19 Burst results for "Peter Crone"

"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

09:56 min | 2 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"Way that I was oblivious at the time taught me the essence or the quality of unconditional love. As of a kid, you know, you could say 15, 16, 17. But I'm still a kid. And then he went to work one day and never came back. But especially after the past and my mom said, which when I was 7, so we had a decade together, where it was just the two of us. And he really, in ways that maybe he wasn't even aware, and it was just intuitive to him, was just like the adoration that he had for me. There was not in any way maladaptive. It wasn't like obnoxious, but he just loved me. And so I think that sort of got imbibed into me in ways that was just organic. You know, I didn't have to know that dad loves me, it just felt it. So I'd say that he's been a teacher in the way that also I think after the fact I got to sort of intuitively dive into what it must be like for a man to have his mother, his wife, passed, knowing that's the mother of the son that he loves or the child that he loves. And the fact that he dealt with that with such grace that I was oblivious to because I was just surviving as a kid. But that also later in life gave me such a gratitude and an appreciation for what it must be like for him and his karma to have to have dealt with that. So that would be one. Then I'm going to throw my mom even though I didn't know her because I was only 7. But there's a there's an atal that she showed me that speaks volumes about the woman she was, which is she'd left this little envelope. And I haven't shared this with anyone, but anyway, it seems appropriate now. But she left an envelope that just all on it said is for Peter chrome when 18 years old. So an inside, there was a beautiful note, and it was the rings that were the symbolic change of exchange of love between my mom and my dad, the wedding rings, engagement rings, maternal rings. So this envelope had been sealed, and my dad had shown me probably when I was about age 12 or 13 because she put it in a farm, my dad kept file. I was a great soccer player and so he kept all these clippings from newspapers and is in there and he would occasionally show me and say, this is from your mom. So why that to me is sort of an Italian to who she was as a woman, because one, she died of cancer. And for her to have the foresight to want to leave a note for her son, who would not get that note for another 11 years. But to be able to express the depth of love that she had for that being, which was me, and to want to share the tokens of love that she shared with my dad. And all while she knows she's about to die. To me, spoke volumes about who that was as a woman. Wow. Can you imagine? The only child and you have the foresight to want to ride a note for that son. Saying the words were incredibly touching. And so that equally and I've never told that story, but so those two. And then out in left field, we've got this argonaut who is sort of the quintessential Indian girl like Krishna murtaugh who I'm sure you've heard of or ramen in my harshly. These are sort of these quintessential eastern philosophy, Vedic yoga doctors, van Dante, the non dualistic way of looking at life and for me shena for good data was I never met the guy I just read is predominant book. It was transcript of his song meetings where people would come to the ashram. And we're talking about Nissan data marash. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Oh my God, that's crazy. Yeah. That's the first spiritual book I ever had. Oh wow, that was pretty deep dive. Well, it's interesting. I had some family that used to travel to India. When I was still in the depths of addiction in my early 20s. And then we go stay at this ashram of Satya sai Baba in two at a party India and southern India. And my cousin who was around my age, he brought me that book as a gift. I am that. And I mean, I was just in the lowest of lows. I mean, just totally mentally and capacity. I mean, reading a book is impossible, let alone a book of that depth. I would read the back cover. Which is something to the effect of, if a building's there, and then the building's gone, what could be said of the space is the space still there. Something like that. You have some non dual puzzle, right? And I still have that copy of that book and what's crazy is all of these years later, that book makes perfect sense to me, and it almost seems not simple because it would be, you know, kind of discounting the gravity of it, but it doesn't sound like a foreign language to me. It's like, oh, yeah, I mean, that's the goal. I don't know that I have non duality, but I start to experience some of that concept. And then one of my favorite teachers, if not my favorite, doctor David Hawkins, I used to reference that book a lot, and all of his teachings were about devotional non duality in this instance and his whole framework that is just benefited my life so tremendously. It's really based on that Vedic system or theology of non duality. So that's interesting. But very few people are aware of that teacher or that book. And it was like, that was the one book that gave me a little sliver of hope that there was some truth out there. Yes. That I didn't understand, but that someone had at some point understood truth. And the way life is. Something I might be able to read it and get some help. And eventually I did. That's so cool. And that's why, I mean, I'll show you my copy one day and you'll just get a kick out of it. It's so doggy. There's probably without sounding to not being an exaggerating. This might be another one or two books inside of it just by virtue of the notes that I write between all the lines. But yeah, so the thing that really resonated with me is because for a minute there, I felt like such a freaking nature because I was starting to see life so like I was an anomaly, certainly to my Friends and anyone I knew. And so for me, he was sort of the safe haven because as soon as I found the book, I was like, oh, I'm not just a complete freak. Like there's somebody else who gets what I'm talking about. So there was this sort of beautiful resonance and this confirmation of like I was really onto something quite profound. And I loved his attitude with her grumpy with it. I could sort of have that compassion for the fact that he's like, look, I keep telling you the same damn things. You're not getting it. Everything you think is like, there was a comedy to his almost like anger in the way that he expressed his profound insights. Absolutely. So yeah, they would be the three that I'd pick. That's very cool. Thank you. Where can people find you? Peter Crone at Peter Crone is Instagram and then people from dot com on website. Awesome. We'll put all that in the show notes at Luke's story dot com slash Peter. Is there anything we talked about this book references and stuff we're putting this in the intro to? Man, thank you so much. And then you got to get to the airport. Yeah, we could wax lyrical for hours. So we'll do it again sometime. Fun and inspiring. They get to hang out with you. I'm so glad we recorded this conversation instead of just sitting on the lawn shooting the shit. I think people are really going to benefit from this. So thank you so much for your gifts. Thank you for having me on my friend. And for letting me just contribute some extra freedom. Yeah, awesome, man. Appreciate it. Well, now, as we say in the industry, it's time to drop the mics, folks. That's the end of another episode of the lifestyle as podcast. That was number four 13. And remember, if you dug that one and I rarely ask for this favor because I feel like when I listen to podcasts, I get so sick of hearing it. But if you'd be so kind as to leave a, of course, 5 star rating, if you feel so called and review on iTunes, it would be extremely helpful. And it's easier than ever before to do that. Click around a bit. You'll find something that says review rate, et cetera. Do that for your old pal Luke. And help me reach more people with this show. It's great when you leave ratings and reviews for those of you that don't know. It helps you kind of find rank and placement in the iTunes world. So when you go in there searching for podcasts, people will be much more likely to find this one due to your positive rating and review. So if you feel like taking a moment to do that, that would be incredible. If not, all I'm going to ask of you is to join me next week for episode four 14. It's called supercharge your home and car with healing energy plus EMF solutions featuring Philip from Leila quantum tech. Now Phillips found the show a two or maybe even three times before, and every time I see him, they've discovered some new application for their technology. And it's just the coolest stuff ever. So I'm probably going to keep having him on as long as he keeps innovating. So make sure you subscribe to this podcast so you don't miss next week's episode or any episodes to follow. As a reminder, if you found some things mentioned in the show such as books or resources or you'd like to read a transcript of the one you just listened to, you can find show notes links and transcripts for this episode with Peter Krohn at Luke's story dot com slash Peter. And lastly, if you were really moved by Peter and his presentation in this conversation, you can find his workshops and courses at Peter Krohn dot com. It's also worth mentioning that all of the links that are dropped in the intros and the outros and even in many cases in the actual conversations taking place here on the show, you can find them on most podcast apps and they are hyperlinked so you can just click them. So if you kind of rattling off all of this stuff at the beginning of shows and after the shows, don't think you have to remember anything. I'm trying to give your mind a break where you can just listen and not have to take notes, write anything down. Press pause to try to go to a site or something. Just click on the show notes, and it's all in there on most podcast apps. So that is my friendly tip as podcast host for you today. I'm out and I'll be back next Tuesday with number four 14..

Peter chrome Krishna murtaugh Peter Crone van Dante Satya sai Baba India atal David Hawkins soccer Nissan cancer pal Luke Peter Krohn Instagram Peter Luke Leila Phillips Philip
"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

06:55 min | 2 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"Ultimately with most situations you arrive at. Well, I can't really, really know that to be true. Perhaps I just had a feeling inside and I perceived it to be that he said something to downplay my significance or something, right? But then at the end of that inquiry is who would you be without that thought? Got it. Who would you be without that belief? And I love watching her work with people. I think I saw her in the early 90s for the first time when I was still like wildly addicted and insane. There was something in the process that she went through with people on stage where I was just like, I don't know what she's doing, but I like it. You know, I couldn't quite grasp it, but it's at that moment, who would you be without that? Well, I would be, gosh, I would be free. I would be fulfilled. I would be in love, I would experience joy, you know? And then in that moment is almost like, well, why the fuck are you hanging on to? What you believe to be true that's likely not. You know? And it's sometimes it's just like a simple little frame shift like that. That seems that seemingly on its surface insignificant, but subjectively to the person having that realization can move a mountain. It's so impactful and that's the ultimate addiction, right? And it's where, again, I use a lot of expressions and quotes. So you can't be held accountable for that which you're oblivious to. And that's where the compassion comes in. Because people will point fingers. And you shouldn't do this. Well, if you had the air conditioning, you'd be doing exactly the same thing. So I would never have the audacity to tell people what to do, but I can point out why they're doing it. And then they can become empowered in the way that they say, oh, I've been doing that forever. Yeah, because you live in the fundamental construct of some form of negation that you're not there. You're bad. And so that's the ultimate addiction. And that's where being able to and sort of inquire into the truth of that. So there is definitely a car that someone has actually mentioned that before. They saw my work. And I love the correlation because I've seen some of her stuff too. And I think we do it slightly differently, but it's really a fundamental inquiry into the truth of your own perspective. Because it's a lie, you know, that's ultimately why it can't be sustained. Over whether it's one lifetime or many lifetimes because the primordial imperative of any organism is to survive. But in this case, the ego survival is based on its own identity, because it's fictitious. So in order to sustain the identity of the ego, that hit you, right? That's great. Isn't that great? Yeah. So you have to come to the E to tell the story, like I was saying, words are descriptive for most people, which is a sustained story. They get to be right consistently. Or you have to keep manifesting environments and circumstances to give validation to your own story. Because that's the way that the ego sustains its existence is being right about its own perception. And it was the most fascinating thing in my work, having done this for two decades is like, wow, I just keep seeing the people would actually rather be right about their inadequacy than just be free. Totally. It's like a course in miracles. You have to make the decision and you're invited to make the decision would you rather be right or would you rather be happy? Right. That one principle for me has been so impactful. I mean, I think I had to hear it once, and it was like, ah, it's one of those things that lodges in the subconscious and find myself in the midst of a conflict in which God, I just got to win. I have to teach them. I have to show them, even if they don't know I want, I need to feel like I want. It's like, God, all I'm looking for in that victory or perceived victory is just a sense of relief and peace, but I could have that, but just stopping the fight. You know what I mean? Another Byron can anything that's grace. She says, defense is the first act of war. Yeah. You know? It's like so much of the stuff that we struggle with is just we perceive it to be at times a war with other people or circumstances, but as you indicated earlier, this is all just this inner dialog. It's this inner war that we're fighting. Only because we don't know that we're doing it. And that's why the compassion comes in, which is why I said you can't be held accountable for that which you're oblivious to. And I think for a lot of people, that helps to shift, even in people that they are in relationships with or they love, they can see them and their mannerisms, their idiosyncrasies, but they're looking from a position of judgment. And I think it's one of the greatest shames in relationships because people will verbally say I love the person or even to them I love you. But energetically, there's this subtle judgment. They're making them wrong for something. And in that sort of there's a disparity, there's the delta between what I'm proclaiming is love, but actually my energy and my approach and my behavior around you is actually quite judgmental. And so when you really see that, it's like, and I saw that with the girl that I was talking about was sort of the catalyst for my own awakening if we want to call it that sounds a bit melodramatic, but it was pretty profound. So I had in ways that I didn't even know it was a very loving kind guy, very generous. I had actually been making her wrong subtly not like overtly. We never thought I wouldn't say things, but energetically, there was this question of like, well, why aren't you getting a job? But why is she helping out? Some people might be as mundane as like, why aren't they taking the trash out? But that's a form of warfare to use the term from Katie. It's like because you're in resistance with reality. And that really is the bedrock of all suffering. Is that I'm in fundamental conflict with the way things are. And we think it's very enticing and tantalizing to think that it's out there. I'm really upset because of what they said. Well, if you break down the physics of that, that's actually impossible. He really to understand the mechanics of how you have an experience. It's like they did something. They're speaking Chinese and they said the same words, but you didn't understand. You wouldn't have got upset, right? So the same data points are out there, but the way that you're interpreting it through these fundamental prisons is a perceived threat is what's generating your own internal terrain shifting into what you're calling on pissed off. But it's not because of something. And when you really get that, it's so empowering because I'm no longer a victim of anything. It doesn't mean I condone behavior doesn't mean I want certain things, but I personally, in the way that I attend to my internal state, don't want to be a victim of somebody else's behaviors. It's like that tendency that we sometimes have to say, well, you made me feel right. You made me mad, you made me this, you know? And I love that. When someone says that it's funny to me because you think, all right, Peter, right now, I'm going to make you be angry. I literally can not cause the feeling to take place in your physiology, mind, body, emotion. I do not have the power to make you feel anything. Right. But your interpretation of the words that I use the sounds that I make vocally have the ability to do that within yourself. That's a huge, if anyone can just get that, you know? That's huge. That's massive. With that responsibility that we can take for our own inner experience comes absolute power to change. And to become free, or at least one of the key steps, if not, you know, the whole kahuna is the.

