. connected songs yet. They use the word. Good for you. Restrained is amazing. But. But, but you know, I I I have regimes. I have recurring dreams about finding the clearing in the forest and finding this marble structure with giant columns and Michelangelo paintings on this high ceiling, you know, I like I in life. I love cities and I love urban landscapes and all this. In my dreams, I dream about desert plains and all these things that you've oak in the songs, that's one of the reasons and other reasons I love you too so much Joshua tree. And all this like, it evokes the language of my dreams, and this song in particular, and it song it's dealing with. You know, he's talking to a woman dealing with relationship and sex. But then again, it's also dealing with spiritual condition. So back to what we were talking about in the beginning all throughout where all this in Chuck Berry and all these guys coming from this is where I came from. This is what I'm dealing with. So that's kind of been the base of of YouTube career when I was first exposed to you too, which is probably nineteen Eighty-one Gloria. Yeah. Ever Tober album and. I remember being struck by who who are these young kids out of out of Ireland, you know, singing in Latin Latin and they had you know, they have this really interesting sound. And my impression was I dismiss them out of hand because I. They had been sold to me as as a religious band as as a Christian band. Well. Sorry, guys. And then they got huge and huge huge huge. And. I mean, there's no denying that the talent in that ban their body of work certainly stands on its own. But you know, you too, and I got off to a rocky start. I am I'll tell you. I loved Gloria when I was when I was doing college radio in the glory days in the golden age of college radio the late eighties. Right. When IRA was a was a. Records. Stuff in man, I was a program director, and I was at the epicenter of stuff. And like, I remember I was the first jockey and Saint Louis to play desire off rattling home really didn't like it at all. In fact, I think I may have stopped the record actually on vinyl in the middle of the track. Just because. It was it was too loud. Right. And and I I made the mistake of not. Not previewing it before I went on the air. And it was like this is not what I wanted to play tonight. So rather than be a professional and let it play out. I was a punk and stopped in the middle and was snarky about it. Sorry. I apologize. I apologize to the the nice guy from the record company who gave me the disk, and I apologize to you to legion. Legion of fans. Wow. Thirty years later. I'm sorry. We're we are just like having come to Jesus moment right now. That's what I'm gonna call this show. Yes. Of course radio comes to Jesus. Excellent. Interesting. The title is interesting as as it evokes, the human condition and the battle between. Between the flesh and the spirit. Yeah. Which is also a theme throughout U2.'s work. Yeah. -solutely so. Yeah. Thank you for turning me on that. It's that's that's an interesting. An interesting perspective on you to that. I hit never had before. And I don't think I ever told you my YouTube origin story and how we got on a bed. But why why would you would you love them? You love them so much and bring them up to me, and I and I of always respectful silence. And it's because of that story because I have a history with this man where it just. We never caught on. And when the Joshua tree was huge. I was still dismissing them out, and as as nothing and at the same time was discovering bands at twenty and thirty years older and was digging that and this missed a lot of contemporary music. I said to a dear friend. Who I knew growing up in the in the eighties that if. If a lot of that music had existed purely sonically at the time, if the music of the eighties existed purely as as music, an MTV did not exist. I probably would have been way more open minded with the music that I heard but dismissed a lot of it because I didn't like the way that it was packaged. I you know, I thought I didn't like videos. I didn't like, you know, the waves guys looked are acted or I thought the video stupid. So consequently, the music associated with it was stupid, which was very limited on my my Alec at the time. And what happened was I missed out on some some really interesting stuff that a lot of people have on cassette. And you too. I'm afraid fell victim of that. And now approach this. This this age that I'm going to I am reexamining a lot of stuff you to among them. I don't know that I will be Daniel Corey level U2. fan. But then you could come to more of an appreciation. Yes. Absolutely. And really that was one of the impetus behind this show was for me to get out of my comfort zone. And appreciate something that other people will bring to the table and Ken, nap izaak in Brad Schreiber in the people who have sat on that couch and brought music in have opened my eyes to something that I haven't heard so I love this. And hearing a thirty five year old U2. song. You know is kind of like kind of like climbing a hidden Beatles track right where and I hate the hate the analogy between you two the Beatles. But they are they're that big in the universe. You know, where you find something you've never heard before. All right, cool. And that song sounded exactly like Hugh to song. But never heard it before. And could could as we're going through this exercise? I can hear it through your years and mine at the same time. So that's really cool. We have three more cuts. And so tell me about company about ghosts story. Okay. So and this one really is just purely more of a personal memory story for me. So go story is is a track by staying it was on his brand new day album, which came out in nineteen ninety nine. And that's kind of saw a new kind of a resurgence for him. You know, as far as being on the on the radio again, and such he got onto a there was a car commercial song desert rose was remixed as a club remix and got onto. I think. Okay. I forget which car brand. But it got onto a luxury car brand commercials. And it became a big hit. And then the so this album came huge. And I went to see him on this tours for some Assan. No. It's the second time I saw him. But anyway, it was like one of the first concerts. I went to with with my wife, Brenda. But this album came out just a few months before I was married before we got married, and I was listening to a lot then. And so and the sun goes story is just about kind of remembering a a love from awhile ago somebody that from years past he has a memory. He finds something remembers. I really love this person, you know, now, and it's so it's very sad. It's very sad. But he wrote a musical play. It was on Broadway. I went to see in previews on what the music for. And they use the song in it. In the context of the play is the character singing about his father when you listen to. It's like, oh, and like stink talks a lot about his relationship with his father. So like, oh, it's about his relationship with his father. You know? So you know, you could apply to a romantic love relationship or to the love of a family member. Or any kind of like, you know, friendship love what have you when you think about it? When it's just this memory of all this person was really important to me. And now, they're gone. You know, so it's a very sad song. But it came out a few months before we were married, and I was listening to the album Allott, and when we were moving in to our apartment where we're gonna live together. I remember we had the TV and VCR setup. I and we were living right around the corner from blockbuster video is tell you when this when this is happening. And I've never been telling me she's like, I rented streetcar named desire. It'd be just right. Wanna watch it? I'm like, okay. So. So you're talking about Tennessee Williams, again, which is funny because this is like before I really got into the theater. This is actually started my journey into the theater and writing all this. So we watched streetcar named desire with the Marlon Brando classic. And I was just blown away with how wonderful and amazing this movie was and I'll sublime it was the first time it was probably the first time. But it really struck home to me. It's like, oh my gosh. The life of these actors performances characters are taking on a whole life separate from the material. And it's really everything's coming together. And to such miraculous thing watching this movie and so. Brinton I kind of had this little clubhouse because we both had our places, but that we were moving into this place. We'd hang out clubhouse Cardi desire, and I was listening to sting album and go story released it out to me. It's all intertwined to be. So it's just a memory of that time for me. So cool. Let's give it a listen here sting quartz radio hour. Listers sky. Says. Kill. Juice. The case. Kush. Don't. No. Nineteen ninety nine in the brand new Dale, right? Yep. Yeah. I'm. Very sting very very well done evocative of of that. Of reviewing your life's thing is really good and looking back on life. And and. An address ING past life. Pain thing is really really good at that is his solo stuff. Stings sting has the ability to be just a bad ass Rockin roller. Yeah. No. And when you've seen him play live or if you've ever seen him sit in with anybody else. Right. He tears it up. Yeah. I I saw the police reunion tour back to two thousand seven oh my gosh. It was miraculous. Those three guys that it was just the three guys making all that sound. Yes. It raged. It rocked it roll. It was pretty amazing. It really was. And so, you know. American audiences have a hard time seeing people beyond their first impression, right, actually, artistic endeavor. If if you're that guy from the police, you're that guy for the police. And and I always felt kind of disappointed that that stinks solo work ended up being on so many soft rock, you know, your your station at the office point five, and you know, so much of his solo stuff ended up on there. But those were the hits those are those were the the one the old tat. And those were the cuts that drove the album sale. But you go a couple tracks deep you really good. Get some art. Yeah. It's great. You know, people can people can pick on sting for being a little self important, self indulgent. But at the end of the day, he really has proven to be a reflective artists in the songwriter. And it's no surprise to me hearing this this record for the first time that it was adapted to Broadway. And my understanding is that in the Broadway version, there's a dialogue between characters in the body of the song. Have you heard that? Well, you saw the play. Yeah. I saw it. I saw it in previews. I so I don't know. I don't remember second. 'cause I'm in that moment in your memory right now. But it might have changed. They might have brought a scene into the middle the song. I don't think I had seen in the middle of song when I saw it. But I said it was a previous. But yet would be interesting to see that version of the song with with the scene in the middle of it. I know he's singing to his father's grave play play. Yeah. And certain line song as look at my hands and those of your hands. I was like oh, yes. Do you stuck in my father? I didn't which I didn't realize you know, when I was hearing the song, but. But yeah, you know, it's like you said, you summed up pretty well. It's like dealing with pass life paying, you know, in in in in a positive way, you know, because he's like, you know, I guess I loved you, you know, and that's very sad. But you know, it's also good. It's also good. It's healthy. It's healing its closure. Man. I mean. You know, I. Coming coming up to a milestone year than that. I am you know, and you'll be there shoot enough young. You know, you guys like you and me tend to tend to look back on our life and go how in the world that I did I get to this point. And. You know, I have spent a lot of time deep mired deep in regret. You know, should have gone this way. I should have done this. Or, you know, this didn't go the way that I wanted. And I am very very fortunate to be where I am right now. I mean things have never been better for me. And if I'm not careful I can fall into that misery of wha-. Wasn't it always like that? Yeah. And there there comes a point where you have to work the rubik's cube of your of your young, man brain. Yes. And go I was a flawed human being and people hurt me. I hurt. I hurt people. I'm sorry for what I did. And you know, like the old saying says if you can make an apology to set things, right? As long hurt anybody, and you can make that apology go for it. But at the end of the day, the person you wake up with every day is yourself, and you've got gotta make peace with with yourself carrying that pain for for, you know, decades longer than it needs to really just just shorten your life. And and I think that's where a lot of music this last cut kinda resonates with people because you can just go. Okay mic. Put it down. You know, I'm sorry that things didn't work out. But. At the time. I was very much there. It's weird. It's very. Various and finding all that through its things on. Interesting. It's nice that album brand new day. Nineteen ninety nine has been remastered in two five point one surround a bet that it's interesting. I'll bet the arrangements are really really interesting in a surround sounded violent love. Love to hear but not on this show because we're just in stereo. Oh my gosh. Anything else you want to add about about Gordon? Gordon, the whole album is really good. And yeah, if you if you haven't heard it, I I'd recommend I'd recommend checking it out. And just a quick stylistic note on the song as interesting in that it is somewhat minimalistic in its in the way begins the weight develops throughout because usually socio sting's solo work with complex jazz arrangements. That's starts off the very simple riff on the Nyland string guitar that kind of repeats throughout the song builds and builds and it's not like a verse chorus verse chorus kind of thing it's just like a collection of verses that kind of climaxes into this bridge. And then. Yeah. And then he sings final verse in it kind of softens. Yeah. So stylistically it's very interesting for him. And it's also just generally beautiful and mice to hear right on. So they pick up that album wherever you get your records, the next cut is this is the road. Yeah. All right. Your posture? So where we going with this? So this is Peter Gabriel. Okay. So and of course, he's a huge artists. And I'm like, I'm gonna pick something. So obscure. This was a download from his website a number of the club, a member of the full moon fan club ten years ago twelve years ago, you could download this song. So I don't think it's been available any other way. But it may maybe maybe it's had some of scare European release. I don't know. But you're in it here. Yeah. Man. Yeah. This actually became was part of a development became another song. He he did a song called tomorrow today on his ovo album, which he wrote for the millennium celebration in London for the millennium dome celebration he soundtracks that moon. Don't experiencing released took the music from that and mixed it into an album called ovo and make tomorrow today is on their Richie havens is all over that album, by the way. Yeah. Yeah. Which is any sounds sounds amazing. Peter Gabriel sing together. Sounds amazing. I've gotta hear this here this. Yeah. Yeah. It's it's some beautiful work on there. But so this is the road is an early version, so the tune, the the melody is very similar lyrics are completely different. And. I just I do like this version of the song. I like as its own song. Yeah. It's. It's funny because it's kind of it's it's relatively simple because it's kind of a demo track. But it's still sounds like Peter Gabriel's just like you're saying like you can't sound like a garage band. Gabriel can't sound like just like some guy at a piano, or whatever, you know. Sounds like Peter Gabriel never never sit on a bar stool with with a six string. James Taylor for you. Yeah. That's never going to happen. So this is kind of like Peter Gabriel in a relatively strip down simpler version of a song. But it sounds like a Peter Gabriel song. And you know, it's it's sad. But kind of hopeful message about another about about marriage. You know, so that, you know, we're dealing with some of these guys they're deal with marriage crisis. Got Paul Simon and Peter Gabriel kind of dealing with the same sort of thing. And so, yeah, we'll check it is known for their for their solid marriages. And boy, all right kidding aside. Here's Peter Gabriel. The coral courts radio hour. Peter gabriel. This is the road. You gotta love artist like Peter Gabriel who came out of such an enormous ban. Like like Genesis, right? And so was such a huge album and the talent EMMY the artistry, let goes into it where even Peter Gabriel's basement tapes sound ten times better produced and thought out than, you know, the rare in scratchy cassette tapes that that a lot of huge fans. Have started a song with guys listen to this? You know, it's, you know, your your little real the real recorder. You know, let's lay this down real quick where where even just a throwaway track that he just he distributes justifaction is produced so. And I mean, it's unmistakably Peter Gabriel question about it. I was surprised to hear. A classical guitar so well fronted in in the mix, you know, it it always surprised to hear guitar in for lack of a better term kind of progressive. Yeah. Alternative music. Especially classical, you know. And and I wonder I don't know this well enough, maybe my classical music friends would know better. But it sounds like this is based on a classical piece, you know, the tonality and the the way that the court structure works is is evocative of some classical music. I wonder if the melody is based on a concerto or something like that. Oh, yeah. That's interesting. I mean, because you know, 'cause a lot of the stuff they were doing Genesis is kind of like really evolved from English folk songs from one hundred years before you know, what I mean so there. Yeah. There's it's always gonna be kinda rooted in some sort of classical or folk type of tradition, you know, with him. So that's that's a good observation for sure an interesting thing about this song is structurally. It's really bounces around this. Yeah. Short. Yeah. Like, three minutes long. And it's it's movements. Yeah. Yeah. Movements to it. Yeah. And it's it's part of it is I think trying to find the song. But in the end result point, it all sounds so unified in nicely produce as you said, I'm accepting that as the final product, you know, what I mean? Yeah. Because it just yeah. Thinking of in terms of being movements because there's like three different types of versus he does. And he kind of comes back at the end and repeats the refrain from this. This is the road repaint from the very beginning. So it rounds out nicely. And it's yeah. It's kind of like, I know it's like a Peter Gabriel, piano ballads sort of to you know. No. And you got some nylon string guitar in there. And it's a little more strip down, you know. But it still sounds like via Gabriel very much sounds like Peter Gabriel even even strip down. Peter. Gabriel sounds super produced. Yeah. Yeah. And it's not a negative. Takeaway that it sounds super produced. You know, the best bands in the world have super produced albums Abbey Road is a is a is a classic. You know, it's it's produced. Peter Gabriel's basement tape just sound slick as anything, it's great. And you're right. It is kinda him stumbling to find a handhold for the song. And it's I think it's telling that it has been released in other versions with completely different lyrics. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. But you know, it's interesting. We saw him at the Hollywood bowl a few years ago. He did a thing when he came out and he played piano. And he's like here's a song. I'm working on and play the piano and saying he had no lyrics. Dislike vocalized, saying this entire melody this entire song write lyrics that. You know is like this is usually start songs and I'll call friends over and we'll play something. And so you had a guy come out and play accordion had a guy come out and play bass at a guy come out play Cousteau guitar, and they did is song. Come talk to me, which is the opening track from his us album, which huge thing with bagpipes and all this. But when they played it just those. Four acoustic instruments, and it's everything was so spot on the time and everything so perfect again. Yeah, it's like, oh, this is very slick and produced even though is just four guys on acoustic instruments stripped down version of the song. So, but you know, that's why that's what I love him so much I love musician earnings, so good. All right. Well, there you go. Peter gave you our last cut our final cut. Yes. The final cut the final cut an inferior Pink Floyd album, the final cut. This is. I saw the title. And I don't think this is the cut that I think it is it's called bad reputation. Clearly, not the Joan Jett cut. No. Not that at all. I was like the core is gonna play gonna play runaways for me. Okay. So so what do I need to know about bad reputation? So this is by free Johnston. And this has been on my mind because I had the pleasure seen him perform it live at the Namm show a few weeks ago, so nam for those who don't know is that huge convention that happens yearly in Anaheim. And we'll happens a couple of a couple of a winter Namm a summer Namm. I think the summers in Nashville at sure, but at the winter Namm here in L A at Anaheim. And it's a it's music products show. So all the tar and all the microphone manufacturers and all this together over people go to check out the year. Yeah. And win full-time and Alex who works GHS strings outsca. Lease. We played her song get out earlier. She, you know, had be able to get to the show as a guest GHS. I was very happy about that. And I just I played so many guitars my fingers, we're just gonna fall off. But. Free was playing a set at the Sennheiser booth. I saw that on the schedule. And that was the one thing like I put together my schedule the beginning to show. And then when I got there I was all out though. And I just like saw everything everything is as it came without. But was the one thing that I planned on that I went and saw for sure was free Johnston do in the set at the Sennheiser booth. Okay. And he had. So he plays guitar and sings and he had sue Bara shaved riot from the smithereens. Say his name. Yes. Yeah. He was playing basis singing harmony, and they did they did a said about seven or eight songs and. So you had this album called this perfect world came out in nineteen ninety four and again shout out to my buddy, Brian Mitchell from high school college, we solicited that album together and Brenda my wife. I with the first two years, we were married. She got me the CD. From birthday when year? So this perfect world. We listen to that a lot and the sung bad reputation had a really nice life on radio and early mid nineties. So this would be his his big song. And it's just so the melody is so nice and just it's nice. Where do you song? Really? Catchy. Melody? And the the the lyrics just roll is just that. It's a really nice song. And yeah, let's listen to we talk about a little more. Got a bad reputation at it is interest charge. Good. Ever. Haven't god. No bird is gonna. Break. Do you? Do you? There was this glory as superior in the early nineties where a lot of contemporary pop rock and roll pop had that jangle birds guitar. Yeah. You know, that that twelve string Rickenbacker, you know. Yeah. And or sometimes it was an acoustic twelve string that was way up front in the mix, and it was such a such a fun time. Yes. Absolutely. Definitely in there. And man, I I haven't heard I've heard this cut. But I haven't heard it in probably twenty five years, and it is so vodka tive of that time, you know, brings me right back to where I was in nineteen ninety six or ninety seven. But and and it's it's such a song of that time. And I just love the sound and the production and everything on it. And the and the in the heartbreak out, but you picked it. So tell me. You know that line says down in Harold square looking through the crowd, your faces everywhere. I just that. I love that line so much. I don't know what I don't know what herald square is. But this there's something really personal important about herald square. And that when he goes there, he just sees her everywhere. You know, I don't know. I don't know what it is just. It has a nice ring to it. Suddenly down in herald square looking in the crowd, your faces everywhere it first of all it kind of reminds me. It's like something here in a Beatles song or something. But then, you know, I it's just the way he executes that line and through the whole song. It's like I said it's really worried, but the the melody is just so spot on massively written pop song. It's just one of the, you know, and it's like one of the best probably of of this genre of the ninety. Yeah. You bet and it holds up as a decent song to a lot of songs that that that rise up out of that era or out of the eighties, which were essentially just novelty songs. Yes. People remember them because they're he'll he'll remember that song. Yeah. But this this is really a good time capsule of that era. And a damn good song. And it really I mean, it could have been released twenty thirty years earlier or to be released today. Yeah. Because it does have this sound almost like a sixties pop or type of thing to it. You know? The birds thing. Yeah. I mean, it could have been like a bird's type song or or or something of that ilk. For sure and. Yeah, when you hear it now, it's like the the productions not dated in any way doesn't have gated drums or over the analog synthesizers mucking up the works. You know? Nobody's Nobis auto tuned. And there isn't you know, there's a hip hop beat behind it not that there's anything. Hip hop beat and contemporary music lead. Absolutely belongs there. But yeah. This. You're right. It's just a good pop record. Yeah. Yeah. But also, you know time capsule for me. Remembering remember, you know, Dayton, Dayton, my wife early on remember, my buddy from high school and just. Yeah. It's just a nice memory for me. And there you go. So that's really where it is. So we have been examining the psyche through the. Through through a playlist of my, Dan. I'm so glad you did. This is fun. This was so much fun. So long everybody. Typical show. Really we're in our second hour already. So if you've had a long commute, we're glad you stuck around around through this. Yes, I am. So glad that that you did this. And I hope you'll come back and do it again. I would love to I wanna I wanna play a cut just actually I think I need to wonderful, especially given everything that that my friends, and I have been through in the last week. But but I do wanna get the word out about danger cat, and I wanna talk 'cause I'm such a fan of your comics. You know, even if we weren't POWs, I would be a fan of your comics because there's just so good. So I wanna I wanna let people know that your work on image is available, and I want you to promote that I wanna talk about some of the independent stuff that you've done recently. So well, I did I did called Moriarty, and I did called red city with image comics moriarty's about professor Moriarty from Sherlock Holmes as the anti hero leading man. And all I did Anthony artist on that. They've Lanphier did letters. I had Mike vase Berg, some of the art and Perry freeze did colors and published by image is a brilliant trade. Paperback, the second volume, I think is my favorite because I wrote I wrote the forward, right. That's right. Right. That is. Yeah. I like that story too. Yeah. So. But yeah, so we did Moriarty and I'll say one hundred years of Sherlock Holmes adaptations, we had the first professor Moriarty graphic novel comics series ever with him as the title character. Ladyman had not been done before we had the I gotta love it. So hop in your local brick and mortar comic shop and ask them to special order, the Moriarty trade paperbacks. And then red city registered city was LA confidential Amar's. Yeah. So if you want cops and robbers and crooked politicians fin towels on Mars and the distant future red city is for you. It is it is a it's a it's a psycho thriller with with a lot of high tech. And and really interesting Superfund read. A new book. I just finished that we're working on the publishing right now for is called blood worth. And that's I mentioned before it's about FBI agent in the near future that can enter people's memories to solve crimes. So the preview story zero issue is available on comic solid for ninety nine cents. Tim page. Preview store if you want check that out I have the first volume done, and we're working on working on getting that getting that out there. My first book, which we mentioned earlier is called profit graphic novel did with Anthony ditch do as artist Chris finale, by the way was the artist on on on blood worth. And he also did color on on red city. And he's a wonderful artist is going on to draw X files and Star Wars adventures goosebumps for eighty w. So my first book that I did was with Anthony and that was called profit. And it was supernatural spaghetti western. And you heard the story of the Genesis all that earlier. And right now, a working on the feature film adaptation with James cotton. Who is the writer director painted woman who talked about earlier, and so I have a draft of scrip done. And. Yeah, so we have some announcements coming up for that. But that that's that's in the works. So, you know, more on that later. Hopefully, so there you go head over to to Amazon com. Ecology plug in Dan, corey's name and just buy whatever comes up because you should. The last I'm gonna play. This shouldn't surprise you a bit. You know, we lost Peter Tork week ago. And you know, I I got to normal little bit. The last time I saw recognize me which is either good or bad, depending. Good. Yeah. It was it was fine. And and he's always been very courteous to me his he put out one solo album without you know, just just him. It was released in the early nineties called stranger things have happened. It was produced by a friend of the show, James Lee Stanley Haya, James hope, you listen and one of the one of the tracks. Just just strikes me as particularly peer torque track. It's his arrangement of an RN be classic. And if you listen, very carefully. Love him love them or not appear had a problem with pitch. Singing. Right. It just not not the best thing, but phenomenal musician and you'll hear some great musicianship in this. But the backup vocals. The producer wanted to get a mom and pop kind of sound to it. So back backing vocals on this are MacKenzie Phillips and Leah concl-. Who is mama Cass his daughter? Wow. So what you'll hear the harmonies in the back of this are the are second generation, mamas and Papas. Excellent. So let's let's give this a listen. And then, and then we'll pack it in. Thanks for listening to the coral courts radio hour, Dan Corey over there. Tim powers over here. And we'll do another episode when we get around to it. And I listened to thank so much. If you like the show, tell your friends if you like any of this music, we encourage you to visit a local brick and mortar record store and buy it from those hardworking merchants apple mortar record stores otherwise downloaded if that's your last resort. But by all means by these records for them here is off of beechwood records, nineteen ninety something. Things. Lifting. Which is. True. Does your. Ready? Face.

