17 Burst results for "Peter Burnett"

"peter burnett" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And so dependable and because of their body shape, they were very, very dirty. And they didn't get bothered by the rough terrain. You know, Horses weren't very useful at that point yet because they break letting because think about early with constant, You know, this is nothing but trees. When those trees were taken down. It was nothing but stumps and action could wander there waiting very slowly and steadily true. All that toe work up ground and to do things but we're horses, you know, excitable as they are and wonderful as they are. Would run crazily through it and the hurting themselves. Devil says. We forget just what a willingness Wisconsin was in the early 18 hundreds. Wisconsin wasn't even surveyed until the mid 18 thirties. You know, that means that there was nothing but trees if there were a few places of prairie, but I mean, we're talking awards that you can't see through its Indian trails and And you know what about 200 people and some fur trappers and imagine if you had a horse and all the sudden you're horses gone, You might never find that thing. Absolutely. And you bring up such a good point that Certainly have this vision of all these wide open fields and flowing farm fields and all that stuff and it wasn't it was it was a North American jungle. It was. Yeah, seriously, And he said, you know you were you come right off the lake Michigan. You had some sand lots and Pine trees and they were open spaces and things, but it really wasn't until Oh, seriously the late 18 forties, probably before you get to see relatively large by larger me like a 10 acre field and double sites in Oregon Trail Traveler Peter Burnett commenting on oxen in 18 50, he says, quote. Best of all the mammoth does not run off unquote Jane that near WTMJ News. A brand new year. It is 4 39 Wtmj. We're getting some brand new snow coming up in the next couple of days. How much? What's the timeline will check in with meteorologist Kristen Curse, Shane right after the break, John, We're here here for an ex wealth management. Think about your current investment in retirement portfolio. Has it changed to reflect what's been happening over the last year? If it's the same as a year ago, it probably hasn't been doing you much good. Most investment advisors will sell you new investments, not an ex wealth management as fee only fiduciaries. You hire them for their expertise in investment, retirement tax and estate planning. They offer conflict free recommendations. They.

Kristen Curse Jane John Shane Peter Burnett 18 50 mid 18 thirties Wisconsin lake Michigan 10 acre last year late 18 forties WTMJ News about 200 people early 18 hundreds a year ago North American Oregon 4 39 Wtmj next couple of days
"peter burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"S air now reporting more than 1000 cases of covert on campus. And that was our reporter. ABC is Mona Cozaar Abdi U. S Census Bureau workers. They're now going toward the door in Sacramento to assist people in responding to the 2020 census, along with hundreds of thousands all across the country. So far, Sacramento already has had a self response rate of 68%. The day. Ben's of the Census Bureau says he expects to see since his workers in the neighbourhood seven days a week to make sure everybody's counting. We make sure that our census takers are well trained in terms of how to keep your information, private. Because one of the points that we want to make sure the public is aware of regarding the 2020 senses that any information that we collect in a number of our different surveys is that the information is kept private. It can't be traced back to the respondent and it can't be used against them by law enforcement. The Census Bureau convince it a home up to six times. To try to get a response. Blood plasma has increasingly become important for cover 19 vaccine research and treating civility, severely ill patients. Ah Sacramento woman who recovered from Coben 19. Knew she could help. Dina Kodiak has more twists on saw an article about a church in South Korea that already had 1600 of its members. Donate plasma was amazing that one organization from a smaller country, a country that's like a quarter of the size of California, they were able to come together with that. Many people imagine how much that could do. Even this within California. It's a gift that only people who've had covert 19 and recovered can give at someone who witnessed the reality of this pandemic. Even if there's a slim chance is donating blood plasma would help. I would want to take that you convince it your local donation site or visit red cross blood dot org's Dina Kodiak News 93.1 KFBK. And more on those three sacrament of schools, which are in the process now of being renamed the SECNAV City Unified School District, saying it's going to move forward with their plans to as they put it, remove symbols of intolerance from campuses. The district plans to first rename three schools Kit Carson. Center Middle School and Peter Burnett Elementary. Sacramento City Unified says the renaming of the schools is part of the district's first effort to dismantle racism from within the system. And let's get caught up in this hour's top national stories. Now on news 93.1 KFBK.

Census Bureau Sacramento SECNAV City Unified School Dis Sacramento City Unified ABC California Dina Kodiak reporter Ben South Korea Kit Carson Center Middle School Peter Burnett Elementary
"peter burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Front of you and one pass it along all the kfbk traffic tip line dial pound 2 50 say traffic traffic on the tens, every 10 minutes mornings and afternoons news 93.1 K. 0 K. Forecast for today. The high in the Valley 92 degrees and then we're looking at 102 to 106 tomorrow and as high as 110 on Sunday, so it's going to be a very hot weekend. Oh, man, 6 61 out now it feels great right now. Beautiful morning right now. Alright. Well, there is word this morning that three Sacramento schools. Will change their names. KFBK Sneak a mega. His report, the Sacramento City Unified School District is moving forward with plans to remove symbols of intolerance from campuses. The district plans to rename three schools Kit Carson International Academy, Sutter Middle School and Peter Burnett Elementary. Sacramento City Unified says the renaming of schools is part of the district's first effort to dismantle racism from within the system. Nika Mega Hiss News 93.1 CALF, IKEA. In other news this morning, the Twin Rivers Unified School District offering Cove in 19 saliva testing. It is part of the school district's plan to eventually get students back into the classroom for in per And learning. The Twin Rivers Unified School District has ordered 10,000 test kits from Rutgers University. A Republican Assemblyman says he doesn't get it. He is not a fan of California's new code 19 Color coded tier system. Can't be Kay's Mike back a report third district Assemblyman James Gallagher, doesn't like the tiered system and pins most of the blame on Governor Gavin Newsom. You gotta love this governor, right? I mean, it comes out this whole thing last week. Hey, I got a new color coded system, you know, look at these flashy, colorful tears. I've established but then you get into the fine print and all of means is.

Sacramento City Unified School Twin Rivers Unified School Dis Sacramento schools Governor Gavin Newsom Sutter Middle School Assemblyman James Gallagher California Rutgers University Peter Burnett Elementary Kit Carson International Acade Kay Mike
"peter burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:10 min | 2 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sarah McCammon. President Trump has taken one of his most aggressive actions yet to weaken the country's environmental laws. Today, the administration announced changes to speed up construction of big infrastructure projects such as oil pipelines and highways. Critics say that move will sideline concerns about climate change and the effects of pollution on poor and minority communities. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. The president was at a UPS facility in Atlanta to announce dramatic changes to the regulations that govern the National Environmental Policy Act or Nipah. He traveled to Atlanta because his administration wants a local freeway expansion project to be among the first approved under the new regulations for decades, the single biggest obstacle to building a modern transportation system. Has been the mountains and mountains of bureaucratic red tape in Washington, D C Depot was signed into law by President Richard Nixon 50 years ago. It requires federal agencies to consider the environmental effects of proposed projects before they're approved. It also gives the public and interest groups the ability to comment on those evaluations. The new regulations set a time limit of two years on environmental reviews, less than half the time they now take. On average. It limits the number and types of projects that fall under Nipah. It puts new limits on public participation and makes it harder to file legal challenges. While Trump focused on building new highways. The oil industry also sees big benefits in today's announcement. A Siri's of pipeline projects have recently been dealt setbacks related to nip a reviews. Mike Summers heads the American Petroleum Institute and says the existing Nipah process has become too cumbersome. We feel if we're going to get our economy moving again post pandemic that this kind of permitting reform is going to be necessary. Environmental groups around Lee criticize today's announcement. Attorney Sharon Beauty No with the Natural Resources Defense Council says the new regulations essentially gut Nipah And take power away from the country's most vulnerable people. Nita gives poor and communities of color, a say in the projects that will define their communities for decades to come. Rather than listen. The Trump Administration's plan aims to silence such voices. There's a long history of polluting highways, pipelines and industrial plants being disproportionately located in these neighborhoods. Beaut. No believes the Trump Administration's new regulations for Nipah are illegal. And she says they will be challenged in court, which means November's election could determine whether these new regulations remain in effect. The presumptive Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, has vowed to reverse dozens of environmental rollbacks Trump has made while in office. Jeff Brady NPR news So who gets to be memorialized in California? There are several schools and streets named after the state's first governor. But what about the native Americans and black people he terrorized? Well this week. We're profiling, statues, memorials and buildings that deserve a second look to see who we honor in America and who we have allowed ourselves to forget. Today, Peter Hardiman Burnett As governor of California, he endorsed the genocide of Native Americans. He also tried to pass a law outlawing African Americans in the state. Author Gregory Noakes has researched and written extensively on Burnett. His book is called the troubled Life of Peter Burnett, and he joins us now welcome. Well, I thank you very much, Ilsa and pleasure to be here. Elias. You mean before Burnett made it out here to California? He was a young man pushing West. Tell us how he came to live in Oregon first. He was a self taught attorney living in Missouri, and he had a fairly distinguished career there. Here's what defense attorney for Joseph Smith after the Mormon War in 18 38. But you want to be rich, and he made all these investments and heavily into debt, and he heard there was free land out in Oregon. So we organize his own wagon train, which actually was the first major wagon train in 18 43 to come to Oregon. And he enters politics in Oregon and in his role I understand in the Legislature, they're he uses a law that bans slavery in Oregon to actually allow slavery there. How did he do that? Well, he did. It was a very tricky maneuver in his party come from the slave owning family brought a couple slaves of his own into Oregon, although one of them drowned on the way and or get it all previously passed a law banning slavery outright. So he passed what became Oregon's first exclusion law banning African Americans coming door again. There's been no such law before, and it's part of the exclusion law. There was this tricky provisions that slave owners would have 23 their slaves after three years. And that was unusual wording, by implication allowed slave owners tohave slaves for three years, right. And so this was change rather quickly, But it did create a window for some slave owners to bring slaves to Oregon in that period. Well, the gold rush, of course, brings him to California. He helps found the city of Sacramento. He has elected the first governor of California. And he was able to get laws and policies on the books that effectively subject gated Native Americans in this state. What were those policies? One of those was a law passed in 18 50 called the Act for the government and protection of Indians and that word protection underline. Because provided for apprenticing native Children toe white people where they could obviously be used his servants or slaves, and then for a vagrant Indian so called vagrant Indians to be hired out to the highest bidder. And it pretty much is like slavery in that period and this apparently involved in his 20,000 native Americans who are were used in that way. And there were also massacres that occurred during his tenure as governor as well right massacres of native Americans. You could say, you know, the one that's stuck out in my mind that I wrote about was ability Island Massacre and Lake County. In 18 50 when as many as 300 promo Indians, innocent Indians, men, women and Children were massacred by the U. S. Calvary. And he had no comment on these air just kind of didn't call out troops to defend them. So in that sense, it was kind of a passive endorsement of extermination. Well, it seems that Burnett has Been reduced to a footnote in California history. I mean, I grew up in California I never learned about him. A lot of people don't know his name despite passing places that bear his name daily. Why do you think that is You must have made a tremendous first impression because we've only touched on a few of the offices that he held over the years. People followed him, but he didn't deliver on his promises. Now, I should say that probably much of the population in the west of that time the white population were hostile to African Americans. But the idea that they would have a governor who seemed to have that it's his only agenda has caused him to be Pretty much for gotten. So you happen you have in California. You have these lists of governors of California and Burnett is always at the top. The very first governor you think that would be a point of distinction, but not much is known about him. Gregory Noakes. His book from 2018 is called the Troubled Life of Peter Burnett. Thank you very much for speaking with us today, but thank you so much as I appreciate the call. I appreciate you're interviewing me. This is all things considered from NPR news..