Byron Katie Peter
"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

07:47 min | 2 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"Said, well, going back to the trust thing we trust you, would you help us to find a replacement? I was thrown into the interview pool of about three or four. On the trainers and I knew as soon as they mentioned the names, I just intuitively knew I'd get it because he was particularly athletic and I would coach tennis for a while and I was a strong skier and they had a place in the mountains and I was like, I didn't know no, but it was an intuitive sense. So that was the previous career for 5 years traveling around the world and Australia and England and New York and it was fun. And how did that evolve into the work that you did now? The deeper work, kind of the personal training of the psyche and soul as I'm starting to gather. Yeah, yeah. It's interesting to sit down and have a conversation with you because I don't really know a lot about you. Right. I know that we have many mutual Friends and every time I've seen you, I perceive you to be warm, articulate kind, intelligent, interesting, inspiring. Like there's just an energetic thing. Thank you. But it's funny, 'cause I really research people before I sit down and talk to them, usually. And I was like, yeah, Peter Crowe, everyone knows him. I'm like, I actually don't. Thank you for indulging me, but you know, if you were describing to me earlier, you have this mastermind program, there's 400 people in it. And I'm like, oh, wow, you know, where did that actually how did that evolve? No, it is being the speed with which the trajectory suddenly in that realm of social media and stuff, that's all happened quite quickly and I'd assert it's just because of the resonance of what I'm saying. Like it's really hitting people, like even here. Like you, like people are very kindly came up to me and they're like, oh, can I get a photo? I love your work. It works changed my life. And then some people are on a panel yesterday who came up and they're like, wow, like there were a couple of things you said that just really hit me and it's just changed everything. So I think that dynamic that's occurring is what's allowing for like 400 people to sign up to and not cheap mastermind and it's been nice to be able to reach people in a way that otherwise I wouldn't have been able to do. So in terms of going from body to mind to soul, like it was sort of a natural progression, right? It sort of going from the gross to the subtle and realizing what I would call that cascade of creation. So if somebody has something physiologically going on, I'm going to assert that let's take a skin rash, right? Like it's an external, it's an exogenous expression of something that's going on internally. In this case, I might have too much heat in the blood or they've had too many spicy foods and like as part of my work is in Io vada. So that also has contributed to my ability to read people and look at their body and but through the lens of these eastern philosophies I was like, wow, like if you're really going to look at what someone's dealing with symptomatically physically or symptomatically emotionally or in their life, you got to understand what was the cascade of events that led to that. And so I just kept going one step deeper on one step deeper and go, okay, well you have this physical issue, but like where's that coming from? Oh, okay, you're holding on to a lot of resentment. And that's because of the relationship you have with the your view of your mother should have been different. And so you're carrying this anger, which is expressing his heat and sometimes with manifests cancer or whatever it might be. And so I just kept going back and back and then I finally found what I would assert. This is I'm writing a book and I'm going to delineate the ten primal prisons of the subconscious. Oh, cool. Yeah, so one of which is that everyone can relate to is like, I'm not enough. And that manifests in different ways. You can either go straight into it. And I was actually on a podcast making this distinction and the guy was like, wow, I never even thought of that and I was saying that you look at a homeless person on the street who's succumbed to maybe some booze and then weed and that it earns progress to heavier drugs and now as kind of basically lost his life or her life. And then you look at the guy in the corner office who's driving a Mercedes and running around in his Gucci suits. I say energetically, there's a very strong possibility that both being informed by the same prison. It's just one has gone into it and one is constantly trying to deny it. But they're both informed by it, and he said, wow, I said, yeah, so the guy who's in the corner office who needs ambient at night to sleep and he needs a coffee or some sort of energy drink to get going and he doesn't really have a great relationship with his wife or his girlfriend and she's really just sort of a trophy as an extension of him thinking he's not good enough, but he wants to be seen when they're attracted. You start to see all the dynamics. It looks good on paper. But actually it's not that far different if we were to look at the actual qualities of their relationships, particularly with the father usually they're not enough because that's more the disciplinarian energy is like, oh wow, they both had this sort of high school ass type dad who pointed out where they're insufficiencies were. Yeah, you went three for 5 at baseball, but what happened to the other two hits? Yeah, like B plus is good, but why didn't you get an a? Like subtle things that people don't parents don't understand, but for the child, the interpretation is like the inadequacy to then sort of grows like a cancer, but emotionally. So that was really the process of my work was getting back to these fundamental prisons and then recognizing the adaptations that we have from them. So it could become a perfectionist or a people pleaser as an adaptation to not being enough. Or equal as I said, you could go right into what's the point I want to give a shit and I'm just going to end my life. And they might seem like extremes, but I would invite people to consider they're on the same continuum. They just manifest differently. People often ask me why I'm so obsessed with red light therapy. I've been doing it for years and frankly, I plan to continue forever due to its incredible benefits. Thousands, yes, I said thousands of peer reviewed research articles have demonstrated the benefits of red and near infrared light for things like skin health, reduced pain and inflammation and faster muscle recovery. I love to do my red light first thing in the morning to get the red light I might get from watching the sunrise. And as red light therapies become so popular, there are several different red light therapy companies now, but I personally use and recommend juv for a few reasons. First, they offer a wide selection of configurations from small handheld devices to large setups that can treat your entire body. I personally use both. Another feature I love with juve's latest generation of products is something they called ambient mode, which utilizes lower intensity red light designed to be used at night as a healthy alternative to bright blue light, which protects your melatonin levels, and as a result your sleep. This is what I use in the kitchen at night in our temporary apartment to balance out the blue light of the nasty overhead lighting. So if you want to get down with some red light juve has got you covered. And for a limited time, they're offering all my listeners, including you, an exclusive discount on your first order. Just go to juv dot com slash Luke and apply my code Luke to your qualifying order. That's JO VV dot com slash Luke. And of course, some exclusions apply as this is a limited time offer. So hurry up and grab your Jew now. In terms of the manifestations of some of these rude issues, what has been your experience of people in the throes of addiction and alcoholism? Yeah. So it gets really deep and we can probably talk another time. But beyond the ten prisons, there are what I would consider two sides to the same coin. So I'm not enough is the more positive expression of self negation of what I call self negation. So when I'm not something like I was talking about earlier, like somebody has anxiety, they're container might be I'm not safe. And they grew up in a family, as I said, where there was this inconsistency and there was like raised voices or screaming or the dad and the mom would fight. So they created that container. So in the not enough, and this.

Peter Crowe tennis England Australia cancer New York baseball Luke
"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

08:17 min | 2 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"Sort of we were on again off again for a minute. And then we came back together and it was sort of like, oh, this is like, you know, this is the best. And we had a beautiful relationship, probably about a year and a half, two years. And then she left. I'm missing out a lot of story, but basically her rationale was that you loved me too much. And she said, like, your love is suffocating. And I was still a very sensitive guy, but I was like, wait, that doesn't sound like a problem. If there's so much love, that sounds like a decent problem to happen. Not saying it's ideal. But I went through this period of about two months that was really just men doing desperate things calling with my friends, how do I get it back? What do I do? And I literally, I can sleep, I lost weight, and wake up, I woke up one night and I actually screamed at my own mind to shut up. I wasn't neurotic, but it was a trying time. Anyway, cut to, I was just sitting at my desk in a rent control apartment in Santa Monica. And I had these incessant questions going through my head, one of which is where is she? Is she dating someone already? Will I see her again? And will I ever have love like that? They were sort of the main pillars of my concerns. And in one sweep, I got the answer to all the questions. And it was I don't know. Where is she? I don't know. Is she dating someone already? I don't know. But I see her again, I don't know. And will I have love like that again? I don't know. And it was so categorically the truth that there was no denying it. And for the first time in my life, I realized that the very fabric of the life itself is uncertainty. And yet by virtue of being human based in these principles of insecurity and inadequacy and scarcity, a little brain is always trying to figure out uncertainty, which is exhausting. I know you can relate to knowing your history a little bit and even what you spoke to on the stage, which was so eloquent. We're trying to figure out, which is really we're trying to find security, which is futile because the nature of life is uncertainty. So in that moment, not only did I get the answer to the questions that have been keeping me up at night, but I also saw the actual fabric of life. You know, if you want to get sort of celluloid like it was like, I saw the code in the matrix. And I thought a freedom that cascaded through my body in a way that I didn't even know was one possible. And that subsequently never left me. Now I've had glimpses, of course, of dipping back into other things to look at, but it was like, oh, I don't know. I don't know what's going to happen. And for the first time, not only did I realize that the very nature of life is uncertain, the future is unknown. But I was totally okay with that. And it was total peace. And so that really set the stage to come back to a question of like that was my quote unquote training was life giving me a sort of the proverbial spiritual two by four around the face in a very loving way, but super profound that from that moment forth, I recognize the distinction between the fabric of physics and life and then the design and the structure of an ego, which you have the fabric which is uncertainty and then you have the very rudimentary feeling of insecurity the ego, which wants certainty and to see the conflict and the paradox of the two. And I realize all anyone's looking for is they just want to feel safe. As one principle, you know, beyond that, you can call it love or peace or freedom, but they're all synonymous to me. They're all sort of bedfellows. So at that moment, they all cascaded through me and the sort of the tipping point of the beauty of the story was I hadn't spoken to this girl for about 6 weeks. For the first two weeks, we've been talking and I'm like waiting for the okay, I'll come back or whatever. Never happened. So the 6 weeks ago by, and within 15 minutes of me having that moment, she calls me. And I had a landline, I don't think I'd never thought that back then. But she closed my landline, I picked it up. And she's now crying saying I miss you so much. And I immediately got the entanglement of the whole thing. Because I hadn't as I was talking about earlier, really been in a relationship with her. The epiphany that hit me, the suffocating love was the adaptation, the coping mechanism that I had for the deep profound fear of loss because of my mom's and dad's passing. So the love that I had in sort of an inherent way with very loving parents that was ripped away that left that boy very hurt was my sort of kryptonite. I will never lose again because that hurts too much. Find love as best as I knew it at the time. So my perfect boyfriend, behavioral adaptations, my compensation skills all be a very authentic, had their undercurrent of real fear. Even have seen it on the surface, but that was the energy that she felt was the suffocation because it wasn't authentic love. And so at that moment, I was actually available. Because I was no longer trying to control an outcome. In this case with her, I was trying to control the avoidance of something, which is the worst form of control. When you're trying to control an outcome to get something, that's subtle energetic differences. But I was trying to avoid something. So she, in ways that she couldn't have consciously known, something calls me within 15 minutes of me having this experience, and she couldn't be further. She was in New Zealand. I was in Los Angeles. I don't know how the hell she got that, but she's literally the antipode on the planet to speak to the power of like, there's no distance in time. So she literally is calling crying. I miss you so much. And all I got at that moment is like, oh, finally, I'm available to you. So that was, I would say the very foundation of how I got to where I got to. What were you doing professionally at this time? I was trying to pursue a physical personal trip. Celebrity fitness training. Really, really, yeah. So you were living in Santa Monica and traveling all around the world with a couple. Very, very renowned. I mean, people could Google it in a second, but so yeah, they were making films all over the world. And I kept themselves felt for 5 years. And how did you fall into that line of work? Again, just my calmer, my destiny, I was a trainer in Pacific palisades that are placed on PCH and sunset, which are pretty familiar with. There used to be called Pacific athletic club, and it became a spectrum and I think it's a bay club, but just opposite gladstone's there. And I heard as my undergrad started human biology and exercise physiology. So for me, transforming a body was like a piece of cake. I understood the inner end, the chemistry, the biology, like the movement, the biomechanics. So it was almost to the point. I wasn't like I was boring, but it's like really like you need someone to help you. And I understood that they really did. But a buddy of mine I was living in this rent controlled apartment, the very same one that I was talking about, my story. And he said, look, I don't know anyone who knows more about the body than you. Like if you get certified, I'll give you a job as a trainer, because I was working this was prior to my gig as a celebrity trainer. I was working in a bar down on peer. And it was fun. It was a summer, but it was sort of a little bit below my pay grade. So I was like, okay, fine, I got qualified as a national academy of sports medicine trainer. He gave me a job in the gym, and I was always incredibly hardworking. I didn't have a car. I had to borrow a push bike to get to work from Santa Monica. I was riding up PCH and pouring rain, trucks going by me. I'm like, if ever I make this, this is going to be a good story. And so yeah, within 5 months, I'd had such an incredible roster of clients with great results. The GM came up to me at one point and she said, we've got two new clients for you. And I was like, sure, bring it on. I actually found a journal from back then, and I'm sort of showing my age, as I said, that was about 20 something years ago. It's about 26 years ago. And I was seeing 13 clients a day. That's an hour workout. I would have my first line at 6 in the morning and sometimes the last one at 8 and somewhere in there like grab a snack. So I sort of had this quiet admiration for how hard I was working. You know, I don't have a penny to my name. My parents went wealthy, they didn't leave me anything. So anyway, so the GM to go back to the point of the story. She came out to me and said, we got a couple of new clients. I'm like, sure, bring it on. She doesn't know these are very special appliances. And she said they're bob's clients. And everyone knew bob because bob had this celebrity couple as his trainers, but he was a dad and he was tired of all the travel and he had handed in his resignation. They.