Paul Simon Dan Corey Mr. Daniel Corey Hartson bones Peter Gabriel YouTube Mexico Mike LA Brian Eno Joshua tree Florida Alex Karen Whipple Nashville writer Richard Burton Brian Brian Mitchell Chuck Berry Daniela Noi
Pinball Winebar

Maybe It's You

1:08:45 hr | 2 years ago

Pinball Winebar

"Gouda show. Maybe calls in. Maybe they. Maybe they think they're. Have all the. Be streamed. What did try and? Maybe. Where does catching up in land? You bet those there's times where it's like, you're you feel like your skin doesn't fit right or something. God I am not enjoying anything about today. Beautiful out is it for who both for everybody because it's sunny. That's great great. Great, son. This week was like, hey, how's it going? Don't talk to me like that. Love it love it. But did you have did you have any events this week any of your clubbing had one last night? Yeah. I had one last night. And then on my way, home from my car broke down. But but broke down right in front of a pinball wine bar. I that's a miracle been trying to I've been wanted to go to for a long time. And just here's how here's how your life. Feel a little bit of a blessing. Nobody even better. So I I'm sitting in the in the. These kind of stories go. And then front of a pinball wine bar, Warren bar. So it's a pinball live at. Live at the house. Great. Sheen's? Just. So they have. End pinball machines, and then like a big wine and wine and beer selection. And I I walked in and thought they're not they're not gonna have champagne, but they did when you say champagne do you mean champagne or drink? I meant champagne. But I tell you the difference champagne comes from a specific area. And and prosciutto is a talion it's a sweeter semi sweet shipping can only come from France Shimshon champagne region in France. Otherwise, it sparkling one do people call do they make sparkling wines and call them champagnes though. They don't so. So okay. Okay. Sparkling wines for seco-, which is talion sparkling wine. Okay. Okay. Which is Spanish sparkling one that it's fucking awesome is awesome. The reason to go to Spain. Is that right? The only reason. Basically. That right. 'cause I let me show you your supermarket can go there and get it. And let me. Pinball wine. Car has broken down cars broken down. And I didn't saunter into the pinball wine bars sham bar order, some Shams sitting there waiting for AAA or something because it was like eleven thirty last night. And I thought I'll just sort it out tomorrow. And I thought I wanna play pinball. But I never have cash at five singles in my wallet is the quarter of those come from and. And do pinball machines. They do they still take is still you got to put a quarter in like they updated the. Anymore? These are quarter machine. I love which one did you play like the I never heard of any of them. They weren't like brand brands didn't have like angels. They were just just good old-fashioned pinball machines, and I'm playing, and then I need another glass, of course shore. And I sit down with a bar, and this this older guy starts talking to me says, hey, how you doing tonight? I'm gonna come doing I'm doing well, and we just kind of talk a little bit. And he asked me where I live, and I tell him I live in Highland Park around the corner. He tells me he's lived there. Forever. And as a mechanic now because I don't know I don't have a mechanic in my neighborhood. So what kind of weird? Through line. Recap of of land shitty week. This feels like this feels like romantic comedy. Such. It's a total lake are breakdown where everything is serendipity see mountains. That's where I'll breakdown there's been mountains. So there's any way let go where you go will. Maybe there's people near them hills. And I'll breakdown in like nowhere with nothing. So pinball wine bar. Nope. Nope, pinball. I'm bar. No. I mean, that's. Hanoch that lives in your mechanics. Shop is like ten blocks from where I live. He said he liked me. Because when he said Hello to me. I didn't ignore him. And how. He's in his late sixties. And he said, oh, everyone such an asshole. Like, I said Hello. Yeah. You talked back in your good guy can tell and come in. I'll take care of you. So I dropped it off this morning. And. Get home Hoover breaking down. So easy. So are you down? Then you had it towed. Then you had the car. Towed? Towed? Towed this morning. Here's the thing. The fact that he's like breaking down a so easy. I mean that is that is a gift of walking through the world with a good attitude in what was he week for you? That's it was my mind. I had kind of shitty bad mood, and yet I would find a reason to get really Pissy about getting having my car break down. I would possibly find a way to make it really complicated. You wouldn't know you wouldn't you're talking. No, you wouldn't. A dream super source for super source vol off. I would try and fix the problem. But I would at least indulge myself in a little bit inconvenient. The only person here is I would break out at the mechanics. I'd break out in the I would wind up right in front of the shop and go, of course, there's this happening to me. Horse. I that's where I would be straight for the melodrama. Just remember like breaking down when I was like I driving or even like fifteen years ago or twenty one. Not have money. If AAA card. A phone. That make it easy. You're right. Champagne and pinball like it's it was. It was super. Most people don't have champagne and pinball whether or not they're they're not applying themselves. Remember? My sister. And I got t-boned in. In Bakersfield right before Bakersfield. Yes, hard. I've never been hit that hard my life. And we were so lucky to be in one hundred. I mean, it was it was I Honda Civic. Yeah. My sister. And I pulled out in the rain. We did not see these guys they were going super fast. Pullout megacity Shen and hit us as hard as you. Could we spend around the circle we went around the circle twice, and I had to call a Mira sealant. Call. I had and make her come get me. Yeah. In Bakersfield, and my sister who she was who my mirror. It was early days when I dating. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And he came and got us my car for while. And then somebody from when we had that car. I'm not gonna tell the story. It is horrible. I'm not gonna tell it not going to tell the story. Breaking down in front of pinball wine bar you'd always hoped to. Right. No. It sounds like a movie. It'd be like my car broke down in front of a guitar store. Candy shop where you can you can buy chocolate guitar need. It could have that would be your that would be your dream ram super into the pinball wine bar, and I hope that when I breakdown down I break down there. No, look at what's it called. Does. It have the, you know, I don't know what it's called fine wine. Hotdogs look at that. My god. That's amazing. All right. You're gonna have to send that should be. So when put that we should credible Superfund incredible. We should go socially sometimes at wanna give pinball or the pinball. When away wouldn't gives us gives us. Good wines. Yes. Okay. The mayor bell stain. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So we were going to try first of all I was. So the puck has last week. We talked about. Horrible. Breakup. Make you feel better about your own. And I just had this is really really clever. So Brian Cosby posted on the maybe it's you Facebook page. What is the name Brian fell? And he said I feel as though I over share a lot here. So I think should keep doing it. Because I feel especially inspired. After today's episode. I'm not murdered anyone and put them through a wood Chipper. However. Avatars of Xs in fighting games named them douche or something else clever. Sharp witted and proceed to wail on them in the virtual world. What's your unhealthy? Coping mechanism for trailing. Heartbreak and first of all and then. That is. But look at this. Kobe. Hold on. He literally. So he makes avatars. And the names them do. And then like here's a screen shot of cigarette. Mario beating the crap out. Wow. Isn't that incredible? I see. Yeah. Look at just beating just wailing. That's fantastic. I actually really actually really like this. I think it seems very therapeutic. Question. How do you? How do you? What is your unhealthy? Coping mechanism for channeling. Heartbreak. I tell you what I always is. I cut my hair. Okay. I would always cut my hair off and be like, cure cut or. I would be like, I'm different. I'm new. I'm no longer the person suffers that better. Healthy. I think it's unhealthy to make any sort of drastic decision that that might leave. You feeling worse. The the next day. I think we make drastic changes are both statements in an effort to try to like Willer selves into feeling different or being different. And a lot of times you go. Well, just made my life worse. Now. I don't feel like me are like me, and I'm in now, I've I've let it go to a more horrible place. I I think when like when if I'm in that moment, I just kind of focus on self care like go to the spa or ten I'm gonna go to the gym. So. So that they get massages have some me time disappear, and then Chopin another country with a different name ten years later me time, Sarah care. That's exactly. I will find a I will find a song that makes me super sad. I will play it as much as I can. I will cry my way through it like I'll play a lot. And then I'll find a revenge song. Right. And then I'll get up and go do something. I mean when I when when I like a big one I went through let's say in the nineties, I went through a big one right before I got sober. And I played all of the smashing pumpkins record, the melancholy and the infinite sadness that very melancholy. Beginning and all that stuff. And then and then I but still I had an exercise the demon. So then I went to Jeff Buckley. And I would just either play lilac wine over and over and over again and just. And then this cried out, and then it would always be some one of whatever whatever social distortion record was out. That would be my fuck you and going to the gym music that you bring up the smashing pumpkins is when I had my super big break up, and I was living in New York. I I went downtown with Billy pumpkin with Billy Corgan. And the three of they went they went with me downtown to cut off, my long hair for my. Yes. And then you gave Bill sartorial. Yeah. And it didn't go. Well. Well, I it was back when he's still had hair but it was thinning? And I I dare to bring up the idea of a tough one of Rogaine and a cab headed downtown actually if they were headed down after after I cut all my hair into a cute rider pixie cut because I. Long wavy hair, and I've always had long wavy hair. And I literally cut all of it off because I was new. And that I wanted to empower everybody else to do things with their hair, and it didn't go well in the cab. Pretty grown the cabby. You don't want to tell the rockstar that he had you don't. Yeah. Yeah. Didn't go. Well, my hair my hair like a fine shirt is wearing out towards the crown. As well. Like bear. All right. Fifty five years. I'm it's okay. The first person that brought up that it was moving in any direction at all to me when we were dating. And I was mortified it was like it seen my asshole. Like, I really felt like when you're like. Oh my God. You're like, oh, yeah. Now, you gotta bow spot on the time about this big. And you made your hand in a circle that is where maybe would be close to now. But not even quite but the area. Yes. Like, it's like a series of trees where you can see some have been cleared down below there. Like, they're they're cutting out, but they're still plenty to push around. And no one's going to notice less. They're fucking hovering and whoever's hovering over us, not a friend. Sure. So. There's sometimes where where the information you have. Secret thing that no one's supposed to notice. Also, especially you and also don't tell me because unless I've brought it up we both know and unless it bothers you I think you should sh. Yeah. I know a lot of women that don't understand. Why men don't want that pointed out like I have a lot of friends at a pointed that out to people and are totally caught off guard that that guy wasn't like. Hey, thanks. That's great info. But in the context of the thing, it was Billy Corgan. It's at the height. It's like they're rising. They're they're becoming an arena bear, right? Music video covers and enrolling stone. And I was like no one else's telling him this right word. That's because everybody everyone fears. Yes. And every Evans yes seeing him excuse me. That was my phone. This is my friend buddies. Help me Kim. Shutouts buddy sorry about that. Guys. If you're turning off. I did it. Everyone at that time hell hair. Yes. Yes. Know it was like. Do that was new stuff. Sure, I still that was it didn't go up. It didn't go out Benchley. He eventually didn't have a choice shaves shortly thereafter, it it worked out though. But there is nothing. Here's the one thing about it. You can tell someone in they're heavy and that person the feelings they can do about it. There's two things they can't do you can't get younger, and you cannot grow hair on the top of your head. They have not figured out in lieu of a wig. There just isn't a they've not come up with that solution not figured out how to regrowed hair for people. And so it's a tough. It's a tough one. Because you're like is this topic. I was trying to act genuinely being critical somebody don't look better without hair. But I just think it is funny that your big brand had Billy Corgan connection. Thread common thread, Billy Corgan, common thread. It's good. I mean, also. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Poor billy. I you know, what he he spent many years on top the world has written some incredible albums. I hope he's a I hope he's doing great. You know, I think you as I am sure. Why not why wouldn't it be my music toured recently, I have to that's right? But he went on Alex Jones show and everybody went you're Alex Jones guy. Yeah. Sorry. Alex Jones is the the tin hat of the Trumpy. He's a he's a he's a right wing conspiracy lunatic, and so Billy. Billy, Billy, Lloyd and seen. Oh, my Lord, which means maybe Vigo. I mean, I right now in the it's kind of been lying though. Like it's been very punk too. The wrong way. It's very against this status quo. That right. There is. In defending homosexuality anymore. Everybody likes. It would. I wonder if your if your instinct is just to what everyone's doing the opposite. In writing land tense, man. Just right up to be like, it's my job to take the opposite -sition. I've got to be the one I've got. I've got to be one people doing people to enjoy serious. Let's just really quickly. I'm not gonna get that serious. As long as no, no, no. I actually I actually just pulled a couple of sound like. I liked it last one. I didn't mean, but it was. No last last week when we talked about breakups in, and I I was trying to, you know, give a little give a little, you know, warm warm soup, and a hug, then a ferry blanket to those are heartbroken by saying it could be worse. Here's the worst brave. I've ever heard of. But you know, but I I was I was gonna stick with the break-up theme. Just because I think people were used in enjoy enjoyed it. So I don't have. I don't have a long horrible big stories. I just have a couple a couple of funny ones that I literally I just went and looked through read it, actually, the what would be. Thank you. That were more like. Historic one as well. Do you wanna do historical Muno? We'll do yours. Okay. Did you want to do something else? I. No, we'll read our sponsors at the end. Okay. Okay. Fantastic. All right. Just a you would I my high school boyfriend, and I had been together for eight months, but he was about to graduate. And I was a sophomore the spring of his senior year during yearbook day. Swat yearbooks with each other. Just after that, we could write messages to each other. I spent the entire next period writing the sweetest note about how proud I was of him how fond I was of him. How it missing when he left when we met in the hall trade yearbooks back. There was something distance is, but I put it down to rough school day when I got to class excitedly flipped through the book to find what he had written. I discovered the filled full page just near the front, and it was a breakup letter about how he had grown beyond me. Parents thought it was best that we split up, etc. And then he voided me for the rest of the school year. Oh my God. Year. Rush. Can you imagine? Then she's got that forever. Really loved you. Have a great summer. Look I've been seeing some of the stuff that you're doing. Tiggy to be forgotten. I have a great summer things are really happening over the summer in some of the clubs. I've joined really kind of moved on as a person looking at. I've been developing a lot of film in the film lab. And I really feel like I'm growing past you. My parents feel like you're holding me back. College. First of all, I don't know if you've heard this. But you know, people have a lot of sex. So I really need to be open for that was I don't know if you saw me in guys and dolls. You really need to appreciate that Masterson. If they're saying about my bat Masterson. The best high school training wheels. A person could ask for learn how to kiss show, it's real wet. Real wet thing. You do try and kind of pick up on the edge is that's incredible isn't horrible now. Although now like that's a great thing to look back at. Your high school yearbook and the giant break from your actual boyfriend. I bet you I thought he was being a good guy. I'm giving you all the info putting it on the table. Putting it in a book you make around for the rest of your life. Think it's best. If I don't be tied down when I'm going to college. I ran this by my parents last night. We've also that's so weird that put it in the book like put a note in the book, but to write it in the book next to like have a great summer. No. It's almost a full page near the front. Knowing you in home egg. Yeah. Yeah. I've had a great time with you. But I really think I've outgrown this relationship. Remember how Britain? I'm getting ready to go to college. My parents think I shouldn't down. Do you have another one? I do. And this is also. Good one. It's a good one. Right. Okay. So I've seen a girl in college. And we actually lived quite close to each other. So we'd seen each other a little over the summer. I've been to her house and met her parents etcetera, she went away on a trip with the college choir. I know right. I know right. Her phone wasn't gonna work while she was away because you know, international stuff. So I decided to surprise at the airport when she got back, you know, Beal, romantic and stuff. So I'm waiting at the airport arrivals lounge. I start see a couple of phase I recognized from college filter through she then walks through I started to walk towards her. And I realized that she's holding hands of one of my high school friends that also went to my college. It happened to go on the trip with her. I'm not stupid, I quickly realized what's going on. But by this point her dad has already seen me walked up and start a conversation with me. He offers me a ride home with her and oh, yes. I think what I think that guy is coming with us to. But I'm sure the three of you could squeeze in the back by this point. I'm reasonably sure I'm going to implode and it's too late to get away. And she's there, and he's there and his awkward. She tells me. We need to talk. I say that we probably don't need to bother and walk back to the coach station for my three hour coach ride home. It could be worse. He dumped her after two weeks, and our parents never forgave her. Because they thought he was an idiot. And that I was great since then she told me that she'd learned a lot in the past two weeks and was a much more mature person. I'm moved on the guy went on to hook up with another my ex girlfriends in for a while. I was concerned that he had some kind of personal vendetta against me. Wow. That's the word that is pretty awful coach ride three hours to the airport. Awful. Oh my God. Not that different than the episode of friends where Rachel decides she finally is not over Ross. And she goes to the airport. He comes back from China and his with. Someone else he's gonna marry. I guess I'm sure I know and every time I thinking it's Ross why Ross I couldn't ever get into Ross everybody. I mean, I didn't watch that show that much when it was on because it was around the time that I was starting stand up. So we were out a lot, and I didn't get to see a lot. But I could never get down with Ross. I always liked Joey and I liked when they were together. And then I didn't listen how the end it. But I like to I like. Joey Dee what's the worst? What's the worst thing? You've done to somebody. That isn't me. What's the worst of? What was the worst break-up? What was your most? What was your most insensitive break-up? Gigs. I would have you know, or just thing you said, I had no I had a okay. So I had a boyfriend that that was older than I wasn't had been married once before and and I was. Kind of reluctantly in the relationship. It was that thing of I I had a habit of finding myself in relationships with people that I was really close friends with a lot of friend chemistry with and then. The lines get blurry or they're they declare villa for me. Like, well, if it worked at it'd be great because they're already my best friend, and then I'm in a relationship with somebody that I am not feeling it with. So I so I was in this relationship with this guy who was an MBA years older than I wasn't he'd already been married. And and and was I think he was convinced that I was the answer to his life. And I was unconvinced and every time I try to break up with him. We would end up in the ER because he thought he was having a heart attack. Every time. I would try to make those packets. Uncommon thing. Yeah. Unfortunately, but I could not extract myself from this relationship, even though I would be like, I I need. I really. What what what would happen post heart attack? I would be guilted to staying in the relationship right anyway. So. When he's just to anytime. Things didn't go wait is put his hand up his heart. He would be like, the shortest breath and the question of heart in the fall of the knees, go, the ER doctors aren't telling him that. It's a hurt. Now. Now. Attack as things ICTY. I kept trying to get its relationship. We kept up with the are and the more. I tried to move away the more he got very panicked. And so he moved into the apartment below mine to keep an eye on me. Say he moved. He moved into the he moved on the second floor, and he moved down to the first floor could watch my comings and going anyway, I wanna date with somebody else because I was like I don't know together every time I tried to begin with this person. He thinks he's dying. I can't gathers relationship, and I'm young, and I don't know what to do. Anyway, I actually went on a date with another person who would ask me out, and and I out them, and I actually met one of our couple of times, Andy I was honest with the guy trying to get us relationship. I can't go this relationship. I don't know to do whatever always had dinner with this guy a couple of times. And I told a friend about it. And the friend told my boyfriend that I couldn't break up with. It was like, you know, you she wants to break up with us. In fact, she's already started seeing somebody else anyway. So the boyfriend that I couldn't break up with came to me and said. He was really into prog rock, by the way, he came to me and said, you know. When Peter Gabriel from the band Genesis and also solar cell Levin when Peter when Peter Gabriel's wife cheated on him, she shaved his head as an act of asking for forgiveness and then Peter Gabriel shaved his head as an act of accepting her apology. So they could stay together. And I was like. Uh-huh. Shave your heads. Speaking of haircuts. If you shave your. Of sartorial disaster. As an active as exhibition, I will shave advocated. So we can stay together. And I said, no, I'm good. And that's how we broke up. I said I'm good for that. That was probably the worst Peter gave. I is this my out greats. I'm not shaving my head. I want to date the other. Prog rock in their listen win. Celtic cross. When prongs split up. Yeah. Yeah. Like, wait. So you I can't get I've been trying for over a year now. And now you'd like me to shave my head to stay in it. Yeah. Heart best came back and said, okay. So if you tweet your eyebrows. What have we what about a trip? Would you take off the split ends at the bottom? Oh my God. So that was probably the. Because I genuinely I. Get out of the relationship. Gabriel wife. I don't think I don't feel like Peter Gabriel stories that great like I feel like they didn't quite get it. Even like that to me is like that was that's a strange decision. Like when it was. That that bears split up shortly thereafter because then he did Roseanne arquett beautiful song but cancer shaved his head. That would have made sense. I might have got the story wrong. I have no idea, and I also don't care, but because I was trying to relationship. I didn't know how have you have you ever known that people like won't let you break up with them. Right broke up with a girl, and she followed me to that's not happening. But then I was supposed to go to Catalina to do show. And she just came with me, and I couldn't get rid of her. Yeah. And then we took a I tried to move on the hike, and I couldn't do that either. But I the hike, and we almost didn't make my show wandering around the the thickets of Catalina going fucked. We get back to the show. Why are you here? Like, it was at weird thing. She wouldn't. She was we'd been actually lived in San Francisco, she flew down to break because you can't break up with me on the phone, and I was like. I'm coming to you can have a harder time doing it in person. And I mean, I really like I think like I don't know how you can't get rid of somebody. But you can't sometimes until you unless you absolutely make a stand. But it's like one of those things where you're gonna have to shout at them in front of other people. You're not coming on this bus with me, or whatever, you know. It was strange. Yeah. It was strange that yet there there was there was. There was there was not a lot of etiquette. And there was also distance. You could put between yourself and somebody else that was following around or sitting on your porch or what has. Stirs from you after this. Did he did he move? No. Now, he's saying down there we both. We are in that same. He organized a potluck in the corner. It was. So that's. So bad. Yeah. That that is that is troublesome people. I I don't have like I don't remember doing anything spectacularly awful to anybody. But I did have somebody say to me why. And I was newly sober. And they said, and I won't say who this person is. But she you're you enter into the story. She she said why? And I said is I'm not attracted to you. And she goes why the fuck did you say that you could have said a million other things besides that? You could have said it was you and I said oh. I'm newly sober and in a program rigorous honesty, I decided to about your bald spot. That's right. Your hair thinning top. I don't think I don't think. I don't think. She was it was she was really really really genuinely really hurt. And I and I. Any truth that thing when someone asks you why there's nothing that they can say to you this making you're like, okay, that's cool. That doesn't hurt my feelings. And it's also look it was a it was an instant thing for me to say. But I also didn't know what to say the truth, and and also just because I'm not attracted to her didn't maker unattractive. She was far from unattractive. But but she was frightening. So right. About two years later. I was with the mirrow way were dating and we were crossing the street and she crossed the street. We were both. We were they she was coming the other side of the street when we pass each other. And she got about fifteen feet away from us and wet, of course, of course. That's awesome. Also failed to say she one of the people I've ever met my tire. But. Almost she wishy joking. But it was a little bit of both. She was nice. She didn't physically very different than she is. Yes. But. But not not not that that's a better for worse thing. But I think she made us mention. Assumption because he had said, I'm wasn't attracted you. I think she he made the subtle. She made assumption based on what I look like in the he was with me that. And she just said it in a like, a I mean part of it was I it was funny. It was funny lady funny when she said, it, it was probably also real it was ballsy for sure. And I, and I I remember us sort of giggling about it a little bit. But it was just that thing. Like, I didn't know to say. And I think I said oh my God. And and it was too late Lemaire new before I said anything and she barely made eye contact with us in smile. There's no knowledge there was no high. She walked passes like a stranger that had looked at us. And then just went, of course, and fuck men to that was and I'm like man, this has been it's two years later. You know, you know, probably gave her some closure if she was from friends super super hurt by funny because when we were dating he kept thinking this person's really like me that much like, I never I never I didn't think it'd be that big a deal. It really didn't. She was a differently. Immo like it could be emotional. But not particularly. It wasn't like she'd been like, oh my God. You love in my life. I don't even think she ever said she loved me. But she did not not like being tossed aside for Mira. Which was I mean, there was no overlap in these relationships Riley, my particular, dating history. I don't have a type or anything I dated all over the map. But I never, but like or I've never had like a one type, you know, like, but boy that was my type is funny that was. Yeah. Funny. I've only really had to have like weird awkward like Stocker breakup with friends. Like relationships. They just kind of. Fizzle out. With friends, but he's because the friend is attracted to you. I don't think so like there's this one guy that I know, and I I never liked him. But he was dating a friend of mine that I've known since I was a little kid, and she she was with him she'd been with him for like a year or something and then she moved away. So I just inherited him, and he would just come over to my house and just really just unpleasant every way a person can be. Just just just boring and awful. And I remember when he was wearing leather pants, and it was inappropriate. And he. He kept telling all the women in the room that he wasn't wearing underwear. And it just was really so gross on a head to say you cannot come over anymore. She broke up with you. Why am I still here? Was she wearing leather pants people. Orbiting the sweat and the smells of your undercarriage reliving this tough. I I went on a blind date with a guy that makes leather pants that makes. Resigns leather pants, and and and literally he was one of those guys that would press as you go to feel what you're doing to me. And it'd be like. So this was her last. That I know of boy for. Boyfriend. Last date before deciding not today and other people so we had been dating. And then I said to her look, I'm I'm done if you're not done, that's fine. But I I'm not gonna go pretend other people. It's hard. I still a few other underwhelming guys to go out. You had a couple of other irons in the fire. And I was totally fine with that. And I remember she called me and. She said she said, I'm going out with a guy. He's got a suburban. And he makes leather pants, and I said good with that. I was like, you know, what man if that's your dude I was threes. And I was telling you is because I was like this is the love. They set me up with this person. As though they're like, first of all, he's got a suburban. He makes leather pants o. Well, those are those are both things my favorite thing. My favorite thing trigger. Car living and non roomy pants and leather pants and please front. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I know. I know what street he lives on. I know where he gets coffee like, I just know this guy got it. So funny too. And it was kind of like little pants had had. I don't know when they're Haley was, but it was not leather pants time anymore. Like, we we were already sort of through grunge at that point. So we weren't we weren't leather. Nobody was really I mean, gene Simmons, and I'm sure there they probably always have their market people. And women could wear leather pants, but he made men's. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. He was wearing I two birthday dinner this week in three women were wearing leather pants three out of three out of Levin in leather pants. I don't wanna say that. Yeah. So I would say. Still where leather pants. I wanna. But that was back when I was in the music business. It was more. It was more common to see a person wearing leather pants in the music business or going to rock shows. Pool at the private school to please. Please. Please take this way in the way that is intended is these are women who are this was a fiftieth or around this is this is a middle-aged birthday party. You're not seeing the younger girls think wearing a you're not seeing the the I I it doesn't seem to be thing with the kids. It's not I don't see pants can't tell you. I don't know. Because I don't go where the kids are. So I don't I don't I haven't seen them in their natural habitat environment to know, if they're wearing when they get quest to go out of their pants is in the thing. We'll tell us whether our grungy wears a leather pan. She would be like she wears an oversized sweatshirt with high boots. We all know ponytail and a high pony. Right, right. Yeah. Love her. And if she wants it, she I if she's seen and she's bought it. She wants it. She's got it. That's true. I saw it. I wanted. I got it. I bought it. Yeah. I got it. I got it. Got it. Okay. What I wanted it. Okay. And then I got it. That's how the. How the? That's how that's that's free market system. Reggie see you want it. You may not be able to get it. But and you probably don't even see it when you see the knockoff. But but here I shouldn't have it. She she wants. She's like a person who likes like I forget that she probably just left her parents house. It was like when I realized I could have cereal anytime of the day I wanted and I could buy any cereal I wanted. I was standing seven eleven I was thirty years old, right? And I was newly sober. And I said to the guy behind the counter I can. And I was willing thing. Lucky charms. I can have this whenever I want whenever I want. I don't hear. Hi. Hi. And by the end, by the way, the clerk in the store literally had his hand on the button under the hands. Hands on the guns hand on the call the police, but cancer. Where you're saying there shouting your lucky charms at him. So he was like, I think it is it is it meth is the unmatched was. What's what's what's the one? Where you can like flip over cars. I think it's. Or? Yeah. Charm ketamine? I dunno known. No. Elephant tranquilizer. We have there's gonna read the three sponsors. And then I'm gonna do my break up the story. So I'll just read the first one and then you can win second win in. These are the we have sponsorship Gordon plane through his cabin hand. Yogurts arrested wet and always in season. Wonder how they do it. They don't just open your hand and have Gordon's try Gordon specialty nut pace pastels in chocolate cherry and yellow. Metairie section of your local supermarket bus station rehab. Okay. So you read the second one. Corns? What courts doing? Red apple the coroner keep coming and soda the sauces in the mood for something smooth try and apple flip flop or the craven crab meat altogether. With a heaping helping of toaster fried nila Reto all the mode use a groupon or two pond and the rock lobster popsicles or on us at red. Apple questions are the menu. Here. The best reader we have that was really nice land, by the way. Please check out the new podcast from stand around audio. I'm not podcast. Listen as your. Listen as your host ten. Tenths navy and Brad corn crank up the Mike refused to say fucking word because podcast is just stupid and beers. Closer happy. Call an hour of snark masquerading as golden silence from the new sweethearts of jen's e Daily Times. Call the totally unlistenable so checkout tints navy and Brad corns. I'm not podcasting. Where refined podcasts are sold. Oh my God. Got you laughing. What kind of quarry? That's right. Oh my God. Okay. We're gonna talk about today. Historically, historically break. It's breaking the Beatles. I've heard of them recently, my daughter discovered the Beatles. My my my my youngest our youngest and. Just we watched a Beatles documentary the other day about their years is touring band. And I realized that their their formation their break-up and everything they did caused them to break up. Exactly. Like people do. Their break-up as no different than than a poorly maintained relationship. And so there's less factors. Yeah. Yeah. So I'm going to try to success change. And you may not. That's right. That's right. I'm gonna try and make this not too long. But I I do feel like if you don't know who the beetles are they were which is very possible at this point other not probably with Arta listenership, anyway, though, the comments incense consensus is that Yoko Ono Ono and to a lesser degree, Linda Eastman. Those are the. Long live killed the Beatles. They they were they had nothing to either any of them with killing. There's a bit more to it. John Paul George and Ringo as teens in the fifties and perform together for the next ten years, or so, okay, they say the nearly every day for ten years straight Ringo. Richard Starkey came into the early in the sixties. But just as the Beatles were starting together following Ringo was also the only Beatle consistently managed to stay on good terms with the other three bandmates in the post Beatle era. All right. Do you think that's because he was the late edition because he replaced Pete best think he was also the child he was the child stand. The fighting with mom and dad were fighting right Beatlemania took over the world in nineteen sixty four somewhere in between the Ed Sullivan show and their completion of their first US tour. It was John Paul George Ringo first trip United States, and the Beatles were excited and overwhelmed, George and John the first. Publicly complain about Beatle mania. However, Paul may have felt the same. He was also completely infatuated with the Beatles. So he was very happy to be married. He loved his wife, but his wife was like, this isn't the greatest thing that's ever happened. Just look at men like that after year, so relentless touring the Beatles decided to stop touring in the wake of JFK's death safety was also concerned their last official concert was a Candlestick Park in San Francisco on August. Twenty ninth nineteen sixty six they had a bit of a break before they return to the studio during their break, John flew to Spain to work on a movie how I won the war in later interviews. John said, that's when he started thinking about going solo also during that period that they wrote strawberry fields forever. I'm not sure why that's important. But they started with the break. Now break is never good break. Time off time officer time off you guys. I think we. That's right. That's right. Meantime, I space when he came back. They made sergeant pepper which was credited to Paul crow Pawtucket the credit for that. So Paul took care of the kids. Really? Well, John was off making his kids and everybody loved the kids and said, we love the kids you doing a great job. And if you look at the if you look at the songwriting split on peppers does it lean heavily towards Paul? I I don't know. No, they they they. Famously split things as fairly as possible between the two sometimes credited to just Lennon some credit just to party and some Lennon McCartney. That's why I was asking was there a particular? Leaning Paul is very into the studio, and he liked all the sound effects. And he loved George Martin on that. So they spend a lot of time in John two things on the real rainy lake keep it real. Then that's a that's a generalization. But the both of them, by the way, you start every thought with stop. Stop. Paul through the Beatles. Finished talking Paul publicly admits that he has experimented with LSD. So so he even though he was the last to try it. He was the first to admit when reporter asked him, but his LSD used he decided to say he was sick of lying. He tried to place the blame on the media saying that it was their choice to broadcast it. So they were using drugs married. So you're in a relationship and you're beginning to seek outside pleasures escaping trying to saving your realities trying to make your nagging religion. You're all doing it together to try and make the experience better. Right. You might be headed for a break. It'll enhancer it'll enhance our relationship and looking for. That's right, right. Finally, Brian Beatles manager Brian Epstein died of drug overdose that same month on August. Twenty seventh nineteen sixty seven almost a year to the date that of the Beatles last concert. It was determined that his death was accidental speculation that might have been a suicide some people claim that Brian's being in the closet was too much for Brian other say he was depressed because he felt like the Beatles. No longer needed him in the wake of Brian's desk. The Beatles didn't quite know to themselves. So Brian would be like their therapist in away their manager. But he was also the person who gave them a sense of self. But he was also seemingly doing drugs with them. Perhaps. Maybe and struggling his own d was it what what did he OD on? It doesn't say here. I have been lucky charms win. Every once. That's right. And that can be too much. And then on August, thirty first Beatles announce they'd be managing themselves. So that's like when you're trying to fix your own relationship. Sure within you can't tell the other person. What it is. You think they're doing wrong, and they tell you what you think you're doing wrong just doesn't work or even if you're both right, especially when all of your right? That's right. Right. Don't be your own therapist. But they decided to start a company together, which that's not gonna solve your problems. Don't start working with your wife, all the sudden, right? I mean we worked together, but that's different. We've always worked together, but it's hard right relationship. Bit of business. Then they took another break. They took another Brig. Do we know who called this one? Yeah. It was John John again. But also. No, it wasn't Ringo. They they went to. And they also against this is when they went they went to India and Ringo did not enjoy the food. So he left he he left early. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. And but but John Paul, George and Patty stayed on. Yeah. They liked it. They that was going to help. Then they came back in. Then they came back into the white album, which is a big messy bunch of terrific tunes. But but very very strange right because awesome transcendental experiences in India exactly when I was a kid the white album. Yeah. We used to torture me number nine. Play pick up the racket with scratch record scratch a little would you pick up play that. That's that's so funny is that the Goth one of the punk one. Did of course with her face painted way. Oh my God. I don't know. But that's when John Deere prince is is this on where they where Ringo didn't drums. Suddenly now, Paul Paul had ideas about Drummond and taking him off the track and getting rid of George Martin, some people have a lot of ideas about what's going on. They're falling into all the they've new information because they've been to India. Guess what else happens here calms? Linda. Yeah. The fishwives as they were. I love you know, it's interesting the way we look at this even store. We looked at historically like and they do to right. And I bet even Linda and Yoko assumed they were the fishwives as well. Like, it was like we're all playing the part in this idea that if a woman comes into the picture, she ruins everything for the boys. Right because it's a man's world. Right. Right. Even though these guys were both in love with their wives and one of them around and we're tired of each other. Yes. And Yoko wasn't artist. That wasn't. That's not her fault was brought into the end for each of those wives to be the advocate of their husband is fucking. What you want? Why you that's what you that's what it's supposed to be. You want a best friend to hang out. Exactly. I said Linda in yoga Paul felt threatened by John's close relationship to Yoko who had quickly become his muse his his wife threatened by relation wife. Okay. Pozzo? So busy falling in love. You met Linda at a club, blah, blah, blah in November the white came out. John is officially granted a divorce from Cynthia. Okay. So he's still married at that point somebody who really was not policy later on that that John just loved powerful woman. He loved a woman took charge and and Cynthia poor Cynthia just wanted to have her husband, come home and have slippers. And she just wanted to trip dishes with kids. Yes. She had Xiulian. Yeah. Yeah. That's right. Yeah. Tensions in the studio made Ringo walkout. Yeah. He returns. But he does walk out walked out. And he's like someone's gonna come get me. I'm ringing. There's someone's gonna come after me. I'm, you know, ten minutes later, I left my keys guys. I guess. That's why I'm like, I'm I'm gonna get to the corner by someone will come after me the next corner. Someone will come after I write one song record. Maybe I can't walk away from this. You know, like, he's the beetle you could replace that you'd want to you wouldn't want to replace them. And he's a great. They were they were perfect as they were. But I think the general public has come to the agreement that they were perfect as they were. Yeah. Yeah. So they're all fighting they keep ball quitting. They bring your Clapton in everybody in now everyone's on their own religion. They've got their own therapist. Everyone has their own. And in nineteen sixty nine Paul was to do another movie they've made some movies. They've started off with help and ended with magical misery tour, which people were like, I don't under not misery. That's right. That's right. That's right. But I think a lot of people saw on felt misery. They and there's just now it's just a lot of fighting now fighting now at the business, it's a business. It's a business, and they're not touring and everybody has their own idea because they're all growing and they've got families. Sure. Yeah. And then in September Abbey Road gets released and John officially announces that he's quitting came in. And just he basically broke up the Beatles. He came and said, I'm quitting. I'm not doing this anymore. Fools, but they didn't tell anybody. And then and then they put out another record which would sitting around let it be. They put it out afterwards that their last record and Paul he quit. So he's the guy that said I break up to break break up are also got to say it because Jon didn't make it public. And and that's it and they never would they would never play together. Again. No one. No one. Asked to shave their head. I think as I actually do feel like didn't didn't John annual go shave their heads at some point it just feels like maybe? Right. But I, but I, but I feel like that might have been predated the Peter Gabriel one is not possible. It's possible. Yeah. It wasn't a brick Gabriel and his wife got the head shaving idea from all kinds of different haircuts all the time because they were inventing haircuts at the same time. Interesting because it does kind of follow that like, you know, we need some space. And now we're getting back together and leads the space again. They sent away from you. So I could actually come back in a pretty eight you one of the things I said in the documentary which the other day, it's the Ron Howard one about touring eight days a week that they were is in love with the fans as the fans were with them when they started to say whereas tickle than excited about. Be very much. Well, I mean, look that first Radiohead movie they're like fucking wiped out already. And you're like you've been banned for year. Like, it's just too much being us. Okay. Yeah. Exactly things with these guys really hung in there for a long time and gave it their all for a long time. And then it burned out. They forgot like it's the it's that classic thing. They forgot the things you liked about each other. They didn't the right kind of space. He didn't have the right kind of communication. They weren't seeing each other. Hey, my feeling like we burned out you get burned out on people when you're with them all the time. Like, he genuinely do space and alone time to actually miss an appreciate because because when you're locked in that kind of dynamic, you know, I it's you end up you end up knowing the worst things about each other. And all of all of the things that used to be cooler cute or funnier quirky now become unbearable when you're you know. You know, they say do what you have that. Fraser, whatever do what you love and you'll never work a day. New. I it's like do what you love and you'll never not work a day in your life. And like sometimes I from my experience some things that I've done in the past. And you're you jump into something that you're so passionate about and then you're like like now, it's just an obligation that it's such a drag. And you forget why are I forgot what I was passionate about. Sometimes I it just starts having diminishing returns. Is that think of like I loved it so much it was so important. But now that I've done it every day for the past seven years. It doesn't have the same magical effect anymore. Now. It's now thirteen. Might other possibility might make you feel that my fill of this. Now at this point. It doesn't excite me anymore. I look forward to it anymore. It's become routine and mundane an an and now it's tipping to the other point where now I'm resenting that this is my thing or you're also expecting the thing to reinvent itself and make you. I think I've probably quit stand up. I don't know thirty times in my head because there's just as I go. I don't want nothing. I don't like anything about this. You know, there's you you couldn't not drive five hundred miles for twelve dollars. It was about that. It was like. L new, and I was in and I. And I liked being in front of people performing I like the actual doing most breakup occur when someone decides that something new is more appealing than where they are where they're like. I'm you know, I ju- that is that seems more interesting to me or I want I want something new. I've had enough of this thing it no longer brings me the pleasure. The canoe bad bad thing. Like, do you think that the new thing? Like are they wrong? I think it's a case by case thing, you know, because I because I think sometime sometime sometimes the new thing is wrong. But at the end of the day, the old thing wasn't working either. And so maybe the actual new thing is solid right now or just just that your body. Craves the need to move on that we that. We stay in things out of these words that we use like loyalty or commitment. And sometimes you're like the commitment is punishing to whatever it is. You're doing you know, like, I mean there have been periods. Where like all. I can I want to pick up my guitar every day when I play guitar when listening to listen play music on like that. And then there's a I don't wanna see that thing. But my every time I pick it up. Nothing happens. Like, you have those moments where you just are uninspired on area. Can't see the angle you saw that before doesn't necessarily mean that it's yeah. It's just triggers different. I mean when I when I first worked in the news business like I could not get I could not ingest enough music. I couldn't go to enough show and rock Shas. Right. Right. And then twelve years later when I've gone to so many rock shows, and I have music around me, all it's my work. It's in my car. It's at my home. It's everywhere, I go and. And then I find myself, I've all of a sudden, I'm not listening to music in the car anymore, and I'm dreading going to shows. And sometimes sometimes you just burn out on the thing that you love you feel guilty that you I mean, you still listen to music, but you don't do you don't go at the same way that you used to like in your head like is a kid. And I think for me too is a life force and is not my life force anymore. Although I do I still do I still is still makes me happier than any. I still I I have a love and appreciation for music still now, but I don't I don't seek it with the same hunger. And you don't feel guilty about not going to you'll. But I do remember very much having that thing of just like dreading having to go see another band deriding like one wanting to get my car and have silence instead of like just just starting to affect me in the negative way. And starting to nor me or feel bad people. Do stand up some watch a friend and go cut. I fucking hate you. I hate this put that fucking Mike down. It's so stupid. Like, you really like a visceral. Like what a dumb like this weird almost like a physical reaction to it. I think we ruin stuff ourselves by over mothering ourselves with become we we we self suffocate with with because we have such a thirst for it. And then it gets the point where then then you just you know, you just burn out. You're looking for an identity in it. So you it it identify. It's your identifier. And so you're always around it or you're was in it. And I'll say it, isn't it, isn't it isn't life-sustaining. Right. You're the energy. It's not the thing. It doesn't make me feel the way it used to. It's what you bring to this obligation rate as opposed to realizing that thing you have to sustain his you in no matter what you're doing. And if you can't sustain you you need to worry about you. Because that's the only thing that sustains. It is your attention to it or your lack of ten you've gone. We've gone to see bands right went. Hey, fuck if you weren't going to show up tonight man, why did we right right? And then sometimes these people fucking possessed. This is unreal. I'm having like someone will surprise you in a way, you didn't expect to because they're so present with what they're doing. Right. And sometimes you're like nobody in this band is actually here right now. All left the building. Right. Yeah. They don't wanna be here. Are they right before they got onstage? Clearly. Yeah. It's interesting. But I think we do that people to in relationships to where you where you smother, you you, you know, year so on top of each other all the time, and you're completely inseparable. And then you stop being individuals. And you're only we and then you, and then know, and then you hit the tipping point where you're just like not everything has to be we right? All of a sudden, you're mad says really uncomfortable. The thing for me for sure for the Beatles to look back at and in. This is true relationships and go look what they did the look what they look there to get his create an, and I don't think even in the moment, they couldn't they still used to get your head around. If I as a fan can't give I head around this year. Their head around the fact that what they did through good and bad for us. Is so incredible. Also, part of his you it actually is perfect. Because there's there's nothing to to take the the the sheen of the the heart swelling Levin stalled Joe that you have about your favorite bands. When they continue making music. You don't connect with everything ivory can almost ruined everything. You know, what everyone just loves loves their body of work. And there's no just like, oh, I hope they don't play songs from. But then there's that. Record that we all hate, right? It wasn't groundbreaking din. Didn't hit us in the hit us in the gut and blow our minds as they invented the thing that people got to live and work in. Copy from those bands that have been together thirty forty years and are going on you and everyone's going, oh, I just want to hear the heads. I don't I just want to hear the old records. I don't wanna hear the new material. The new material. Right. It would have been hard. Like, I guess if you're a artists to stay where we wanted them where we liked him where they affected us and moved us. Yeah. And they all they all did. I mean, maybe ring didn't have the output. They all did some great solo stuff. They all did signs that people loved, and then they and then they also made some music that is Paul especially very hard to listen to. But but for the most part, but for some stuff that may go I you should. There you go. I you should have been a week off. But but. But then. The judge. Yeah. I felt like we're going through a body of my work. Remember your member when you were member, you're Buddhist years? Greg your, but it's end up number when you went through that period or three oh, look at you. Yeah. I'm gonna go ahead and take Paul, Don. Nobody's me really sad about your disapproval. I think part of the thing that that thing I think it was a little bit heartbreaking is that. They never got any kind of resolved. Just I mean, they they did eventually become friends. But I heard Howard Stern asked to Paul. I think it was like five months ago, I interviewed him and he said, but you guys ever all in a room together again. And he said, no. And that's just that they all four sitting room and go fuck dude were still what have we do like, they didn't I didn't need anything more from them. Now, you know as you get older, right? You just want to hear them play the hits and on that kind of stuff. But I would love to hear them talk about it or be about it or congratulate each other or no. And I'm sure they did. But they know that they went through something is exactly like a relationship. They went through something. They can never explain to somebody else that that could be people can speculate on. But nobody really knows what it was like. No, no, no. So we learned from the Beatles. A little bit. It it really is. It really did follow the sort of format stages of the break of a romantic relationship. Right. We're trying to talk yourself into it other neighbors of the stones who've never broken up. And and we're everyone's always worried about Keith drunk mom. He'll be worried about him for decades to come. All right. I guess if you tell us about your breakup or your relationships, you can write to us at maybe it's you podcast achie- male. Look, here's the thing. Right at right us, just write us and say, hi, we are tired of going to that mailbox. Not seeing lots of glorious stuff. Send us a nice. How do you do tell us? What you like whether show tell us what you don't like about the show doesn't matter. But right us, it's maybe it's you podcast at g mail. So rash, concord. All right. Hill year, we. It was a good show. This podcast was brought to you by Starbucks audio produced by land Romo and was injured by map or so don't forget to subscribe rate and review wherever you get your podcasts.