California Peter Burnett Oregon Nipah Trump Jeff Brady president NPR Atlanta Trump Administration Gregory Noakes attorney Peter Hardiman Burnett Elsa Chang Joe Biden
"peter burnett" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:16 min | 2 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on KCRW

"Traffic slow from Seal Beach Boulevard case you're doubly traffic is brought to you by Cedars Sinai Medical Center. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sarah McCammon. President Trump has taken one of his most aggressive actions yet to weaken the country's environmental laws. Today, the administration announced changes to speed up construction of big infrastructure projects such as oil pipelines and highways. Critics say that move will sideline concerns about climate change and the effects of pollution on poor and minority communities. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. The president was at a UPS facility in Atlanta to announce dramatic changes to the regulations that govern the National Environmental Policy Act or Nipah. He traveled to Atlanta because his administration wants a local freeway expansion project to be among the first approved under the new regulations for decades, the single biggest obstacle to building a modern transportation system. Has been the mountains and mountains of bureaucratic red tape in Washington, D C Depot was signed into law by President Richard Nixon 50 years ago. It requires federal agencies to consider the environmental effects of proposed projects before they're approved. It also gives the public and interest groups the ability to comment on those evaluations. A new regulation set a time limit of two years on environmental reviews, less than half the time they now take. On average. It limits the number and types of projects that fall under Nipah. It puts new limits on public participation and makes it harder to file legal challenges. While Trump focused on building new highways. The oil industry also sees big benefits. In today's announcement. A series of pipeline projects have recently been dealt setbacks related to nip a reviews. Mike Summers heads the American Petroleum Institute and says the existing Nipah process has become too cumbersome. We feel if we're going to get our economy moving again post pandemic that this kind of permitting reform is going to be necessary. Environmental groups around Lee criticize today's announcement. Attorney Sharon Beauty No with the Natural Resources Defense Council says the new regulations essentially gut Nipah And take power away from the country's most vulnerable people. Nita gives poor and communities of color, a say in the projects that will define their communities for decades to come. Rather than listen. The Trump Administration's plan aims to silence such voices. There's a long history of polluting highways, pipelines and industrial plants being disproportionately located in these neighborhoods. Latino believes the Trump Administration's new regulations for Nipah are illegal. And she says they will be challenged in court, which means November's election could determine whether these new regulations remain in effect. The presumptive Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, has vowed to reverse dozens of environmental rollbacks Trump has made while in office. Jeff Brady NPR news So who gets to be memorialized in California? There are several schools and streets named after the state's first governor. But what about the native Americans and black people he terrorized? Well this week. We're profiling, statues, memorials and buildings that deserve a second look to see who we honor in America and who we have allowed ourselves to forget. Today, Peter Hardiman Burnett As governor of California, he endorsed the genocide of Native Americans. He also tried to pass a law outlawing African Americans in this state. Author Gregory Noakes has researched and written extensively on Burnett. His book is called the troubled Life of Peter Burnett, and he joins us now welcome. Hi. Thank you very much, Ilsa and pleasure to be here. Julius. You mean before Burnett made it out here to California? He was a young man pushing West. Tell us how he came to live in Oregon first. He was a self taught attorney living in Missouri, and he had a fairly distinguished career there. Here's what defense attorney for Joseph Smith after the Mormon War in 18 38. But he will want to be rich, and he made all these investments and went heavily into debt, and he heard there was free land out in Oregon. So we organize his own wagon train, which actually was the first major wagon train in 18 43 to come to Oregon. And he enters politics in Oregon and in his role I understand in the Legislature, they're he uses a law that bans slavery in Oregon to actually allow slavery there. How did he do that? Well, he did. It was a very tricky maneuver, and his party come from the slave owning family brought a couple slaves of his own into Oregon, although one of them drowned on the way and or get it all previously passed a law banning slavery outright. So he passed what became Oregon's first exclusion law banning African Americans coming door again. There's been no such law before, and it's part of the exclusion law. There was a tricky provisions that slave owners would have 23 their slaves after three years. And that was unusual wording, by implication allowed slave owners tohave slaves for three years, right. And so this was changed rather quickly, But it did create a window for some slave owners to bring slaves to Oregon in that period. Well, the gold rush, of course, brings him to California. He helps found the city of Sacramento. He has elected the first governor of California. And he was able to get laws and policies on the books that effectively subject gated Native Americans in this state. What were those policies? One of those was a law passed in 18 50 called the Act for the government and protection of Indians and that word protection underlying Because it provided for apprenticing native Children toe white people where they could obviously be used his servants or slaves, and then for a vagrant Indian so called vagrant Indians to be hired out to the highest bidder. And it pretty much is like slavery in that period and this apparently involved in his 20,000 native Americans who are were used in that way. And there were also massacres that occurred during his tenure as governor as well, right massacres of native Americans. Oh, yes, right because you know, the one that's stuck out in my mind that I wrote about was ability Island Massacre in Lake County. In 18 50. What? As many as 300 promo Indians, innocent Indians, men, women and Children were massacred by the U. S. Calvary. And he had no comment on these air just kind of didn't call out troops to defend them. So in that sense, it was kind of a passive endorsement of extermination. Well, it seems that Burnett has Been reduced to a footnote in California history. I mean, I grew up in California I never learned about him. A lot of people don't know his name despite passing places that bear his name daily. Why do you think that is? He must have made a tremendous first impression because we've only touched on a few of the offices that he held over the years. People followed him, but he didn't deliver on his promises. Now, I should say that probably much of the population in the west of that time the white population were hostile to African Americans. But the idea that they would have a governor who seemed to have that it's his only agenda. Has caused him to be a pretty much for gotten. So you happen you have in California. Had these lists of governors of California and Burnett is always at the top. The very first governor. You'd think that would be a point of distinction, but not much is known about him. Gregory Noakes. His book from 2018 is called the Troubled Life of Peter Burnett. Thank you very much for speaking with us today, but thank you so much as I appreciate the call on appreciate you're interviewing me. This is all things considered from NPR news.

California Peter Burnett Nipah Oregon Trump Jeff Brady president NPR Trump Administration Gregory Noakes Atlanta attorney Peter Hardiman Burnett Cedars Sinai Medical Center Seal Beach Boulevard
"peter burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:45 min | 2 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mount Sinai dot or GE on the brain There show talk doesn't just mean talking. It also means listening. It's a challenge to allow different points of view to be heard and still keep a strong grip on the truth. We do our research. If we here lies masquerading his opinion. We have to call that out. Brian Lehrer Show weekdays. 10 a.m. to noon on 93.9 FM and AM 20 W n I c Worldwide mobilization against racism has reached a Nobel Peace Prize winning aid organization Doctors Without Borders That organization has provided critical care to people in some of the world's most desperate and dangerous conflict zones for decades. But over the past month, more than 1000 current and former staffers have signed a letter charging the organization with racism and white supremacy. Tomorrow, the group's international board plans to vote on a raft of measures to begin dismantling what even top officials there agree is a pattern of institutional racism. NPR's Nurit Eisenman reports. One of the staffers who signed the letter alleging racism within doctors Without Borders is Margaret Ninguna. She's a Cameroonian immigrant who had a long career in the U. S. Has a social worker before she joined Theeighty Group in 2017. I thought it was a great organisation, given the work that we're doing in countries that have Experience war on from me. The possibility that she faced racial discrimination from them did not cross my mind that all but no gonna says the micro aggressions began literally the moment she reached her first posting. Ah hospital run by the aid groups in south Sudan, suitcases still in hand, No Guna and another new arrival, also an American of African descent. Walked into the office of a top official, a white female. You know, talking to two people when we say hello. So this woman she not us, you know, she turned looked at awesome. Continue talking over the following weeks again and again. No gonna would notice white staffers treating white colleagues one way warmly, respectfully well, for people like her with black skin and an African accent when they weren't being ignored. You have everything that you do have been put on other microscope. Everything that you do is question but no gonna says the situation was far worse for local South Sudanese staff. For them. A job with doctors without Borders was too precious to risk complaining even when white staffers would talk down to them and berate them. You know, it was just very traumatizing to see that to hear that because coming from Cameroon It brought back the colonia mentality. Christos Christou is president of the International Board of Doctors Without Borders. He questions how widespread incidents of outright racism are across the organization's many missions. He says. There is no question the organization is built on a problematic model, essentially the idea of the white savior white doctor going and providing that system to bar people in Africa. There's a little African team and so increase, too, is calling for a total rethink the whole way off, distributing the decision making power but also their sources. But how much of this talk will translate into progress on the ground? Africa. Stewart is the president of doctors Without Borders US board. She points to her own election back in 2017 as a sign of the appetite for change. Consider she notes who raised her a surgical scrub back My mom who could not go to nursing school and her bastard daughter and with a Black Panther dead named Africa. I mean, this is was not born for this. But she also notes that earlier measures that she and others have pushed like a plan adopted by the International Board to increase the pay parity between international staff and local staff. It's taken years to actually implement. It feels like we're part of the solution, but it also feels like, damn it. How long does it take to wear down a mountain parrot? Eisenman NPR news. So who gets to be memorialized in California? There are several schools and streets named after the state's first governor. But what about the native Americans and black people he terrorized? Well this week. We're profiling, statues, memorials and buildings that deserve a second look to see who we honor in America and who we have allowed ourselves to forget. Today, Peter Hardiman Burnett As governor of California, he endorsed the genocide of Native Americans. He also tried to pass a law outlawing African Americans in this state. Author Gregory Noakes has researched and written extensively on Burnett. His book is called the troubled Life of Peter Burnett, and he joins us now welcome. Well, I thank you very much, Ilsa and pleasure to be here. So let me ask you. I mean, before Burnett made it out here to California. He was a young man pushing West. Tell us how he came to live in Oregon first. He was a self taught attorney living in Missouri, and he had a fairly distinguished career there. Here's one defense attorney for Joseph Smith after the Mormon War in 18 38. But he will want to be rich, and he made all these investments and went heavily into debt, and he heard there was free land out in Oregon. So we organize his own wagon train, which actually was the first major wagon train in 18 43 to come to Oregon. And he enters politics in Oregon and in his role I understand in the Legislature, they're he uses a law that bans slavery in Oregon to actually allow slavery there. How did he do that? Well, he did. It was a very tricky maneuver in his party come from a slave owning family brought a couple slaves of his own into Oregon, although one of them drowned on the way and or get it all previously passed a law banning slavery outright. So he passed what became Oregon's first exclusion law banning African Americans coming door again. There's been no such law before, and it's part of the exclusion law. There was a tricky provisions that slave owners would have 23 their slaves after three years. And that was unusual wording, by implication allowed slave owners tohave slaves for three years, right. And so this was change rather quickly, But it did create a window for some slave owners to bring slaves to Oregon in that period. Well, the gold rush, of course, brings him to California. He helps found the city of Sacramento. He has elected the first governor of California. And he was able to get laws and policies on the books that effectively subject gated Native Americans in this state. What were those policies? One of those was a law passed in 18 50 called the Act for the government and protection of Indians and that word protection underlying Because provided for apprenticing native Children toe white people where they could obviously be used his servants or slaves, and then for a vagrant Indians so called vagrant Indians to be hired out to the highest bidder. And it pretty much is like slavery in that period and this apparently involved in his 20,000 native Americans who are were used in that way. And there were also massacres that occurred during his tenure as governor as well, Right massacres of native Americans. Oh, yes, right. You could fit in. You know, the one that's stuck out in my mind that I wrote about was ability Island Massacre and Lake County in 18 50 when as many as 300 promo, Indians, innocent Indians, men, women and Children. Were massacred by the U. S. Calvary, and he had no comment on these or just kind of didn't call out troops to defend them. So in that sense, it was kind of a passive endorsement of extermination. Well, it seems that Burnett has Been reduced to a footnote in California history. I mean, I grew up in California I never learned about him. A lot of people don't know his name despite passing places that bear his name daily. Why do you think that is? He must have made a tremendous first impression because we've only touched on a few of the offices that he held over the years. People followed him, but he didn't deliver on his promises..