Santa Monica Pacific athletic club Pacific palisades gladstone New Zealand Los Angeles Google GM bob
"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

03:20 min | 2 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"But the way that you're interpreting it through these fundamental prisons is a perceived threat is what's generating your own internal terrain shifting into what you're calling on pissed off. But it's not because of something. And when you really get that, it's so empowering because I'm no longer a victim of anything. My name is Phoebe Crone and you're listening to the lifestyle as podcast. Today is a good day, my Friends. It's the day I'm dropping another life-changing conversation with the powerhouse of a guest. This is episode four 13 transcending limiting beliefs and negative patterns to achieve your highest potential with Peter chrome. The mind architect Peter Krohn is a writer, speaker and a thought leader in human potential who works with world class entertainers, professional athletes, and global organizers. Peter redesigns the subconscious mind that drives behavior to inspire a new way of living from limitation and stress to freedom and joy. Peter is a fascinating guy and someone that I've been wanting to get on the podcast for quite a while. He works with all types of people, including professional athletes, royalties, celebrities CEOs and the general public like you and me. He works with his clients using a holistic approach of mind body and spirit. And in fact, his company slogan is spiritual freedom, mental peace, and physical vitality. Sounds familiar, right? That's really what we're all about here at the lifestyle as podcast. Peter says that when working with the body, he is unrivaled basing his training on an incredible foundation of knowledge and Ayurveda, human biology, exercise physiology, biomechanics, and anatomy. Now, what we talk about in this show has more to do with your state of mind and emotions. And I want to let you know that you can find show notes, links, and transcripts for this episode at Luke's story dot com slash Peter. That's Luke story dot com slash Peter. Now on to the episode. So this conversation covers just about everything one could hope for in the realm of personal growth and development. So just trust me when I say you'll want to listen through to the conclusion of this bad boy. And for those who enjoy spoilers, here are just a couple of choice nugs, Peter shares with us in this episode. Self labeling and how it affects us internally, words as both the lock and the key to our freedom, letting the old version of yourself die, tools you can use to trick the elusive ego, breaking free from self imposed roles, the primal prisons of the mind, using words to create instead of reinforcing old stories, the bedrock of all suffering and how to escape it, curiosity is the portal to possibility, dissolving the perception of problems. And then Peter also takes me through a mind-blowing many mind architect, coaching session toward the end of the conversation that was very enlightening to say the least. So make sure you stick around to hear that. So thank you so much for joining us today and listen. If you are inspired by this conversation, I would be extremely grateful if you could leave the show a rating and review on iTunes. Now doing this is much easier than it used to be. All you gotta do is click around on your Apple podcast app and you'll find the ratings tab where you can take about 60 seconds to support the lifestyle as.

Peter Phoebe Crone Peter chrome Peter Krohn Luke Apple
"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

02:23 min | 4 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"And so it shows you how, as I said earlier, your relationship to anything is just always informing you of where there's a belief that sticky, Peter Crone talks about it being your situations, your life, your circumstances are all showing you where you're not free. And I think relationships teach us that a lot. When we're coming up with our vision for a partner and we're dating, and we've got, you know, some of those red flags and non negotiables, what do you think is a way one could determine when those are valid versus when those are becoming an excuse to remain avoidant and protect ourselves? Being too picky and too too discerning, you know? And not opening ourselves up to the possibility of something existing outside of that. As a defense mechanism. Yeah, such a good question because especially avoiding people will identify as independent or I just have high standards. And while that, of course, can be true. I think we need to check in with ourselves and say, are my standards walls. Are they actually walls? And I think somatically, well, no pretty quick if that's true. You know, like, do I push people away? Because by using discernment, and we'll get informed by that. Also, we'll get informed when we push someone away and we realize MBI walked away from something that was actually pretty good. And can we return to it, you know? So really, it's just being able to play with it. We take it so seriously because we think, well, if this doesn't work, or I push them away, then I've lost the person I always was meant to get because, no, you're being informed by it. And in the future, you'll have the opportunity to potentially either with that person or someone else. Now you have a new skill set. And I don't think we often see it with that kind of grace, you know? That, again, you're being invited to integrate the wisdom..

Peter Crone
"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

02:27 min | 7 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

"Months in the first month is at the end of February. So I think we'll start talking about it and January, middle of January. And then we'll do the whole launch and people can join us probably like in the first two weeks of February. Awesome. Well, I've said it before and I'll say it again till the end of time consider my platform and extension of yours. Anything that you have to promote, I'm more than happy to share it with the world and my audience because I really really do feel that you are creating massive shifts in the world. Thank you. Allowing people to discover themselves and experience freedom and you do have a gift and it's so apparent even through this conversation and through all of the other conversations that I've listened to online. I didn't know I listened to as many podcasts of yours as possible before. And I found a playlist on Spotify that has a compilation of all of your podcasts. Oh, wow. There's some fans out there that feel the same way as me. Wow. That's so touching. I'll link it in the show notes. If you want to hear more of Peter's work and the conversations on some other prolific podcasts be sure to check that out. And I'll also link Peter's Instagram, your website, anything else. That's it. Just coming up with fool. Okay. Towards the end of the year. But now I'm also very excited about it. But thank you. Thank you for the kind words. I love being with you. You're such a sweet soul, and I'm so glad we're Friends. And your generosity, again, means the world to me. I'm just doing what I can to help people so it's really only through people like yourself with big platforms, shows like this that I get to share something that hopefully people took away and it can just nudge the needle in terms of their life and their greater sense of freedom and inner peace and true vitality, which is what I'm committed to giving birth to here is a new type of human being who's not living in a place of fear and survival, but really from a place of freedom and love. It's so beautiful. And I applaud you on your mission. And please give Peter a follow. He is well worth a follow if anybody is deserving of one compared to I'm not even going to say it. Either way. Just thank you again for tuning in for listening for subscribing to the show. If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a comment. Please leave a review. And as always, I'm.

Peter
"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

08:26 min | 7 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

"Pure or as pure as possible to allow me to operate at my highest level of consciousness. So I feel like I don't talk about that much because I feel that a lot of the people aren't receptive to that. So my access point is through performance. And vanity. Just showing people what you can achieve because that on a very deep level will speak to many people because they have these feelings or these beliefs about themselves or self image that will actually create enough motivation to change. And then they experience maybe the spiritual benefits of adopting a cleaner diet. Yeah, spiritually cleaner. I think you know for whatever you take it or leave it, but as an invitation to, I think just because of who you are, I think you'd be maybe not shocked, but perhaps a little surprise how many people in ways that maybe they don't fully understand are drawn to you not just because of aesthetics. You look shredded and it's inspiring and the potential for human anatomy. Especially Instagram is obviously so popular as you see what could be possible for oneself. But my guess is that many people follow you for a much more profound reason. Because you know, you have something to offer that's beyond the visual, right? That your kindness, your heart centeredness, your dedication, these are values as opposed to aesthetics. And so I would invite you to maybe appeal to that a little bit more because that's what the world needs. You know, whether it's through food, meditation, and I'm not saying you don't speak to these, but you just said yourself. You don't really talk about it, too much. So I think it's a disservice to your followers and to yourself to not let them know what's behind the curtain a bit more. You know, like I'm always very happy to be vulnerable about my life and what I went through and I think that's where people really relate because they can look at me and go, wow, this guy's just like, oh, and I get bombarded with compliments of like, wow, never met someone so peace, and you just don't seem to be phased by it. It's sort of under the impression as that's how I always was and it's just not true. So when they hear the university and I was things I've been through, it becomes much more relatable in that case. And in your case, you know, what were your struggles with food, or what have you had like your own back and forth with yourself about should I shouldn't I and that becomes much more to me inspiring versus like it's great to see some guy who's just shredded and can lift the things you can live. But later understand the who is behind that. It's just my invitation. You're absolutely right. Before you came, I made a post on Instagram today. And it was a picture of me with a hoodie and some short shorts. Probably the shortest shorts that I own. And it was leg day and I went and trained with them. And I took a picture of myself and I was writing the caption, and in the caption, I was detailing and explaining how not so long ago had a very deep insecurity about the size of my legs because being a professional bodybuilder and competing in the category that I did, I was focused heavily on the upper body. So I would avoid training legs because I could spend another session training the upper body, which would then put me in a better position to compete. So my legs were underdeveloped. So naturally, that brought on a bunch of comments from people online, so it made me deeply insecure about them to the point where I would not wear shorts at all. And now here I was posting this picture and I was reflecting to myself and I was about to share how I had this insecurity about wearing shorts and part of me chose to delete that caption because the part of me that is afraid to be seen and or maybe come across as somebody that can be perceived to have a very aesthetic body. So I'm nitpicking with my own insecurities. How dare I be insecure when there's other people that are in worse shape than I am aesthetically and here I am complaining about my insecurity. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. I get it. So what's going on there with me? Well, I think there's two parts. You can have your humanity and have the insecurity and then the sort of the elixir to that conversation is, but I've decided to post it because what I'm learning to work on is self acceptance. So it's not just you don't leaving people with criticism, you're leaving people with humanity. So you're sharing vulnerably, like, you know, even if it's relative to somebody else who doesn't even know how to squat, and they're like, are you kidding me? Like my legs look like matchsticks. You know, it's like, what's your problem? But they will be able to relate to the fact that you said, you know, even in my realm of expertise where I compete, like I, through the realm of comparison, which is where we always feel inadequacy, like we compared to these ideals and standards, which are not truths that just whatever we glob onto to maintain our own insecurities. But you can share that. Everyone can relate to that. Whatever their version is. And then the medicine is and I wanted to post this anyway because it's challenging for me, and I want to learn to embrace my own humanity. And I hope you can find something that you perhaps don't like about yourself and find some love and acceptance. I'm putting words in Jamal. But do you see that can coexist? Yeah. Because otherwise, what I hear is that you had an opportunity to be vulnerable, then you second guessed yourself, which is the same mechanism of self doubt, which is still perfectionism. So even if your perfectionism is about not showing perfectionism, it's perfection. It's so subtle. Find a new way to manifest, right? Yeah. So you are removing something because you don't want to come across in a certain way is still a form of perfectionism. It might be well intended like you're being considerate, you're not being arrogant about it. So at least you've got the sort of the more the softer version of it, but what I feel is like there's just an opportunity for you to literally embrace your version of fear and insecurity. And everybody's got that. And then people are going to say whatever they say. But if you articulate it from that space, it's amazing how few people react because they're not picking up so much on the picture or the physical words they're feeling the energy of my humanity and my rising above that to go, you know what, it's okay. Thank you, Peter. You're welcome. I really appreciate you. Yeah, thank you, back at you. Thanks for the kind words earlier too. I was trying my best to not deflect not to fly and accept it fully because that historically been where I was at. And working on that. Well, you did a great job and I appreciate you even being honest about it. And the thing I want you to recognize again is I'm saying something. What it's revealing is what you've already said about yourself. Again, I quote, I say other people's words can only affect you if you already believe them. Right? So when you really get that, it's like no one upsets you. They just say something and what it reveals is what you already think about yourself. That is upsetting. And so there's more space for love and acceptance of self. Wow. Thank you so much Peter. Well, before we end this conversation, you have a mastermind. Yes. Coming out that I wanted to talk to you about. Okay, cool we're about. I would love to join. Yeah, I'd love to have you on it. It's gonna be so fun. I mean, I've been blessed to do many workshops and courses, but I don't win anyway. I want to diminish the impact they've had, but this just feels like it's going to be so huge and I'm so excited because I literally will get to interact with people or online. It's not a life event, but like all the other stuff has been streamed where I talk about anxiety or depression and it's helpful, but now I'll coach people and then explain what I just did. So if someone's a coach, they're a teacher, they're a trainer, they're a nutritionist, they're a parent. Anyone who's in the realm of helping anyone who would love to understand human psychology and why we suffer. This is going to be super powerful. And when does that come out? We're going to do 6.

