18 Burst results for "Peter Cappelli"

"peter cappelli" Discussed on Snarf Talk

Snarf Talk

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on Snarf Talk

"Yeah the original stranger things basically anyway more news just one more thing i got on well you kinda too but i'll save it to what you're watching for. The second one so james guns make an suicide squad movie. I knew that did you know that in a while. We haven't but <hes> we've. We've talked about it before. We have oh okay. I thought i'd bring it up again because they cast another guy that we know idris elba. No no is he still cast was rumor. <hes> i think he was in. I think i thought it came out and then they change. Who did the cast peter cappelli no kidding. He was dr mr kepala in doctor who what's he going to be. I don't know they didn't really set they didn't release his character or anything they you just said james gunn cast peter cappelli in suicides. I'm in for james gunn anything yeah james anything. Peter cataldi was probably probably my least favorite actor. Oh really yeah i would say. I haven't seen the doctor. I haven't either so called the. I don't even know what her name is. I can't so i haven't time and caught up there. I'd like i definitely liked capacity. I mean he wasn't bad not saying like everything doctor. Who does i enjoy so. He was not bad. I think he suffered from <hes> storylines. That weren't as interesting. Yes a companion. That wasn't wasn't as interesting not even close but i'd like how he played the character. He had a real anger to him to a certain extent you you think so yeah. I don't think it was close to david tennant hangar. See david tennant was brilliant because he could he could go from goofy too heavy to changli quickly and i don't think it's the same type of anger that peter crepaldi had he did bring a certain gravitas to the character. He's just a different type of actor. He's more of a theatrical. I her son i venture to say <hes> if i need to go back and the problem is sense matt smith all right dr who and we went into the new era with capacity and the new ones the problem is the shows..

peter cappelli david tennant james gunn Peter cataldi peter crepaldi idris elba dr mr kepala matt smith
"peter cappelli" Discussed on The Film Buds Podcast

The Film Buds Podcast

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on The Film Buds Podcast

"Steal it from you. Miranda Richardson was a fairy queen paid a Peter Cappelli pair Michelle's malefic aunt and uncle lakes dairy queen and King and Miranda Richardson is the person who gave her the horns Hashi cursed her because she was like an unruly teenager. Oh yeah you know 'cause like Michelle. Why do we keep saying Michelle Pfeiffer Pfeiffer Michelle do oh? I'm just oh I'm so excited for Michelle Pfeiffer so much she she really is we all know how much I love but malefic <hes> her coming of age was really going to be like the center of the story and in the in the final film ended up being being like less than ten minutes you know the open they think we only see teenage malefic as like backlit like at one point Ella Cornell was will be the child and then there's a scene where like teenage is kissing pissing Philip Yeah. It's a blip in Oh and she was supposed to have like an hour's worth of footage being a bad ass teenage torn. We love that sugary. If punic partisans can be better I know I don't I don't understand why they cut that out. I'll he'd be a pervert fairy right anyway. Whatever but by would have been like twice as long but you know what that's there you go? We'll take we get back to the future having come out like a couple months apart. Wow and you have an audience. You have an audience you know obviously do because they're getting a sequel shocks me shock to yeah yeah like it's like frigging. What call gotTa See Colo Snow White and the Swiss weisman brutal? I loved I loved the first calling Atwood's worst designed films. I can't believe that she designed the costumes for it because because they would have the huntsman one the first one is amazing has the the beetle wings but the second movie looks like Party City Trash. I don't understand what happened with calling clean. They're calling where where the beetle wings where exactly let me be. Assistant don't f up the Little Mermaid. I'm budget is you've been the sensor know boop she what she did. The Alice in wonderland sequel the through the looking glass which was the only one that I liked was Helena Bonham Carter's Lorne corset anything it was good Helena Bonham Carter Helena B._C.. Yeah I'm yeah it's good solid go to a love a retelling. I Love Juno Temple. I love sweets. I love sweet people okay. Hey that's good. That's what makes the world go round how well no not really but probably the opposite but that is expiring in spite of the World Yeah now. They're always bad good people down the point of this movie. I think calcavecchia everyone has good and bad so sorry it's fine. Wow okay. I'm struggling. I'm GONNA sound weird fake term anyway <hes> well. I would have liked to quite a better if it wasn't l.. Fanning yes he really sucks sucks out some the life for me. Okay it's. A Sham and a half I can think Oh my God let me count the ways. Basically I think the one from Mama Mia the James.

Michelle Pfeiffer Michelle Pfeiffer Pfeiffer Mic Philip Yeah Helena Bonham Carter Helena Helena Bonham Carter Miranda Richardson uncle lakes Hashi Peter Cappelli Mama Mia Fanning Little Mermaid Juno Temple Atwood Ella Cornell ten minutes
Disney and Netflix threaten to pull out of Georgia over new abortion law

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:07 min | 3 years ago

Disney and Netflix threaten to pull out of Georgia over new abortion law

"Politics is part and parcel of this economy. Sometimes it's subtle, sometimes it's not. But it is always there today is one of the not subtle times. Netflix, Disney NBC universal and Warner media have all said in the past day, or so that they are going to consider pulling production out of Georgia. If it's controversial new abortion, law goes into effect. Georgia has been something of a southern home base for Hollywood for years, now, thanks to generous tax credits. Mostly netflix. Shot stranger things in Ozark. Their Disney did Black Panther and avengers endgame. But both companies now say their employees might just not want to work in Georgia anymore. Marketplace's supreme Inishmore has that one. American politics can feel more polarized these days, and that has leaked into the workplace according to Leslie gains, Ross, and the workplace reflect the Sidey gins Ross is a strategist at Weber Shandwick had recently surveyed workers about employee activism. He by percent, said that if they were considering a new job, they would take into account and employers stance on issues at fence society. That could be all the more reason to stay away from polarizing political issues with sizeable factions on each side. But perhaps, not if you like Netflix or Warner media are in the entertainment business. Peter cappelli is a professor of management at the Wharton school, many of the employees that they see as most central most difficult to recruit, most difficult to retain, our people who have views they're quite different than the views on abortion or earlier, views restricting rights, L, LGBT community, otherwise put many of the stars. And key producers, and other talent companies need are opposed to Georgia's law, and they and workers in the US generally are in a position to make demands. Scott Dubrovsky is a spokesman for glass door or seeing the lowest unemployment rate that we've seen in decades, and so people have options into where they go to work net Warner media in Disney, all hedged their threats to leave Georgia by saying, they'd wait to see if the law goes into effect in two thousand twenty as planned that will depend on how court challenges go