Oregon California Peter Burnett Africa International Board of Doctors official Brian Lehrer president Mount Sinai NPR Peter Hardiman Burnett Borders Sudan Cameroon GE Nurit Eisenman Lake County
"peter burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Incoming company are building a better building a better segment a segment that is a right now is our nation is discussing what to do with these monuments and statues of former slave owners were also looking to provide a history that includes more diverse stories Marcia I am in the city of Sacramento historians working on a new program to bring these stories to life through new video tour one she believes that needs to be highlighted is this African American business owner story on I street there is a gentleman named Daniel bloom as an African American man he was a former slave came here in eighteen forty nine and was very successful in the gold rush he set up a laundry business he actually built his house just a little ways from the then governor of the time Peter Burnett who is an extreme racist he tried to block he wanted in that first constitutional convention they wanted to say that African Americans didn't even come in California they were they were southerners that brought all their prejudices with them Daniel blue is more than just a great businessman he started the A. any church here in town he founded the first interracial school where it was African American children and native Americans that went to school together he also is credited with freeing the last slave in California where he went to and had a lawsuit to negotiate to win us freedom of young African American woman named Edith and he won it and he just went on to later Mary and he adopted her and she went on to marry and have a life here in the Sacramento area I'm in believes people need to see themselves as a part of history and she's working to tell those mark more diverse stories.

Daniel bloom California Edith Mary Marcia I Sacramento business owner Peter Burnett Daniel blue
"peter burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Discusses what to do with monuments and statues to former slave owners were also looking to provide a history that includes a more diverse stories Marcia Ivan is the city of Sacramento historian she's working on a new program to bring these diverse stories of Sacramento's history to light at the city of Sacramento history center through new video tour one of the people she believes that needs to be highlighted is this African American business owner on I street there is a gentleman named Daniel hello as an African American man he was a former slave came here in eighteen forty nine and was very successful in the gold rush he set up a laundry business he actually built his house just a little ways from the then governor of the time Peter Burnett who is an extreme racist he tried to block he wanted in that first constitutional convention they wanted to say that African Americans didn't even come in California they were they were southerners that brought all their prejudices with them I'm in says he was more than a great businessman Daniel blue is also a humanitarian he started the A. any church here in town he founded the first interracial school where it was African American children and native Americans that went to school together he also is credited with freeing the last slave in California where he went to and had a lawsuit to negotiate to win us freedom of young African American woman named Edith and he won it and he just went on to later Mary and he adopted her and she went on to marry and have a life here in the Sacramento.

Marcia Ivan Sacramento business owner California Daniel blue Edith Mary Peter Burnett
"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

13:21 min | 2 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"That's right folks extra credit the segment where and we get you know some human person that's tangentially familiar with the topic by varying degrees my favorite of late has been the colonel glad when Bolen of boy man he really he really set the internet on fire with that segment I let me love glad when I let him into the Facebook group folks so I I hope we're all still cool did you create a monster I don't know I don't know well today we have another quite informed gentleman joining us the host of the new howstuffworks show behind the **** which does deep dives into horrible people throughout history from Saddam Hussein's hobby writing erotic fiction to Hitler's spanking fetish I believe friends and neighbors then if I may Robert Evans Hey all has a crack in man it's it's it gets weird it is weird there's been a lot of like silent head shaking on this album so it doesn't really translate super well on the podcast but yeah who knew yeah I mean we're talking about Oregon which is if you like yeah if you go to like Portland or whatever it seems on the up and I spent a lot of the last three years and like rural southern or again and it's it's a pretty racist place like Josephine county where I was is chock full of **** quite a lot of them out there so it's it's it's a fascinating place even in the modern day yes yet tons of them it's one of the most racist counties in one dies densities of hate groups anywhere in the United States chock full of **** as it turns out not a good talk no no terrible coffee in terrible craft beer that the **** make yeah so when we when we originally talked off here Robert one of the things that we were very interested in both his colleagues but also as fans of your show was seen whether there was a specific person associated with the the supremacist origins of Oregon kind of setting the tone that we could we could learn a little bit more about with you and you found the guy right oh my god I sure did any Peter Burnett I think Peters is first name yet just a tremendous piece of crap in may be like you there's a long list of of super racist politicians in American history but he's in the running for most racist he's he's he's definitely like in that conversation for sure yeah we set him up briefly as just have having been the one that kind of came up with the idea of these exclusionary laws early on before Oregon became a state and he loved this idea so much they named it after himself the Burnett lash law which emitted black people who refuse to leave the state to be given lashes like every six months six months or something like that and he loved it so much that was a genius idea the Burnett last law yeah he was so proud of his his whipping people rule that he stuck his name on it which is a special kind of of terrible but he was actually like a violent jerk way before he went to Oregon when he was still living in Clear Creek Tennessee he was a shop owner like a general store owner he suspected this enslave black man was every now and then breaking into his store at night to drink from his whiskey barrel because they distort whiskey in barrels back then it was a it was different times he rather than like taking any of the other actions you might take in this situation he sets a trap using a rifle with like a string tied to the trigger tied to the window shatter holy so that when the guy crawled in the middle of the night this rifle shot him dead yeah he was in charge of the crime because it was in in slave man he said he was sorry but that's like Peter Burnett before he gets into politics they must have like a stand your ground law back in those days too I guess I just don't think they had laws yeah thank you use them at the eighteen twenties or whatever like there is no rule and that's such a cartoonish sort of Rube Goldberg S. kind a contraption he probably got the kit from acme that's insane okay go on give us more yeah so hit one of his early jobs before he gets off to organizing after he murders this guy with the Looney Tunes trap is he's a lawyer and some of his party's most prominent clients were Joseph Smith founder of the Mormon religion and all of Joseph Smith you know apostles or whatever all of his friends because they were on trial for kinda sort of fomenting a frontier war that had they had broken out in and around Missouri and so he he is these guys lawyer in his main achievement as a lawyer seems to be getting the venue change that the court case was being held in and this venue change allow justice math and all of his guys to escape and run away and and yeah so that that that's his career as a lawyer before he he gets on that first big wagon train to Oregon for the Great Migration and whatnot while yeah so ya already covered yet he made the lash law he made the exclusion law which he was he was an abolitionist but he's like an interesting way we we thought when we when you hear about abolitionist in the pre civil war airy usually think about just the few people who would have been like on the right side of history some of them were just abolitionist because they were that racist they were so racist and that was Peter Burnett he was abolitionists that because he didn't like the idea of there being black people anywhere in his state and he thought that slave labor was bad for white people so he was like he went up to the right conclusion wishes that slavery was a bad thing but he wound up there through like the most racist chain of logic that he could have possibly gotten too which is always interesting to me that was a sentiment that was big time shared by the majority of people in Oregon began they did incorporate and become a state the majority of people voted against slavery but also for ousting all the freed black people yeah and I I did find when I was doing my research that in eighteen forty at least Burnett had two of the slaves of his own this is Bethany is living in Missouri and there's some evidence that when he immigrated to or again he tried to bring one slave with him a young girl who drowned in the Columbia River during the voyage so not a lot of it's kind of an enticing piece of like what was going on there but that that's all the info I found so far on that right because she was projected to be somewhere between ten to twenty four or something yeah it seems like it might be kind of a creepy Thomas Jefferson sort of situation there yeah I suspected that as well yeah so this guy we've talked about like our young talked about what he did in Oregon but after he got done in Oregon this dude moved to California and he became in eighteen forty nine the first governor of California of the state of California the California is very first leader as a state in the union was this guy Peter Burnett who get a lot of terrible things maybe my favorite thing he did that isn't terrible was in eighteen fifty he changed thanksgiving that year from a Thursday to a Saturday just because it was better for him personally I mean I can I can get behind that it's always weird to me that thanksgiving is on a Thursday yeah that that's whimsical and fun but he also tried to bring racial exclusion to California with the Chinese right well first with black people he first tried to he in his first message to the California legislature he called exclusion like the first important like an issue of the first important the most important thing the California could do because he thought black people gonna take jobs from white people and that they would be unhappy in California and cause disruption because they would be second class citizens because he wasn't allowed to be anything but second class citizens so yeah he tried to they were like a thousand black people already in California many of them free and he tried to have them all kicked out and to stop any more from settling and that was to racist for eighteen fifties California so he lost on that and he wound up actually like in eighteen fifty one quitting being the governor over this because he tried a couple of times to get California band black people and they just wouldn't do it and yeah I mean there's some pretty pretty racist quotes from him that I could read but that's probably not necessary but it is fun to note that after he was no longer governor and after his political career was over as you know the world continue to advance and modernized in his old age yeah his crusade as you mentioned was trying to stop the Chinese from coming to California so he was just just comprehensively racist across the board every chance he he got which is impressive in a terrible way yes at least you can say he was consistent but honestly good on you California for anyone listening who is in the state right now I think this speaks very highly to the character of the state even as far back as the eighteen fifties he he also published an autobiography right at some point yeah that that's where he started ranting about Chinese immigration yeah Robert surely he got some sort of amazing comeuppance right like burned to death in a fire do you know drowned under suspicious circumstances give me some gotten a fight with the locomotive you know I mean I I think he died rich in old he was in his eighties or somehow man that's a bummer now it's just less what always happens with these **** right I mean I think you're seeing that a lot executive the Cosby episode he kind of got it come up as but even that sort of like a pyrrhic victory where it's like too little too late for a guy that's been scaring people over four years on you know on checks yeah every now and then you get a moose Selene or Qaddafi where they get dragged out into the street and punished by the people that they spent decades **** with but that's almost that almost never happens usually they die rich in a villa somewhere I'm really glad that you said this Robert because I was listening to the Gaddafi episode which I thought was fantastic and and I'm still preparing myself to check out the winds dean episode which is a two parter correct yeah yeah yeah that one's a big one what we'd like to do is again thank you for giving us more insight on the life of Peter hardamon Burnett screw that care yeah I know right the mass here but we were wondering if you could tell our if you could tell our fellow listeners here a little bit more about behind the **** and what they can expect when they tune in to your show well I mean our goal is to tell you everything you don't know about the very worst people in all of history so you know you've probably sad you know stone or whatever in your underpants and watched a lot of documentaries about Hitler on the history channel over the years but you probably don't know that he based a lot of his military strategies in his like attitudes on existence and life on a series of young adult novels that are basically like the German equivalent of Harry potter back in the eighteen hundreds while you know and and for that matter while we're on the subject of novelist you probably haven't read Saddam Hussein's romance novels but I have and that's one of the things we get into in this podcast I referred to it as erotic fiction was that close that I love you is too far no no it is very erotic in fact is a long passage where an elderly woman yells at children about how sexy males are so that's fun yeah or those novels in particular largely considered these will make little maniacal analogies about his relationship with the country yes and they're there it's one of those weird things there's a lot of cases like with the cams in North Korea a heart being credited to dictators who didn't actually make it Saddam definitely wrote these books get into that to an extent but they're like they're a mix of rants about modern politics and like utopian fiction and so it's like a mix of Saddam screaming at the people he hates and trying to set up the ideal government three never quite got to make in Iraq it's it's a really strange insight into what was going on in the man's head that's fast in order I wanted to noon and no spoilers but I could you tell us a little bit about some episodes that are coming up soon yet today right now there is a new episode on Paul man a fort part one of which just dropped in part two which will be up Thursday so that's a that's a big one I checked that out and we we've been doing an ongoing series about king Leopold of Belgium and the condo and we're recording an episode today about what happened after Leopold who is one of the worst people in our history doesn't get you know enough it knowledge meant for just how terrible he was so great and we're also recording an episode about the serial killer Albert fish with his one of his descendants who is all up comedian in LA today so that's going to be fun man that's fascinating yeah we get a good good slate we are going to wrap it up today we want to thank you so much for coming on the show Robert Evans friends and neighbors the mastermind behind one of howstuffworks newest podcast behind the **** if you.