Instagram Jamal Peter depression
"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

07:19 min | 7 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

"I've seen people, you know, just start crying out of nowhere. Even people who do something like massage work or fascial release, you know, like really getting in there deep tissue, the stuff can get stored, and they might not know where they're crying. That's my only consideration is with a physical manual work. It can be it can be a little bit disorienting if you feel something but you don't know why. So I tend to be more in like in yoga terms Guyana yoga, you know, there's like Bhakti yoga, there's different forms of yoga in terms of worship or dedication or service. Mine tends to be more just by virtue of my web viewing life and my intellect is like it's the Guiana sort of that booty like intellectual yoga. So I like to personally help people understand something. I think it gives them the rains versus like, you know, you could as a trainer, if you told somebody, hey, do this on Monday, do that on Wednesday. And they're getting gains, and they know there's obviously a correlation because they're doing something and they're seeing. But if they don't fully understand the mechanism by why did you have me do this exercise and there's an empowerment that I think comes when you give somebody the equal understanding as opposed to just the instruction. So I think it can I think I know it can go both ways? I just personally love there to be some sort of correlation with the psychological as well so that you can become sort of the master of that domain versus just the experience of it. Yeah, I like that because I have been incorporating all of these different modalities, including breath work, meditation, just trying to find peace through different ways. And I have had my own experiences with breathwork in particular and have had incredibly intense emotional releases that also spawned or allowed me to remember memories that I had forgotten about. Yeah. Yeah. No, I mean, it's all really one continuum, right? They talk about the mind body connection, like there's this, you know, like there's two entities and really it's like when water is boiled and it becomes steam like, it's not really too separate entities. It's just in different forms, you know, so to me, mind and body is all interrelated. So when you recognize that natural correlation of one form to another, then yeah, if you tweak something over here, then this has to at some level, it's sort of basics of entanglement theory, writing quantum physics, like you tweak one electron over here and the other one immediately instantaneously shift. So for some people they're more physical and they're more in their bodies like a lot of women they like to dance or they want movement as an access to something and maybe even when they're feeling emotional, they might go for a run or they have to dance or something like that. Guys, we tend to be a little bit more sort of left brain we want to analyze. We want to think through so I think all of it even for myself as much as I love to understand. I think there's so much power for me in terms of truly breaking things down and really like systematically understanding. I still like a very like as you know into my workouts and infrared sauna coal plunges, like doing this, these alternate therapies, hyperbaric chamber, like, this is an intrinsic part of my experience of life and I can't deny it. So how important would you say food is in that component of creating freedom or the feeling of freedom or experiencing it? In Iowa, which is part of my practice, you know, we have the three main pillars, which is a horror nidra and Brahma charia. So, meaning the first one is intake, like what are you taking in? It's not just like food, it's impressions, like mentally, you're watching violent movies, you're watching, you know, like video games that people shooting, whatever it is. That's a form of ingestion. So it's very important. It's important to sleep and lifestyle, which are the other two you need to remember. So for me, it's overlooked. I think also the way people eat. It's another form of relationship, right? What kind of relationship do people have to food invariably it's driven by some sort of emotional imbalance, like for a lot of people, food is the ultimate drug. They may not think that they have an addiction because I don't smoke weed. I don't do cocaine. I'm like, I don't have a drinking problem. But, you know, when they come up against something challenging or they don't know how to deal with something or they're upset, how many times does that happen in the fridge? See what's there? Nothing's there. You come back ten minutes later. Again. Right. There's a certain degree of patterning there that people oblivious to where they're being driven by their emotions again. So food is imperative, obviously we needed to maintain this meat suit and food itself is a massive topic, right? Because, as you know, from all of your expertise and being a vegan and all the beautiful things you share with your community, but then there's whatever that song is there's levels to this shit, right? You know, it's like you could hold up a carrot in one hand and a carrot on the other hand and as far as we can send in terms of labeling that both carrots, they sort of look similar, but in terms of the prana and the energy, like one could be full of like GMOs, life of 8 carcinogenic chemicals, and the other one is made in some loving mothers backyard. Both carrots but in terms of the impact they have on their physiology 9 day. So to me, it's imperative, but it's insufficient, like there's too many other components because I could equally work with someone who does have all the organic clean and have a chef. But the way they eat is in a hurry on the stress at a table with people who don't respect each other in a relationship that is disharmonious and under stress because the person feels like they've got to deal with emails. So they could be eating the best food, but their digestion is not going to work because they're in a fight or flight mode. Conversely, if someone is eating, I would never invite anyone to eat GMO foods at all, but if they were, but they bless the food. They were doing it ritualistically in the way they ate. They were giving gratitude for the fact that they have food, then their body is going to alkalize it in a different way. And that's that realm of mystery. But that's where many people go into that spiritual realm when it comes to food and the consumption of it. Ultimately that's the reason why I'm vegan in the first place. I was raised with under the Hindu belief system where they don't consume flesh. They do consume milk and ghee. When it's raised when the cow was raised with a certain level of reverence and respect and love and care. But you and I both know that's not the conditions that most of any of the milk or cheese on the shelves are raised. So yeah. It's more of a spiritual way of cleansing my body or keeping my.

Guiana Guyana Iowa
"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

07:56 min | 7 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

"You have plenty of drinks. I need to work with. No, just that's the trust component. That's the recognizing look, being human, like in Buddhist terms, like the human experience is suffering. It's one of the noble truths, right? So you don't have to wait too long before something is going to happen. You're an active guy. You've got a beautiful relationship. You've got your business. You've got moving parts, like life is going to provide some wrenches and in the mix. So now it's just a reframe instead of like when those things happen going into some sort of retreat, defend, deflect. It's like, oh, okay, great. Here's something I'm being upset. I'm being triggered there's some inherent fear that I'm feeling, that's my opportunity to put some chalk on my hands and to like see if I can lift this. Would you say that those inherent feelings that you're talking about are common amongst people or could you categorize them into a sense of unworthiness or not enoughness or yes, so that's primal patterns that we will have just by virtue of being human, like not enoughness is certainly something that everyone can relate to and absence of a feeling of worth for sure. And again, depending on where people are in their arc of their journey, some people will have transcended it, some may not even have gotten into it yet. It might still be dormant. Some people might be like in the midst of battling it right now. Some people might be trying to escape it, justifying it. There's a mirror to different stages of people out. But in my work, you know, I've recognized ten primal prisons that we live in and that's what I'm going to be writing about in my book. And the journey of a human's evolution in terms of their spiritual growth is to break out of all of the ten. As far as I'm concerned, did you list them in order? You don't have to get into the way to share them in the book. But is there one that sort of unlocks the next level? It's a beautiful question. No one's ever asked me that question. There is a natural cascade, yeah. So what I realized in the way that for whatever reasons my blessed mind works is I saw that the whole experience of life is based on the laws of relativity. So meaning, in later terms, we only experience something by virtue of we have a relationship to it. And I always use a very simple example of your lying in bed and you feel hot, but you move your leg out to the side and the sheets are a little cooler, you only have that experience by virtue of the relativity of temperature. So when that hit me I was like, oh, there's a definitive list of types of relationship we have as human beings. And so I broke that down without giving away the whole farm here before my book comes out, but we have a relationship to ourselves. We have relationship to others and you get the theme. And then I broke that down, I was in a relationship to ourselves, our relationship to my body, our relationship to my thoughts. We have some sort of spiritual relationship and relationship to our emotions. That's not super like you know, wow, that's amazing. You go to a spa and you hear about mind body and soul, right? But I was like, oh, and so there was a subtle to gross cascade in terms of like, okay, if we look at the innermost, which is the spiritual, and then the next subtle will be sort of the mental, and then the mental cascades into the emotional, which then shows up in the physical in your body, right? So you have a thought about something that makes you feel anxious and your anxiety manifests in your stomach and butterflies or whatever it is, right? So I saw it started to see this cascade. And again, just by virtue of feeling very fortunate to have the mind that I have, I recognize within each of these levels of relationship that was a fundamental constraint that was primal. So if it is a cascade, so you start with one that then sort of like that stack of cards. You know, bleeds into that. It's not to say that is automatic. You have to still do work at that level and recognize fundamental pretenses that we live in, like, thinking I'm not enough, it's very real for people, and it can impact their life to becoming homeless, like if they're really and I'm not enough. And they feel worthless and they could lead to drugs and then they basically completely degenerate into somebody who becomes an addict, but being driven by this not enoughness like it really has an impact, but they're not enoughness itself is not a truth. It's just a story that got developed or triggered through childhood and a kid being dismissed or told that they were worthless or you're a mistake or kids here awful things, right? So anyway, beautiful question, but yes, a subtle cascade and that's why I'm so excited about the word because I think it's almost like this formulaic approach and alignment because you sort of go through each stage and once you recognize and find the location of that prism within yourself, see the correlating events that transpired in her life that gave evidence to that prison, you know, my brother was more the athlete or my sister is the better academic. That's why that's when I was 5 and I started to feel not enough. So that helps to have a placeholder as to when it started, then we investigate the validity of it as I said it's never a truth. It's just your own reality. And then once we undo that, we discover what's on the other side of that, which is freedom. Wow. I have one question about that. Yeah. Is the memory of requirement. If someone dissociated in some dramatic event is the memory of required details about what happened to requirement. No, but it's pretty fascinating how many times I was just working with a client super well to do a bunch of finance stuff, not wanting for anything financially like super successful. And in his mind was not dealing with trauma. It was more something in performance in his life. Which on the surface looks like, you know, just whatever being someone who's interested in his case sports. You know, it's not a big deal, right? But by virtue of doing the revealing process, he remembered this particular event. And he said, wow, I haven't thought about that for 30 years. You know, so when given the space going back to your question earlier about how do we, you know, when someone's going through something and I was using the maternal first, look at a child as if it's a child having attention or their hurt and they're upset. Natural proclivity is to want to hold and love. So when someone feels that space, the brain feels sufficiently safe to actually process something. So I assert that I hold a space of just unconditional love and acceptance. And so people feel comfortable sharing anything because there's no potential ramification of being belittled judged or criticized. Because these things are, we tend to have shame around, so we don't want to share them, right? So you don't have to remember it, but in the right context in the right conditions, the brain can remember things in a way that it feels safe and very healing. So for him, it was like tears came up and that was what was required for him at the moment to just sort of strengthen his realization that had already happened. He would have had the same revelation, not maybe to the same degree of feeling it, that would have taken a little longer. When you do have the emotional recognition and correlation to an event, it just helps to harness and integrate the understanding quicker. Which is why it's nice if you can't remember it, but it's not pivotal. It's not imperative. Is there a way to maybe come out at the opposite way? Like a physical modality of releasing and creating freedom, emotional freedom? Yeah, for sure. I think when people could do like a lot of breath work, like I think that can be incredibly cathartic..