Georgia Disney Warner Media Netflix Sidey Gins Ross Weber Shandwick Peter Cappelli Wharton School United States Scott Dubrovsky Ozark Fence Society NBC Professor Of Management Hollywood Leslie Ross
"peter cappelli" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Making its operations more efficient and less reliance on the US, postal service and better able to handle oversized items like couches and combats which now ten percent of its deliveries because really there's nothing you combine online. I'm Jack Jackson for marketplace. Politics is part and parcel of this economy. Sometimes it's subtle, sometimes it's not. But it is always there today is one of the not settle times. Netflix, Disney NBC universal and Warner media have all said in the past day or so. That they are going to consider pulling production out of Georgia. If it's controversial new abortion, law goes into effect. Georgia has been something of a southern home base for Hollywood for years, now, thanks to generous tax credits. Mostly netflix. Shot stranger things in Ozark. Their Disney did Black Panther and avengers endgame. But both companies now say their employees might just not want to work in Georgia anymore. Marketplace's Sabrina finish. Whereas that one American politics can feel more polarized, these days, and that has leaked into the workplace according to Leslie gains Ross in the workplace reflect this -iety gains Ross is a strategist at Weber Shandwick it recently surveyed workers about employee activism. He by send said that if they were considering a new job, they would take into account and employers stance issues affects society that could be all the more reason to stay away from polarizing political issues with sizeable factions on each side. But perhaps not if you like Netflix or Warner. Media are in the entertainment business. Peter cappelli is a professor of management at the Wharton school, many of the employees that they see as most to central most difficult to recruit, most difficult to retain, our people who have views they're quite different than the views on abortion or earlier, views, restricting rights, LGBT community, otherwise, put many of the stars and key producers, and other talent. These companies need are opposed to Georgia's law, and they and workers in the US generally are in a position to make demands. Scott Dubrovsky is a spokesman for glass door or seeing the lowest unemployment rate that we've seen in decades, and so people have options into where they go to work. Netflix Warner media and Disney have all hedged their threats to leave Georgia by saying, they'd wait to see if the law goes into effect in two thousand twenty as planned that will depend on how court challenges go in New York, I'm sorry benefits for marketplace. Big happenings in New York City public transit system, tomorrow, the MTA as it's known. In New York is going to start a slow roll out of his new tap to pay system. Just a limited number of subway stations in the city, not fully system wide till twenty twenty but still progress riders are going to be able to pay and enter the subway simply by tapping their credit cards or their smartphones, a seemingly simple change. Yes. But as marketplace's Marielle Sagarra reports one that could mean big things for New York City and the rest of the economy, pretty much everyone who's written. The New York City subway has had this experience. You take out your magnetic swipe card is wipe it if think it worked..

Georgia New York City Netflix Disney US New York Ross Warner media Jack Jackson Netflix Warner Weber Shandwick Warner Marielle Sagarra Ozark Peter cappelli Wharton school Scott Dubrovsky NBC MTA
"peter cappelli" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"A young age, what it takes to be a manager since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business, the how to be the boss. Course teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit. Yes. So I actually went down to warden to be a fly on the wall in this course. And this is a class that was launched in January, and it's really targeted to undergrad and the idea was that number of students are graduating from college within two years, there now suddenly, managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do this courses meant to help them through that, that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself. Isn't it that folk? With two years, experience or something becoming managers. Well, it is, and it's happening a lot at tech companies, for example, that are growing and suddenly need managers, new areas, they might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh and it consulting firms or this is part of the path where you, you've been two years now, you suddenly or supervising a couple of other people, but it's, it's really difficult to manage and a lot of people just aren't prepared for it number of college courses oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues appears versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Yeah. Another is, I think it was a young woman in your story, who said she was too prized. I guess, or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people, a lot of time in a supervisory position and not so much projects. Like, perhaps, you might have in your other work world. That, that was it one of the big lessons, of course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you're an individual contributor somewhere and now suddenly jail these people have to do that as well. The courses tried to emphasize you're a manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on, on a number of different lessons from how to manage over workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even pretty funny part of the class when I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employee complaining about it. What do you do? So, so what are the professor do in this case, the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this? They did. I mean, part of the course is doing role playing scenarios do a lot of lectures, or some guest speakers but role playing part of it. So, for example, the, the B O case students had far a big range of different reactions to that some felt that, you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it. They kinda pro and trying to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene issue, other, stall, they should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli, really had to say, you know, handle this pretty sensitively, but he had A a. whole kind of checklist. How students should be with it? And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece, entitled like a boss, a college course for first time managers paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school, where they're teaching this type of stuff till undergrads as is not an MBA class. How about managing older workers, you know, folks, who might be as old as their parents, right? Well, that's it. Courses largely taken by people in their twenties. And so, yes, they will be expected. We'll be managing much older workers. And I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly when you're appointed into supervisory role. It's really important to take some time to kind of feel out of the team. The second piece is also just listen to those employees, they have more experience. They might have ideas what team could do better. So I think, you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all these students to really be careful situations. Don't come in with a bunch of orders, changelings around really focus on what's happening the team and go from there students found it helpful. I presume most kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had changed her own behavior as an employee going through this class. She was working at a student credit union sophomore at Wharton at Penn. And she, she said she was CC and her boss on every E mail that she said, she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing. And the professor underscore said actually that really annoys bosses. Don't do that. So as a result, she, she's tweeter behavior. Lesson learned Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty two minutes now.