Bolen Facebook six months three years four years
"peter burnett" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

16:47 min | 3 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"It's white people who are looking for a study because they're the ones who actually have some who who will lose something in this process but but what we need to what we need to do is we need and this is why we need a national dialogue honoration class. This is why we need. Foundational level changes like I'm advocating for <hes> because not only is this about simply paying reparations. It's about abolishing slavery. We will not be a nation where we the people truly means all the people in Hill. We do something about land titles. I think there's a populous though that feels feels like if anything it's GONNA if there's going to be any reparations and used to go to indigenous people I and and <hes> that was part of why that question posed to him which was centered around. Obviously you know slavery <hes> which obviously recently happened in his a bad thing indigenous people were slaved as well my own people were for sure okay <hes> yeah you know but I think what what what I like about your approaches. You're hitting it from the foundation and sort of putting aside okay is it is it do we deal with as indigenous people indigenous issues if you will or issues Dave slapped me. I used the wrong analogy on this show we talk we make a distinction between issues and problems there problem. Okay the and the point Yep Yep. They're distinct problems. Okay not issues. There's a reason the way we define it here. Mark as we say issues are debatable. Problems is need be fixed. They're there and so you know. I like the fact that you're you're hitting this at a foundational level. It says okay here's a rat today <hes> here's here's a road to fixing it. What do you think thank you know what I mean? So if that's that's making any sense but there's definitely contingency out there. That says you know <hes> they're not even honoring treaties so you know in essence what's our with our starting point and shouldn't it shouldn't doubt attention going to Indian country. I you know well and this is what I love about what happened South Dakota where the government tried to pay for Mount Rushmore and the Lakota people like no. You can't pay us for that yeah. That doesn't have a monetary value exactly YEP. I love that because well I think reparations and right now the debate about it is in regards to slavery while I think that's not a bad conversation and probably Ali from that we need to do. I also convince us not GonNa fix the problem and the challenge and I I've learned this more since I've moved to the East Coast as compared to living I grew up in the South West <hes> but on the east coast which is where much for policies written America's racial sins beginning to end with slavery and while I completely agree slavery is a massive black eye for this nation is not the beginning nor is it some of what we've done and this is why I go back to this quote by by Peter Burnett the governor of California I go back to the policy that Abraham Lincoln and it's our nation has learned and how to talk about it fishy of slavery without completely going desert but it has never learned how to talk about its history of genocide and ethnic cleansing against native peoples breath and it's still a complete state of Stockton denial about that and this is what I'm so adamant you know and so this is when you look at models for social change and one of the models for social changes a model disruption where you protest you mark you sit in you coop stage now. Our nation has used this model very effectively over the past over our life over the history of this nation. You know whether it's me to whether it standing rock whether it's I've matter whether it's occupy Wall Street you know we've used this model well and even our deepest dialogue. We've had on race to date which I would say is the civil rights movement came out of a model of disruption you march you sit in protests and then you finally get stopped the the flow when you co off the stage now in this model the moment you co op the stage. One of two things happens very quickly which is either. You're the owner of the stage takes it back or your audience leaves because they didn't come to listen to you know if you go to a concert and another ban co ops the stage well if you don't like the band you're just GonNa leave because you didn't come to hear them and so so literally all you have is a soundbite in this model. Now Black Lives Matter Metoo standing rock. We've used the soundbite masterfully and have I used it to affect a certain amount of social change the interesting thing about the civil rights movement is the civil rights leaders kept the stage and the audience right. We actually had a long dialogue ugh about civil rights in this nation regarding our history with race so you have to ask how did our civil rights leaders keep the stage well unfortunately one of the main ways I would observe observed that they kept the stage. Please hear me I have deep respect for civil rights leaders and they moved us far beyond where we were before and I do not want to to criticize their work but I also have to say if we want to get past where we are now we have to be able to critique it and do it better the next time and one of the ways that they kept the stage is by the moral authorities that they referenced. Why are we giving civil rights to people of Color and the moral authorities is that were referenced throughout the Civil Rights Movement were are foundations the declaration of independence and the Constitution these are the things that Dr King referred to as the blink check now these documents are blatant white supremacist and sexist and racist document so unfortunately the broader outcome of the civil rights movement while it moved the ball forward a little bit essentially the dialogue? I love that we had was not the fact that are right are white supremacy racism and sexism extent down to our foundations. We basically said we have good foundations. We just have to be better Americans so instead of attacking the systemic white supremacy racism and sexism and identifying that implicit bias we basically ended up affirming American exceptionalism which again is the coping mechanism Atkin hasn't friend nation in deep denial of genocidal pass as well as current racist reality and so this is why I'm convinced black life matters happening today because the civil rights movement didn't actually bring to the point that Ed it's our foundations. That state black lives matter because what I'm hearing to is it's cyclical right so you know anytime you're trying to. You're trying to find your reference point. <hes> it's falling back to the same problem again until you you can keep plastering wall. All you want and chill you fix the cracking foundation. Your walls are going to continue to crack your window. Sills continue to gap in your carpets GonNa continue to sag you have to fix the problem as a Libyan chat says maybe reparations to indigenous peoples should look like the return of lands and sacred places she writes this is why why I absolutely agree we have to re we have to rethink and we have to have a deep dialogue about land titles because land titles to this day as referenced by the Supreme Court and Ruth Bader Ginsburg in two thousand thousand five is based on a dish humanizing doctrine of discovery and until we fix that problem we're we the people will never include native peoples <hes>. I have to read this one in Chad. It's it's apropos. Sandra wrote I spied hearing references that the quote founding fathers and a quote landowning quite men intended piece equality and concern for others as principals the country was founded on if every speech was rewritten to expose the truth we would have global and I quote Oh crap it all make sense now in quote session and she's right absolutely my life got considerably less confusing. The day I acknowledged the the constitution wasn't written to protect the native man the day I acknowledged the reason we have a constitutional protect white landowning man suddenly the history of my country. The United States of America made perfect sense. Well you know what I believe. The Constitution was written by racist meant now. Here's why I say that they came here with I preach preconceived ideas of what they had where they left and they brought them here and after after a little strife and a little hardship they decided that they would craft a charter that would enable Obam to live a life. They wanted so the reason. I say that it was found this I mean the constitution was created by racist men. They were racist now. They take themselves as racist. I'M GONNA say no call the behaviors they <hes> conducted themselves in and with were normal behaviors for them. It was it's normal is taking a breath of fresh air so denigrating a person of color calling them <hes> some sort of slander derogatory <hes> <hes> name with normal now so you know they weren't considered as racist. They didn't consider themselves races. That was just normal for them. Now I giving I'm not giving them a pass by any means but yeah the pushback is it was a charter created by racist men to perpetuate racist policies period yeah it was it was to contain yes it was to continue to further their agenda and obviously didn't include people of Color and you can see that very clearly in this whole debate. Now we have on Gerrymandering that where the Supreme Court basically just said you know we're not gonNA decide this well if you read the constitution article on sex and two which is where they're setting up the electoral college and they're determining. How are we going to decide votes in this country <music>? The entire purpose of electro college is to maximize the voice and the sway of white landowning men. They're counting women. They're counting wanting African people they can't decide if they counting as a whole which is what the the South wanted because they had more slaves down there and and the north is like no if you if you count all the black people then you have an unfair advantage of the south of the North was actually advocating for for less than then a whole person the whole reason we have in electoral college is to elevate the voice and the sway of white landowning men Gerrymandering is written into the constitution. That's why we have it. That's why we use an electoral college and this is what makes us. Why are we even debating this this? Can we acknowledge. This is the purpose of the system. We've set up exactly now. We you need to change that system and actually on my on my personal website. It's I haven't released through my campaign yet but on my personal website this I did this about four three years ago. I read I read through the entire confrontation through the twenty seven minutes. I noticed that if you read the entire document there are fifty one gender-specific male pronouns. There's not a single female pronoun of the entire document correct not one and suddenly this this makes sense as far as the position of women in our society 'cause we don't even think about them in in our and not only do we not thinking about them. Then we still haven't corrected it to this day. You know it it takes it takes two amendments payments to get women the right to vote the fourteenth didn't do it is still specifically to women and natives in the fourteenth amendment. It took the the women's suffrage in in the nineteen hundreds taxi get women the right to vote was also very all right very blatantly <hes> absent of acknowledgement of Matriarchal societies here yeah so you know and and so on well I did with this constitution is I think it's good that we can amend the constitution but the problem with that is so we can have an amendment at the end of that said Oh when we say we the people we actually mean women too but to get to that point you have to read through page page after page after page of blatantly sexist language and then you read a footnote at the end in the terms of the amendments to say Oh actually when we said he meant her too so I would argue. We don't need to amend our Constitution because amendment amending hasn't worked very effectively. We haven't abolish slavery yet so I would say we actually have to edit the thing we need to add it so I went through the constitution with a strike through funds and I merely merely to to identify the white supremacist racist and sexist language so every time I came across the heat him are his. I replace it with a proper noun or gender neutral pronoun every time I came across Texas thing like the three fifth compromise yeah. We never said that. Let's just put a stroke. We don't need to forget. We set it but let's put a strike through fund through it. Yeah we should have said this thirteenth amendment neither slavery nor involuntary servitude silicosis within the United States period no claws keeping legal in prison. Now I added one amendment to the Constitution. I inserted one word on your mark because if you constitution so into doctrine of discovery it actually says <hes> invade search out capture vanquishing subdue all say ballo Pagans Hagen Saracens whatsoever reduced persons to perpetual savory convert them to his into your use and profit the implicit bias of the dachshund discovery is that the natural world anything below the white landowning male exists for the exploitation take prophet of the White Landowning Mail. This is why corporations can be sued not for destroying the environment but for not maximizing the prophet of their white landowning male shareholders because the world you the assumption. The implicit bias of the constitution is there's nothing in there that states there's value for life and instead it exists for the exploitation profit of the white landowning now and so I- inserted two words in the preamble we the people of the United States in order to.