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

07:26 min | 7 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

"Just planted it. It hasn't had any song, you didn't put any, right? So it's the conditions that allow for those kind of subjects to arise. You know, I couldn't for one minute claim any state to the fact that I got to this point of revelation in my own life, just because, yeah, I chose to it's like, how conceded would that be? It's like, I don't know, like the series of events at the time were so, so difficult for me with a girlfriend leaving or my dad passing or was that really my doing? At some level, okay, yes, as we could say, my soul curated it that way. But really, I'm the beneficiary of my life even the trials and tribulations that gave me the insight to be able to recognize the things that I recognize. And I would not for one minute say, yeah, that was all me. You know, I think there's just such an audacious arrogant attitude there. So I think that, again, on the flip side, recognizes like patience and compassion and that. Okay, what might seem self evident for you? I've seen this many times, maybe you have with a girlfriend or a guy friend who's in a relationship that you know categorically as dysfunctional. Like they keep coming to you because they're sad or they keep coming to you because they're hurt or they keep coming to you because they're disrespected and you're like, for you, it's like just glaringly obvious like, what are you doing? Get out of the relationship. But then already. You know? And so people will face their quote unquote demons and that the shadows when they're ready. And we can not pass, just love them for where they're at, and then support them when they're ready to get support. I think after we spoke, I actually spoke just to be transparent here whenever I was going through probably the hardest part of my breakup with Bianca. Yeah. And from that conversation, you helped me realize that, again, the things that happened in the past happened. Yeah. And I was looking at them through the lens of trying to understand why it happened to me and holding onto these stories of the pain. That was associated there and the breakup and everything. And since then, or I don't know if it was your conversation or series of events. But I've really tried to change the way that I look at those difficult moments and see them as places that can offer a far greater perspective than the one that I have now that can help me evolve and seeing those events as something that has happened for my soul's highest spiritual evolution and for me personally when I started looking at those things that way. It softened? Yeah. Everything that happened and allowed me to start examining it from a place of curiosity rather than a place of reactivity or resistance or resistance. Beautiful. So is that something that happened to you or can you resonate? Do you resonate with that at all? A 100%, I think the difference is, for me, very early on in my own journey, I recognize that these difficulties were actually opportunities. So I didn't resist them. I was just like fastidiously curious, you know, like I was like, okay, like why am I getting upset? Why do I have fear? Like why do I worry about this? Or what is the what is the deeper concern at hand here? So for me it became like an exercise in true fascination about my own conditioning. So obviously when I was younger, there were different ways that I replicated and I would do my own sort of escape mechanisms. I was never into drugs or I had to occasionally have a few cocktails in college, but like I never used substance in any way. I tended to be more like, I just get sad, or I'd sulk when I was younger, you know? But I very quickly recognize that actually this is an opportunity for growth. And as you were speaking, I think you'll love this comparison because of your industry, which is if you look at training, physical training. And I work with a ton of pro athletes who like you just spelled and shredded and strong. And if I gave like say one of my MLB guys, like two 5 pound dumbbells. And as I dude, okay, let's try and knock out a ramp. It's like look at me like I've got like I'm smoking crack two heads. And because there's not sufficient resistance. So we understand it in the physical domain that actually we could actually argue that we sometimes push ourselves too hard into resistance. Because of ego and we want to get bigger, like we want to have this sort of personal best, but we understand that I need conflict. I need something to be fighting against. But when it applies to the emotional people go the other way. So no, I don't want to deal with that. But if you could understand that the same growth, like whether it be my resistance capacity in terms of strength or my cardio capacity in terms of like fitness, you know, my VO2 max is getting better because I'm sprinting on the treadmill. If you apply the same principles to emotional strength to emotional growth, then you're going to want to dive into resistance. And so whenever I've used that with people in space like you in the fitness, like there's this sort of like epiphany, it's like, oh my God, yeah, like that made total sense. You don't go to the gym as strong as you are and like pick up like these like three pound dumbbells and show people what you can do as a chess fly. You know, it's like, no, if you're gonna get better and get stronger and evolve and access different levels of potential and your physical realm, you know that you have to face adversity. So when life is now your quote unquote, squat rack. Coming at you, and it looks like, wow, wow, hang on a minute. I've only done one 60 before. This feels like two 50, you know? Okay, well, does mother trade just like, you know, she knows God won't give her anything she can't handle she just wishes he didn't trust us so much. Is the way she raised it, which is beautiful, right? So just trust that life is always going to give you something that somewhat in your Wheelhouse even if it feels like it's beyond your current capacity and for that reason it may take time. You don't jump like a hundred pounds of squatting or deadlifting like overnight. But there's a progression, so sometimes when there's adversity, you take a while to work through it. But we don't want to go the other way, which is like, ah, you know what? I'm not good at that lifting. I'm going to go over and do the row. Because that's what we've ever done. It's like, okay, no, there's an opportunity for a better job, but I'm scared, and I'll make more money, but it's okay, I'll just do what I'm doing. But then I'm going to complain to my Friends that I don't make enough money. You know, it's like, well, right? Does that make sense? Is it perfect? I love the analogy. My mind immediately went to, I love training. Yeah. And I seek that out every single day. I go to the gym and make it incredibly uncomfortable for myself because I know that on the other side of that is I'm going to find strength and I'm going to adapt and be more resilient and be able to handle those moments of discomfort for longer and sit with them. Yeah. But how do you do that with me like the emotional realm? I don't just start argue with people. You don't have to be with you, you know what I mean? You don't have to seek it out in this world. Believe me. Just post something about COVID on that..

Bianca MLB chess
"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

07:57 min | 7 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

"I like to as best as I can, have compassion even for the guy right now somewhere out there in LA who's busting someone's call window and stealing a pass or an iPhone or I'm not saying that those actions don't require consequences and they will to some degree if they get caught. Apparently in LA it doesn't matter what the hell you do. The officials have at it. They're doing such a great job of policing everyone. But anyway, that's an aside. But normally there's some kind of consequence, right? So there's the difference between being responsible for your life, which is an empowering conversation versus it's your fault when you're bad and you're wrong. That's a disempowering conversation. So for you, hopefully the shift you're seeing is like, okay, you can maintain an accountability for your actions if I take this glass of water and I accidentally knock it like and it spills like responsibility would be like go and get some paper towel or clean it up. But a lot of people are like, oh my God, I'm such an idiot. Like, I'm so sorry and like there's this over melodrama about which is really a reflection not of the fact that you're just not a glass over and some border like no one died. But what it did reveal is that that person's identity is probably around the child that was reprimanded a law when they did something wrong. They feel shame. They feel guilt. And any time they now do something they categorize is wrong. They go straight into that little child of I'm bad and I'm in trouble. Whereas people are like, oh, dude, don't even worry about it. If I had that response, I wouldn't even be connected to you in the moment of reality. So that's where again, like it's saying most people aren't in relationship with life or other people. They're in a relationship with their own conditioning. So my quote is, I have an intimate relationship with reality. I deal with what's happening and sometimes what's happening warrants like some serious action. Like someone gets really hurt or in their account. It's not like, ah, don't worry about it. No, it's like let's get an ambulance if you've got like you've broken your family. All my blood, but now that they're like thigh and it's like, yeah, it's fine, like overreacting. Like, what happened in your childhood? It's like just being appropriate to what's called for. You know, use the analogy of if you take a brick. And you throw it into the ocean. The laws of physics are beautiful, right? So depending on the size of the break, the weight of the brick and the speed with which you throw it in, there's going to be like a splash in a sound that is totally appropriate to the physics of the size weight and speed of the brick. If we were able to pick up like a skyscraper and throw that in the ocean, then again, obviously bigger size bigger weight and depending on the height a lot of speed, the size however of the splash in the sound from the ocean is still appropriate to the skyscraper. No exaggeration. It's not like the ocean's like, dude, you freaking kill him. This is insane. It's just the splash appropriate. But most people in life get thrown bricks, but they react like it's a skyscraper. So if you can understand that Delta, the differential, then you can really eradicate a lot of suffering from a life and go, wow, my appropriately responding to the situation at hand or my reacting based on past trauma and stuff that I've yet to heal. So with the trauma itself, it can feel insidious where you don't necessarily know where it shows up in reveals itself. For me, I know that, like I mentioned earlier, my romantic relationships seem to have been the place in which it was most apparent. Because as you're growing up, maybe some teenagers do dedicate themselves to self reflection, but I did not. I was just kind of finding my way and it wasn't until I got into a more serious relationship. It enabled me to confront some of these traumas that I didn't know existed until I was in the container of the relationship. Yeah. So I suppose my question is, how can we become more vigilant at shining a light or discovering them or is it more about having an attitude of it happened and having some kind of peace with it? What side of the spectrum, I think that kind of question is a little bit like, you know, the length of a piece of string, like it's like, I think like I would appeal people to have patience and compassion again with others in the south, meaning, okay, you might not have self reflected as a teenager and I think that's again a little bit of you being hard on yourself like you were supposed. I don't know any teenager that self reflecting. Teenagers are smoking weed and breaking shit and throwing toilet paper over people's homes and back in cars into brick walls. You know, like that's what we do as teenagers. So I think you can give yourself a little bit of space there, but I think it's understanding the arc of a human being's life is that everybody's going to face whatever they need to face at the appropriate time, not before not like too late. So what might seem self evident to me with all the work that I've done? Like, if I were to impose my journey onto somebody else relative to education, that resources are age. There's, again, that sort of energy of audacity and inappropriate expectation versus if I look at every individual as they're on their own journey, like then as space to allow them to go through whatever they have to go through when they have to go through it. And let's be honest, like, as hard as it is to recognize, most people, many people at sadly, go through the entire lifetime without looking at trauma. And that's a hard thing to like really recognize. They don't want to or they don't have the means or the wherewithal or the confidence or the help to look at what happened in their childhood. Now they may dabble with some therapy, but for the most part, it tends to be self medicated, therapy, you know, whether it's food, alcohols, description drugs, street drugs, whatever it might be. That's their form of coping. And it's difficult to look at some of these things that were really like painful, hurtful, scary for a child, which is invariably most children. So it takes a big being and then we can get into a deeper part of conversation about how many lifetimes have they come around. You know, like if it's a young soul, then forget about it. They're like, no, no, I just need to make more money. I need to get a 6 pack a bigger home and a better looking partner and then I'm fine. There's nothing to look at aside from that. And then you work or I work with fortunate people who tend to be saturated in the material world and they're still unhappy anxious or depressed and they're like, okay, we got nowhere else to look because I fulfilled on all the things that I thought would bring me happiness. And so that's often the case. Is there has to be a certain degree of some kind of accomplishment in our lives, like we don't have to be multi millionaires or anything, but it's like, okay, I'm doing okay. And I feel like for some reason I'm going through the motions and not really getting along with my spouse, my kids don't really pay attention to me. I feel like disrespected or you know there's now you start to look at these more subtle energies. So I think there's patience with self and other that you're going to look at your stuff when you're ready. You know, it's like you could look at a rosebush and go, well, what the hell? Why is it not blooming? It's like, well, it's.

LA
"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

06:52 min | 7 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

"Working on having more compassion for myself. Great. I'm just one little note there because it might help you with that part too about helping yourself is when you said you're getting good or better with your partner in terms of what she's trying to communicate to me was the word you use if you listen back. I want you to kind of just this will be powerful. Don't think about it what she's trying to communicate to me, what she's trying to communicate. Period. But you said it's different. Because like for a guy, it's like, what's she trying to communicate to me? You're still involved in the process. There's still the eye, right? The you that has to do something where you're trying to get it right. And I love I just love your dedication to your partnership to being a better man to being a great influencer in terms of your inspiration, your work, right? But I want you to think about it in the absence of you. If there's no you, if there's just the container of love and patience. So it's not what is she trying to communicate to me. It's what is she trying to communicate? And can you hear the difference? Subtle the powerful, right? Because then there's no you. Like now you're in her world and that's the greatest gift you can give another human being is to get their reality, not like, how does that reality relate to me? Or you're still there. But which I know for a lot of people this might sound weird, but for those who are ready to hear it, it's very profound, right? Like in the absence of me, I'm just with their reality. And that's love. As far as I'm concerned. So whatever she's trying to communicate, whether it's sensical or not, to you, it might be like, this is like this chick's crazy, whether it's your partner or somebody else. No, they're just saying something. So what are they trying to communicate, period? Not that they're trying to communicate. How does that affect me? What do I think about that? What are they trying to tell me? You in a relationship with yourself. So now if we can extrapolate that, it becomes a little slippier and like more subtle, but what I'm trying to communicate, right? So then you learn the art of listening, which I would assign my real superpower when I'm working with people is that I hold a space of pure listening. I get their reality. I'm not like Peter Crone trying to do something to fix their life because I know from my perspective there's nothing wrong. They just have a story that's in the way of me wanting them to see that there's nothing wrong. So I just listened to the story and then very carefully and with love and patience I can help them see that their story is in fact fictitious. It feels real, but it's not. And then when they're left when that's dissipated, they're left with nothing but freedom, which is my main product, or at least a sense of peace and relief. So with yourself, the harshness or the inability to listen from a compassionate place, ironically is part of your the part of you that's asking to be heard, right? Meaning, that's part of the same faculty that's based in inadequacy. So you do something and then the part of you that's not happy with that berates you for it, right? Like I'm guessing, right? I said this is sort of perfectionist bent in there, which is part of the same mechanism. So it's self sustaining. So versus look at, okay, well, you did what you did, and in this case, we're all human so you made a mistake. You didn't do as well as you could. You made a bad choice. I bought a stock and I lost money. In my case, I was like, oh, okay, that was stupid. You know, it's like, no, it's just what I did. And my humanity because I'm not a wizard and I can't see the future. I did what I did, and I made a choice at the time with the amount of awareness that I had. And when you really get that, there's nothing but like love and compassion for ourselves too, because you can only make choices at every stage in your life within the level of awareness you have at that time. So to in hindsight, go back and say, I should have is just a completely nonsensical perspective. Because who you are today, even if it's 24 hours later, certainly if it's three years later, which is where a lot of people break themselves, things they did in their high school and they call it. It's like, but you're like ten years more experienced than the person you're berating who did what they did that was appropriate for a 19 year old. When I was 15, I backed my dad's car out of the garage because he'd started to teach me how to drive and is excited. And I was like, oh, I want to try it. There's a little dark. It was kind of dark and, you know, I knocked the whole garden wall down. Now, I love my dad so much, you know? So I would have never wanted to do anything to upset him. I certainly would never have wanted to do anything that was that catastrophic. It wasn't even a fence that was wood. It was brick, like it was impressive, right? But for 15 year old, curious and excited to learn. That was an appropriate action. And I'm not saying that there aren't consequences. I had to remove the lawn and wash the cars and do whatever to earn money to build it back and I think I even had to lay the bricks. And whatever I had to do to learn accountability. But there's no judgment. There's no shame in that world. There's just like profound acceptance that we're all doing the best we can at every stage of our life. I love that. I love the way that you can put things as it just helps me understand myself in so many more ways than I ever could. I feel like in a vacuum, I can't see myself just in a way I'm thinking or behaving, which I feel like has been an issue or I don't even want to say an issue because I'm trying to not just say that there's a problem. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I'm just saying that it's a theme. It is a theme of mine. And for me, it can come with shame or this should have kind of energy that creates judgment or how do you have the accountability of acknowledging how you showed up without having the judgment attached to it. Beautiful question. Yeah, wow. So to me, that's really when you understand true responsibility. There's a very big difference between folds and responsibility. You're still a little bit, it's softening now as we speak in the world of fault. You look at it's my fault, what I did. Now you might not be using the word fault, but like judgment, self criticism, self berating. These rule in the realm of fault. The shoulds and shouldn't. I shouldn't have done that. I should have done this. That and Snell, I critique of a behavior, the first of all is redundant, because the behavior's already happened. You can't change your history. You can only at best learn from it, right? And be accountable. Like if you did something like I knocked the wall down in my case, it's not that I shouldn't have done that or shoot it on, so it's what happened and now I'm gonna clean it up. Literally and figuratively. So for you, understanding the difference between being responsible for your life versus having guilt and shame for your life. Subtle, but so profound because that makes space for your humanity. And there are consequences. People do some dumb shit in the world, right? And.