Wall Street Journal reporter professor Wharton school university of Pennsylvania chip cutter Wharton harassment Penn Peter cappelli two years twenty two minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"A young age, what it takes to be a manager since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business, the how to be the boss. Course teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit yet. So I actually went down to warden to be a fly on the wall. And this course, and this is a class that was launched in January, and it's really targeted to undergrad and the idea was that a number of students are graduating from college within two years, there now suddenly, managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do, this course, is meant to help them through that that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself. Isn't it that folk? Folks with such, like two years, experience or something becoming managers. Well, it is, and it's happening to the water tech companies, for example, that are growing and fedayeen managers in new areas. They might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh, and it consulting firms where this is part of the Pat, where you, you spend two years, you suddenly or are supervising a couple of other people, but it's, it's really difficult to manage. And a lot of people just aren't prepared for it a number of college courses are oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues your peers versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Yeah, I know there is a I think it was a young woman in your story, who said she was surprised I guess, or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people a lot of the time in a supervisory position. And not so much projects, like, perhaps, you might have in your other work world. And that was it one of the kind of big lessons, of course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you're an individual contributor somewhere and now suddenly or manage all these people have to do that, as well the courses tried. To emphasize, you're a manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on. But it touches on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was pretty funny, part of the class when I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employee is complaining about it. What do you do? Yeah. So, so what are the professor do in this case, the, the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this? They did. I mean, part of the course is doing role playing scenarios, they do a lot of lectures, or some guest speakers but role playing is part of it. For example, the, the be oh, case students had far, you know, a big range of different reactions to that some felt that, you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it that they should kinda pro and trying to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene, issue, other stalled. They should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli, really had to say, you know, handle this pretty sensitive leave, and he had a whole kind of check. For how students should deal with it. And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece, entitled like a boss, a college course for first time managers, and he paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school where they're teaching this type of stuff to undergrads as is not an MBA class how about managing older workers, folks who might be as old as their parents, right? Well, that's hit this courses largely taken by people in their twenties. And so, yes, they will be we'll be managing much older workers. And I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly when you're pointed into a supervisory role. It's really important to take some time to kind of feel out the dynamics of the team. The second piece is also just listen to those employees, they have more experience. They might have ideas for what the team could do better. So I think you know that was the kind of overarching. Message to all these students to really be careful situations. Don't come in with a bunch of orders are changing around really focus on what's happening to the team. And go from there students found it helpful. I presume most found it's been kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee after going through this class. She was working at a student credit union should a sophomore at warden at Penn. And she, she said she was CC her boss on every E mail that she sent she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing and the professor underscore said actually that really annoys bosses. Don't do that. So as a result, she, she's tweaked her behavior. Lesson learned Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty two minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Some guys okay with selling other guys just want to do things right. Well, they go on men's lotion with intensive oyster. Rises and skin strengthen and proteins skin that looks and feels good. Don't settle go for the goal. On. You work for the swig you respect to swit- and never regret the swift. You've got gold on Potter. Fights, weather's older leaves each keeps you Philly fresh cool and clean. Go by respect. The switch uses directed. I.

Wall Street Journal reporter professor Wharton school university of Pennsylvania chip cutter harassment Philly swit Potter Peter cappelli Penn two years twenty two minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"A young age, what it takes to be a manager since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business, the how to be the boss. Course teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit. Yes. So I actually went down to warden to kind of be a fly on the wall. And this course, and this is a class that was launched in January, and it's really targeted to undergrads and the idea was that a number of students are graduating from college. But then two years there now suddenly, managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do this course. Has meant to help them through that. That's kind of an underlying story in and of itself. Isn't it that folks with, like, two years, experience or something becoming managers? Well, it is, and it's happening in a lot at tech companies, for example, that are growing and selling the managers in new areas, they might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh and it consulting firms or this is part of the Pat, where you you've been two years and suddenly or are supervising a couple of other people, but it's, it's really difficult to manage. And a lot of people just aren't prepared for it a number of college courses are oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues your peers versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Yeah. I know there is, I think it was a young woman in your story, who said she was apprised I guess, or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people a lot of the time in a supervisory position. And not so much projects, like, perhaps, you might have in your other work world. And that was it one of the kind of big lessons of this course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did. When you're an individual contributor somewhere. And now suddenly you're manage all these people have to do that as well. The courses tried to emphasize you're a manager that is your time job. And that's what you need to focus on. But it touches on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even a pretty funny part of the class when I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employees complaining about it. What do you do? Yeah. So, so what are the professor do in this case? The, the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this. They did. I mean part of the course is doing role play scenarios. They do a lot of lectures or some guest speakers but role playing is part of it. For example, the, the be oh, case students had far, you know, a big range of different reactions to that some felt that, you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it that they should kinda pro and trying to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene issue, other, stall, they should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so. The professor Peter cappelli really had to say, you know, handle this pretty sensitive leave, and he had a whole kind of checklist for how students should deal with it. And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece, entitled like a boss, a college course for first time managers, and he paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school where they're teaching this type of stuff to undergrads as is not an MBA class. How about managing older workers, you know, folks, who might be as old as their parents. Right. Well, that's it. Discourses largely taken by people in their twenties. And so, yes, they will be expected. We'll be managing much older workers. And I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly when you're into a supervisory role. It's really important to take some time to kind of feel out the dynamics of the team, the second piece is also just listen to those employees he. They have more experience. They might have ideas for what the team could do better. So I think, you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all. These students did really be careful situations. Don't come in with a bunch of orders are changing around really focus on what's happening in the team. And go from there, students found, it's helpful. I presume most founded kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee after going through this class. She was working at a student credit union should a sophomore at work or at at Penn. And she, she said she was CC in ho boss, on every E mail that she sent she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing and the professor underscore said actually that really annoys bosses. Don't do that. And so as a result, she's, she's tweaked her behavior Muslim learns Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty two minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Some guys. Okay, with settling other guys just want to do things. Right. While they use go beyond men's lotion, with intensive moisturizes skin strengthening proteins skin that looks and feels good. Don't settle for the goal bond, you worked for the swing. You respect the sweat, and never regret the swift you've got golden powder. Vice weather's odor. Relieves itchy keeps you feeling fresh cool and clean go by respect to sway uses directed and.