Civil Rights Movement United States Supreme Court America White Landowning Mail Dave East Coast South Dakota Texas Chad Mark Ruth Bader Ginsburg Mount Rushmore Ali Obam Metoo Peter Burnett Abraham Lincoln
"peter burnett" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition. NPR's Noel king talks to David Wessel, director of the Hutchins center, the Brookings Institution about the Federal Reserve indicating it may cut interest rates in the future. And the FBI is helping local authorities ended Dominican Republic, investigate the recent unexplained deaths and illnesses of several Americans. Those stories coming up on morning edition. Now. This from Casey audible you news. Governor Gavin Newsom issued a rare public apology on behalf of the state of California for a history of what he called violence and mistreatment against native Americans Newsom issue. The apology in Zeca order and, and in person event. Casey will use of George has more Newsom issued this order saying, California must quote reckon with our dark history. More than one hundred tribal leaders gathered in Sacramento, for an annual meeting, and Newsome sat with them in a circle, some of them applauded the apology, for starting the healing process in their communities, Lawrence Stafford is with the federated Indians of green rancher RIA, today, more than ever, we need to remember the history of our shared past in learn from its lessons newsome's executive order referenced remarks by California's first governor, Peter Burnett who pledged a war of extreme. Nation until quote the Indian race becomes extinct. KCRW's Evan, George. Good.

Governor Gavin Newsom KCRW California Casey Newsome Noel king NPR George Brookings Institution FBI Federal Reserve Hutchins center David Wessel Peter Burnett Sacramento director Zeca Lawrence Stafford
"peter burnett" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:31 min | 3 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on KGO 810

"You go. Oh, what a handsome looking he goes. Yeah. He's. You look around and you realize but for racism, we all share these same similar experiences. Right. I remember put my kid in one of my kids, flew for the first time by cross country. And I remember like my heart thumping as he was getting right? Yeah. And so all these things you know, we're we all share. And then you, you see that story of those central park five and, and I know you told me to watch it and it's well done. I'm not going to push back on that. I watched like twenty five minutes of it in my heart. The whole time felt like somebody was sticking a nail in an hammering with a club. It was I can't stop watching it. And you know and, and there are, you know, great, great documentaries, and great stories like that. But like my wife can't do that, like miss watch Mississippi burning. You know, and that's like a comic version of what this thing watch is really finish watching. I can re read, I'll go read the book that it's based on, but I can't I mean these kids are just you just like you say you want to go in a hug them. You just want to know what's coming, so dumb in, in, in your neck of the woods, and San Jose. They're talking about change the name of a school. And this is not. We all know the story right from around the country. Although there are some surprising ironies city of Austin very progressive community wants to change the name of Austin. Stephen, Stephen F Austin was a divisive figure in Texas history. He wanted he didn't want a slave to be freed. And he said, when they were free, they would try to kill all the whites. He was crazy guy. But, you know, so most of what we go after when we do, this are either confederates or like in this case in the San Jose unified school district Thursday night. They did they dropped the name of Peter Burnett, who was a, a California's first governor from one of the city's oldest middle schools, and they, they instead named it after an indigenous. Innis person. Or group. I don't know this tribe. I'm sorry. I I'm going to alone middle school. Aloni Aloni, and members of this tribe of the San Francisco, Bay area, happy with this decision because apparently Vernet was not a exactly what you would call a fan of the indigenous people to the exact opposite. He, he advocated for exclusion of African Americans from California and later in his life supported the federal Chinese. Exclusion act. He this is much later when you know, when, but he wanted to his, his idea was we should exterminate native Americans, jeez. Yeah. He so he had a school named after. So I mean how far down this rabbit hole. Do we go? And I say all the freaking way. Yep. Don't stop with confederates if you're going to say that Robert E Lee can have a statue. But Thomas Jefferson, Ken. Now, I know we revere, our founding fathers we do. And we know Andrew Jackson. He was a monster. What president was our fifth president. Andrew Jackson, does that say. I'm sorry. I don't have that in front of me. He's a on on our eight four at seven checkout. On seven. vistaprint Okay. dot So com he's on our vistaprint on the now. ten dollar Bill on And Hamilton's with on a the check ten. of the roads, here's Heather He's a solo on the twenty accident. Jackson In twenty San Jose, and that's from the the whole Chilton debate auto body about traffic Harriet, desk, Tubman, is Andrew located Jackson in the center divide of was south a horrible two man. eighty before Who one put a zero price one on southbound the heads two of eighty native is heavy Americans between even eighty children five and when say you seven kill th them, street in you two would stretches get paid. eastbound to thirty-seven He is before trumps Lafi favorite president at an accident still clearing from knocked the two me over right the lanes failure. traffic So jam packed all of these from things, before all of these one men A one now. should have And their then names up to taken the north bay and just getting people word of go, an accident, you northbound know, it one is saying, north of you know seminary. what if we start finding It's out not things about, like, clear. What lanes if Martin any Luther are King, blocked as you travel Martin the Luther East King Bay has some things east for five home and him eighty around before these San days? Ramon I don't road. know if you There heard was an that accident store on that the shoulder. Traffic's heavy is from balancing Eden canyon around by one to of Fallon, his biographers. you'll pick I'm up not even and going slow to mention down again again, before but you can I go on read look at through yourself the Mont passer horrible may story still be an accident near north Flynn about. out of San Francisco northbound one zero one packed from just north of two eighty to the bay bridge. Traffic is sponsored by big O tires the team you trust this week at participating big O tires, buy three tires. Get one free on select in stock sets of four tires with. Let's say let's get rid of those names down in, you know, in, in, in the south like, you know, Jackson, you know, or like or. Robert E Lee, high school or leave Leesburg, Virginia. Or I mean it's everywhere you.