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Oblique Strategies (Entry 856.RO1202)

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

53:48 min | 1 year ago

Oblique Strategies (Entry 856.RO1202)

"This awesome we are Jennings and John Rodrick. We speak to you from our present which we can only assume as your distant past the turbulent time that was the early twenty. I singer during the great cataclysm that will surely befall our civilization. We began this monumental reference of strange obscure human knowledge these recordings represent our or attempt to compile and preserve wonders esoterica that would otherwise be lost so whether you're listening from an advanced civilization or have just reinvented the technology to decrypt our transmissions. This is our legacy to you. This is our time capsule. This is the on the bus you have accessed entry eight five six dot. Ro One two zero two certificate number two six three eight oblique strategies yeah you are Pop Music Fan. I think I mentioned it enough. That people probably have a sense that you are more culturally diverse than just a guy who knows a lot of trivia big music nerd music nerd third film Nerd Book Nerd Poetry Nerd Preeti big poetry nerd. Yeah I would say yeah. I I have been impressed with your knowledge of poetry over the years. Yeah that often comes up. You'll be like Ken what what Emily Dickinson poem. Does this remind you our all the Bert came hopping down the block. He did not know I saw and you're like yeah. Yeah yeah yeah right heavy man. I definitely will throw out some William Carlos Williams and you're just right there bear with me. I'll just say the next line say the next. It's a funny thing we just high five each other. No one knows what we're talking about but you. You're a David Bowie fan yeah yeah. I know this about you love Bowie. How do you feel about Bowie's. Berlin period is thin White Duke era. I understand understand. He might be with us today if used maybe half of them as much cocaine as he did though you never know during his do you never know. Maybe the cookie is is what kept him going. There's no there's not approved link. Ken between copious cocaine use and and cancer I would say there's not as it's hard to pick a favorite David Bowie record or song for there's probably not a song I like better than sound vision off of low. Heroes is an amazing using album. That's just great work and it sounds like it's coming from another planet and so how how much do you know about Brian Eno who produced just those records. How much do you credit that era that trip tick of Bowie albums to Brian Eno being a little younger. Can you like my first exposure to Brian. Eno was as you twos producer that's right and so I think of him as a youtube producer first stood foremost oh and he's the also the guy from Roxy Music and David Bowie producer and but I think he's probably one of the greatest most innovative music producers of the Rock era right he he produced for those of you not not familiar with the the production credit of albums he and Daniel Len wa co-produced unforgettable fire which was U2's super big nineteen eighties record where they were they transitioned from being a kind of quirky Irish new wave band slightly Christian Catholic new wave band to being to being being like a major major international band of superstar anthem factory and then Joshua Tree and Achtung baby as well but where pineal when Wa is an extremely accomplished musician you know he can play the the pedal steel like nobody's business you know never credited himself as as much of a musician at all he much more sort of thought aww himself as a conceptual artist when he joined roxy music in the early days it was it was by happenstance. You know he met the Sax Player. US subway station is that right and I was like Hey WanNa play the synthesizer and he in the early days refused to appear onstage. He he sat behind the mixing console and added the symph affects and then also actually sang backing vocals from from back back from the mixing board. Yeah that kind of seems like that goes with the cerebral edge we have a variety now right yeah that's right and when he did start appearing onstage in Roxie music and roxy music had a certain kind of onstage look and feel but e-e-e-e-no came out in basically a Peter Gabriel in genesis style costumes big elaborate outfits that you know that set him apart kind of like the guitar player of Limp Biscuit who often wore black contact lenses. You have to wonder whether wrestling bad thought about that. You really do considering the rest of the conversation. I was thinking of Rock and rock. Yes limpest. Get us well. You're right Bryan ferry was trying to present himself as a pretty swab operator exactly and then he's got his wing man. Dan is a real peacock but you know came at music from from outside and and added added added kind of I think I think his approach to it was. I'm not here to be a virtuoso. I'm here to I use music and sound in particular as as another palate in the creation of art. He's an idea guy. He's an idea the ago and in that he was influenced by the painter Peter Schmidt who was an English painter who kind of was a polymathic artist and someone someone who who although was a painter expanded his purview to include kind of every different way you could make art and was part of that sixties movement where the experience of art was was rated as highly as the as the product or or in fact our was no longer considered a product but it's not an artifact anymore right. It's more path or a or a an emotional experience or a or a journey and is this his work. I'm looking at it. It's kind of watercolors others. Yeah often very minimal landscapes yeah his his pallet. They almost feel like they're made out of ripped paper or their multimedia works with their representative. That's interesting actually pretty which I was not expecting. They're beautiful and he also was a teacher and our teacher feature and influenced. I think had an at an outsized influence on a generation that came after him he wasn't it wasn't all conceptual sexual right. Yes you're seeing a lot of thought I was going to be like a guy standing with a bullhorn under a you know a bucket droppings Vienna sausage yeah yeah right right or you know or or sort of John. Cage figure who are white canvases or just begins a process where the artist no longer longer has his hands on the work but just sets it free and let's the art you know take its own path now. These are very controlled and show a high level of crap. They were GONNA album. Uncovers honestly well kind of what what what bonds I guess Schmidt and John Cage and a lot of a lot of artists of this period is a is a recognition that the artistic impulse does not it doesn't need need to be bound to logical progression at doesn't need to one thing doesn't need to follow from another ride. You can you in in in both producing and consuming art. You can have none hierarchical experiences are you can have lateral kinds of approaches to art you can you can a effectively make it by not focusing on technique by. I not pursuing an end goal right and you see this in a lot of modern art a lot of extemporaneous art where an end and and ultimately it it factored into or figured deeply into punk the idea that being good at it and pursuing pursuing a intentional course actually kind of throttled here creative not just your creative impulse or gift but like like creativity itself. I'm I'm a little skeptical. We've talked about this a little skeptical about that whole idea because I do admire craft. I do admire technique and what I'm working on something. I actually enjoy constraints the idea that you know the idea. That's it's a purely intuitive thing that maybe anybody can do can be sloppy work right right and in particular with modern art. How many people are I don't like the whole my kid could do this thing right but it's rarely true to the to the uninformed. I guess to the untrained trained I it could be difficult to distinguish between art made by a university versity educated artist and art made by an elephant with a paintbrush and this is the this is the criticism of it. Although of course when you're confronted by a by a truly great work of art I think even a lay person will find their their reaction is when you absolutely can tell a beautiful work and it isn't just it isn't just happenstance yeah yeah the more the more I look at art. I realized that every single thing I like everybody you know a large group of people like as well like people can just tell what's good good and what what they like to look at yeah you can put it's hard to find a you know a great piece of art that is that you could buy to put on your wall even because if you like it enough other people do this guy can start charging tens of thousands of dollars canvas. Well you can see it in in those exhibitions where you'll have a a charcoal drawing by Rembrandt and then a charcoal drawings by his students who are also great artists and who are in the process of being trained. I mean every once in a while. You do see a work that expert can't quite attribute definitively to an artist or to his school but for the most part a rembrandt charcoal and one right next to it by one of his very talented students you just know instantly from the quality the line that this was done by a master and sometimes in the same artist you'll get an art exhibition and you'll you'll immediately say oh those three are the best ones and if you closer those are the three that will have sold right because you know whatever the lightning was that struck those pieces we can all agree. They have it more than the other six but there is. I think a lot of truth to the fact that an artist doesn't always or necessarily understand their inspiration understand Dan. You do not ever sit down and say today. I create my masterwork because if you could that's all any artist would do sit down and and and follow a logical progression to making a great work. It's just terrifying hoping that it comes hoping that it doesn't go away and knowing where it comes from which often often artists just credited with coming down from the sky and and yeah when God played a larger role in in Contemporary Society Eddie people credited religion was the major influence and now you know we have a whole secular arts community that would that struggles to find at a euphemism for God. I've heard some artists talk about how you know. There's no way to pull down the ideas and they frame it as putting themselves in a position to receive see them. You know keeping track of what factors make you prone to inspiration and then trying to duplicate that. Do you need to be with people. Do you need to be the away from other people. Does it Jay up early in the morning. Do you need to be up late. At night. You know just create the create the incubator for it but you never know when fertilization is going to happen right and unfortunately even that is not because because you can set up the exact conditions where you made your your last great work and find yourself utterly blocked whereas on your way into town on on the train you suddenly get electrified by new idea so the the the mind in particular the arch creating mind the art creating impulse and in and in fact this is also true of of any inspiration that you you search for it and don't always find you sometimes did you find it the less you search for it right and this is this is this was understood to be true in ancient times right the the the pursuit of great art and the and the question of using logic to make decisions already was being interrogated did by by people in ancient. China and it is I think best personified by the not personified but best exemplified by the presence of the I Ching I was. I was wondering if that's where you were we talked about this in the John Cage entry that's right and and the I ching played a major role in John cade get John Cage's art and it did also in in Peter Schmidt introducing randomness is that right introducing randomness in the form of kind of you know throwing a lot and believing in some ways that the result of the roll dice and the combination of of sort sort of numerology to discover a like a a an obtuse answer in a in in a in a document collecting all these sort of solutions that will reflect the hand of God or it will reflect it will it will conjure meaning that does exist somewhere. There is an answer. There's you know he recognized. There is an answer outside side of yourself and how to bring it down how to put it into language and how to apply it doesn't very practical ways right each each possible hexagrams. Each arrangement of the lots is related to too short text is that right a message like literally the book will give you the message that you were supposed to get about moment and then your interpretation of it yes he comes and that's carefully chosen to not be direct right and and whole schools evolve a trying to figure out well. Is there a comprehensive theme to interpreting these things it does each person go run off with with an. I'm sorry sorry I mispronounced it. As I ching the itching to each person go take their little message and determine for themselves how that answers their question. It's funny that there's this this a happy medium between advice that would be too specific to be useful and advice that is too general to be useful somewhere in the middle of the where the advice is still all somewhat cryptic it specific enough that it gives you something but cryptic enough that you can still interpret it individualize it for you and your situation listen right and in particular if year if your worldview believes in sort of a a selfless selfless truth or or is if the if the if you're religious world and your political world is is working against Ego to to imagine that your interpretation is also sort of not a sign of your genius but rather a sign of sort of a you know a flow of for lack of effort to add a hippie term to the idea right so these coming from outside of yourself you need to recognize and that that acknowledgement amount of eastern tradition and that incorporation of eastern ideas was happening within the art and and Avant Garde in the West in this same time period the sixties and early seventies it was the time of popularization of yoga and meditating and answered Western Music then all seemed like a new discovery and and was appealing to people because it seemed it was certainly more ancient in in a lot of regards than the western tradition also it hasn't been poisoned by it answers all the needs these people had for religion spirituality without being their parents religion right which was which was now tainted by both real and imagined slights that that had come to that generation and it was applicable to do things like art and exercise and seemed to be all encompassing where a Christian tradition may be didn't a have that sort of fully fully universal application to your priest and said how do I make. This is crazy painting. You know the priest is going to have less to say maybe about it. What Christianity has that specificity. I was talking about. There's a spectrum and Christianity is You know a lot of western. Religion is very far on the on the specificity spectrum like and its primary concern is what happens after you die in some or how to behave according to a a moral path that will ensure your fate right rather than how what is your process a lot of very specific specific suggestions. Here's the way God would like you to dress here. The things God would like you to do here the different things he would like you to do on a Sabbath. Here are the things he wants you to eat. You know there's a lot of that and there's an that's it's very hard to apply specific codes like that to what should my answers questions and answers questions like what kind of person should should. I be on one axis. Should I cheat on my wife or not but it does not answer questions on the axis of what kind of arts should I make right. If you throw the each ing of Christianity the the answer is going to be. Maybe God doesn't want you to make this. If you're having trouble even about not wasting your time so much Brian you know wow that's really good iino was influenced by Schmidt and by cage and was after after he left roxy music because he would be been in Roxy Music for a couple of years and it didn't work out because probably Bryan ferry was wearing ascot's and he was wearing a feathered headdresses and they had a little part of the way then can only have one brian and it doesn't matter if you spell it differently. It's like the homophones O'Brien. You get one one the thing about Brian Eno is he. He is he is very posh Brian. He knows full name. I don't know if you know this is Brian. Peter George Saint John Lebed teast Adila Saal. No whoa really so he's not. He's not like Brian from the block. He's he got a nice art school education creation because his parents can afford an art school education and also he has a he has that kind of rarified gentility. His air sounds so space age. You're like oh well. He changed. He must have changed his name at some point. It's one backwards you know but no it's. It's actually it's a French huguenot name that sounded like Ino- or something I gotTa anglicised into so he came with this blazer under name ready to go yeah right and and and he has a kind of blade runner I mean he's he's slim. He's other other worldly and weirder glasses than anyone else on earth probably like no matter where he is although he does the thing where he's he is restrained. He's not Elton John Right. I mean when he was but he he somehow got. He got little some kind of Scandinavian rigidity to him yeah he he he became more disciplined as time went on but after he left. Roxy Music immediately begin working in what he described as ambient music which was not again in not music where he was searching for the perfect melody but rather music that was that was meant to be experienced as a component of an experience or music that was atmospheric. Yeah it lends a feeling a feeling not a story or a or as you say. Even a melody is fairly often it seems structuralist right and it does it now. We it's been duplicated so many times that it feels almost like you know we hear that kind out of mute music in nature documentary you can't turn on the TV without hearing it but imagine the first time he was like no. This is music to yeah believe me and it was you know it was astonishing launching and it had a bit head of wide ranging effect. I don't know if you've ever listened to music for airports while in an airport. Does it change the work I have if any does you know you walk around an airport with your headphones on listening to music for airports and you're like I get it. Now I get it but it made him a popular his his sort of sonic experimentation made him popular choice for Alan Guard musicians to you employ as a sound effect EST or or in the boys case and a lot of other cases as a producer. It doesn't vary how much a producer actually contributes to the sound of the record absolutely I mean some producers are some producers bring a real engineering mm perspective to records where they use the technology and the tools of the recording media to to make interesting getting drum sounds and to make interesting to to make the compositions more interesting to say why don't we take out that course and put in an hour or hop to the solo and so forth and there are other producers in hip hop right producers. The name producer is given to the person that produces the track the sound that the the rapper wraps over but other producers become real collaborators and are are responsible for the sound of the album the musician brings in the the song and then the producer deconstructed and turns it into a and uses a sonic Palette that belongs to them and I think in the production of of the two albums Daniel Lam wa was the the person that brought the more formal production the guy behind the soundboard that was that had comments on the on the base part and then E-e-e-e-no oh would come in almost as a consultant and add a dreamlike sounds or he would often inspire songwriting changes by asking interesting questions or or posing a opposing an approach because of there's less technique than actually like a a like a very broad concept yeah we'll so in the mid nineteen seventies during this period where Schmidt and Iino and a lot of other people were exploring the process process of making art as a form of art arts education and also art creation of they started to realize that a lot of time what what what inhibits you as an artist. Is that you encounter in a dilemma you encounter a crossroads and you're stymied you can't you don't know what to do next. It's is not a dilemma between two things you are blocked. You don't know what comes next like that. It's a it is a I mean it's a it is a kind of UH. It's the problem of infinite possibility yes when you go in and push record you can do anything you could just make raspberries with your mouth for an hour our and call it an album and if you wanna make something more disciplined if you're looking to make something beautiful it's often it's often been incredibly overwhelming to choose even between three path. I just hate staring at that blinking cursor in my word processor you know like I have nothing to say. A. And something's got to be here. Something has to be here. I have zero ideas and you often. Just start writing right or you're you're. You're you're told to Lynda. Barry would say move your hand. You know like make keep moving until something comes out usually end up just going for a walk I move every other part of my body but I often do sit and just start writing just like blog orbiter darb and eventually I mean you have something to work with. At least that's how we do show clearly. Let's start talking and see if it becomes about something at some point but in the early Seventies Schmidt and iino working separately and inspired by the itching had started to write down on the note cards these little aphorisms that weren't meant to be direct instructions but were meant to cause. Does your your your sort of vertical thinking you're logical process to short circuit big with with the idea. Nia that your creative mind needed to be stimulated needed to be given a problem to solve that wasn't the problem at a hand