Wall Street Journal reporter professor Wharton school university of Pennsylvania chip cutter harassment Peter cappelli Penn two years twenty two minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Yes, I actually went down to warden to kind of be a fly on the wall. And this course, and this is a class that was launched in January, and it's really targeted to undergrads and the idea was that number of students are graduating from college within two years, there now suddenly, managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do this courses meant to help them through that. That's kind of an underlying story in and of itself. Isn't it that folks with two years, experience or something becoming managers? Well, it is happening, a lot at tech companies, for example, that are growing and suddenly, the managers in new areas, they might appoint someone who still pretty fresh, and it consulting firms or this is part of the Pat, where you, you've been two years now, you suddenly or are supervising a couple of other people, but it's, it's really difficult to manage. And a lot of people just aren't prepared for it a number of college courses oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues your peers versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Yeah. Another is, I think it was a young woman in your story, who said she was surprised I guess, or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people, a lot of time in a supervisory position and not so much projects. Like, perhaps, you might have near other work world that, that was it one of the big lessons of courses that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you're an individual contributor somewhere and now suddenly in jail these people have to do that as well. The courses tried to empathize your manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on. But it touches on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even pretty funny part of the class when I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and their employees complaining about it. What do you do? Yeah. So, so what are the professor do in this case, the, the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this? They did. I mean, part of the course is doing role playing scenarios do a lot of lectures guest speakers but role playing part of it. For example, the, the B O case student had far, you know, a big range of different reactions to that some felt that, you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it that they should pro- and trying to figure out that there was something underlying that hygiene issue, other felt, they should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli, really had to say, you know, handle this pretty sensitively. He had a whole kind of checklist Ralston should deal with it. There were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece, entitled like a boss, a college course for first time managers paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school, where they're teaching this type of stuff to undergrads as is not an NBA class how about managing older workers, folks, who might be as old as their parents. Right. Well, that's it courses largely taken by people in their twenties. And so, yes, they will be expected. We'll be managing much older workers. And I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly when you're pointing into supervisory role. It's really important to take some time to kind of feel out that antics of the team, the second piece is also just listen to those employees, they have more experience. They might have ideas for what the team could do better. So I think you know that was the. The kind of overarching message to all these students to really be careful. They situations don't come in with a bunch of orders are changing around really focus on what's happening team. And go from there students found it helpful. I presume most kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee after going through this class. She was working at a student credit unions off more at work or at Penn. And she, she said she was CC and her boss on every E mail that she sent. She wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing and the professor underscore said actually that really annoys bosses. Don't do that. So as a result, she's, she's tweaked her behavior. Lesson learned Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty two.

professor Wall Street Journal reporter harassment Ralston Peter cappelli NBA university of Pennsylvania Wharton school two years
"peter cappelli" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on 600 WREC

"At a young age, what it takes to be a manager since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business, the how to be the boss. Course teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit. Yes. So I actually went down to war to be a fly on the wall in this course. And this is a class that was launched in January and really targeted to undergrad and the idea was that number of students are graduating from college within two years, there now suddenly, managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do, this course, has meant to help them through that that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself. Isn't it that? Folks with us like two years, experience or something becoming managers. Well, it is, and it's happening at a lot of tech companies, for example, that are growing and selling the managers in new areas, they might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh and it consulting firms or this is part of the Pat, where you, you spend two years now, you suddenly or supervising a couple of other people, but it's, it's really difficult to manage and a lot of people just aren't prepared for it number of college courses are oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues your peers versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Yeah. I know there was, I think it was a young woman in your story, who said she was surprised I guess, or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people a lot of the time in a supervisory position. And not so much projects, like, perhaps, you might have in your other work world. And that was it a big lessons, of course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you were an individual contributor somewhere. And now suddenly or manage all these people have to do that as well. The course has tried to empathize. You're a manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on, touches on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was pretty funny, part of the class when I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employees complaining about it. What do you do? So, so what are the professor do in this case? The, the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this. They did. I mean, part of the course is doing role play scenarios, they do a lot of lectures, there's some guests beakers but role playing is part of it. So, for example, the, the B O case students had far, you know, a big range of different reactions to that some felt that, you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it that they should kind of pro and trying to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene, issue, other stalled. They should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli, really had to say, you know, painful this pretty sensitive, but he had. A whole kind of checklist for how students should deal with it. And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece, entitled like a boss, a college course for first time managers, and he paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school where they're teaching this type of stuff. Tell undergrads this is not an MBA class. How about managing older workers? You know, folks, who might be as old as their parents, right? Well, that's it. Courses largely taken by people in their twenties. And so, yes, they will be expected. We'll be managing much older workers. And I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly. We are pointed into a supervisory role. It's really important to take some time to kind of feel out the dynamics of the team. The second piece is also just listen to those employees, they have more experience. They might have ideas for what team could do better. So I think, you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all these students visited really be careful new situations. Don't come in with a bunch of orders, changelings around really focus on what's happening to the team. And go from there students found it helpful. I presume. Kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee after going through this class. She was working at a student credit union. She's a sophomore at at Wharton at Penn. And she, she said, she was in her boss, on every E mail that she said, she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing and a professor underscore said actually that really annoys bosses. Don't do that. And so as a result, she says she's tweaked her behavior. Lesson learned Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty two minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Some guys. Okay,.

Wall Street Journal reporter professor Wharton school university of Pennsylvania chip cutter harassment Penn Peter cappelli two years twenty two minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"But these of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit yet. So I actually went down to warden to kind of be a fly on the wall. And this course, and this is a class that was launched in January, and it's really targeted to undergrads and the idea was that a number of students are graduating from college. But then two years there now suddenly, managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do, this course, has meant to help them through that that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself. Isn't it that folks with us like two years, experience or something becoming managers? Well, it is happening that a lot of tech companies, for example, that are growing, and settling, the managers in new areas, they might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh and consulting firms or this is part of the Pat, where you spend two years and suddenly or supervising a couple of other people, but it's, it's really difficult to manage. And a lot of people just aren't prepared for it a number of college courses oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues appears versus supervising, which is a totally different beat. Yeah. I know there was, I think it was a young woman in your story, who said she was deprived, I guess, or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people a lot of the time in a supervisory position. And not so much projects, like, perhaps, you might have in your other work world, that, that was it one of the kind of big lessons of this course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you were individual contributor somewhere, and now suddenly, you're manager, all these people have to do that as well. The courses tried to emphasize you're a manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on. But touches on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even a pretty funny class when I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employee is complaining about it. What do you do? Yeah. So, so what are the professor do in this case? The, the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this. They did. I mean part of the core. Is doing role playing scenarios. They do a lot of lectures or some guest speakers but role playing part of it. So, for example, the, the, the oh, case students had far, you know, a big range of different reactions to that some felt that, you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it that they should pro and trying to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene issue, other felt, they should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli, really had to say, you know, handle this pretty sensitive leave, and he had a whole kind of checklist for how students should deal with it. And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them. Depend think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece, entitled like a boss, a college course for first time managers, and he paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school where they're teaching this type of stuff to undergrads as is not an MBA class. How about managing older workers? Folks, who might be as old as their parents. Right. Well, that's hit this courses largely taken by people in their twenties. And so two guess they will be expected. We'll be managing much older workers. And I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly. We are pointed into a supervisory role. It's really important to take some time to kind of feel out the dynamics of the team at the second piece is also just listen to those employees, they have more experience. They might have ideas for what team could do better. So I think, you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all these students to really be careful in this situation. Don't come in with a bunch of orders are changing around really focus on what's happening in the team. And go from there, students found it's a helpful. I presume most found it's been kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee after going through this class. She was working at a student credit union a sophomore at Wharton at Penn. And she, she said he was CC in her boss on every. Email that she said she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing and the professor underscore said actually that really annoys bosses. Don't do that. So as a result, she's, she's tweaked her behavior. Lesson learned Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty two minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Some guys. Okay,.