Peter Crone Snell
"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

07:32 min | 7 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

"Chemical shit storm has just happened. And so we want to hold and rear reassure and say it's okay come here. Once the tequila is left the system is left the building. Then we can go more into the paternal, the male instinct, which is like, so what was it about? What they said that upset you. So then it gets more into the analytical. So when you're in it, you're in it. Your dukes are up and you're ready to go to protect yourself potentially. And there's no like sitting down and having a rational mature conversation. It's like you get out, just run or fight or whatever you go to do. So compassion, sympathy, understanding empathy all of those are beautiful spaces to hold somebody when they're upset. Like, you know, girlfriends do this great for each other, like they are honey, I'm so sorry that's awful. You've just had such a bad day. Whereas the guys like, well, why didn't you just leave earlier? Whatever the pro is like, no, they're upset, you're not getting it. So both have their place, but men particularly tend to jump in with the male stereotypical response, which is a solution based on it. Yeah, versus just I get it. No, that really, that sucks. That's really awful. Like I'm sorry you're feeling that way. And hold a space of love and compassion. Then, once the chemicals have sort of left the bloodstream and there can be a little bit more maturity in someone's ready to look at things that were before discomforting or uncomfortable or difficult or challenging or upsetting. Then you go, okay, yeah, no. It's just every time somebody says that I always feel like I'm an idiot. You know, like now you go, oh, okay, and where did that start? Now you can get into the analysis of it so that the next time they face the same external trigger, they don't have the same reaction. At least it's minimized. For someone that has maybe, would you say that holding space or being compassionate towards oneself is a skill that is inherited or witnessed and adopted or can you because I feel like in my personal experience growing up and I'm not trying to put blame on anybody no family or caretakers or anything like that. I didn't necessarily acquire the skills of holding space. And maybe it was in a sense of survival, most of the time, so I didn't allow me the safety to feel to be able to give that to somebody else. And as I've gotten older, I've recognized that that was a quality of mine that I wanted to improve. And there was no better container for that than a romantic relationship for me. And I was the exact prototypical guy that you just mentioned. I'm very analytical. I lived in my logical brain. So anytime a girlfriend was telling me about her emotions, I'm just like, we'll just feel better. Get over it. A sense of a sense of disconnect from the ability to have empathy for someone else. For anybody that may be resonating with that or wanting to improve their empathetic skills or a capacity, what would you say to that? I think it's a beautiful point and really wonderfully articulated challenge of people have. And I think the easiest way as an access to getting that quickly is to always envisage the two or three year old version of whoever it is that's struggling. And parents do this automatically, like and when I give them that sort of construct to work from, they're like, oh yeah, well, if that was my daughter, I mean, so it's just when we look at an adult, we were under the assumption that they should know better because we're 20 or 50 or 80. Like, you know, you're a man, you're a woman. And that may be true biologically and based on appearance, but most people's emotional age really without judgment struggles to get beyond 5 or 6 years old. Which is, you know, it's kind of comical, but that's why as a species we're really doing a lousy job. You know, like we harm each other, we harm ourselves, we harm the planet, like, you know, it's like a toddler doesn't know what the hell they're doing and they're just breaking shit. Yeah, we think we're all there and we can fly spaceships and blah, blah, blah, right? But emotionally, we got a lot of room for improvement. So when you understand that, go, wow, everybody is really just having a tantrum like when they're upset. It's just a child having a tantrum. Now, that's not to say there isn't a place for like some discipline or some guidelines to help corral somebody. You don't want a kid just like running around and you know as an adult like breaking shit and shooting people like that's another. Yeah, so there's a way to protect other people from somebody's tantrum. But if you just look at it emotionally from that perspective and go, okay, there really acting out like a child who didn't get the ice cream that they wanted. I remember as an Aubrey Marcus podcast, you know, I'm sure you know Aubrey has a dear friend and he was describing something he'd gone through with Milana his wife at the time and they had had this argument they weren't talking to each other for hours. And like I said, I said, yeah, so you're both just sulking. You'd have to turn off so hard. 'cause it just was like, yeah, that's it. We were just being kids. Like, and he's like, you know, grown man. He's a real man, you know? But really emotionally, he was being a child. And so I think this is part of my work with people as helping them to go through this arc of a human being's life, which is, hopefully, integrate a wisdom, greater maturity, and to really stop being a child and to truly become a mature conscious adult. So to start with to go back to your question, how can I help people is to recognize, look at yourself and others through the lens of a parent looking at a child who's upset. And that immediately will elicit a greater sense of patience and compassion. Because if it's a child, it's upset, you understand there's an inherent empathy because it's a child and they're frustrated. They don't know how to express themselves, they don't have the coordination, and that's why they drop the glass or they don't have money and so they can't buy their own toy that they won't that you won't give them. You know, it's like there's a band width there of like patience and we don't afford each other adults that. And if you did, it would really change the dynamic by which people can really heal. In relationship, particularly like you said in romantic relationship is when most of this tends to come up, right? Because that's the beauty of getting your heart strong heartstrings attached is like you can't you can't just walk away. It's not like some guy at the grocery store just flipped you the bird and you're like whatever. If it's someone who's living and shares the fridge in the bathroom with you, it's like, okay, we gotta talk about something here because it keeps happening. So yeah, I love that. Definitely remember that next time. Not necessarily for my partner. I feel like I've come leaps and bounds from where I was being able to hold space for somebody and there's a process that I go through every time we have a conflict and making sure that I do my best, my absolute best to hold space first and foremost to try to understand what it is that she's trying to communicate to me. But it's mainly whenever I have judgment for myself is where I find it difficult to hold space or see myself as a hurt child. Yeah, yeah. So I feel like maybe the partnership is improving, but still I'm actively.

Aubrey Marcus Milana Aubrey
"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

08:22 min | 7 months ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Generation V

"Lot. Yes. No wonder I'm so busy. Beer, man. I'm so excited to have you on. First of all, thanks for coming down. Thanks for saying yes to being on the show. No, I do. I love you and I it's a pleasure to be with you and I have been a big fan of everything that you represent out there in the world. And I think you're an inspiration for so many. And so if I can contribute in some way to you to your audience, then that to me is a life worth fulfilling. Well, I have no doubt that anyone who is listening to this episode is going to receive a lot of insight from you and hopefully some brand new perspectives that they will be able to take forward into their life moving forward. I know that we met at your house for the very first time through Andre, who helps me produce this show. And it was for a dinner discussion, kind of like a round table event where it was like me and you and a few others blue, I believe it was there. Cool cats. Logan was there. Logan was there. Silly. Seeley, yeah, of course he was there. Yeah. It feels like a game show. We're on already. Can I call a friend? Yeah, it was a Andre curated like the whole gathering, and he's done it. Subsequently a couple of times and just really beautiful people, but we'd never met. And I certainly felt an affinity to straightaway, so I'm glad that we stayed in touch and I'm here today on your show. The first time I heard you speak, I was like, who is this guy? I don't know what he's about or what he does, but I just want to be his friend. I remember coming up to you afterwards. I was like, hey man, I just love to stay connected with you. I feel like we could get along and develop a friendship in here we are a few years later. Yeah, thank you. It was an interesting evening and I definitely feel like there was a lot of powerful sharing from everybody, but I do remember being in one of those zones where I forgot the topics that we were discussing, but I certainly felt like I was dropping some insights for people to better relate to. And I remember in that conversation, I think I was so moved by what you had to say. And I don't remember the content of what you shared, but I remember how it made me feel and I just thought to myself, this guy is changing lives. Like I had some pretty powerful perspective shifts in that one dinner and I told you I said, feel free my platform is more platform. So any type of content that you want to share, I know that it would create ripples into the world. So I was happy to extend that to you. I remember that and being very moved by your generosity like that because at the time I was pretty new to the Instagram waves and I think I'd had an account for like maybe three months or something and had all of my 5000 followers, I don't know what it was. But it just meant the world to me that there was that kind of group of men particularly but you know women as well that were just so open to supporting one another, which I feel can sometimes be absent in the world. And you did share, which meant a lot to me that you also followed through. So I think you and I correct me if I'm wrong, but I always feel like giving is you always end up receiving just as much if not more if you make it a point to help people whether it is through your platform or whatever service you have to offer, even if it's just paying them a compliment. I always try to leave the people that I meet or come in contact with feeling better in some way shape and form. And I think that you also have that gift. Yeah, thank you. I say, you know, the gift of giving is in giving itself, you know? So, like, if you really get that, it's very simple what I just said, but it's also profound, right? Because like we often associate giving as though the recipient is the beneficiary. But to me, it's quite the contrary. It's not to say that there isn't some reward or payoff for them on the other side, whatever it is, it could be a wilted flower that a kids give someone that's touching or it could be someone buying someone a brand new Rolls Royce. I don't care. But the knowing that we have the capacity to contribute and make a difference, hence the act of giving, is itself a form of self evaluation and validation, like where I'm recognizing my own worth in my capacity to make a difference. And people don't, they miss that. And certainly, I think there's a lot of people who struggle with receiving because they have these deep seated programs of inadequacy or feeling like they're not enough. And so that becomes of an impediment to receiving, because who am I? The subconscious narrative of who am I to receive something, whether it's as basic as a compliment that people will deflect or be an opportunity that people dismiss, but they miss the benefit of receiving is it's dual. It's not just like you allow the person to contribute, but you allow the person to feel the benefit of contributing. So everybody can relate to the fact that when you give something to somebody, you feel good about it. Like I made a difference, whether it's just kind word someone struggling right now, especially in the world. And you made them feel better. You dropped by, you bought them some soup because they're sick. Whatever it is, you feel good by virtue of the fact that you made a difference. And people sometimes neglect to remember that when they're receiving they're also affording the person who's giving them something that same experience. So you know, to just maybe take a beat before you automatically because it tends to be automatic like dismiss or deflect something and go wait a minute. Am I denial of somebody trying to contribute to me? I'm actually equally robbing them of the capacity to feel good about the fact that they just made a difference in my life. Wow. That's so powerful because I can relate to that to be honest. I mean, growing up and receiving praise just always felt uncomfortable. I was an overachiever, so I would receive praise. And I was gifted athletically, so I would always excel in whatever it was that I was putting my attention to. But I never felt comfortable receiving awards, receiving recognition, receiving praise, and I immediately would deflect it. And part of it, I feel is a false sense of humility. It can come across as being humble, but in reality, it's almost a feeling of unworthiness or maybe even what's the word impostor. Exactly. So can you speak on that? Yeah, I mean, knowing you as I do, like, you know, a sweet soul, very sensitive as a man, like beautiful qualities that I feel like we need more of in the world, but I can also see that a deeper level, and there could be that sort of self doubt. The feeling of not enoughness, so we could also say that you are overachieving was a coping mechanism. So the person that becomes the people pleaser or the perfectionist or an overachiever, oftentimes that's an adaptation to the feeling of a deeper sense of inadequacy. So it's the way that we compensate. So if it is compensatory, then what happens is when you receive the acknowledgment for the due performance, it's still hits the part of you that was the driving mechanism for the performance, which is the part of you that doesn't feel enough. So that's where the dismissal happens. So the discomfort that you feel, then this is, again, maybe a powerful insight for you to receive, but you're not feeling discomforted by the fact that you're getting an accolade or a compliment. You're feeling discomfited by the fact that it's triggering your own sense of inadequacy. So if you just get that, that's like a powerful chef, right? So because we think we got hurt by what someone said or in your case, you felt like you felt discomfited by what someone said, no, somebody just said something. Whether it be offensive, demeaning, or in your case, like complimentary. But what it reveals is where are we stock in some story about ourselves? So if somebody gets triggered by someone being critical of them, then it might look like, well, they're being dick or they're being harsh. We'll know they're just saying something. They're literally taking hot air using their vocal cords making a sound, and if it was in an alternate language you wouldn't know what they're saying. So right there, there's further evidence is not because they're blowing hot air at you with a certain vibration. It's that it's triggering some part of it that's unreconciled in the way that you view yourself. So if it's a criticism, it can only impact you to the degree to which you already currently.