Andrew Jackson Heather He San Jose unified school distri Robert E Lee president San Francisco San Jose California Austin Aloni Aloni bay bridge Peter Burnett middle school San days Stephen Innis Martin Stephen F Austin
"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:40 min | 3 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Am sure it does. It's like when people visit our city, and call it hotlanta. Yeah. I would say this is even more agree. Just probably people running around. They put a burden on the yes, and Portland has this national reputation at least for being a very progressive city, right? Face tattoos or cool. Marijuana decriminalized the streets are paved in marijuana. In fact, in Borland, it does have a particular smell. And in general, people would see it as sort of a bastion of left leaning culture. Yeah. Super chill. You know you can you can buy a sandwich. I song. In Portland, literally doesn't have to be a good song. It's just a song a song or a little soft shoe. Or maybe you got a one man band. Dick Van Dyke situation going on did see a one man bamboo knows there. Did you see that guy just pulled that out of my of my year? Well, you are correct. And there are one man bands in Portland. There are also numerous amazing things amazing bits of history. One of our co workers, a guy named Nathan is actually from Oregon. And he assured us that Portland is more of a cultural exception to the rule. Nowadays, wearing my Timberline lodge hat right now. I bought at the Portland airport. And as you might imagine Portland airport, not a chain restaurant incite my friend, all of the shop sell handmade artistic goods. I bought some really cute little pieces of pottery there for my mom. That's sweet of you. Man, and that's really dope hat. It is a great hat. So it's safe to say that you and I are fans of Portland and would travel there again in the future. Sure, at least modern Portland. Right, right. I don't think I would want to travel there in a time machine to be passed. Yes. Yes. Today's episode is about the origins of Oregon Portland in particular when take or as it's called here in some of these articles that we're looking at the Oregon country. Yeah. Oregon country might sound weird to some people. What is Oregon kept seeing it? And it was a little weird sending. But I figured it out with my internet sleuth skills. What would now be modern day? Oregon Washington state, and I'd Aho was all kind of cluster together in this one big old chunk of land collectively referred to as the Oregon country. Yeah. And this was, let's see way back in eighteen eighteen. Right. The US and Britain agreed to jointly occupy this seems like a odd couple situation. And then I think the US started getting a little greedy and being, you know, we kind of want this for our own when it turn this into some states. Yeah. Because the British wanted to be in the area in Oregon country, mainly to engage in the first trade, and James k Polk who was an expansionist president. Right. Really wanted to make this our own and not not share not go with the Brits anymore. So that. That alternately happened they negotiated. They decided it wasn't worth going to war over the Brits. It anyway. And there was some back and forth. And there's a really great slogan that the northerners used it was fifty four forty or fight, and fifty four forty was talking about the coordinates, the latitude that Mark, the northernmost part of this territory and during these negotiations, the US is first proposal was that the territory be cut in half. Right. With that, with that border at the forty ninth parallel, and the British rejected it. And so the expansionist many of whom were anti slavery northerners, which is super important for this part of where they are the ones who called for more American aggression, get out there, be a big dog fifty four forty or fight. It's hard to say you did really well with that fifty four forty or fight is tough. When you really get it right though, sense of accomplishment, as I'm sure they felt when they finally arrived at a pretty decent deal with the Brits, where they divided the territory along the forty ninth parallel pretty close to fifty four. I guess what's the forty though fifty four? Forty minutes divisions of the grease a decimal. So this is where we end up with Oregon needing to become a state. And when you become a stay, what do you do you have to have a state constitution? And as we know constitutions are not generally made overnights. They often reflect common practices goals or even existing laws that a community has practiced or written down beforehand, and Oregon, had its own pre existing laws in eighteen forty four they passed something called the exclusion law. And this was this was enacted by the provisional government of the region at the time. What, what did the exclusion law do? Yeah. Was this guy named Peter Burnett, who was like kind of Oregon trail kind of blazer, I guess, Peter Hardiman, Hardiman, Vernet, and actually spoiler alert, we're going to dig into him in a little more detail. Later in the show for shadowy big time for shadowing Bush, here's what this dude is just to give you a taste of what his medicine was, like he was a former slave owner and as a really crazy resume did all kinds of interesting things, but by all accounts, a alarming dastardly racist nearly so this exclusion law, that was enacted sort of pre proper government and constitution basically allowed slaveholders to hold on for dear life to those slaves for a maximum of up to three years. And I, I was like, wait is this is this because of emancipation? That was decades later. This is eighteen forty four that wasn't until eighteen sixties, right? And I realize, oh, no, Oregon outlawed slavery in the territory. Right. But here's the thing is going to go. That's nice. What a great bunch of people. Okay. But, but there's more so yeah. This grace period of three years. But then all of those freed black people work required to leave. Yeah, that's the thing, the government of Oregon passed this. Exclusion law of eighteen forty four and in it, they did place, a ban on slavery, with a requirement the slave owners, eventually free their slaves, but they did this with the understanding that any African American who remained in Oregon, after they were freed would be flogged, whiplash and forcibly expelled from the country if they're were caught in the Oregon country, again, within six months, then the punishment would be repeated. And then eventually the law was amended in another version to substitute forced labor, so essentially slavery, instead of flogging and then it was repealed in. Eighteen forty five. So this community was so racist that the didn't even condone slavery. They were so such white supremacist data's didn't want him around, like at all. And there's, there's some language we'll get into a second, but I just want to point this out of the that law, you mentioned about flogging, that was called the Burnett lash law. Because our buddy Burnett was so into this, that he wanted to brandit with his own his name was like a signature thing. And it required that declared rather that offenders, who refused to leave would be punished with, quote, not less than twenty or more than thirty nine stripes, and that would that would be a cycle that would recur every six months until they left. And fortunately, this lash law did get amended and repealed. So as far as we know today. Day. No people wherever lashed as a result of that law. But this was just the first of three different laws likeness that all were meant to ban people of color from Oregon country which, again at that point is like Washington, Oregon, and part of Idaho. A huge swath of land. That's right. And we're getting some of this information from, from places wounded. My favorites was a Washington Post article by deneen l Brown, Colin Portland van blacks Oregon's shameful history as an all white state, or as I've seen it referred to as an all white utopia kinda right after at least there's this weird history of intentional communities and utopian thinking in Oregon. So it's not, not all examples are racist. But this definitely was the idea for the people who are supporting this concept was that somehow society would be better if they all. Felt like if they also identified with the same ethnicity. Now, did they have the same sort of racism that would be common? In the north east at the time wherein, for instance, Italian or Irish immigrants or children of those immigrants are still considered not white enough. I don't know. But what was on the books was specifically targeting people of color in eighteen forty eight this provisional territorial? Government has the law making it illegal for any quote, negro, or mulatto to live in Oregon country, but they did have a provision for people who had native American blood which they weirdly referred to as half breeds. Despicable people. They are big people. But it's interesting that all it takes just get a little white in. You really didn't like black people. Yeah. That's what it boils down to. All right, then. Yeah. So it's state time baby. Here we go. What do you need to make a state as established earlier, yet you need? You gotta have some dirt gotta delineation between your dirt and the other people's dirt, yet to have some people in both sides. Oh, that you can differentiate constitution. There we go. Yes. In eighteen fifty seven the government of what will become Oregon was working on its constitution. They did a couple of things they grossly plagiarized constitutions from other states at the time. That's gonna be some of that constitution is on exactly great work poetry that you, you know, pilfering from his look down upon it's sorta like stealing a boilerplate release form. Yeah. I think that's a very good point. Let's get something cleared. View may be competing to be the next account executive at heart media..