Wall Street Journal reporter professor chip cutter harassment Wharton school Peter cappelli Wharton university of Pennsylvania Penn two years twenty two minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"A young age, what it takes to be a manager since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business, the how to be the boss. Course teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit. Yes. So I actually went down to war to kind of be a fly on the wall and discourse. And this is a class that was launched in January, and it's really targeted to undergrads and the idea was that number of students are graduating from college within two years, there now suddenly, managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do, this course, has meant to help them through that that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself. Isn't it that folk? With such, like two years, experience or something becoming managers. Well, it is, and it's happening in a lot at tech companies, for example, that are growing and suddenly, the managers in new areas, they might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh and it consulting firms or this is part of the Pat, where you, you spend two years now, you suddenly are supervising a couple of other people, but it's, it's really difficult to manage and a lot of people just aren't prepared for it a number of college courses are oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues appears versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Yeah. I know there was, I think it was a young woman in your story, who said she was surprised I guess, or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people a lot of the time in a supervisory position. And not so much projects. Like, perhaps, you might have in your other work world that, that was it one of the big lessons of this course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you an individual contributor somewhere and now suddenly manager all these people you have to do that as well the courses. Tried to emphasize you're a manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on. But it touches on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even a pretty funny part of the class when I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employee is complaining about it. What do you do? So, so what are the professor do in this case? The, the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this. They did. I mean part of the course is doing role play scenarios. They do a lot of lectures or some guest speakers but role playing is part of it. So, for example, the, the, the oh, case students had far, you know, a big range of different reactions to that some felt that, you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it that they should pro- and try to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene issue, other, stall, they should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli, really had to say, you know, handle this pretty sensitively, but he had a whole kind of check. List, how students should deal with it. And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them dependent think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece, entitled like a boss, a college course for first time managers, and he paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school where they're teaching this type of stuff to undergrads. This is not an MBA class how about managing older workers, folks, who might be as old as their parents. Right. Well, that's it. This has largely taken by people in their twenties. And so to get they will be expected. We'll be managing much older workers, and I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly when you're appointed into a supervisory role. It's really important to take some time to kind of feel out the dynamics of the team. The second piece is also just listen to those employees, they have more experience. They might have ideas for what the team could do better. So I think, you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all these students to really be careful situations. Don't come in with a bunch of orders changing around really focus on what's happening in the team. And go from there students found helpful, I presume most of them found. It's kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee going through this class. She was working at a student credit, union sophomore at work or at, at Penn. And she, she said she was CC and ho boss on every E mail that she sent. She wanted to make sure her boss knew. Exactly what she was doing and the professor underscore said, actually that really annoys bosses. Don't do that. So as a result, she's, she's tweaked her behavior. Lesson learned Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty two minutes now after the.

Wall Street Journal reporter professor Wharton school university of Pennsylvania chip cutter harassment Peter cappelli Penn two years twenty two minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"A young age, what it takes to be a manager since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business, the how to be the boss. Course teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit. Yes, I actually went down to work to be a fly on the wall in this course. And this is a class that was launched in January, and it's really targeted to undergrads and the idea was that I'm number of students are graduating from college within two years, there now suddenly, managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do this course. Has meant to help them through that that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself. Isn't it that folks with two years, experience or something becoming managers? Well, it is it's happening a lot of tech companies, for example, that are growing and suddenly managers new areas, they might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh and it consulting firms or this is part of the Pat, where you spend two years, suddenly or supervising a couple of other people, but it's, it's really difficult to manage. And a lot of people just aren't prepared for it a number of college courses are oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues your peers versus supervising, which is totally different beast. Yeah. I know there is, I think it was a young woman in your story, who said she was apprised I guess, or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people a lot of the time in a supervisory position. And not so much projects, like, perhaps, you might have in your other world. That was it one of the of big lessons at this courses that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did. When you're an individual contributor somewhere. And now suddenly you're in jail these people to do that as well. The courses tried to empathize your manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on. But it touches on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even pretty funny part of the class when I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employee complaining about it. What do you do? So, so what are the professor do in this case, the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this? They did. I mean, part of the course is doing role play scenarios do a lot of lectures or some guest speakers but role playing is part of it. For example, the, the B O case students had far, you know, a big range of different reactions to that some felt that, you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it that they should pro- trying to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene issue, other stuff. They should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so. The professor Peter cappelli, really had to say, you know, painful this pretty sensitively, but he had a whole kind of checklist how students should deal with it. And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of managers day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece, entitled like a boss, a college course for first time managers paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school, where they're teaching this type of stuff to undergrads as is not an MBA class how about managing older workers, folks, who might be as old as their parents. Right. Well, that's it courses largely taken by people in their twenties. And so, yes, they will be expected Moby managing much older workers. I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly when you're pointed into supervisory role. It's really important to take some time to kind of feel out that AmEx of the team at the second piece is also just listen to those employees. They have more experience. They might have ideas for what the team could do better. So I think, you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all these students to really be careful situations. Don't come in with a bunch of orders are changing around really focus on what's happening in the team. And go from there students found it helpful. I presume most found. It's kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee going to this class. She was working at a student credit unions just off more at Wharton at Penn. And she, she said, she was seeing her boss, on every E mail that she said, she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing and the professor underscore said actually that really annoys bosses don't do that. So she's, she's tweeter behavior. Lesson learned Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty two minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Some guys okay with settling other guys just want to do things. Right..