and by doing that you would take an oblique path of an angle you couldn't have imagined a leading up to do you know a as an attempt to solve whatever your problem and you know and Schmidt were both working on this independently and when they when they realized the other there was was doing a similar thing they compared what they were making they each had a deck of cards and it was and there was a tremendous amount of overlap that's interesting between what what they were doing so they decided to collaborate and they were they were influenced by a writer by the name of Edward de Bono who mm-hmm who'd written a book or had coined the term lateral thinking. I know this guys the lateral thinking guy yeah. Are you familiar with. Have you read. I don't know the air but I remember in the eighties being like teachers who had read the book being suddenly very excited and we had to learn about lateral thinking and so suddenly we get to do something fun in class right where we'd get a problem to solve you know like how would use a block of cheese and a barometer to do X. Right. It's the it's basically the interview questions you get at Google Jake's and also we that's around the time I heard these in the early eighties though situation puzzles you would think I'm talking about John and Mary lying dead on the floor and a puzzle in a puddle of water and you'd I have to kind of figure out what unusual approach to take to the problem to make the story makes sense man points a gun at a bartender once again at a man and he says thank you and leaves happily or something you know what interpretation of the story make sense it's basically it's basically hanging some bananas from the Ceiling Ailing and putting a chair in the opposite side of the room and waiting for the monkey to finger. That's right for a higher dimensional being. That's exactly what it looks like. When is the monkey just GonNa move over the stool. We'll on the classic example apple of it is the judgment of Solomon Right where women are arguing over. WHO's baby who whose baby it is. This and Solomon says let's cut the baby in half and then the true mother is revealed. I read a as a kid. I was very influenced by this book of I think I don't know if they were Chinese. Folktales or later Western evocations of Chinese hotels about a wise judge who's always making these Salomon light confusion rulings. I remember one about a a poor kid who's living being above a bakery and he he era above a restaurant and he thanks them at one point for creating those beautiful smells that help them meet his his poor rice every day and the restaurant tour gets mad and takes him to court and says this guy's been stealing my smells. I demand recompense and the wise Confucian judge thinks and then he nods this is really stuck with me apparently and he says I award Take out all the silver in your pocket. That's what I'm awarding and the port student so sad because he takes it all the silver in his pocket and the judge says now jingle it and he jingles it and the guy says okay now put the money away you took his is the smell of his cooking and now he will take the sound of your coins and I was like this is amazing. How do I how do do I think like that well. Oblique strategies then became a thing that could they weren't just pursuing as a as a neither artist was writing these down just as a you know with the intent of making a book they were writing them down with the idea of making a deck that they could consult something you know in a way a random brain turn up a random card and let the universe tell you right and a lot of them. Were music specific specific. Oh is that I was GONNA ask so. Where these on the specificity spectrum do they actually suggest a tool or technique or they just like be more open? I've been what what kinds of things do these cards say well a lot of them. Were were just general kind of you know. Oblique obtuse recommendations recommendations. Some of them were were specific to to making music like for instance abandoned. Normal instruments is is a is an oblique strategy where you're sitting in your. You're working on a guitar part. It's frustrating. It's frustrating. What do we do go to the oblique strategies you pull out a band endan normal instruments and your left to decide what a normal instrument is. Probably your guitar qualifies as one and try tried to find something in the studio to make to fill the area fill the gap in the song you were trying to fill but with something else you have to literally abandoned your guitar. Are you have to leave it on the Dorsey back and start. Go Banging on the pipes and in the studio washroom take your guitar to the to the front step of a fire station richer talk a little note on the case and so they made this little deck of cards and between the two of them they came up with about one hundred and thirteen cards and they published a publish them. Would you know they made them with the intention of handing them to other people and and and having them be useful like just friends in the art scene or is this. Is this a mass market item. It was it was not a mass market item. At first it was the first edition had they made about five hundred of them and they were you know their handsome because these artists rushing it so it was a little black box box that had these cards inside and they were signed recognize that they were making an artifact and then they were popular with their friends so in nineteen seventy-eight they made another addition this time of a thousand and the number of cards went up from nine one hundred thirteen to one hundred twenty eight you can imagine once he'd made one hundred thirteen of them that you would be inspired and keep making oblique strategies so. I was surprised to learn that in that three years they'd only added fifteen cards it. It seemed like there would be four hundred by seems like every time a little a little. A vague notion occurred to you. You would be like that's a card right right exactly and the following year they're third edition came out a also of a thousand this time. It only had one hundred twenty three card. I want to see the ones that don't make they'd taken five live away now. I don't know I don't know whether it's which of these ideas turned out to be awful. I remember spy magazine used to where they would list. The people who got dropped from WHO's who every year like who who is no longer who I wanna see the non oblique strategies the didn't make you cut out and then there might have been quite a bit of circulation but of of these ideas and there quickly became obvious that not everybody was using these for music and so there were additions of Oblique Strategies. The didn't have musical prompt. I'm looking at a set of them right now and some of them are very specific to music engineering but some of them are like remember those quiet evenings evenings yeah. Here's one that says what goes on good point. That's a great question in fact now there are oblique strategy websites is where you can just go and get a randomized like. I'm sitting in one now. why don't you give us an idea for the show who like what should we do this point emphasize. I'm for size repetitions emphasize repetitions. Now you say emphasize repetitions. We should emphasize repetitions. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa get again always first steps that as a verb and I dig that about it yeah well and it almost seems like the more general they are the better for me and I think in my experience working with them because it just wants his body percussion and you know we can all just bobby up right now it just fat boys at in working with these and I have used them creatively. Fli You have if you if you give yourself the leeway to like pick through five of them until you find one that better or worse. It's worse because sitting in working with always for steps. It really requires that you that you surrender and surrender to to what this is and what you what you pull out of always first steps is going to govern your choice because you're looking for. I mean to sit in and pick cards until so you find one that works for you. You're not surrendering your executive function and the art I like has surprise and mystery guests and this guarantees some kind of level of unpredictability right art with surprise and mystery right and you're going to find you're going to work in it with your hands in a different way if you set out to to pursue always first steps in the process and particularly if you pull that out in the middle of a recording session. Where do you get to first steps. You know what if you accidentally we're doing this new you kept turning over cards and it said things like nine eleven or a baby with leprosy and then you're like oh uh-huh cards against humanity yeah you can't require a record laws although you probably could it would be insane clown posse record or something. I'm sure there are people out there that are that are doing that right now or if they weren't. They're gonNA do it tomorrow. My first collection of oblique strategies strategies was given to me as a gift and a friend of Mine and artist by the name of Christian Cosmos sat at a typewriter and typed oblique strategy type to them out on three by five cards with her little vintage each typewriter and made this set for me as an art project in its own right where she using some canonical list or Rashid just picking tips that worked for her so so as we you know as I said the number of oblique strategies went from one hundred thirteen to one hundred twenty three in nineteen seventy nine and then precipitously dropped to one hundred oblique strategies in nineteen ninety six the software designer Peter Norton whom you might know hasn't Norton Antivirus Antivirus Guy who was a pacific northwestern. He's from Aberdeen. I didn't know they went to read and he was kind he worked for Boeing and was sort of just a general problem solving engineering type and bought one of the first IBM PC's and early on realized that I mean he accidentally deleted a file as we all have done thousand times but rather other than tears hair out he said about to write a program where he was able to retrieve the deleted file and that program became popular you know he traded among among other. PC programmers of the early eighties and he developed a software company that that that had a whole series of mm-hmm of different products and became an early tech or not early but like a like mid period tech millionaire and sold his his sold his company to what system dine. Let's just say it was Info Tech Hang on on. Let's see who it actually is not grow yeah. It's a info dire tech. It was Compu- Abuse Do Corp.. It's by a Simon Tech are symon tech which is a company that makes makes utilities today symon text so he became a millionaire but at a at a certain point was you know had been influenced by oblique strategies or was aware of it and he asked me knows permission to make an addition of them for his friends and in nineteen ninety six he made a Christmas present addition that had little little art attached to it and he made four thousand copies by more than there's ever been on earth. He's got a lot of friends and so the the arrival of these in nineteen ninety six actually post dates my friend Kristen Kristen making this set for me. Oh you had it before. Peter Norton was right so at this point there were only I think a couple bowl of thousand of them in existence but within the arts community they were widely known and they had been the the the strategies themselves had been disseminated enough that Kristin was able to get it you know a list of them but she was unable to get her hands on a set because they you know they were a a very expensive very prized and and I assume they're collectible now but presumably making a deck of cards is not the hard part no but but you couldn't I mean I mean they were. They were copyright protected. You couldn't just make a black box full of Enos cards. They will catch you. I mean you could sell them well. Kristen did right she sat and and it was part of I think her process to almost a meditative process put in a three by five card right an oblique strategy like for instance remove ambiguities and convert to specifics. I bet there's a card in there are with the exact opposite advice the Wilshire there is I was reading a story about how when Boeing we're working on. I guess it's Heroes The instrumental tracks sense of doubt it it kind of has an oddly dramatic through line at a bunch of surprising things and they had each drew on a different card and card said make everything as similar as possible and Bowie's Said said emphasized differences so they both had to had they had to compose this track aligned with competing oblique strategies and kind of the oddness of that instrumental is what results well and I think I think that is that's exactly how they have appeared in my the music over time right you. You're given a problem to solve an often. It is against what everyone in the room actually wants to do that's you are you do not want to convert specifics to generalities at the point at which you're like stymied you once you want some brecon solid advice but just tell me whether we should put keychains here or not now kristen. I think became aware of oblique strategies because they appear as a plot point in the movie slackers either Richard Licht Letterman Yeah slackers for the nineteen ninety sort of generation X. cult film slacker. It's we're going to get worse. slacker not slackers it's like. I think it's first movie slackers. slackers is what we call one another slackers the film but a character in the movie walks around sort of handing out oblique strategies card. I remember this. I didn't know what they were yeah and and one of the cards and kind of the most famous one was not actually one of the canonical oblique strategies not not no original it wasn't no it said withdrawing in discussed is not the same thing as ap oh this is becomes an rem emmerich rats right so rem then takes them says Richard Said Richardson Richard Meeting Richard Linklater Richardson withdrawing so does that mean Michael Stipe did not know it was an oblique strategy because he credits Richard Linklater with it well. He credits him because he because it's not it's. It's not a real car. It's a fake oblique strategy and what I found when Kristen made my set was she made her own there. I have most one hundred and thirteenth some of them are interpolations by her yeah and and it's incredibly seductive to do and I've sat in made did oblique strategies. The idea of you PRODUC- Adecco has some of hers and then some of your own somebody else produces one that has the ideas of years they liked plus their own right mutating and tenderloin out there really beautiful and they're really they're. They're not easy to make because they have to. They have to to reverberate because they are inspiring lateral thinking you know they are in the Peter Schmidt wrote a book called the thoughts behind the thoughts. They're trying to they're trying to convey and conjure something other worldly or at or at least to break your pattern and so you can't just write down you know take a walk more. Go generates electricity or whatever like they have to. They have to have an element of bafflement. Have you thought what do you think about lateral thinking thinking as it applies to non artistic fields you know it's important for engineers coming up with novel solutions as well or I mean I guess comedy is Ann Dr. But I'm thinking about Improv people not taking the first idea but waiting for something weird or to occur to them right. It's a little bit yes and yeah. I think there's hardly any realm of that requires. An engineering of course requires a lot of creative thinking sure like I know you put down computer programmers but should a good programmer have stack of oblique strategies one. They are trying to figure out the best way to to shirt liver a product. I mean absolutely should I yeah. I'd disparage computer programmers because it is hilarious for me to do not because I actually don't think that they do want work because they had asthma and can't catch up. That's right you can outrun them. I do it mostly because they are. They are heralded as the prince and Princess Rise of our Contemporary Society and I think that they need to be taken down a pain because they are they are EGOMANIAC but oblique strategies remain of feature in in music production coldplay has credited them and and and other musicians will start off in and have oblique strategies as a component of their process. I continue I. It's easy to forget that you have them. It's it's it's easy to forget that they are an oracle right someone that you can consult outside side of your when you're making an artistic work particularly one that's collaborative it's very seldom democratic and and it and it's often of very small group of like minded people and and here you have a You have some way to to connect with the with the other. It's weirdly easy to just kind of stick with the process that you always do. You know it's it's. I don't know if it's because it's reassuring or you know. Even if it's not working for you it's just so seductive to stay in that step at a time iterative the process and yeah what you need to step outside it yeah an in music making. I mean it's a big part of the process to try and make take all your songs. If you're making an album to make those songs feel like part of a whole like you suggest to producer hey let's record the drums for every every song in a different location. The producers going to push back because it will sound to the listener like an alien combination of like a playlist playlist like as like a combination of songs that don't belong together and so in almost every recording session you go in and record the drums all for for all of us for all the songs and then you begin to add interesting other elements but but but it's easy. I think to make an entire record where you never wants wants deviate from today's Guitar Day. Let's go record architectures. I mean it's the it's the thing about music doesn't interest me is that I think the song sounds too much like all the songs on the last record and all the songs on the record before that and you'll hear it in modern pop music. There's never a point where the producer doesn't say okay okay. Let's bring a vote coder in here. Let's bring auto tune in and we'll make the song sound like it's got auto to non it. No one ever says let's pull out an oblique strategies adages card and you know they hardly ever say put. Auto Auto Strategies Scooter Braun as the next the next Justin bieber records gonNA sound so much better that would be my strategy and that includes oblique strategies entry eight five six dot. Ro One two zero two certificate number two six three eight in the omnibus listeners simple subtraction subtraction simple subtracts. I'm not going to give I'm not gonNA give your social handles. Just mine go. The following is both stratagem. Don't forget to follow the Omni at the omnibus project on also media. I am at Ken Jennings on twitter and have nothing else to say. I I have a part of this too. I can add myself let me see analyzes his Co.. Analyzed color changes in grading. That's going to be a little tricky and giving an email address but who knows what color changes me. It's true it could be vocal color. Don't forget to send us the electric mail. If that's available in your era at the project at mail dot com interesting that Gregorian being in chant is where you go. Is there a card for Gregorian chant. That would explain a lot of low. I think let's see what my owed bleak. Strategy is imagined the piece set set of disconnected events okay so I'll read email addresses and you've gotten crash your car and it's up to the future rolling Congress on facebook under a group of the same name there are like minded people on Reddit as well if you'd like to send as an unrelated event and if you would like to write us a letter or send US strategy your own please do so out on cards and send them to Po box five seven four four shoreline Washington nine eight one five if you put in a self addressed stamped envelope John Wadden oblique strategy of his own and send it back to you. Do we need holes. That's that's the next one I got do. Do we need to talk about the Patriots John. Yeah I think I think we need holes. Let's put a hole right here of in my pocket. I thought Oh you like space but you meant a yellow submarine. We you can contribute to the John has a hole in his pocket that needs funding for the omnibus. If you would like to contribute to become part of the project and the process at this time capsule checkout patriots dot com slash omnibus project and and be generous please. Let's see here my next oblique strategy for completing. This altro is today tonight. Lose my oblique strategies. Oh curses this can still be one of the holes find. We've added another whole here while you dig yourself out of trying to find the right. Url Well Let's see well so oblique. Strategies are available for sale. Now you can buy a box of them. They've been licensed by E-e-e-e-no and are now imprint imprint and the number of them available has exploded. I'm probably going to actually buy us out. I think yeah from from from just a few thousand two now an infinite number but also they're available online at the oblique strategies you can google it and find it will oblique strategy generators or if you're in the future just dig through the wreckage to generate a complete set you can do with magic gathering or po came onto mine says the most important thing is the thing most easily forgotten that would be read at reference. I already did that future earnings from our vantage point in your distant past we have no idea how long our civilization survived but we hope and pray that the catastrophe we fear may never come give the game away. This whole thing is just an excuse for me and Ken to we're not actually being time cops yeah. This is just a biweekly podcast. PODCASTS are doing for fun and Financial Gain Yeah Wow I. I think we are going to do that but the cards told us to. It said right there. If the worst comes soon this recording all recordings may have been our final word the whole the holes leaving the inconsistency principle uh-huh providence allow. We'll be back with another on the.