Oregon Portland US Peter Burnett Borland Marijuana Dick Van Dyke Timberline lodge James k Polk Nathan Washington Post Peter Hardiman account executive Bush Aho Washington president Idaho
"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:45 min | 3 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the show, ladies and gentlemen. I'm Ben I'm no. This is a very standard intro. We're trying today. Yeah, we're going we're going straight for it. But we were only able to make this show, of course, with the assistance of our esteemed third member of friends, neighbors, super producer Casey program. Sort of the Nilo, bening would white bread a little homogeneous bet. Yes. Yes. Today. We are. Well, let's let's start in the modern day for a long time. Neither of us had ever been to Portland until pretty recently true, I only spent a little bit of time there. I think you had a little bit more of a fully fleshed out Portland experience. But we tell me in is the the dream of the nineties, in fact, still alive in Portland. Yes. I thoroughly enjoyed the town. I thought it was surprising. I was diplomatic enough. Not to directly, mention the comedy show Portland area to anybody that gets really old. I am sure does, it's like when people visit our city and call it hotlanta. Yeah. This is even more agree. Just probably people running around. They put a bird on it. Yes. And Portland has this national reputation at least for being a very progressive city right, face tattoos or cool. Marijuana's decriminalized. The streets are paved in marijuana. In fact, and Portland. It does have a particular smell. And in general, people would see it as sort of a bastion of left leaning culture. Yeah. Super chill, you know, you can be can buy a sandwich I song in Portland, literally. Doesn't have to be a good song. It's just a song a song or a little soft shoe. Or maybe you got a one man band kinda Dick Van Dyke situation going on. Did see a one man band when I was there. Did you see that guy? Just pulled that out of my of my year. Will you are correct? And there are one man bands in Portland. There are also numerous amazing things amazing. It's of history. One of our co workers, a guy named Nathan is actually from Oregon. And he assured us that Portland is more of a cultural exception to the rule nowadays. Actually wearing my Timberline lodge hat right now. I bought at the Portland airport. And as you might imagine a Portland airport, not a chain restaurant incite my friend, all of the shops sell handmade articifial goods. I bought some really cute. Little pieces of pottery there for me mom. That's sweet of you, man and this really dope hat. It is a great hat. So it's safe to say that you and I are fans of Portland and would travel there again in the future. Sure, at least modern Portland. Right, right. I don't think I would want to travel there in a time machine to pass. Yes. Yes. Today's episode is about the origins of Oregon Portland in particular when take or as it's called here, lemon some of these articles that we're looking at the Oregon country. Yeah. Oregon country, it might sound weird to some people. What is Oregon kept seeing it? And it was a little weird sending. But I figured it out with my internet sleuth skills. What would now be modern day? Oregon Washington state, and Idaho, was all kind of cluster together in this one big old chunk of land collectively referred to as the Oregon country. Yeah. And this was, let's see way back in eighteen eighteen. Right. The US and Britain agreed to jointly occupy this. Yeah. I've seen like a odd couple on a situation and then I think the US started getting a little greedy and being, you know, we kind of want this. For our own when it turn this in some states. Yeah. Because the British wanted to be in the area in Oregon country, mainly to engage in the first trade astray, and James k Polk who is an expansionist president. Right. Really wanted to make this our own and not not chair now. Go with the Brits anymore, so that ultimately happened they negotiated. They decided it wasn't worth going to war over the Brits. It anyway. And there was some back and forth. And there's a really great slogan that the northerners used it was fifty four forty or fight, and fifty four forty was talking about the coordinates, the latitude that Mark, the northernmost part of this territory and during these negotiations the US is I propose. Title. Was that the territory be cut in half? Right. With that, with that border at the forty ninth parallel, and the British rejected it. And so the expansionist many of whom were anti slavery northerners, which is super important for this part of the story, they are the ones who called. For more American aggression, get out there, be a big dog fifty four forty or fight. It's hard to say you did really well with that fifty four forty or fight is tough fun. When you really get it right though. It gives you a sense of accomplishment, as I'm sure they felt when they finally arrived at a pretty decent deal with the Brits, where they divided the territory along the forty ninth parallel pretty close to fifty four. I guess, what's the forty though fifty four forty minutes divisions of degrees? It's like a decimal kind of radical. Okay. So this is where we end up with Oregon needing to become a state. And when you become a stay, what do you do you have to have a state constitution? And as we know constitutions are not generally made overnights. They often reflect common practices goals or even existing laws that a community has practiced or written down beforehand, and Oregon, had its own pre existing laws in eighteen forty four they passed something called the exclusion law. And this was this was enacted by the provisional government of the region at the time. What, what did the exclusion law do? Yeah. Is this guy named Peter Burnett who was like kind of Oregon trail kind of blazer, I guess Peter Hardiman, Hardiman Burnett. And actually spoiler alert, we're going to dig into him in a little more detail later in the show. Foreshadowing big time. Foreshadowing, Bush, here's what this dude is just to give you a taste of what has matter was like he was a former slave owner and has a really crazy resume did all kinds of interesting things, but by all accounts, a alarming dastardly racist. Virulent. So this exclusion law, that was enacted sort of pre proper government and constitution basically allowed slaveholders to poll on for dear life to those slaves for a maximum of for up to three years. And at first, I was like, wait is this is this, because of emancipation? That was decades later. This is eighteen forty four that wasn't until late eighteen sixties. Right. And I realize, oh, no, Oregon outlawed slavery in the territory. Right. But here's the key thing is going to be oh, that's, that's nice. What a great bunch of people. Yeah. Okay. But, but there's more. So, yeah. This grace period of three years. But then all of those freed black people work required to leave. Yeah, that's the thing, the government of Oregon passed this. Exclusion law of eighteen forty four and in it, they did place, a ban on slavery. With a requirement the slave owners, eventually free their slaves, but they did this with the understanding that any African American who remained in Oregon, after they were freed would be flogged, whiplash and forcibly expelled from the country if they were caught in the Oregon country, again, within six months, then the punishment would be repeated. And then eventually the law was amended in another version to substitute forced labor, so essentially slavery, instead of flogging and then it was repealed in eighteen forty five. So this community was so racist that the, the didn't even condone slavery. They were so such white supremacist data's didn't want him around, like at all. And there's, there's some language. We'll get into a second. But I just want to point this out of the that law, you mentioned about flogging or. That was called the Burnett lashed law, because our buddy Burnett was so into this that, he, he wanted to brand it with his own. His name was like his signature thing, and it required that or declared rather that offenders, who refused to leave would be punished with, quote, not less than twenty or more than thirty nine stripes, and that would that would be a cycle that would recur every six months until they left. And fortunately, this last law did get amended and repealed. So as far as we know today. No people wherever lashed as a result of that law. But this was just the first of three different laws likeness that all were meant to ban people of color from Oregon country which, again at that point is like Washington, Oregon, and part of Idaho is a huge swath of land. That's right. And we're getting some. Of this information from a few different places ruined. My favorites was a Washington Post article by deneen l Brown, Colin Portland van blacks Oregon's shameful history as an all white state for as I've seen it referred to as an all white utopia, kind of right after at least there's this weird history of intentional communities and utopian thinking in Oregon, so it's not, not all examples are racist. But this definitely was the idea for the people who were supporting this concept was that somehow society would be better, if they all felt like if they also identified with the same ethnicity. Now, did they have the same sort of racism, that would be common in the northeast at the time wherein, for instance, Italian or Irish immigrants or children of those immigrants are still considered not white enough? I don't know. But what was on the books was specific? Typically targeting people of color in eighteen forty eight this provisional territorial government passed a law making it illegal for any quote, negro, or mulatto to live in Oregon country, but they did have a provision for people who had native American blood, which they weirdly referred to as half breeds despicable people. Big old people. But it's interesting that all it takes just get a little white in. You really didn't like black people. Yeah. Yeah. That's what it goes out to. All right. Then. Yeah. So it state time baby here we go. What do you need to make a state as established earlier? Yeah. You need. You gotta have some dirt. You gotta have delineation between your shirt and the other people's dirt, yet, to have some people in both sides, so that you can differentiate constitution. There we go. Yes. In eighteen fifty seven the government of what would become Oregon was working on. It's constitution. They did a couple of things they grossly plagiarized constitutions from other states at the time. You know, there's gonna be some of that, right? I constitution is on exactly great work poetry that you, you know, pilfering from his his looked down upon. It's almost like stealing a boilerplate release form or say. Yeah, I think that's a very good point. Blue Cross Blue shield believed everyone should have access to healthcare, no matter who you are or where you live. That's why in every state are companies are working to improve health and expand access to care from training..

Oregon Portland Hardiman Burnett Timberline lodge Dick Van Dyke bening US Marijuana Idaho producer Casey Blue Cross Blue shield James k Polk Nathan Washington Post Peter Hardiman Bush Washington
"peter burnett" Discussed on In The Gate

In The Gate

15:38 min | 3 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on In The Gate

"Now that the triple crown is over that's often when we hear it in the gate. Do us state of the industry type of show. And boy is there have been a lot going on a lawsuit looking to declare co-winners of the Kentucky Derby are sharp upturn in sales at the most recent auctions. And of course, the fallout from the more than two dozen deaths at Santa Anita since the start of their meet on December twenty six in the wake of that latest news and the many. Reforms that track officials have implemented as a result, some in the mainstream media have started to call for a national over arching governing body to run the sport right now. It's state governments that make an enforce the rules, approve race states, etc. And the tracks work through the state governments, but otherwise are completely independent of one another as we have detailed here on in the gate for the past few years. There has been legislation introduced into the US house of representatives that would establish a national arm of the government to set and enforce medication rules and testing procedures for racehorses. We've shown, how that Bill is likely to go nowhere at least for now. But when California governor Gavin Newsom grants that California horse racing board the right to shut down a meat for health or safety reasons, and when influential people like Senator, Dianne Feinstein. And yes, the people for the ethical treatment of animals get involved. Then you wonder if the climate isn't maybe starting to ripen. For an overarching governing body of horse racing. Of course, if such a thing ever is to happen, a number of industry, stakeholders would have to come together to make it happen. Each of those stakeholders has concerns and interests that would need to be satisfied. So here's what we're going to do. We're going to lay out what some of those concerns are in living, breathing form. We've invited three guests who represent broad swaths of the horse racing business by no means are they the only representatives of their respective sectors? But they'll give you an idea of what it would take for everybody to work together. If the idea of a one for all all for one governing body is ever to happen. We've invited a former state racing Commissioner a current track operator and a current horsemen's group Representative from the state government side of things we welcome. Peter Burnett who was once the chairman of the Virginia racing commission representing the track. Operators is Phil Ziegler of emerald downs. Seattle and we also have with us Eric handle Bax CEO of the national horsemen's benevolent and protection association. Welcome gentlemen. Let's start with the broadest question. Do you think in the big picture that horse racing would benefit from having a single governing body similar to a stick and ball sports league? Let's start with Mr. Burnett. Well, you know, I think that, yes, it probably would benefit and make two observations about that. One is, I think the thirty some jurisdictions that govern racing have been extremely protective of their right to continue doing that. And, and in particular their way of doing that, and there are probably about thirty different sets of rules that horsemen have to get used to in terms of or bide by in terms of participating in the sport. But these jurisdictions came about at a time when most of the. Activity of horse racing was exceedingly local, including attendance of, of its entire gambling fans nowadays is the second point that I think would be helpful is that we have with all of our computers, electronics, and TV and all the rest, the ability for folks to not be at the track and still effectively. Enjoy the sport. And to do their wagering in the like and a national system for that could be very helpful. What about from your standpoint, Mr. Ziegler as a track operator? Do you think the sport would benefit from a single governing body? Well, I think that in the broad sense. Probably yes. Although I don't know that we pay enough attention to the good things that we have now with the association of racing commissioners international in model rule. And there are a lot of cooperative efforts between the industry and the different states in cross licensing and things like that. And. And, and I do think that we have a presence of cooperation between all the tracks that active now and actually does a pretty good job. Most of the model rules are going to stop it in pretty much every state. And I think that goes a long way towards what we're looking to accomplish Mr. Hamill back. What did you think from a horseman perspective of that? Absolutely will. Thank you feel for bringing up the hair TI because what I would I would like to bring about. And I know Mr. Burnett would agree. I think that unfortunately, there aren't enough in. We might say casual fans that don't understand the weeds of our industry that even know what k- are CI association of racing. Commissioners international is obviously, those of us on this call do, and hopefully those who listened to the podcast will, then the educated, some. But what we have is each of the. States that have an authorized pair mutual, wagering systems. They're members of the, and the AR CI is a template for each individual rule book, what I would like to also say, is that when compared to rules such as an NBA MLB year NFL one must understand that our rules are law, and the laws governed by each state, and while there are some variations I certainly acknowledged that what continues to be pushed incorrectly, and the falsehood of rhetoric that we continue to hear in mainstream media, as Phil touched on the massive amounts of uniformity, that we currently have is very impressive. When you consider that numb, the national uniform medications program has really only been in. Assistance. For six years. We have twelve of the thirty four active para mutual jurisdictions in the United States, are exactly the same much different than what you hear from people who are pushing other agendas. Twenty of the thirty four para mutual jurisdictions in the United States have adopted three of the four phases of numb. So, again, the amount of uniformity, that we currently have is not pushed in the media enough, in my opinion. And when you ask me do, I think we need a national governing body, my answer would be we have one, and that is the AARP each state, no different than the adoption of a speed limits maximum does have a right to change or very from the model rule. But when you look at and another comparison to something outside our industry while speed limits maximum speed limits may vary. The fact that you cannot drive under the influence in every state is fact, so my comparison alludes to the fact that if you look at all thirty four active fair mutual jurisdictions performance enhancing, medications is completely prohibited. And again, when you're looking at decline health and welfare, something that we may touch on the administration of Lasix one hundred percent regulated and also protocol in the same fashion. So I don't think we need another national governing body. I think, of course, there are always things that we could do better in a more collaborative. Way. And certainly when issues are raised such is the most freak most recent this phosphates issue. Our industry comes together swiftly and we act quickly. But when there are issues that are concerning or need further discussions. We take a pause and we try to do it correctly. We'll if a movement toward a national governing body ever were to really start. What would be your biggest concerns? Let's start with Mr. Ziegler. Well, again to some extent where we're moving in that path already would model rules. And cooperation, I think that record then transparency is important as well. But, you know, I believe that we've done a great job with that already. And I think we need to continue on that path, and keep looking at the science and keep looking at model rules and ways to. Make it better. And we have a lot of great experts in this industry that spend a lot of time way more than I spend on dissecting every medication in every dosage and what safest for the horses and for the sports and again, I think we're doing a pretty good job of that right now. And we're moving in the right direction. And I think this notion again that we don't have what we already have is ball's because we already have it. We're already doing a lot of great things. Well, I know Doug O'Neill has been cited for a medication violation in one state where the medication level would not have been out of bounds in another state and I don't wanna make this all about medication. But Mr. brunette does somewhat seemed like you know, the football field is a different size in New York versus Michigan. Is it possible to come together on this in the form of a national body? That's the big question. What do you think? Well, I. I certainly think it's possible and I agree with earlier comments about the effectiveness of AR I in the best example, I can give you of that is, when I took my turn as chairman of it, I think, about two thousand nine or ten, we had the I would call it, good fortune of banning anabolic, steroids, under our model rules, and there's no more anabolic steroids and racing and US I'm aware of, and I think it's, it's an example of folks having a lot of respect for the model rules. And I think that, that body could be a very effective Brel national organization. I don't think it has to be something that's under the department of whatever in Washington DC, and I think that, that the medication issues in rules without focusing too much on them. Do do raise that issue that one state has one view that this level is okay with them? And for what? Whatever reason that's the why they stick with it. I think the advantage of having a model rule that everybody is willing to adhere to is you don't run into those situations. And I'm not so sure that the science of, of medication is so controversial that we couldn't have common rules for the entire thirty four jurisdictions that everybody could live with for all for the benefit of the horse, by the way. Well, I, I would just say that, I guess, coming back very to your original question as far as what, what are concerned the and our biggest concern as horsemen, and again, representing almost thirty thousand owners and trainers, we would need for a governing body to use scientific facts, basic, equine, health, and safety policies, and not be concerned about optics and one thing that continues. To frustrate me in coming back to optical is that phrase perception is reality. I am I am not a believer in that. I believe reality is reality, and we who are in the industry can't let optics or the perception of those outside the industry, Dr that for us, we have to be steadfast and using signs doing what is in the best for equine health and welfare and continued to follow veterinary leaderships, such as the av may and such in our world importantly, ADP, or the national association of racetrack veterinarians, so for us, the importance would be to have a governing body that, that was populated with stakeholders again, which we have now in the model rules process. Yes. And certainly if any federal oversight ever needed to be discussed, or as a possibility, what we should be looking to the United States Department of agriculture, not the current methods, which is coming from the central trade commission. So that would be my concern, but I would still double back and say, if people were more properly educated on what processes we have now and what we go through now and how we look to science within the racing medication testing consortium, doing pharmacological studies far more dynamic studies to learn where medications do or don't have any further effect on the heat point athletes. Those are the processes that we're going to now and we need to spend more time on this. I think that comment raises really. I think pretty clearly the issue of what mechanism is going to be most effective in voiding, optics, and is going to be most likely to adopt reality and hard core science and be capable of cheating, some level of uniformity in the both the promotion and application of various rules, whether they be for medication or, or other issues. And I couldn't agree more that you want significant stakeholders, you want credibility. And I think that at least in my experience in Virginia, the commissioners are appointed by the governor, and the governor can have different views and different political objectives, and some governors don't know which end kicks in which when bites, and I. I think it can be a little bit fraught, sometimes with less experience, than what most of us who are experienced in the business would like to see across the board. But I think it's how you pick that organization and what its.