Wall Street Journal reporter professor Wharton school university of Pennsylvania chip cutter Wharton AmEx harassment Moby Penn Peter cappelli two years twenty two minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business. The how to be the boss course, teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter. Paid a visit chip what you see? Yeah. So I actually went down to ward to be a fly on the wall in this course, and this is a class that was launched in January, and it's really targeted to undergrads. And the idea was that a number of students are graduating from college within two years there. Now, suddenly managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do. This course is meant to help them through that that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself, isn't it that folks with such like two years experience or something becoming managers? Well, it is. And it's happening a lot at tech companies, for example, that are growing and suddenly mean managers in new areas, they might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh. And it consulting firms where this is part of the path where you you've been two years. Now, you suddenly or are supervising a couple of other people, but it's it's really difficult to manage and a lot of people just aren't prepared for a number of college courses are oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues or your peers versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Yeah. Another is. I think it was a young woman in your story. Who said she was surprised, I guess or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people. A lot of the time in a supervisory position and not so much projects. Like, perhaps you might have a near other work world that that was it one of the kind of big lessons at this course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you were an individual contributor somewhere. And now, suddenly or manage all these people have to do that as well the courses tried to empathize. You're a manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on on a number of different lessons from how to manage over workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even a pretty funny part of the class. When I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employee is complaining about it. What do you do? Yeah. So so what are the professor do in this case, the the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this. They did. I mean, part of the course is doing role playing scenarios they do a lot of lectures, or some guest speakers but role playing is part of it. So for example, but the the B O case students had far a big range of different reactions to that some felt that you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it. They should kind of pro and trying to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene issue other stall, they should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli really had to say, you know, to handle this pretty sensitive leave, and he had a whole kind of checklist for how students to deal with it. And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond. All this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal, he's got a piece entitled like a boss. A college course for first time managers, and he paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school where they're teaching this type of stuff till undergrads as is not an an MBA class. How about managing older workers know folks who might be as old as their parents. Right. Well, that's hit courses largely taken by people in their twenties. And so yes, they will be expected. We'll be managing much older workers. And I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly pointed into a supervisory role it's really important to take some time to kind of feel out the dynamics of the team. The second piece is also just listen to those employees. They have more experience. They might have ideas for what team could do better. So I think you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all these students to really be careful situations don't come in with a bunch of orders are changing around really focus on what's happening in the team and go from there. How house? Pacific is the class. Or did you notice that the because you reference these boundaries to being a supervisor versus some situations that just have to go right to HR, the professor advertisers that that managers are not therapists. They're not they're kind of handle every issue in employee's life. And so there were some situations, for example, that just had to be referenced with two other groups. And so, you know, I think that was that was a big a big piece of dust is just making sure the managers. No, they don't have to do everything students found, it's helpful I presume most found it's been kind of really kind of surprising helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee after going through this class. She was working at a student credit union is a sophomore at Warton at Penn. And she she said she was seeing her boss on every E mail that she said she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing. And the professor and discourse said actually that really annoys bosses don't do that. So. As a result. She says she's tweaked her behavior. Chip it's Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This.

Wall Street Journal professor reporter Wharton school university of Pennsylvania harassment Warton Peter cappelli supervisor two years twenty minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business. The how to be the boss course, teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit chip which see I actually went down to work to be a fly on the wall in this course, and this is the class that was launched in January and really targeted to undergrads. And the idea was that number of students are graduating from college, but in two years there now suddenly managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do. This course has meant to help them through that that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself, isn't it that folks with such like two years experience or something becoming managers? Well, it is tapping lot at tech companies, for example, that are growing and selling managers new areas, they might appoint someone who still pretty fresh. And it consulting or this is part of the Pat where you he's been two years, and suddenly or supervising a couple of other people, but it's it's really difficult to manage and a lot of people just aren't prepared for it. A number of college courses are oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues appears versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Yeah. Another is. I think it was a young woman in your story. Who said she was surprised, I guess or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people. A lot of the time in a supervisory position and not so much projects. Like, perhaps he might have in your other work world that that was it a big lessons. Of course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you're an individual contributor somewhere. And now suddenly in jail. These people have to do that as well. Tried to emphasize your manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even pretty funny part of the class when I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees smells complaining about it. What do you do? Yeah. So so what are the professor do in this case the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle. This did part of the course is doing role play scenarios. They do a lot of lectures, or some guest speakers but role playing as part of it, for example, the B O case student had far a big range of different reactions to that some felt that you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it. They should pro- and try to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene issue other stall, they should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli really had to say, you know, painless pretty sensitively, but he had. A whole kind of checklist. How students should deal with it? And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of managers day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece entitled like a boss. A college course for first time managers, and he paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school where they're teaching this type of stuff to undergrads. This is not an MBA class. How about managing older workers, folks? Who might be as old as their parents. Right. Well, that's it. Is largely taken by people in their twenties. And so guess they will be we'll be managing much older workers. I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly when you're pointed into supervisory role it's really important to take some time to kind of feel out the dynamics of the team. The second piece is also just listen to those employees. They have more experience. They might have ideas for what the team could do better. So I think you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all these students to really be careful situations don't come in with a bunch of orders are changing around really focus on what's happening the team and go from there how how specific is the class or did you notice that the reference these boundaries to being a supervisor versus some situations that just go right to HR. The professor emphasizes that managers are not therapists. They're not to kind of handle every issue in employee's life. And so there was some situations, for example, that just had to be referenced referred to other groups. And so, you know, I think that was that was a big a big piece of just making sure demand. There's no they don't have to do everything students found helpful I presume most kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee going to this class. She was a working student credit union this off more at Wharton at Penn. And she she said she was in her boss on every E mail that she said she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing underscore said actually that really annoys bosses don't do that. And so she's she's tweaked her behavior. Chip it's Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning,.