Oblique Strategies Peter Schmidt Brian Eno producer David Bowie Ken Jennings John Roxy Music Elton John Right US Dan William Carlos Williams Peter Norton John Cage Google Bowie cocaine Peter Gabriel
Top 10 Prog Rock & Prog Metal Bands of All Time

The Loudini Rock and Roll Circus

1:11:40 hr | 1 year ago

Top 10 Prog Rock & Prog Metal Bands of All Time

"Tonight on the dean, hard rock and metal circus. The greatest hard rock and metal prog acts of all time. One know what they are. Stick around. You're listening to the Dini rock and roll circus changing rack history one podcast at a time. All right, boys, and girls moms and dads, grandmas and grandpas rock and roller 's of all ages. Welcome back to the dean, hard rock, mental circus. My name's Lou Lombardi, aka Lou Dini. And tonight on on the show the podcast. We are going to be talking about the greatest prog rock bands. We get like ten lined up. Nice even number. But you know, how we are. We're so what are we? We're all over the place all over the place where like very indecisive people. So. If we say fourteen while then you'll just have to deal with that. Little dish river it'll be a little bit. You can cry about it. We get we. So you listen loot any rocket hard rock metal circus. Our website is Lou Dini, rock and roll circus dot com. Please check back often for more great podcasts. Like this one. Please tune into rock rage radio. You can go rock ridge radio dot com. Get signed up get the app on your mobile device. And then you listen to great hard rock and heavy metal twenty four seven, and you can listen to us every Sunday at noon, loot, any rock and roll circus. Art rock models. Rather is the regular feature program at noon, Sundays, noon on the on rock radio sitting with me tonight in the co pilots chair is MS lily v six the sixer what's the lily lily? Is you? Since we don't have bumper music like that. I'm just going to sing good seeing all the things because I'm not gonna sing anything. Goodness. Any who's it's hey, didn't you everything going on this weekend? I had a thing this weekend. A big thing. Now, you don't anymore. Why so big it was like more JOL Guerande big ole and. Yeah. It was it was that. We we. We did a show. We did. We played twenty Monroe live in Grand Rapids, Philly. I am not Nikki sixes, brother. Thank you, though. We're going to chat after this. Go ahead. Sorry. Really you pissed off six or now. Now, you have to go to the ninety corner off you sit on the ninety bench for the resin podcasts. Continue your son. Billy gets a time out. Anyhow, we'll talk about that a little bit later on. But it was a it was a great show lament a lot of great people. They treated us. If you if you're in a band, you need to try to get out there to twenty Monroe live intervened, and there, the treat you frigging awesome. The crowd that they're really ask about music out there. So checking we'll talk about that a little bit later on. I wanna tell you about the vans. We're going to be playing this evening. Or does after depending on. You're listening the vans. We're going to have time they're going to give gideon's mob divine tragedy. Max out the silk nine so album things. Yeah. It's going to be really good show. I'm looking forward to it. So I think what we're gonna do is. We're gonna actions we're gonna be talking about Prague. We're going to start off with frog, and this is getting some odd. This is the latest albums. They have that they have out it is called to sell title gideon's mob. London. Nineteen sixty three the blue flame on the Ledeen hard rock and metal. Six. Landfall fall. Tim. Straight. Stick. See? Sources. It was so. Trek something straw. Nothing. Three. The stream. Sure. Just like. Flex. His life such. Bye. Just like. Okay. Gideon's mob on the Lou Dini, hard rock and metal circus. I'm gonna go ahead and give you their website. Brand new record just released this year. I think maybe like maybe just a few weeks ago gideon's mob dot com. Check them out. If you are a prog and you're looking for like, prog rock that you not really going anywhere. This is like deep shit. This is like a major indie. You know, the whole the record is pretty experimental pretty adventurous, Brian. So did a, you know, a very creative guy. So check it out gideon's mob dot com, and you can get it's an all the places suave find all the cool stuff. So we'll let we'll speak in of progressive not regressive. But progressive. We're we're talking about what is progressive rock. Do you want an actual definition? I have it. I wanted to lily is like the rock historian in the building. I am. She knows all the things about ROY. Why don't know all the things? So a lot of what actually is the definition of the textbook definition, progressive rockets style rock music popular, especially in the sixties and seventies and characterized by classical influences, these keyboards and lengthy compositions also called art rock classical rock and Subotic rock. The style wasn't outgrowth of psychedelic bands who abandoned standard pop traditions in favor of instrumentation and composition period. Do we have? During. Do we know what was the very first progressive album or progressive band? We do not. But we have a big three. So says the interwebs. Okay. So what are the big three of the the progenitor they say, and I don't care who tells me, I'm wrong dream theater. They're not now. Wait a minute. This is what they're called the big three three different ones as meaning. There's different kinds of. Okay. It didn't come up with this. This is like a new thing fates warning. And queens are considered to be the big three not the top three. Not the first three the big three. I prose you're gonna have to look that. Rock band. That's probably a good thing to look 'cause I didn't look. I mean, they're they're having this. It's like a war between Pink Floyd procra-. The moody blues that's legit. The nice should all be mentioned as Vance who pave the way for that first king crimson album, even the Beatles. This is something I want. I did want to mention the Beatles a little bit because the Beatles. Definitely I think the I think the progenitor invention it in your definition. There of of progressive was the psychedelic psychedelic has more jamming and progressive. It isn't so much about jamming as it is. Like this section this second long sections different sectors, kind of put together. But. Yes. So there's a there's there's the seeds of that. Are you go even go back to the Beatles? Yeah. Moody, blues procra- harem early. You know Pink Floyd. Yes. As with most things in music, it's very hard to pinpoint the first thing, very that's like there are some like you can pinpoint like Robert Johnson is like king of the guy the father of delta blues. But is he whether other guy there were other guys with document? Yeah. He learned that from some with it learned from the devil. I okay. So will. Yeah. That's my. Yes. So, you know, so it's very hard. Like, I did a video I did a podcast on. Why why at event Halen is the most important guitarist of all time. And I had a hard time finding out who was the first guy that did two hand tapping. 'cause that's one thing that you've got saints four, and it was very difficult to nail it down. Because there's this guy this guy and everybody every every time I study little thing. I had down at find out what there was somebody Brava for. Apparently, there was a jazz guitarist, maybe like in the thirties who there there who there's not video, but pictures, and you know, recordings of him. And I can't remember who thought my head go back with that up again. But if you think about the electric tar. Even the coup stick like if you're playing like, there's only so many things you're going to do so one things you would seem natural screwing around reach over. And you'd pluck note, you tap that on with your other hand like it's doesn't see like all that like crazy that people probably weren't doing that with Qatar from the beginning ATar so the same with the birth of of progressive rock, you can't really really hard to kind of go comb. You know, this is it this. This is the thing that you know, I mean, even like the birth of rock who we can't have a real definitive answer. Yeah. It's very hard. Like it was the first rock song. You know, you we all over the place anyhow, but we we're kind of in the ballpark there. It's kind of like late sixties kind of is kind of beginning of the sort of psychedelia more. And I think bringing in some players that were more educated type players guys that you know, really kind of had had handle little bit on music. We're a little bit more studied a little bit more schooled. I think too that like the whole jazz fusion this nothing. We were talking about in my private group about return to forever is return to forever. Progressive return to forever, jazz fusion. To me when I hear when I think of return to forever, I think jazz feud, but there could be elements, but some people say, no, no, no that's progressive. I Allan Holdsworth. I o you with Bill roofer is that progressive or is that to me, that's just fusion and not progressive. Here's here's the thing. Toto has progressive elements, but I wouldn't consider them progressive rock band the band a lot of people don't realize this. But until they became a sort of yacht rock band sang these sort of light light Rb ballads Ambrosia was a progressive band. Their first few albums the first four journey albums are progressive. You know, it wasn't really resi Perry. And study this more concise hop songs, so. So there's a there is a lot to this definition. His some also wanna talk before we start getting into the big countdown here. Why do you notice? It progressive really takes a lot of shit from critics. I mean, they get like they are. So like, I mean, they eat the. The ones that I was reading about most of them have critical claim. Now, my opinion is I'm not really big fan of progressive rock as you guys know already. My reasoning is because I just get bored with it, quite honestly, and I'm not even going to get into Russia. But I everything that I've read has been pretty positive. So I don't know what the negative things are. So I think they don't get. Yeah. Like, you know, here's a question. You know didn't know there was some bands of big pop hits did are listed as aggressive. And I don't think I don't think E ELO like, I don't consider them. I didn't that was on a big list of them. And I didn't consider I don't really consider the elements. But they have like they did some like it was the seventies. So that was when all everybody was putting weird. Interludes and opuses and stuff like that in between the song. But essentially this all the songs, you know, by Illo are don't bore us. Take us to the chorus type songs, right? You know, turn to stone. You know, don't bring me down. I mean, these are all like pop straight. So Jeff throw the band that? I forgot about as progressive is JETRO ta I mean, but here's why I always thought of Jethro Tull death-row tall to me was always black Sabbath with flute. I was that. It was spoke the, but I that's on my list. All know, definitely, you know, one of the, you know, founding meme. Meme band of progressive rock, very important progressive rock band. But I do remember, you know, a lot of these bands. You know, I it just seems to me like the Rolling Stone. And these different, you know, the, Lester bang types. Kind of go more for this sort of? Singer songwriter. Indie pop punk bands and any bands to connect play. Let's get crap. I have a question for you by queen's Reich about it. Okay. To me is not progressive when I think of them. I think of listen jet said he woman. I think of be the best. I can I think of Syros that like three those songs don't sound progressively just sound like rock tunes. I mean, I practically have empire memorize I is like one of my favorite albums of all time. But I'm not now, I don't know mind crime as well. I understand that mine. Crime is kind of. Yeah. Wall. Kind of. That's yeah. I want to see Jeff Tate's up remind crime. When it comes to town because I do actually experience that even probably sleepless real, but. Yes, queens break I would consider progressive, but that's because of that era of music, so so so do so can you still be progressive and like not do some progressive record think? So because there's a couple there's two on at least two on the list that I have that. And what about some of the early Metallica stuff that has all these different? Like even the song. Like one by towel. Anybody can have the elements, but they're obviously. But there's there's like sample Tura is considered like a progressive metal band. That's fates warning has like ABBIE bad. I mean, they're definitely they're they're heavy. Of course. And dream theater theaters in progressing. Drink a lot, of course. Yeah. Dream theater. Yeah. Well, there's a Rolling Stone poll, and I'm just gonna kinda run these down real quick here. There's also a lot of bands. I didn't realize we're considered progressive because. Quite honestly, I'm going to tell you. I like I said, I don't know much about progressive. I did a lot of research for this podcast because I don't really listen to it a whole lot. So I had to get the definition of what it was before. I could make my choices. And I didn't realize that some of them the one my list, we're actually progressive. So I'm not gonna live out that. That's all right. That's all right. The this is from two this is from July. Twentieth of two thousand eleven Rolling Stone readers poll, the best prog rock bands of all time. Never -tendance dream theater. Number nine is Mars Volta. Like the name is. Oh, I don't even know what tool tool I've seen Emerson number seven Emerson lake and Palmer number six is. Yes. Five king crimson before. Jeff. Genesis to navigate. Oh, we won't ever. Get your number one. This even close rush run by won by a landslide. But this couldn't come as any surprise. The Canadian trio have perhaps the most intense enthusiastic Bank community in all of rock. I think that out of all the progressive rock bands out there. They're kind of the most enduring I mean, yes king crimson is, you know, still get together and tour, but they not have the impact. Decade after decade after decade and playing like. You know, that are forty degrees c the DVD. I mean, they're playing they're playing to like twenty thousand people thirty thousand people Russian Rio like is like insane king crimson. Those aren't even dream theater dream theater. They had. Trouble. Go through the late is not play you know, doesn't play those kind of audiences. So they are kind of unique in that sense. That a lot of progressive ads kind of gone away and come back on the way and come back. Yes, went away and came back a couple of times king crimson went away and came back. Genesis went lanky back but Russia's been like boom, boom, boom record record record record and consistent lineup with the exception of the first album. It's convinced consistent lineup. So you have to kind of give the devil. There do on that aspect of. We're going to get into our top ten here in a minute. What am I gonna play another band? I would've come back, and we're gonna jump into the top ten. Progressive rock bands of all time, this Aban called divine tragedy when civilization falls on Lucchini, hard, rock and metal circus. Guys soil. We have. All right define tragedy guys. And let's go ahead and give you the website for those guys Facebook dot com slash divine tragedy. Metal metal Facebook dot com slash divine tragedy. Metal before we opened the show with gideon's mob. So let's get into the big countdown. We've we've we've we've put it off long enough. So. What do you got Lil little? I'm gonna preface this by saying Russia's not on my list purpose, it should be. But it's not going to be. So don't get excited when I don't say rush 'cause I'm not gonna anyway. All right. We got what's your what's what do you got ten here? So go ahead. What do you are you having some kind of order or not? Yeah. I do have. I'll I'll like I'm gonna tend to one. So in place of rush is my number ten put Supertramp for number ten because they started out as aggressive. They did while they were originally considered progressive until they discovered pop music is more money making. So we have two prefaces. You can't can't be banded switched. You gotta be progressive. So what do you got free number nine dream theater? Okay. Why would tell us about during American progressive metal? They they didn't come around till the eighties. So they weren't part of that whole sixty seventy thing. Part of the big three highest selling album is images and words, I like them because they're more medal in heavier. And their most popular songs, which are unfortunately, I don't know whole lot about them other than that stuff. But metropolis part one the miracle and the sleeper change of seasons home and pull me under this that I liked by them. If there are better songs, I'm sure there are those are the ones I like, okay. So so that we had ten nine eight. My number eight is actually tool who I've seen? Don't be such a tool. I see I've seen them live. Don't Ella me, but fell asleep at that show because I was completely exhausted from seeing shows that whole week, and I'm sure they were great. But I totally missed the entire show. It was at the Peterson event center in Pittsburgh songs. I like buy them or Forty-six to schism third. I am on ladder Ellis. And they've won Grammys. They became dominant in the alternate of metal movement with enema nineteen eighty six. They really liked the visual arts thing. They did. I do remember that from the show. They did do a lot of our stirring their show and their videos as well. And they were very experimental. So they were they were probably art rocking. I think Taurus, responsible for designing a lot of that. Art work that that happens like their videos all. Stop motion animation. Some actual I met Maynard wants to he has wind. So he was finding bottles before Toby. Nice. I like them just to digress. Unlike his other project from circle. I do. Same night that I thought all playing that to you and the mystic like better. Okay. So we have Supertramp dream theater tool. What else you got Kansas, which I didn't realize was progressive rock and still I knew the definition of progressive rock. Yes. We know them more for their carry on my word sign in dust in the wind songs. But I mean, seriously, listen to some of their other stuff got some really great song other than those the ones that made the money, obviously, everybody knows them. But yeah, like, I definitely didn't know that they were. Huge Kansas fan. They were inspired by Jedis. The thing the thing like Kansas more than way more than. Yes. Genesis. And a lot of those other prog bands from that era. Was this Kansas is progressive rock band. Did not forget about the rock. Yes. I mean, I think that to me probably why couldn't figure out that they forgot like to me. Yes. Genesis gentle giant king crimson. They're great players and everything doesn't have any. Whereas if you listen to a song by Kansas loner is is like a totally like balls out in your face rock. Tune in the rich Williams is really underrated guitar player and carry live grit who plays guitar and keyboards rich worked really well together. They've had great lead singer, Steve Walsh mazing. Lee vocalists and amazing piano players. Well. They were one of the things that you don't realize I read carry LeBron's book. He was Hugh wildly influenced by Raymond's our. So a lot of what they do has that kind of doors implants, they had the war have a blues base kind of God elements of like Allman brothers and southern rock to in. What they do. I just I like one of my absolute for me was I was making list, they'll be way more way more stop. But well, like, I didn't know people. But I I didn't realize that. I didn't really was our Kansas was progressive rough it I just think like rock so whenever now can you hear? Now Hillary here now, nobody gets that. So what do you got next number six is on? My list is faith warning again, another medal. Heavier progressive band getting Kim around in the eighties. They are one of the big three as well. So they're one of the ones responsible for progressive creation. Developing popular Zeeshan, I'm trying to read the comments as we go to but they were influenced by the new wave of British heavy metal. So definitely tell that in a lot of their songs and. The songs I like, and this is how I chose them. I chose how many songs by the band, and that's how they made my list. I know strange, but point of view still remains guardian. We only say goodbye are my favorite songs by them. I think I like the heavier ones, but they're there at the bottom of my list for some reason. Okay. So that your top five bottom on one. All right, cool. So. What do you guys? Let's go ahead and take a look at we. We did run a post. Yeah. Got a little bit of attention. I saw you get internet's being bizarre. We having bizarre bizarre net. Bizarre webs webs? Well, first of all, let's go to the inner circle people because you guys chimed in on some stuff to I ran oppose and ask people to pick like one as opposed to trying to pick a whole bunch of people people can't just pick one. You is everybody's ten. They pick three. If you ask them when they picked five Stephen fifth and says Devin Townsend. And he is great as well. Jim Vernon says dream theater Floyd rush. His crush of Jim says a man crush on John Petrucci, we have some of the comments of. Voy? Void. I don't know who I do not know who those James you'll post that. And when we go to our thing later, we to go to after we'll check some of that, Dave FOX writes blue waster caught I don't think of B O C as. It could have been maybe one of those that were loves it because of the cowbell. So I who would it love it because of Calvo. So barb Hillary hill zoo skis recommend I asked her could you recommend fates warning because I don't know much about awaken the guardian recommended awaken the guardian some people don't like John arches singing. However, I'm fan and as for of void I recommend the album nothing face for one great reason, the welding of rhythms per song and second is second to none. I think she was melding probably Louis x Walker return to forever, Brian. Jeff beck. Steve Hillary Ronnie Montrose gamma project. I don't Jeff Beck as progressive, but Richards, j Richard Smith nectar and hawk wind Hoch went on your list. Donna. Okay. So so those are those are few then let me go to my regular my. My. More public. Not