Andre Logan Seeley dick
ASP's Favorite Things

Advanced Selling Podcast

09:47 min | 1 year ago

ASP's Favorite Things

"This is the advanced selling. Podcast list of tools gear people and things you need to be following things you need to have in the bag so analysts tools that we recommend people that we follow books that we read or listen to anything else. This is going to be a quick rapid. Here's they are not a lot of depth into them but you can go research them on your own but we get asked all the time. So what books do you read. What podcast you listen to what tools you use. Well we're going to tell you that in this episode. That's what we're going to do. So it's gonna be like a list big list and then you can go check them out and hopefully someone's gov a great tool. Thank you for telling me that. So these are in no order than no order. I've got him in order. Yes you want to put them in order now. That'll that'll take agree. So because i've got some. I've got some tools. Some software some gear some gear stuff than calling people. I follow so also kinda start. You bet software app that everybody needs to have on their chrome as an extension as crystal knows c. r. y. s. T. a. l. k. w. ws s. Crystal knows it's a preparation tool for any conversation. You have with someone. It essentially looks at their lincoln profile. Organizes there that information at finds into a disc profile which is a really easy to understand personality profile better than that though. It teaches you how to talk to them. That has a conversation coach. Based on what. I'm going to be talking to the person about and the modality that i'm gonna use to talk to them so basically says i need to email bill to make a good first impression and it gives you a little sound bytes based on bills linked in profile. And it's amazing. Everybody should use crystal nose. Crm s keynote abuse by the way none of these people were affiliated with right right. There's no need advertiser huge talked about talked about four and it's good good My first one is rev dot com read on com. Rav a dictation service Let's imagine you leave a meeting and you want to dictate A follow up email. You will describe your phone. Open up the revs. Aft- dictated now. You can do the same thing with siri but ravitch's really reliable Person on the. There's a human being you're actually dictates. Transcribes it if it's longer form it's probably better like if you wanted to Dictate an article or you think. There's a really good idea for an article you can dictate. Let them do it. And then come back and modify edited. But i think it's a great time saver it's about a buck and a quarter a minute so it's pretty reasonable. Chances are you're not going to have really long things you're going to be doing in there. But dot com is one of my favorite tools. Love it my next one. That i doubt a lot. Same deal no affiliation whatsoever. Huge fan of gong dot com. Many of you have heard of that. Were power users here at our firm and it is such a useful tool for coaching and for self evaluation of Sales conversation and you get data back from gung dot com. That talks about things you should and shouldn't do in the sales process. All based on data and artificial intelligence is fantastic. Gung dot com Recommend any sales leader listening to this to go check them out against affiliation with podcast so de fan big fan Might second one is A twenty dollar tripod. That i cannot all in on We're going to start doing some youtube shorts. I don't know if you're familiar with youtube shorts but They're all vertical. You see them on the shelf underneath your main youtube feed. So if you're on your mobile you'll start to see these. You're kind of wondering what they are. They're called shorts and they're less than a minute and but they have to be vertical. So you can do a short for youtube and also repurpose it on instagram. Or or one of the other verticals sites. But you need. You need a tripod. if you're going to do any kind of stuff like that. I think the days of holding it for certain things but if you're going to produce something that you want hundreds of thousands of people to see i think you need some kind of stable base for your found Tripods are easy amazing. How many how few people have them. Twenty dollar version is not a floor. Length just sits on your desk and it's really makes a real easy to record. I love twenty bucks on amazon twenty bucks amazon bills amazon link kidding okay. Here's i'm gonna go to people follow. I've got three people. One of them's kind of one of them comes as a package deal. I guys get him. David meltzer david meltzer. We've had David on the podcast Was a big time big time. Sports agent Unfortunately lost a an enormous amount of money and that incident actually changed his life the he would say for the better and he is one of the most giving talented Gracious humble smart intelligent coaches. You could follow if you don't follow david meltzer's shame on you. You'll find him anywhere online on instagram. He does free. Coaching sessions every friday every friday. He's doing something and just a really really great Human being everyone who listens to this show should follow david meltzer. Also i've never been on one of his Friday morning calls if you have i have. Yeah they're just they're just outstanding just outstanding he's so giving and he doesn't for free and they're usually maxed out because people love what he says to do. He just great fan. That's good. I've got one to follow here. His name is peter crone. Cro n e. You know peter. I don't yeah. I didn't either until i saw him on Saw him interviewed by aubrey. Marcus who owns on it. He founded the company called on its online and nutrition company but aubrey has a podcast. And it's one of those things you like. I don't ever heard of peter cronin. I'm not gonna listen to that. I'm gonna go with some. i thought. Well what the hell. Maybe i'll learn something and this guy is really good. He's a performance coach. Lives in england. just look up anything he does because he talks about the mindset and the mentalities at a whole different level than you and i are talking about him but i think you'll like him. Peter crown zero. Lots of lots podcast. That's the best thing about doing this drills get to learn all this stuff to see. Yeah i'm making a lot of notes. Bill my hand on my whiteboard over k next to follow for me as a married couple Very very successful married couple in great just human beings. My opinion jesse. It's ler and sara blakely sara blakely founded spanks. Oh yeah one of the most successful self made women in the world and jesse it's ler is also self made is in a He has a a thing called life. Resumes all about experiences. He's an ultra marathoner and those two together are comedic dual like no other. And they're they've got four little kids if you don't follow them on instagram. You need to follow both of them. They're just hilarious. They put out great content. Very inspiring people talk about them being like a billionaire couple. That seems just absolutely normal and down to earth. Because i think they are jesse it's slur. It and sara blakely follow them. Didn't jesse it's ler do some kind of a like a training challenge or something. He did went on. He does a cold plunge challenge. He's gone back. Hof is a guy on wim hof place for a cold you know. He's got to go plug lunch exactly but he does it. Lots of things around performance great. Yeah he just did a fifteen minute fifteen incline fifteen minute challenge put your treadmill at fifteen incline and run for fifteen minutes and see how far you can get. Wow at like last week while it's crazy. Yeah so yeah. I've heard of him. I don't follow him. that's good. that's good let's see Here's a book. That i sound really good especially for sales professionals who are looking to build their brand their personal brand. And the guy's name is chris. Ducker the rise of the new twra. Noor line entrepreneur new partner. It's been out for a couple of years. Might have heard of it. But chris i follow. Chris have been do a little bit of coaching with him. And he's really. His book is really good when it comes to building your personal brand Not like you're not like being a enter an instagram influence or in your in your brand in your business that you're in how do you portray yourself. How do you talk about yourself. It's really good. It's really good and it. It'll stretch you thomas. The book will stretch you. It's called the rise of the poor. Chris tucker. I would recommend that book. The book i'm going to recommend is a great life book but it will transfer into your sales life and one of my favorite books. I listen to this book. Called the book of joy and it's an interview with the dalai lama am bishop desmond. Tutu diamond desmond tutu. And they are both very very joyful people and have had lots of pain in their lives and they're interviewed by a reporter. Who just as a brilliant job. Just pulling out their life stories together intertwining it. And they talk about the difference between happiness and joy and fulfillment and It's a really really good heart opening a book. I found that will absolutely have you show up differently in sales life. The book of joy with desmond tutu the dalai

David Meltzer Sara Blakely Youtube Amazon Ravitch Jesse Peter Crone Siri Aubrey Peter Cronin Peter Crown Lincoln Crystal Instagram Spanks Marcus Ducker David
True Healing and Freedom Begins with Acceptance

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:15 min | 2 years ago

True Healing and Freedom Begins with Acceptance

"We are so afraid of our fears. I mean I think it's one of the main problems in society. Everyone is afraid of their fears, and we're afraid of pain. And so, what do we do? We lock it away. We trapped inside of us, and of course as you've talked about on the podcast dot actually becomes. Sickness, highway, one droop wrote here the number one thing holding us back in our life is our own limited narrative. We literally become confined by the thoughts we think, and the words we tell ourselves these deep seated constraints of our subconscious lead to self. Sabotage inhibited performance. Procrastination failed relationships, disease, and so much more in this mini episode that we're presenting here for you today on the Brooklyn podcast I speak. Speak with in q Peter Crone and Diego Perez on how our perceptions are self, limiting beliefs shape our reality, and how to find freedom and acceptance in our lives how we can break through. Let's listen in starting with my interview with my good friend in Q. and award, award-winning poet and multi-platinum Songwriter, we discuss why first and foremost were so afraid of our fear. We are so afraid of our fears. I mean I think it's one of the main problems in society. Everyone is afraid of their fears, and we're afraid of pain. And so, what do we do? We lock it away. We trapped inside of us and of course as you've talked about on the podcast that actually becomes. A sickness in many ways it can become something that transforms to your body yelling at you that you're not doing something right? You're not actually like releasing these things so I think it's not about ignoring or distracting yourself from these negative things about. Ing Them. And alchemy is about unconditional love. So. It's about looking those you know sides of yourself that you think are shadow sides in the face with courage, and and actually not arguing against them, but like accepting them and loving them and integrating them, and then in the integration you have the Alchemy, and not operating from that place that you perceive as negative, not creating more of that, but you know welcoming that into your life rather than pushing it away because who I am is directly based on everything that I experienced. Can't pick and choose you know I can't say oh. These are the good things, and these are the things that I want people to see I mean it's all a part of who I am. Humans are story creating machines nowhere. Is this more evident than our desire for things to be different? They're such a strong tendency for us to believe that things could be different or that they should be different. This creates resistance to life that has us quite literally fighting against reality, which is a losing battle. My good friend Peter Crone, who was? On episode fifty five of the broken brain podcasts he's a writer speaker and thought leader and human potential. He says things are the way they are, but only always I love that quote. Let's listen in as he talks to us about why the first step and healing is acceptance and not fighting reality I've heard you say that. The first step in healing is acceptance yeah. Tell us more about that. So the antithesis of that would be resistance. Right to go back to like you said well. Why do we have these limitations? And my as I said is that we arrive with these sort of preinstalled constraints and the game is okay. You're constrained. You believe you're somehow inadequate to something wrong with you and life will present people in circumstances into your into your life until such time that you see where you're not free in new. Reconcile it right so. Acceptance like true profound acceptance embraces all of it right so even if I have a belief of inadequacy, even if I'm sad, even if I'm angry. We want to see the absence of resistance to that. That is like flow state. Cool it flow state like where I'm no longer. The. The antagonised in my own life things the way they are I'm not fighting

Peter Crone Brooklyn Diego Perez
"peter crone" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