Wall Street Journal reporter professor Wharton school university of Pennsylvania chip cutter Pat Wharton harassment Peter cappelli Penn supervisor two years twenty minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business. The how to be the boss course, teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit chip would you see I actually went down to ward to kind of be a fly on the wall. And this course, and this is the class that was launched in January and really targeted to undergrads. And the idea was that a number of students are graduating from college within two years there. Now, suddenly managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do. This course is meant to help them through that that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself, isn't it that folks with such like two years experience or something becoming managers? Well, it is. And it's happening that a lot at tech companies, for example, that are growing and selling the managers new areas, they might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh. And it consulting firms or this is part of the Pat where you you've been two years. Now, you suddenly are supervising a couple of other people, but it's it's really difficult to manage and a lot of people just aren't prepared for it. A number of college courses are oftentimes structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues or your peers versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Yeah. Another is. I think it was a young woman in your story. Who said she was surprised, I guess or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people. A lot of the time in a supervisory position and not so much projects. Like, perhaps you might have a near other work world that was it a big lesson. Of course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you're an individual contributors somewhere and now suddenly jail. These people have to do that as well. The has tried to empathize. You're a manager. That is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even a pretty funny part of the class. When I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employee is complaining about it. What do you do? Yeah. So so what are the professor do in this case, the the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle this. They did. I mean, part of the course is doing role playing scenarios they do a lot of lectures, or some guest speakers but role playing is part of it. So for example, the B O case students had far, you know, a big range of different reactions to that some felt that, you know, maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it that they should kind of pro when trying to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene issue other spell, they should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli really had to say, you know, painful this pretty sensitively, but he had A a. whole kind of checklist for how students should deal with it. And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal. He's got a piece entitled like a boss. A college course for first time managers, and he paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school where they're teaching this type of stuff software undergrads. This is not an NBA class. How about managing older workers, folks? Who might be as old as their parents. Right. Well, that's it. This is largely taken by people in their twenties. And so yes, they will be we'll be managing much older workers. And I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly. When you're appointed into a supervisory role. It's really important to take some time to kind of feel out that antics of the team. The second piece is also just listen to those employees. They have more experience. They might have ideas for what the team could do better. So I think you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all these students to really be careful in this situation that don't come in with a bunch of orders are changing around really focus on what's happening to the team and go from there how how specific is the class or did you notice the because you reference these boundaries to being a supervisor versus some situations that just have to go right to HR. The professor appetizers that managers are not therapists. They're not there to kind of handle every issue in employee's life. And so there was some situations, for example, that just had to be referenced to referred to other groups. And so, you know, I think that was that was a big a big pizza. Does is just making sure demand. There's no they don't have to do everything students found, it's helpful I presume. It's kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee ever going to this class. She was working at a student credit union. She's a sophomore at at Warton at Penn. And she she said she was CC and her boss on every E mail that she sent she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing. And the professor underscore said actually that really annoys bosses don't do that. So she's she's tweaked her behavior. Chip. It's Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty minutes now in front.

Wall Street Journal professor reporter university of Pennsylvania chip cutter Wharton school Warton harassment NBA Pat Peter cappelli supervisor two years twenty minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Since many new grads are finding themselves promoted to unfamiliar management positions earlier in their careers at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business. The how to be the boss course, teaches the gritty realities of managing Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter paid a visit chip would you see? Yeah. So I actually went down to work to be a fly on the wall in this course, and this is a class that was launched in January and really targeted to undergrad. And the idea was that a number of students are graduating from college within two years there. Now, suddenly managing people for the first time, and they have no idea what to do this courses meant to help them through that that's kind of an underlying story in and of itself, isn't it that folks with two years experience or something becoming managers? Well, it is happening with a lot of tech companies, for example, that are growing and subtly mean managers new areas, they might appoint someone who's still pretty fresh. And it consulting or this is part of the Pat where you you've been two years. Now, you suddenly or supervising a couple of other people, but it's it's really difficult to manage and a lot of people just aren't prepared for it. A number of college courses are structured about how to work in teams or how to work with colleagues appears versus supervising, which is a totally different beast. Another is I think it was a young woman in your story. Who said she was surprised, I guess or perhaps disappointed how you really managing people. A lot of the time in a supervisory position and not so much projects. Like, perhaps you might have in your other work world that that was it one of the big lessons of this course, is that managers are not super employees that you should not be expected to do all the tasks that you previously did when you're an individual contributor somewhere. And now suddenly in jail. These people have to do that as well. The courses tried to empathize era manager that is your full time job. And that's what you need to focus on on a number of different lessons from how to manage older workers to how to deal with sexual harassment. And there was even a pretty funny part of the class. When I was there when they were talking about how to handle someone who has be oh, one of your employees, smells, and the employee is complaining about it. What do you do? Yeah. So so what are the professor do in this case, the the students kind of worked on small group scenarios of how they might handle. This did I mean part of the course is doing role playing scenarios they do a lot of lecturers or guest speakers but role playing is part of it. So for example, the the oh case student had far, you know, a big range of different reactions to that some felt that you know there. Maybe there was some kind of depression linked to it. Wpro. We're trying to figure out if there was something underlying that hygiene issue other they should bring a candle in there were just a whole range of responses. And so the professor Peter cappelli really had to say, you know, painful this pretty sensitively, but he had a whole kind of checklist for how students to deal with it. And there were a bunch of other cases like that just kind of unusual situations that might come up in the course of a manager's day and trying to get them to kind of think about how to respond to all this speaking with chip cutter reporter at the Wall Street Journal, he's got a piece entitled like a boss. A college course for first time managers, and he paid a visit to the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school where they're teaching this type of self till undergrads. This is not an MBA class. How about managing older workers folks who might be as old as their parents? Right. Well, that's it. This is largely taken by people in their twenties. And so yes, they will be expected. We'll be managing much older workers. And I think the lessons there was I don't make any big changes quickly when you're pointed into a supervisory role it's really important to take some time to kind of feel out that AmEx of the team. The second piece is also just listen to those employees. They have more experience. They might have ideas for what the team could do better. So I think you know, that was the kind of overarching message to all these students to really be careful situations don't come in with a bunch of orders changing things around really focus on what's happening in the team and go from there. How house was civic is the class or did you notice that the because you reference these boundaries to being a supervisor versus some situations that just have to go right to HR. Well, the professor episodes is that that managers are not therapists. They're not there to kind of handle every issue in the boys life. And so there was some situations, for example, that just had to be referenced to refer to other groups. And so, you know, I think that was that was a big a big piece of desert just making sure demand. There's no they don't have to do everything students found, it's helpful I presume most kind of really kind of surprisingly helpful. There was one student who said she had even changed her own behavior as an employee for going to this class. She was working at a student credit union is a sophomore at Wharton at Penn. And she she said she was seeing her boss on every E mail that she said she wanted to make sure her boss knew exactly what she was doing. And the professor underscore said actually that really annoys bosses don't do that. So as a result, she says, she's tweaked her behavior. Please chip. It's Wall Street Journal reporter chip cutter twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning,.