private not private so Bryner. So says yes Pink Floyd king crimson JETRO. Tall course. So Brad bradey Brady Nevada. And he says so many think this one. This. You don't get a pass or piss? Michael Stover mentioned like late orchestra in narnia, and Kansas and dream theater. Dave resort. Davis. Hard has has his own progressive band. Call check out the name of this Kevin. And I I the pike is this is one of the as we played all the time because the name is so cool to name his band is. We came from Spain. Sounds like a fifties. Scifi movie perfectly Kresa became from space, like an awesome. I love that name. I be still making. I actually went to see him one time to Mark Richardson tall rush. Genesis king crimson gentle giant bone ash. Brian stay. Yes. Rush Pink Floyd. Genesis LP Emerson lake and Palmer. I know nothing. Do oh what a lucky, man. He. Okay. What once on? That's basically nothing. Well, come back friends to the show that never ends. It's could attend come inside come in. You don't know. That's just being difficult. I am I to being difficult violin Holdsworth? Again, I'm not I'm to me to me when you're talking Allan Holdsworth, you're talking jazz, fusion, you're not talking progressive anyhow. So those are some of the picks from the from y'all fans out there. Let's another band. We're gonna do the top five when we come back. For all. All y'all. All y'all. These top is not progressive says he's doing Allman Charlie Doyle, no, I'm not agreeing with, you know, see about they're coming to name everybody threat. Motley crue. This is max out steel toed boots. I love that rock and roll are recommittal circus. Max out steel toed boots on the Ledeen hard rock metal circus. And I think it's max out dot com. Maybe what is it max out max out band dot com? Check them out. We opened the show with gideon's mobbing gideon's Bob dot com, and then we had divine tragedy in the middle there. facebooKcom Bax divine tragedy met we are going to close out the show here in a little bit with silk nine their new song. We're big fans of silk nine here in the hard rock metal circus. Great where great the great friends of the podcast, and they just guys alright banned. Yeah. Good guys. Great band put on a great show. So we talk about them here in a minute. So lilla. Little. Phil lily lily. To go number five. Nutsy is Jeff throttle? And there are fun. They're British rock band from Blackpool. They're fun because they have the flute guitar vocals, the whole thing. I got to see Ian Anderson concert at the palace, which was totally. It was just all over the place when he was literally all over the place, a little flew, go and everywhere I've heard that he's I've seen video. He looks like he's heard that he puts on it's a fun entertaining show. And I discovered that I knew more songs than I thought I did buy them, which was Aqualung look a motive breath cross eyed Mary thick as a brick bungle in the jungle and tool to Rockaway t under which is my favorite one by them. And didn't realize also they were progressive. I was just enjoying. I don't I didn't know what progressive told us progresses. She wouldn't have gone like you might she might have not. We'll see sucks actually that was an ex husband band. He really liked going to be like really the band. And I read it over play them like rush. Why Russia's and on my list guys? So. I didn't mind it. So didn't set aside. No, our personal feelings female active. We have Email bring in. Okay. So what's? So what do you got for number four? I have number four as yes. No. Yes. No truth. Okay. Although I didn't realize against progressive band. I only know the songs that are popular. Sorry. I didn't know what the hell it meant. I hear progressive. I hear rush. That's it. That's all I know. Somebody somebody really damaged you. You know, what I listen to abused by rush. You know what I listen to this is not using Russia's a weapon. Shaimaa. Anyway, this band has one. All kinds of awards Grammy nominations, nineteen eighty five nineteen Ninety-two inducted in the rocker hall of fame two years ago. The songs, I know and like roundabout owner of lonely heart level, find a way and changes. Those are the songs, I know. Like. And they are coming to town this year, by the way. Heart of the sun with Asia. Long distance run around the just. The album fragile is. Like their magnum opus. All these progressive. I think have an album that really kind of like just it ceiling together. Yeah. When I you know, I think for for for Kansas is left overture for rush. It's moving pictures for. Yes. It's fragile. You know, they all have that one record where like it just everything. Really? I think for Todd Aqualung where you know, the things just kind of like everything just worked. It's difficult music. And it's difficult to get right? It's easy to screw up. Because you've got to real so many things have to come together to really make it really really work, especially bands. Like like, yes. And JETRO tall and Kansas playing these longer pieces that have all these different sections and everything and it's very easy. If you got one section of the song, that's like. Would you consider Chicago? Then it kind of falls apart progressive Chicago who said that I'm asking myself. That they had on there. Earlier records. Definitely add stuff was progressing because. Yeah. I just remember them having very lengthy. Yeah. Compositions as well. I'm just thinking that fall under that, or is that just another sort of pop band. I didn't know. By the eighties were like, you know, hardly say 'em. So you know, that whole like beaters that whole only pops up, but you know, yeah, they expect they were more experimental earlier. But it's difficult to do. And it's very is really easy to screw it up. It's like one of the easiest things to do is to be a bad progressive pant. Because like we got. This guy's a parody. Really? You got to really know what you're doing TV attempt at. So when the band like yes doesn't album like fragile which is amazing record. Even though. Yes is not my favorite Chris rock band. It's like a miracle like that works. You know? So it's I really have a lot of respect for AXA can really pull that off. Really, really? Well, and some of these bands have had a couple records, you know? Kansas leftover chair in point of no return are like kind of sister albums of each other. And they're both very very very good. They they did the progressive thing later on. They started going to more condensed type songs more straightforward three four minute type tunes, but those two records, right? They're kind of. Sister. Odds of each other that you know, they do the progressive thing. Everything really nail it. So what do you got nickel next to list number three number three is queen's Reich? Another American progressive heavy metal band formed in the eighties. They did not gain notoriety until operation mind crime in nineteen eighty eight. They still continue to tour to this day, if I could talk it'd be great. I feel like it's sort of underrated though 'cause they always seem to be like an afterthought on lists of different things. And I don't know sort of an underrated type to my in my opinion. But I do like silent city is of stranger. I believe in love Queen of the Reich. The lady were black who's my favorite songs. Okay. Number three, number two, number two. Genesis gonna do. Yes. Maybe later English English Robin for nineteen sixty seven hundred Genesis. And I'm not gonna explain it to you because you need to smack in the head with tack hammer. However, I discovered that I don't necessarily like Peter Gabriel Genesis. I like Collins Genesis. Well, that isn't no. But I'm sitting there leader Gabriel, the progressive lamb, again, they're they're magnum opus. They're like. This lamb lies down Broadway that album is their big. Yes. Record with with Peter Gabriel where it really kind of all came together that is one of those bands way to nudity for me. Like, I really honestly when they dropped the progressive thing became more like pop and brought in more like Aren be types that I like that so much better. I just don't think I it just it was it was progressive. But it was not rock. It was just something else. I just didn't like all right. But I think it's pretty bomb that they like will not got rid of Peter Gabriel, basically quit. And then they're drummer took over as a singer. And they still were freaking amazing. They were bit Phil Collins transplant. I think that's pretty awesome. Even though I would is awesome. I totally agree with you. Even though I discovered I did like Phil cone Dopp day, just dropped progressing. So to number two curious different of one. Floyd. Okay. You going to say like, you know, bumble foot or some crazy thing Floyd is going to be. I'm gonna say this Russia be my number one not going to get letters. Good. I I only don't like rush because it is sort of like a thing with my ex husband. However, I do I did go see to concerts. I did enjoy them. They're not going on my list. They would be number one. If that wasn't a thing, however, Pink Floyd is fantastic. As number one. They've been around since nineteen sixty five they had several lineup changes as so the other bands are a lot of the other bands. And I mean, they sold over fifty million copies of dark side of the moon alone worldwide. I mean, they're pretty awesome. Their shows were awesome, very, colorful and fun. And like they've had. Oh my gosh. What are the ones that were awesome? Dirk side of the moon. Wish you were here animals the wall, the final cut, you know, lots of fantastic things, and I have like seventy five songs written on here for like my favorites. I think that Pink Floyd like rush is one of those progressive bands just consistently put out really good records, just consist everytime. They went out and they got together in the studio. They usually came up with something really really cool Russian Pink Floyd or two bands that I can actually listen to the records and not have to change the songs. And again, like I said, it's very difficult music to do. What's interesting about rush is that that I think put them in a class all by themselves is that they were able to be progressive even when they were playing shorter songs like a good example Solly Tom Sawyer is that is crazy tune. There's no song that sounds like soil before or since it is in a it's like an genre all by itself. It sounds like aliens. It's like crazy. Nobody can like what the fuck is Tom Sawyer. It's insane. It's like I mean, it's just one of those songs, but it's a pop song. I mean, it's it's it's progressive, and they do all these little things that I do all these different parts just like progressive, except somehow they they will down to like, I think four minutes. I mean, it's. Not it's not like the side one of twenty one twelve or something like that. It's like, you know, they really, and I just feel like that is some such an amazing record. I just don't and I love I think they did great records after that. But I don't think that they did another record where achieved that. Thing musically where they were able to somehow retained progressiveness it seems like on their other albums when they play shorter tunes. They sounded more like a straight Rochman like like distant early warning time stand still and cold fire. Those are great great up just rock tunes. They're not really progressive. But somehow on moving pictures they were able to do this. I mean, they've they have a hit song instrumental. That's there's very few hairs hardly any instrumental. We could do podcast on. There's probably ten hits that were instrumental over the years. And why Why's he is one of them? That in itself is massive accomplishment. Okay. And look at the kind of tune, it is it's crazy. That's another song. That sounds like it came from outer space. So I think I think that I think Russia's kind of a class all by themselves. They try in my opinion, they transcend what progressive rock is because they are able to do something. And I just think think couplings first of all it's testament, the amazing musicianship in the band. It's also testament to the fact that these guys are tight, I mean, they were broS they love each other. They enjoy spending time together, and they were really passionate what they wanted to play music. You know, these other bands Lil, you know, go out, and you know, they got all kind of side projects and are doing this. And that and don't keep the focus on the one. Right. And while I know Getty Lee and outside in both solo records one time for the most. And I know he's he did outside doesn't song with the guys from that trailer park, boys. Oh, yeah. They were unfairly. Yeah. Right. And know, they're big south park man's. I get that. But for the most part, they just it's been three of them. So I think that that has a lot into and I think the same way with Pink Floyd. Even after Roger waters left, Richard Wright, Nick, Mason and Gilmour. I mean, I think those guys would just really locked in the new what how three of them worked how how other worked that could play off each other really really, well, they could bring ideas together. And they knew just one of those things that you don't get when you're constantly changing numbers. You can't do that. It just it doesn't it though. It's not going to be when a half to have them. It's not gonna flow. It's not gonna flow. You're not gonna have the kind of consistency of great music album for album decade after decade. So with rush kind of being a category. All by if I had to pick my top three my top three progressive bands are Pink Floyd, Kansas and rush, although I really wanna put Kansas number one for kind of like you like personal reasons. Kansas was a band that like one man's changed? My life. They just when I heard that that band, they blew my mind completely. Because of the fact that they were progressive, and they were so rock and roll at the same time they had that a lot like you. Listen to the all the breakdowns and all the jamming and stuff in carry on sun. It's got that swagger. You know, what I mean, it's got that rock and roll their plant. This risks are all real sassy and kind of comic Aerosmith and as grooves, you know, going on that the two Qataris playing each other. And I don't hear you don't hear that rush. I love Reggie here that don't hear the Pink Floyd. No, there's none of that Pink Floyd the closest time causing pink. Floyd is a disco song another brick in the wall part is a disco song. Yeah. I get it. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that I could see I roller skated to that song that was going to be our class on. I mean, it's and it's got got killer guitar, and as well, so those are just those would probably be my top three with maybe. Yes. Number four because I was a Steve hall was a big influence on me and the fragile album. Just that was another was seminar. You picking Kansas is your number one. I would love to Kansas. But I just feel like I just feel like I kind of have to give it to rush just because Russia's rush my thing with Russia's I- Kansas did a bunch of stupid stuff afterwards. Like like, they got whole because the couple of guys in the band got religious. And like it kinda like pulled the band in weird directions and lost their groove. You know, rush just way more consistent record after record. I mean, there's something I like on every single record that they've done every single record. I don't how many like what nine thousand albums. I even did a record record covers. I think where they where they did. Like just song that they grew up listening to they play heart full of soul. He's like, you know, you know, and they sound cool on it. It just you know. So I kinda I would I just would have to give it to them. But my history with progressive rock is really Kansas. That was the band opened the door for me for progressive rock. And then yes. Pink Floyd and Russia was a little bit of a hold out on. I don't know why I just I just a little bit of a whole night on those guys. So in any case that would probably be Mike my my top ones right there. What are your favorites that we have any comments you want to talk to about talk about the the audience? Oh, let's pull all these guys because we have been jamming here jam out with a clam out. Billy says. Yes, Darth Mardom ass- wrath. Brin says, yes, Dave. Chris Wicky says yes, I'm gonna say your neighbor on your pronounce. I'm sorry. Let's see somebody likes my outfit Geraud said Michika. Oh, that's cool. Just feel like it's more heavy metal and not so much. They remind me more of what the speaking say. Real quick. We didn't really touch on the real heavy. No. We of bands like simple Torah vans. Like that. We just we didn't get it's this is a bigger genre than you, really. I thought this was going to be like. And then what about this? What am I sorry about those fans? I think Michigan more like megabucks, I I don't think they're necessarily progressive. But anyway, tool said by Jesse such a tool crash neck. Balls deep. Somebody said get up. Hit me up. Everybody should get one of these everyone. Please. Somebody said Charlene mcclain's Hollywood dead. Not really going to agree with that Hollywood. It's not like the Hollywood vamp. No, it's different band. Somebody's gonna call me. Great. Okay. Drawn lily at eight six seven five three nine Jeff per US Dream theater. Definitely progressive also say rush crash McCracken. Yes. Jethro to Jethro toll. Genesis also Kansas. Jeff derna. Yes. Jeff Purna queen's Reich. Operation mind crime snooty Heemskerk king crimson, which we did not talk about at all. What can done after I'm gonna give you a little spiel on them you need to give that she'll Michelle wack rush tool. Yes. Jethro tull. What about BT? Oh, no, you're wrong. Sorry, Bachman Turner, come on come on. You make me look that here thought I trained guys better than. Connecticut. Chris thunder we'll dots. And it was the last one comment. What about thirty eight special drummers and three guitars, but a little bit southern. Chris I love you, Chris you're like original fan. And I love the shit and your top fan, according to rock radio. Catcher is another one of these bands that they did court of the crimson king. Which is which is which is coal jam. They're cool band. I love the musicianship. But I personally other than. The album discipline and there and court of the crimson king. I'd never felt like the song writing. Was there the way that like dream fee, even like dream theater and these bands like they're amazing musicians? And I I got to see him live one time. Just just absolute killer band. But. I just don't I just don't here. I don't I don't hear the I mean, you we could say guy we haven't talked about. We know nobody mentioned, for example on the the list on Facebook. They did. But I. I don't know. I just I don't I'm not fan. So I'd it's white ever listed. I mean, I love Frank is. Well, I see in my mind, I think of him as fusion, I don't know why I just think I just put him more in the. Because to me he's like beyond progressive things. Did he you know, he does he has jazz albums, you know, make a jazz noise here he has shut up player guitar albums and son of shut up and player. Guitar your. I mean, I don't to me it's way reading about him earlier. And I was I it didn't feel like it didn't really mention a whole lot about progressive mentioned experimental because definitely he was experimental with a lot of different things. But I didn't see the progressive. There's the whole thing where with all these things. There's always overlap. So there's an overlap between fusion and progressive right there. You know, there's an overlap between psychedelia and progressive and fusion, you know, what I mean. It's like there was a lot going on. Yeah. So so this is one of those topics where I really wish Keith would have would have been here because I think that he could have brought a little bit more clarity to it. It's just a very big. It's a lot bigger genre than you realize. Yeah. It really is. I mean, a song like bohemian rhapsody technically progressive that's on a lot of lists. Queen was on the list. So it's probably wise because of songs like dad is like completely, you know. Experimental progressive, you know, multiple section. This are really good example of a song like Tom Sawyer where it's an a class all by itself. Like there's no other song label. He mean rhapsody right now. Well, I mean, there's nothing did nothing else. Nobody ever did anything like that before or since it's completely in the glass by itself that would be fun podcast. Twenty songs that are like completely in class. You cannot really. And I think well, he me wraps. Tom Sawyer would definitely be on the list of those songs that are just like what the hell is this? It was huge people loved it. But it's like. What is it? Can't. We are going to bug out of here with some silk. We're just gonna kinda play them as we go out. You've been listening to Lou Dini rock and roll circuit or high rock rock will start circus hard rock something you want to lose any Rockall circuits that come listen guys. If you want to get access to me on my regular pay on my main page, and my other business pages, I'm not real interactive. If you wanna hang with me a little bit more where I like, actually, you know, kind of get mixed up with you guys more you need to join my private group. You can do that at Lombardi rockstar calm there. You get exclusive music exclusive video exclusive conversation, it's a great community of people that are really passionate about great guitar driven rock, progressive rock metal rock and roll alternative. Metal alternative rock. All there at Ledeen, excuse me Lombardi music dot com. So check that out. That's actually we were bugging over to here in a minute for the after party. So, and that's where we hear the real juicy stories in the realtor jokes. So you all that they're lily once you head. You gotta show come on rock radio. What he went talking with lily, six nights on rutgersradio. Six PM eastern time. Download the app or stream it right from the website rock radio dot com. Guys, six eight we are live on rock ridge radio every Sunday, you can tune in here, the rock circuits. We actually he'll songs imagine that. So it's you know in this not us moments of silence talking amongst ourselves. Talking yourselves for three minutes while this is so. So we're going to wrap up the show with silk nine you guys have a great night. Great rest of the day. And we'll catch you guys all on the next day hard rock metal circus. Take care guys. Wait. What? Screen. What's?