10:33 min | 2 years ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"They're all over their body. Like what are the chat. Someone just believes right like oh I believe I'm going to get better. I mean is there at some point. Eight like reality. That says you know what this is like. It's too far down the road right like it's no matter how much you believe and you hope that there are some times like you kind of pass you in your past the point. Yeah and it's definitely easy to do that. 'cause it's terrifying if you're in that state right so the the examples that I give anyone that has cancer especially with the later stage I recommend reading radical remission and Anita More Janis book dying to be mean Anita was in the film she was as late stage wjr cancer. Is You get winning Tacoma. Her organs are shutting down she had lemon size tumors metastasized all throughout her body coming out of her skin from her neck to abdomen and and the doctors were basically like she's in a com- on there's no way she can recover from this. Say Your Goodbyes. In that coma she had a near death. Experience it's and had a shift in perception. It was see the film read. I know you're talking about the things that for people who are listening. I mean she realized allies her her big moment of a high. She's in this other realm is that she made her whole life she'd been making decisions from fear and in this other realm. She felt nothing. But the unconditional. Love that many people when they've gone to come back or whatever it is described this like you can't undescribable love you know. And that's our source. That's where we come from God that seven. That's whatever you WANNA call it. And so she realized she actually had a conversation with her dad the essence of her dad. Who is she had a very tumultuous relationship with in life and she realized that there was no judgment it was just unconditional love and and he told her? Go back and live your life without fear and you will heal hill. And she was like I don't want to go back to that life like that all I remember like i WanNa say here. This feels great and he said No. You're not done with your mission. So she went back into her body. She woke up she knew things. She had this awareness of things that she could not have known in a coma conversations. She recounted that happened forty feet down the hall. She just had this awareness so it it was all true. She shifted from fear to love and her body healed so in my belief. I feel like you can always come back from anything. She is embodies. How our bodies are designed to heal and we just need to find the right formula to allow them to recover and come back? But she's the most extreme case so I can come back from anything but it takes a massive shift in your consciousness. But how does that mean I saw that in the documentary and I was like blown away way. I mean like I have like this even real like houses possible because you know in my life. I know people who've had really just you know right now even People who are really sick and like they are so fighting. They're finding their lives to be alive. They are willing to try anything. And then they go round the world and they look for Shamans and they look for any type of healer and it doesn't work right. Would you say about those people who really like their mind is in the right place. Ace the are like in that space. They they believe and they and they really do have hope and it still doesn't work again. That's the question you're not gonNA. Yeah kind of talked about it in the film to like especially with children like we get like unprocessed trauma and these negative subconscious beliefs. This can lead to a woman in her fifties having cancer because she's just taking care of everybody else in Exeter self whatever but what about the children that come into the world sick nick or childhood leukemia. Whatever it is like that doesn't seem like it's from unprocessed trauma maybe past lives? I mean all of that is outside of my scope but you know and we talk about people who knows what people's destiny or fate or mission in this life is and also. It's so hard for people that love them. You know love someone going through something and they're not even open to thinking this way or someone that's doing everything right and still not working so I don't have of all the answer is no there is definitely exactly I mean we don't I don't expect you right. You're not God but I I find that's best. That's my like pessimism. Awesome ISM coming in like well. I I've seen it on both sides right. I've seen people who've had you know miraculous things like miraculous things happen with when they do believe even though they have that type of attitude and then I've seen also not such great things out you know but I think overall there is something to be said for are your how your mind and how you how these things the mind over matter really makes a difference with anything exactly and a lot of times. There's some uh even though they're like positive like behind closed doors they're still really angry at the cancer. There's still a major resistance. They're not in full acceptance and surrender. We talk about. I know I saw that. You talk about that a lie about how you have the resistance. So you're saying like or someone was. Who was the expert in the book? That was talking about the resistance. Peter Crone right young. Yeah and then about how that also is at Trentham But why why would if I mean God forbid when that happened would how do you just be like okay. I'm taking it you know what's I don't understand how the resistance place apart because isn't that also counter intuitive hip to the fact that you are fighting and you have hope and you don't want to believe it doesn't that make a difference it does and there's there's healthy resistance and then there's unhealthier there isn't students right it's healthy resistance if you're lifting weights and you WANNA get bigger muscles weights. That are too heavy for you or doing to many reps are not the right. What's it called form? It's going to be detrimental so resisting life this again. This is why healing for me is more of a spiritual conversation and this is something that Peter. The Guy who talks about in the film really believes that life is always working for us not to us not against us. Yes so we have to get to the play. If we're going through a hill and crisis especially gotta get to a place where we trust that God the universe whatever is working for us and for we're getting we're going through stuff. It's kind of an out chemical process. You gotTa go through the fire to get into your highest evolution of self right. You're So diseases part of that you know. And so at a certain point we have to stop spending are valuable energy fighting back against it And just surrender and go okay. What is the lesson? What does the blessing? What is this trying to teach me so that I can let that go so I can forgive that person so I can wake cup and treat myself better with self love and also working out and eating right and were beating ourselves up mentally and physically every day? Hey by eating shit and being stressed all the time and our bodies whatever it is so it's diseases a wake up call. It's life working for you and to stop you know one of the first steps is really you can feel sorry for yourself. You know. You don't WanNa stay there right you read this horrible diagnose this is you got but then you gotta go okay. Now I'm going to do. I have to accept what's going on so I'm not wasting valuable energy resisting and I have to face it head on and I gotTa keep doing my best every day except for how about fasting fasting for healing you. Do you believe in that. You think that by by fasting and helps with your healing process. I do digestion takes up so much energy every day in our body and I think especially in the United States are are way too big. We are eating workout. You're walking doing podcast five hours a day. You're getting dot really really early. But there's a whole other podcasts. For most people were digestion. Takes away all our energy for that. We should be using to to repair so like I digestion your food and then if there's food to digest then your body's like as long as you're not stressed your body's like okay. What can I go through? They go through everything to see what tissues need repairing hiring and restoring and all that stuff our bodies trying to heal and every moment and we get in the way with by too much food or stress or toxins and overload. Okay so fasting every mammal in nature. When they're sick they've they find a quiet little shaded safe area and they don't eat? They let their body body. They may eat some grasses to throw up to get rid of any parents or whatever but if they got become wounded or they're sick they fast because their body speeds are healing is their body is able to repair because it's not using on the energy to digest so there is some research in the book from Kelly Turner. Who did all this research on cancer? I thought yeah. It's counterintuitive right. And I think that. especially if you're going to chemo. And your withering away like you're like on my God that woman needs to eat. We need to get calories. Whatever a lot of western institutions don't care about what kind of your eating they give you? MLM's and Chitty Hamburgers Burgers. And I. I know it's unbelievable. It's like double detriment on her body so there there's these clinics where you go and they prove that fasting under supervision and with you know I don't know the exact protocol for everybody with cancer but it actually speeds along on healing and shrinking tumors and all of that. I saw that and I was. I was actually blown away because I know that people when people are sick they. That's what they do. They give them ensure boost and all sorts of garbage that like but I always thought eating well but still eating so when I saw that whole thing about fasting Ding for cancer I was I was really surprised and that you can't do it under supervised environment I would say. Just be conscious and aware that but when you're eating heavy meats and stuff that needs to be broken down take more energy to break down your body's taking away resources that it could be using to heal so if if you are if you're needing to propellers vegetables raw raw fruits and vegetables making sure you don't have any other digestive issues counter exactly go to but Juices things that are easy for your body to digest but.

cancer coma Peter Crone Tacoma Anita Chitty Hamburgers Burgers United States Kelly Turner chemo Exeter leukemia
"peter crone" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

10:33 min | 2 years ago

"peter crone" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"They're all over their body. Like what are the chat. Someone just believes right like oh I believe I'm going to get better. I mean is there at some point. Eight like reality. That says you know what this is like. It's too far down the road right like it's no matter how much you believe and you hope that there are some times like you kind of pass you in your past the point. Yeah and it's definitely easy to do that. 'cause it's terrifying if you're in that state right so the the examples that I give anyone that has cancer especially with the later stage I recommend reading radical remission and Anita More Janis book dying to be mean Anita was in the film she was as late stage wjr cancer. Is You get winning Tacoma. Her organs are shutting down she had lemon size tumors metastasized all throughout her body coming out of her skin from her neck to abdomen and and the doctors were basically like she's in a com- on there's no way she can recover from this. Say Your Goodbyes. In that coma she had a near death. Experience it's and had a shift in perception. It was see the film read. I know you're talking about the things that for people who are listening. I mean. She realized lies her her big moment of a high. She's in this other realm is that she made her whole life she'd been making decisions from fear and in this other realm. She felt nothing. But the unconditional. Love that many people when they've gone to come back or whatever it is described this like you can't undescribable love you know. And that's our source. That's where we come from God that seven. That's whatever you WANNA call it. And so she realized she actually had a conversation with her dad the essence of her dad. Who is she had a very tumultuous relationship with in life and she realized that there was no judgment it was just unconditional love and and he told her? Go back and live your life without fear and you will heal hill. And she was like I don't want to go back to that life like that all I remember like i WanNa say here. This feels great and he said No. You're not done with your mission. So she went back into her body. She woke up she knew things. She had this awareness of things that she could not have known in a coma conversations. She recounted that happened forty feet down the hall. She just had this awareness so it it was all true. She shifted from fear to love and her body healed so in my belief. I feel like you can always come back from anything. She is embodies. How our bodies are designed to heal and we just need to find the right formula to allow them to recover and come back? But she's the most extreme case so I can come back from anything but it takes a massive shift in your consciousness. But how does that mean I saw that in. The documentary was like blown away way. I mean like I have like this even real like houses possible because you know in my life. I know people who've had really just you know right now even People who are really sick and like they are so fighting. They're finding their lives to be alive. They are willing to try anything. And then they go round the world and they look for Shamans and they look for any type of healer and it doesn't work right. Would you say about those people who really like their mind is in the right place. Ace the are like in that space. They they believe and they and they really do have hope and it still doesn't work again. That's the question you're not gonNA. Yeah kind of talked about it in the film to like especially with children like we get like unprocessed trauma and these negative subconscious beliefs. This can lead to a woman in her fifties having cancer because she's just taking care of everybody else in Exeter self whatever but what about the children that come into the world sick nick or childhood leukemia. Whatever it is like that doesn't seem like it's from unprocessed trauma maybe past lives? I mean all of that is outside of my scope but you know and we talk about people who knows what people's destiny or fate or mission in this life is and also. It's so hard for people that love them. You know love someone going through something and they're not even open to thinking this way or someone that's doing everything right and still not working so I don't have of all the answer is no there is definitely exactly I mean we don't I don't expect you right. You're not God but I I find that's best. That's my like pessimism. Awesome ISM coming in like well. I I've seen it on both sides right. I've seen people who've had you know miraculous things like miraculous things happen with when they do believe even though they have that type of attitude and then I've seen also not such great things out you know but I think overall there is something to be said for are your how your mind and how you how these things the mind over matter really makes a difference with anything exactly and a lot of times. There's some uh even though they're like positive like behind closed doors they're still really angry at the cancer. There's still a major resistance. They're not in full acceptance and surrender and we talk about. I know I saw that. You talk about that a lie about how you have the resistance. So you're saying like or someone was. Who was the expert in the book? That was talking about the resistance. Peter Crone right young. Yeah and then about how that also is at Trentham But why why would if I mean God forbid when that happened would how do you just be like okay. I'm taking it you know what's I don't understand how the resistance place apart because isn't that also counter intuitive hip to the fact that you are fighting and you have hope and you don't want to believe it doesn't that make a difference it does and there's there's healthy resistance and then there's unhealthier there isn't students right it's healthy resistance if you're lifting weights and you WANNA get bigger muscles weights. That are too heavy for you or doing to many reps are not the right. What's it called form? It's going to be detrimental so resisting life this again. This is why healing for me is more of a spiritual conversation and this is something that Peter. The Guy who talks about in the film really believes that life is always working for us not to us not against us. Yes so we have to get to the play. If we're going through a hill and crisis especially gotta get to a place where we trust that God the universe whatever is working for us and for we're getting we're going through stuff. It's kind of an out chemical process. You gotTa go through the fire to get into your highest evolution of self right. You're So diseases part of that you know. And so at a certain point we have to stop spending are valuable energy fighting back against it And just surrender and go okay. What is the lesson? What does the blessing? What is this trying to teach me so that I can let that go so I can forgive that person so I can wake cup and treat myself better with self love and also working out and eating right and were beating ourselves up mentally and physically every day? Hey by eating shit and being stressed all the time and our bodies whatever it is so it's diseases a wake up call. It's life working for you and to stop you know one of the first steps is really you can feel sorry for yourself. You know. You don't WanNa stay there right you read this horrible diagnose this is you got but then you gotta go okay. Now I'm going to do. I have to accept what's going on so I'm not wasting valuable energy resisting and I have to face it head on and I gotTa keep doing my best every day except for how about fasting fasting for healing you. Do you believe in that. You think that by by fasting and helps with your healing process. I do digestion takes up so much energy every day in our body and I think especially in the United States are are way too big. We are eating workout. You're walking doing podcast five hours a day. You're getting dot really really early. But there's a whole other podcasts. For most people were digestion. Takes away all our energy for that. We should be using to to repair so like I digestion your food and then if there's food to digest then your body's like as long as you're not stressed your body's like okay. What can I go through? They go through everything to see what tissues need repairing hiring and restoring and all that stuff our bodies trying to heal and every moment and we get in the way with by too much food or stress or toxins and overload. Okay so fasting every mammal in nature. When they're sick they've they find a quiet little shaded safe area and they don't eat? They let their body body. They may eat some grasses to throw up to get rid of any parents or whatever but if they got become wounded or they're sick they fast because their body speeds are healing is their body is able to repair because it's not using on the energy to digest so there is some research in the book from Kelly Turner. Who did all this research on cancer? I thought yeah. It's counterintuitive right. And I think that. especially if you're going to chemo. And your withering away like you're like on my God that woman needs to eat. We need to get calories. Whatever a lot of western institutions don't care about what kind of your eating they give you? MLM's and Chitty Hamburgers Burgers. And I. I know it's unbelievable. It's like double detriment on her body so there there's these clinics where you go and they prove that fasting under supervision and with you know I don't know the exact protocol for everybody with cancer but it actually speeds along on healing and shrinking tumors and all of that. I saw that and I was. I was actually blown away because I know that people when people are sick they. That's what they do. They give them ensure boost and all sorts of garbage that like but I always thought eating well but still eating so when I saw that whole thing about fasting Ding for cancer I was I was really surprised and that you can't do it under supervised environment I would say. Just be conscious and aware that but when you're eating heavy meats and stuff that needs to be broken down take more energy to break down your body's taking away resources that it could be using to heal so if if you are if you're needing to propellers vegetables raw raw fruits and vegetables making sure you don't have any other digestive issues counter exactly likely to juices things. That are easy for your body to digest.

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