Wall Street Journal professor reporter Wharton school chip cutter university of Pennsylvania Wharton AmEx harassment Pat Penn Peter cappelli supervisor two years twenty minutes
"peter cappelli" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"And you will actually get to decide what leads the four o'clock hour, happy you. So if you've cast a glance downtown driven downtown you'd be able to get through downtown and look at the streets. You may see these some folks in costumes running around and doing stuff. So it says here on the copy read the nexus of nurses back in town. That's clever a mynorthwest dot coms dioxide reports on the emergence of a blazing new trend based on one of the most beloved in old maligned old playing games. This weekend critical role fans commonly called critters will be among more than ninety thousand people expected to flock to downtown Seattle for emerald city comic. Con group of voice actors won't playing their own home game. Klay every week for a few hours. Doesn't dragons diverse that is Hollywood voice actor Travis Willingham. He is a cast member of critical role and you heard that correctly. They livestream dungeons and dragons DND in this weekend featured just as prominently as star Trek's, George decay or Peter cappelli from doctor who will be the cast of critical role and online show about DND. It should be said that this is not an isolated phenomenon. There is an array of DND shows in podcast all feeding off the fervor for this game. It's unprecedented. Honestly, there is this huge surge in popularity does dragons is really benefiting a lot from that right now. That's greg. Tito, he's with wizards of the coast, which is the Renton based game company that produces dungeons and dragons we've seen double digit growth for Dutch. Dragons over the last five years two thousand seventeen was as far as we can tell the most successful year dragons history, and then twenty eighteen blew that out of the water with all of this success. The cast of critical role decided to do another passion project this month. They started a Kickstarter campaign to fund an animated series based on the stories from their games within eight hours. They met their goal of seven hundred fifty thousand dollars, but they didn't stop there. As of this week. They are nine hundred and fifty seven percent funded which is seven point two million dollars. We certainly had underestimated the fervor passion of our fans of which was a surprise in. This all started just like any other game DND some friends just wanted to get together. And hang out, you know, getting together on a weekly basis and hanging out with your friends at telling stories at laughing at has a benefit beyond what I think even decrease. To the dragons kind of thought it would be.

Travis Willingham Tito Klay Seattle Hollywood Peter cappelli George seven hundred fifty thousand d fifty seven percent two million dollars eight hours five years
"peter cappelli" Discussed on Extra Hot Great

Extra Hot Great

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"peter cappelli" Discussed on Extra Hot Great

"Traveler what like an emigrant like we get like people or paranoid and close-minded copy that so I just felt like it was it was trying too hard for to make a very obvious point. And I get that. This is a show for children question. Mark. Is it still I don't even know. I know originally it was that was in my notes to that. It's like, maybe I'm not being fair. But why? Anymore? It is at at at the least eight young adult with adult rising. Fair enough. I I did appreciate as m said there is there is minimal Sifi baloney. But in terms of you You know. know with all due respect to joslin. I'm sure it's true that having having to say lines in unison is really hard. This. It went on what I so. So so long so long so much of it. And and if you wanna see the same kind of thing done in a more interesting way toward the end of patriots season one. There's a long sequence with two characters who are throwing rock paper scissors at each other and matching each other like such a good food over and over and over like I so much longer than you can possibly match to the boy. Whereas like, how do you think they did this? They couldn't possibly memorize the sequence. They had to have people behind them throwing up Cunard's or whatever. Anyway, that was much more interesting from a technical standpoint than than this so em I appreciate the the big wing, but. No Dave to me. This episode seem like a political Facebook discussion science. Talking over each other to know until somebody earns the place down at the end. That's a good thing. This this is the doctor who that I was very delighted not to see when we did blink. Now. I'm not a doctor who person you were mentioning the very first episode with the mannequins that was like when it came back. I'm gonna give Dr Who another shot. I sure do love that theme song. So let's try it again. And then there was like garbage bins turning into people and stuff like that. Or eating people. I'm like, you know, what can't do it the show is this episode of somehow full of of whimsey, but absolutely dire. So you right. The first time me. So I didn't really follow up with any doctor who stuff I didn't really pick it up with any of the new doctors with David Tennant or Matt Smith or Peter cappelli, just like every time I'm like, should I go back to that undiscerning like for me, the the tone of doctor who doesn't agree with me, the typical tone, and I think this kind of is in that ballpark, and I will say that of all the doctors in the modern era. David Tennant is definitely my favorite. I think he is the most approachable. You know, because of his sort of pleasing manic energy, I feel like he's head and shoulders above the first guy whose name they actor. I forget who's a real Drissa for Eccleston Kista. Yeah. He's he seems like he's like the poster child for everything sour like sour patch kids and a of him with his arts cross looking at you dare you to eat it. The things I'd like about this episode feel like when they wanted to get frantic and manic they did so very effectively with the over talking with the really over the top somehow still affective musical cues. Like, it really did seem like they just let a few monkeys loose in an empty orchestra and had them Bank things together for a while. It was just crazy, but it worked. But I think at the end of the day for me. M says, you can't compare this to episodes outside of the Davies era an Icee poppycock to that. I will compare this to what I think is my episode. Which is blink. I still haven't found a better episode than blink. Now. I think as I said when we did the blink cannon. I think that's still in the Russell t Davies rhyme. But it's cinematic where this one isn't there's a lot of differences in presentation..

David Tennant Facebook Mark Eccleston Kista Cunard Matt Smith Dave m Peter cappelli