Russia Kansas Pink Floyd gideon Kansas Lou Dini Ledeen Jeff Jethro tull Brian Dini rock Allan Holdsworth Solly Tom Sawyer Facebook Peter Gabriel Genesis Peter Gabriel
Age Range- Bangin' vs Dating

Pod Dirty to Me

28:27 min | 1 year ago

Age Range- Bangin' vs Dating

"Here's. Welcome to pod. Dirty to me. We give you more than just a tip. We go balls. I'm Jason I'm like, I'm Dan. Thanks for coming tropic today. What's your age range for dating hand or banging? And is there a difference between the two? Ooh. Excellent topping wanting. Yeah. Who? Yeah. Because then we have another listener question at the end. Oh, we have another listener that responded, this letters on listener years, letters. There's a pigeon. It by door with a letter. Yesterday. All right. So we're going to start with. The mailman ring twice at the mailman the postman the postman rang twice twice or rang twice. Yeah, he was looking for anal. House, mike. Your way. Well, I, I appreciate the thought you know. You know just the guy. All right. To let us start with what we call this show, the word of the day. This. What is called the slump BUSTER the wet slump BUSTER. Buster. Okay. When a professional athlete FIS the dirtiest. Nastiest fattest, most disease ridden. Skank. Puts the would tour with the intent that will break up a slump. What the? I feel like there's so many things like this has to be this might be a common thing with, with that leads. Or, or would I I don't know. I hope the jeeter did it. I mean the ones you heard about what jeeter certainly didn't fit that description. And what I know is that even put the wood to her, like come the fuck on. Come on. I feel. They're playing that it's mostly baseball players. Yes, I got my thought. Oh, sorry. Offend you. America's favorite pastime apparently isn't baseball. It's beating the slum. You gotta get back into the past. Needed this love open a can of worms this tear, the whole time, you're describing it I thought, major league so yeah. The guy that was president twenty four with his shit. On a related note. Did you hear the J rod proposed J, lo or a rod Iraq did not propose jails rod? Yeah. I don't know how feel about that. Oh. I mean she's a finance bitch like I was in. He is just I would lock that down to. He's at that shit on paper like like some. His damn, you know, she ain't had the best history. What, what does that mean? It just it just much. She ain't had the best history with marriages, man who she's been married to various people. Very one of her dancers. Very few people. I'm almost positive and it just didn't work, but that's celebrities in general. It seems like she's not married me. Well, that's that would break, you know, she would not be married, a non celebrity, which would probably work out. I'll be her slump BUSTER. Well, yeah, I was gonna say, she's yeah. He's if he's marrying her than she is definitely not a slump BUSTER because. No, she has finds out of the game. Aged at the cooler anyway. Pray needed us performance enhancing drugs, too. For me lo was was hotter, when she was younger I don't really feel her for a forty eight or forty. Yes. We obviously, and we'll get to this very soon the age thing, but yes for for her age. Absolutely. I just for me. I don't know. I found her more tractive, choose younger says. Sheet similar. And maybe it's just all the press and all the stuff you see are. And then in stuff now, maybe I've grown tired of her. Have, you know, one thing he doesn't grow tired of. Well known for something. Yeah, the anal your poor wife asks. We're only the case. Yeah. I hear you buddy. Okay. So. What's our topic? Let's bring out of this slump. Age range, what's your what's your age range for for dating verses banging? Yeah. And is even a difference. There is devastated in it. Yeah. Agree there difference, Jay, would you like to go? I know not really. Just kevin. No. But I will if you want me to well, you know, you know let's start with just banging. We're all sorts anyway, right? Yes. Yes. Yeah. I don't know if I have an age range for banging, I think we were taught we touched on it a little bit earlier. And like I know in the first episode of this podcast, I was like I have an eighteen year old now that I've actually thought about that. Admit I driving home from work the other day. And I felt like these, you know, high school kids, and I'm assuming somewhere like seventeen or eighteen and I was like that would be terrible like they're so young kids. So maybe. Pretend like professor. Let earned that a oh no. I don't know. I there's something I appreciate about appreciate about an older lady that, like, really takes care of herself. I remember when we were working together at a certain retailer Salish -ment. There's one day where this older lady came in. She must have been in her mid fifties. And she was like smoking cougar. Yeah. Like she's like her. She was beautiful or she. She clearly took care of herself. And I was like I hit that I don't like. Yeah, she was amazing. It's just beautiful. I don't know of Cougars is still thing. But back in our time now was hot Cougars was on fire. I still thing. I'm sure it is maybe vary. My alive and well in our society J, but it just seemed like it was a huge thing back in the day. Yes. Or maybe this was just kind of getting kind of becoming known cougar thing. But yeah, we'll give you there's some there's some sexy fifty plus year olds sitting here is not like fifty five is like a trip. Further away from me to bang twenty five or twenty eight year old well, yes, the Bank, fifty five year old is just keep twenty five year olds to take. It's a lot easier for them to take care of themselves. Can you did you ever have to show? We're talking about banging eighty. That's true. We're just going to banks want him to be attractive and hunting. So you've got yeah, you'd have a maybe a tighter age range, on the on the banging are more broad, which broad. I would say. Broad spectrum or who I would sleep with. Yes, a much, much broader spectrum for who I would bang versus who I would date. Yes. Yes. So with our say, probably mid twenties. Yeah. To fifty fifty four for dating if no banging for back. Dating. It okay. We're gonna do this in pairs. Mike. Oh boy, my range. Yeah. I agree with you. Let me just get yours. Right. She gives it up the as I'll do. Ainhoa you give up the ass beggar that certainly helps. If a head to give you a range, I would say, probably twenty four to fifty two that's very visit Bank for I would-i four to fifty to fifty two and a half. Yeah. Yeah. No, I'm you know able. It'll probably slide a little bit. Yeah. And I have a hard time thinking, I you know, someone that's in their early mid twenties would would have that opportunity. You know, but, you know, certainly, I would think thirties forties, would be more doable, but yeah there's very hot attractive females in their fifties. I didn't want to get too far into the fifties. So I was fifty two fifty three fifty four possibly. But yeah, it's, it's a pretty pretty broad range when you talk about banging, right? You know, in hate to say it but, you know, it all comes down to this. When it's banging. Are you attracted to them? Then that's, that's number one. That's pretty, you know, you're not really thinking about the aids thing for probably about number seven or eight on the list of things you're looking for even impr-. Don't even care to meet the other criteria. If I'm going to do that, you'd, they're probably be in that age range. Now Jin I'm gonna ask. You that question? And do you have a difference between female and male? Oh, yes, Tristan you heard that is ball. Yeah. Toes, keeping me on my toes. I can appreciate that. Okay. So I'm thinking that for just having sex with. Probably, I would say mid twenties to too early fifties. I mean plastic surgery. And like really taking care of yourself is is the thing. And so, I mean, maybe even like. Oh, I feel I feel kinda maybe not maybe not early sixties. I was gonna say possibly. But I. It is because it's hard to find people. You know that aren't frigging celebrities that make million dollars a fucking day. It's hard to find people that are able to keep up with themselves as, as readily, and well as celebrities are. But then again, you never know. So possibly, I would say, maybe you know, mid twenties too late. Fifties four four sleeping with. And I feel like that would apply to both males and females actually because I have seen some older men that I've found very attractive, there are there are those men that can continue to take care of themselves just as just as well as women do. So I'm open to to. To date. And maybe Mike, 'cause he takes care of himself. And I just do whatever. I'm working on you. It's not like you let yourself go or anything like, don't, don't talk about yourself, as if you're a lost cause or anything like you're still feel. It's weird. Not to get off. Get off topic. But like it's weird because like I'm doing this, this at right now. Like couch to ten K or whatever. And I looked at as like six miles six point something or whatever, but I'm already running six miles like three times a week now. And I can't lose shit. I have not left less lost, like ten pounds but like I've plateaued. Like, I know why I refuse to change my diet. Well, it definitely couldn't be the fly empty beer bottles. I see over there could this? This. It definitely has nothing to do with that drink, what we do this podcast, I ever, you know, to be honest. That's the only time I may have a few at home here and there but. Vice the quantity that I have on evenings like this is reserved disrepect casting. That's just I I don't drink as much as I used to at home. I I'll may have two three tops and that's every once in a while. And another side note, Mike had to go get a checkup for something when we were really twenties, or thirties this. Yeah. They were asking about his drinking habits. Well how much he drink. And he was like, well, how did you rake? And he was like, well, I don't I drink, maybe once or twice a month. But when I drink, I'll drink like nine or twelve beers, he's like nine or twenty four beers. Yeah. The person was trying to get him to go. Talk to a alcohol. Do you to talk about your drinking? What do you talk once or twice just going out bureau once or twice a month? Yeah. Raking every day. Yeah. Profession. Does that make you feel like a severe frigging alcohol and substance abuser? If you even admit to like, anything, they're like, making you feel you go out one night, one or two nights a month and just get hammered alcohol. It's not like a week of craving or so then I started thinking, I'm like alcohol. Yeah. No looking at Alex work. You work. You look into what that is in your life. I don't have any of these problems. Right. You're like if you only knew about the hookers and blow, I had the other night, then maybe really be questioning my, my curricular activities, but we need to get his trip. Brothers. Dream stripper. Yes, either do the show from a strip club or have a stripper on here that we can just ask some questions. It'd be easier to get the stripper on here because we'd had all hill, but other quipped. Yeah he might need your. I met a really nice stripper last night. She was she was we are we were, you know, talking hanging out and stuff? And I, I mean, we were I was there for a friend's birthday party. So I was not getting any lap dances, or anything for myself. No, I don't want, I don't care about any of that. I'm like I've been perfectly fine with going out and meeting people field fashioned way not in a strip club. So. Yeah. No. Not that either I do not do dating apps, but, but she actually was really sweet. And just seemed like a genuine person and didn't go completely dead in the eyes when I was having a conversation with her. Yeah, she's attractive, and I liked that. She was a little bit older. She wasn't you know, twenty years old trying to put herself through college with a sob story about her fucking cat with one testicle. Her cat with Justin killer cancer. And that's why she needs five hundred dollars and hang out with her. My cat lanes, right? Yeah. Lance has one testicle and he's just trying to just right. Is way through life without dying. What if it went over? But he's no, no. I got you. Laying down over here. I'm sorry. So she actually was a genuine human being that I connected with and seemed like a good person. So I mean, I feel like it's a real possibility to, to get strippers on this show. So we would love to have your input. If you're a stripper, you would love to talk with us on our show. We would love to have you any of the caller. Well digits now. We should work so, so. Yes. Yeah. If with a boombox. Peter gabriel. Oh because. Oh, no. I just want you to be my show. No, I'm not trying to up with you. That's I feel good Michael app. Dan's. Dads. Are you able Mike? Back door. You're about to find out. That your name might back overnight. Okay. Okay. All right. We'll, we'll boys. These boys can dream. Jen. Thanks. Love these guys getting back on, on our topic. Yes. Fungal, john. So I think we all agreed. You know, mid twenties. Yes. To early to mid fifties. Yes. We have a whole around on. Yes. And the on the, the banging now J what about dating dating more complicated? I year. Well in every way really for dating. I don't know. Man, I probably go like thirty seven thirty seven thirty eight to forty eight maybe very specific. I said, maybe. Yeah. I mean, like, well, obviously, I never understand the these guys that date, these super young chicks. You have nothing in common with him. What are you gonna fucking talk about like you're only with them for sex? There's nothing intellectually or like worldview wise unless you're dating an old soul. So I would say, like mid thirty five to forty like a ten year five years below, like ten years below five years above your age. Yeah. Yeah. That's maybe that's a pretty narrow. I would say that the much narrower gap. Just going to be most. Yeah. For me. It's probably, I would it's very similar to that. I say, probably early thirties to mid forties. If you had to, you know, say, yeah. I mean you want you definitely want someone if you're going to date them and possibly more down the road, you wanna be compatible and more areas than just a bedroom. You wanna have them to have similar interest in knowledge of, of things. You may have knowledge of, you know, it's hard to have a conversation about things when you're forty five, and you're talking to a twenty five year old, you're dropping all these references things and they're like. So you wanna have something in common with them. So, yeah, I'd say, probably early in really for for Jay. And I even early thirties is probably kind of pushing it, that's why I said it thirty five. Yeah. You were about that. Probably that early for me early thirties to like, you know, mid forties in really then probably closer to, to forty. That's interesting. So they really narrow down a lot for for you guys. I, I mean, I still kind of feel like I have a broad age range. I have met some, some younger people that have a good awareness that have a good intellect that have a good maturity level. I don't want to say the cliche, you know, age age is nothing but a number kind of saying, but I also don't necessarily want to restrict my thinking in that area and necessarily limit limited so much. So I still feel like my dating age range would be pretty broad. I still think that I would date I would move age range up for dating from, like low to mid twenties to. I do probably want to date someone. That's at least very late twenties, too. I mean, I'm gonna say all the way to too late forties. Because I have met, I mean, I've met people well into their forties, and fifties who are still so immature and lacking. True. And it yeah, it does it does happen. And it happens where I, meet younger people who I expect to be very immature who actually completely surprised me. Yeah, I really I don't want to limit it as much. And so, I feel like I'm still pretty open on that, that age range, just because everyone's different. Everyone has different life experiences, and those really can help shape you as a person, intellectually, emotionally, all of the things that are important. You know, when you're dating someone, so, yeah, I don't like to be as restrictive with that. Head is very open minded of you. Thank you. I feel shallow. Oh, no. We're just hey, that's just how it is. It's preference. It's personal preference. I trying to be a more open person in many aspects of my life. So I feel like I don't really like to necessarily put limits and boundaries and hard nose on things until I've kind of felt out the situation to anybody else. Dad, his funny, how you and I are spot on the famous bonds like that was kind of funny. Well. I think I think for us in our in our age age, is that we are. I think it's pretty accurate. Yeah. I think. Yeah. Well, should we go to our final segment? I'm Stewart another viewer letter. Like to call it letter. So listener Email. That's probably more accurate description of it. So this question comes from Sean in Texas, Texas, emails, so far, Texas, Sean. We'll call him that. Sean said us Email about our episode are infamous second part of our oral trilogy. We haven't been third part yet. We're still working out. Fill in the works. But it might get off anal. Oral after anal. Nope. Refer back to the dirty episode. Exactly. So Sean asks, I know that Orleans is considered not cheating by Mike and is considered cheating by Jen, and Jason, what about hand jobs? Oh, yep. Still cheating still cheating cheating, Mike. Mike, mike. I do not believe hinge of cheating oh. Shot here. If I if I'm gonna say a blow job is not cheating, then how would a hand job man. No. Absolutely not Sean, please. I don't know what you're thinking who got in mind or what you got planned. But just do it, man. Not good. Silent hand job through everyone you a hand job, you that's my opinion to other people here that think otherwise, but, you know, I can't I cannot sit here and say a blow job is not cheating say hand job is cheating. I can't do that. So no, it's not cheating. Go ahead to get it done. More intimate. Mike. What's more intimate than? Oil. Cable, then, yeah. That point the oral sex would be more intimate than a handful in job. A no. Yeah. A hand fucking job is when you have your hand that's true. Yeah. Again with the JJ. Really, we don't JJ. You want. What do you want me to call it? It's called a vagina, Jason of a Jain already. Oh, you're dirty your dirty tramp at war mouth. Nothing. That's, that's only question. So. No, I don't think it's cheating. So obviously, Mike doesn't think it's cheating. Doesn't think anything's cheating. Do just don't think Orel in hand jobs cheating. Well, they're cheating any kind of physical contact in a sexual manner. Another human being that is not your significant other is absolutely anyting in okay? You know, here's, here's a scenario so you go to get massages, right? Those are basically someone putting their hands on you and massaging, but not in a sexual manner day, medical, not necessarily a lot of people go to get massages just to get massages. It's not like they got conditions or anything they just get massages. So. What if someone is massaging? You know, you get a little extra. No, no. Now I have I have a patriots fan I'm going to with. With with anything. Get the hell out of here. Pages just got busted for us. Miss is ring. Oh, so I'm go to say, if your table, it's not g oh, wow, say this, Sean, I don't know what you're playing is or what you're what you're thinking. But please rightous back to le-. Let us know how that worked out. End up going going with what did you think? Did we sway your opinion? Anyway, mike. What you tell you why. If you got a job at the itchy parking lot, I would not openly tell her. I don't believe when I got home, she would ask that just because she didn't ask cystic. So if you came home, and she said, oh, how was HEB would you be like it was fucking off? I would say, I got the fine. I got milk. No. Don't listen to Mike or else you might find yourself in some precarious pretty fucking awful situation. Awesome situation, or that if you ain't only live on planet it with Mike, then. Well. I I meant it with love. With love. All right. Sean, thanks for your question. Jehan jab from handoffs for everyone. Mike is down with it down with everything, don't tell your way. Mike thinks that too. But if she asks that he feels like you can tell her, and it'd be never just going to bring it up. And I, I don't believe the, the wife or the spouse would say, hey, you're gonna hand job today. I don't think that's gonna come up either. So you're probably okay. Just get the hand show in your in your scenario. They have to ask specifically your if you did something for you to admit. Yes. Wow. Okay. Wow. Just just make sure I understand just so we know where you're coming from. Yes. Cool. I was just checking. All now. Yeah. Position is critically crystal, crystal fuckin- clear. All right. Do do. Do. Deal. If you do it for damn sure you don't. Tell your wife. Yeah. And hopefully she doesn't ask you got ahead. HEB people out at Texas. Like what the fuck is? HEB. Like your Kroger. Your piggly-wiggly. Spectacular finger. All right. Well that, that brings us to the end of this episode. Thanks for checking us out. Look, I on Instagram Facebook at me, if you have any questions or tails, you'd like to share for us with us, more more more more to shoot us, another one at Padre to be at G, Bill dot com and with that, Jason my. Oh my.

mike Jason Sean baseball Buster Jay Texas America BUSTER Jen Iraq Peter gabriel president Alex work kevin professor Tristan Jehan