Phil Ziegler United States Peter Burnett chairman Commissioner California Santa Anita United States Department of ag Kentucky Derby Gavin Newsom Dianne Feinstein Bill Virginia racing commission national association of racetr Seattle AARP ADP Virginia
"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

13:13 min | 3 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Can generally familiar with the topic by varying degrees. My favorite of late has been the Colonel Gladwin bolan. Boy, man. He really he really set the internet on fire with that segment. I let him into Gladwin. I let him into the Facebook group folks. So I hope we're all still cool. Did you create a monster? I don't know. I don't know today. We have another quite informed, gentlemen. Joining us, the host of the new house work show behind the bastards, which does deep dives into horrible people throughout history from Saddam. Hussein's hobby writing erotic fiction to Hitler's spanking fetish, I believe, friends and neighbors benef-. I may. Robert Evans AOL has crack if it's weird weird. There's been a lot of like silent headshaking on this doesn't really translate super well on the podcast. But yeah, who knew we're talking about Oregon, which is if you like. Yeah. If you go to Portland or whatever it seems on the I spent a lot of the last three years in rural southern Oregon, and it's, it's a pretty racist place Josephine county where I was is shock full Nazis. They're quite a lot of them out there. So it's, it's, it's a fascinating place even in the modern day. Oh, yes. Yet, tons of it's one of the most racist counties, and one of the densities of hate groups anywhere in the United States, chock-full, and Nazis turns out, not a good coffee. No, no terrible coffee, terrible craft beer that the Nazis make. So when we, we originally talked off air, Robert one of the things that. We were very interested in both colleagues, but also fans of your show was seeing whether there was a specific person associated with the, the supremacist origins of Oregon kind of setting the tone that we could we could learn a little bit more about with you, and you found the guy, right? Oh my God. I sure did any Peter Burnett. I think Peter is first name. Yeah. Just a tremendous piece of crap, and may be like, there's a long list of super racist politicians in American history. But he's in the running for most racist. He's, he's, he's definitely like, in that conversation for sure. Yeah. We set him briefly as just having been the one that can came up with the idea of exclusionary laws early on before, Oregon became a state, and he loved this idea so much the named it after himself. Burnett lash law, which emitted black people who refuse to leave the state to be given. Lashes like every six months or something like that. Any loved it so much genius idea. The Burnett lash law. Yeah, he was so proud of his, his whipping people rule that he stuck his name on it, which is a special kind of, of terrible. But he was actually like a violent Jere way before he went to Oregon when he was still living in clear creek, Tennessee. He was a shop owner like. General store owner. He suspected, this enslaved black man was every now and then breaking into his store at night to drink from his whiskey barrel, because they stored whiskey. Barrels back then it was a different time. Rather than taking any of the other actions, you might take in this situation. He sets a trap using a rifle, with, like a string tied to the trigger tied to the window shutter. Holy so that when the guy crawled in the middle of the night, this rifle shot him dead. He wasn't charged with the crime, because it was an enslaved man. And he said he was sorry, but that's like, Peter Burnett before he gets into politics. They must have had like a stand your ground law, back in those days to guess I just don't think they had laws. You talking about the eighteen twenties or whatever there was no rules. And that's such a cartoonish sort of rube Goldberg s kind of contraption probably got the kit from acne. That's insane. Okay, go on give us. So one of his early jobs before he gets off to Oregon. I think after he murders this guy with a looney tunes. Traff is he's a lawyer and some of his party's most prominent clients were Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon religion and all of Joseph Smith's, you know, apostles, or whatever all of his friends, because they were on trial for kinda sort of fomenting a frontier war that had broken out in and around Missouri. And so he, he is, these guys lawyer in his main achievement as a lawyer seems to be getting the venue, changed that the court case was being held in this venue change allow Justice myth and all of his guys to escape and run away. And yeah. So that that's his career as a lawyer before he gets on that first big wagon train to Oregon for the great migration and whatnot. Yeah. So yo already covered yet. He made the lash law. He made the exclusion law, which he was he was an abolitionist, but he's like an interesting. We fit when we when you hear about abolitionists in the pre-civil war airy usually think about just the few people who would have been like on the right side of history. But some of them were just abolitionists because they were that racist. They were so racist. And that was Peter Burnett. He was abolitionist that because he didn't like the idea of there being black people anywhere in his state, and he thought that slave labor was bad for white people. So he was like he wound up the right conclusion. Which is slavery was a bad thing. But he wound up there through the most racist chain of logic that he could have possibly gotten to which is always interesting to me, those a sentiment that was big time shared by the majority of people in Oregon began. They did incorporate and be. Become a state, the majority of people voted against Lavery, but also for ousting all the freed black people. Yeah. And I did find when I was doing my research that in eighteen forty at least Burnett had to slaves of his own. This is back when he was living in Missouri. And there's some evidence that when he immigrated to Oregon, he tried to bring one slave with him a young girl who drowned in the Columbia River during the voyage, so not a lot of it's kind of an enticing piece of, like what was going on there. But that that's all the info I found so far on that. Right. Because she was projected to be somewhere between ten to twenty four or something. Yeah, it seems like it might be kind of a creepy. Thomas Jefferson, sort of situation, there suspected that as well. Yeah. So this guy we've talked about, like talked about what he did in Oregon, but after he got done in Oregon, this stewed moved to California, and he became in eighteen forty nine the first governor of California of the state of California. So California's very first leader as a state in the union was this guy Peterberg net who get a lot of terrible things. Maybe my favorite thing he did that isn't terrible was in eighteen fifty. He changed thanksgiving, that year from Thursday to Saturday, just because it was better for him, personally. I mean I can I can give. That it's always weird to me, the thanksgiving Zona Thursday. Yeah. That that's in fun. But he also tried to bring racial exclusion to California with the Chinese. Right. Well, I with black people, he I tried to in his first message to the California legislature. He called exclusion like the first important issue of the first importance the most important thing, the California could do, because he thought black, people are going to take jobs from white people, and that they would be unhappy in California, and cause disruption because they would be second class citizens, because he wasn't gonna let him be anything but second class citizens. So, yeah, he tried to there were like a thousand black people already in California, many of them free, and he tried to have them all kicked out and to stop any more from settling. And that was to racist for eighteen fifties, California. So he lost on that, and he wound up actually lake in eighteen fifty one quitting being the governor over this because he tried a couple of times to get California to ban black people, and they just wouldn't do it. And yeah I mean there's some pretty pretty racist quotes from him that I could read, but that's probably not necessary. But it is fun to note that after he was no longer governor and after his political career was over, as you know, the world continue to advance in modernize in his old age his crusade, as you mentioned was trying to stop the Chinese from coming to California. So he was just just comprehensively racist across the board every chance he got, which is impressive in a terrible way. Yeah. At least you can say he was consistent, but honestly good on you California for anyone listening in the state right now. I think that speaks very highly to the character of the state even as far back as the eighteen fifties. He he also published an autobiography, right? At some point. Yeah. That's where he started. Ranting about Chinese immigration. Yeah. Robert, Shirley got some sort of amazing comeuppance right like burned to death in a fire drowned under suspicious circumstances. Give me a fight with a locomotive. I think he died rich in old. He was in his eighties or somehow, man. That's a bummer. Westwood always happens with these bastards, right? I mean, I bet you're seeing that the Cosby episode, he kinda got us come up. But even that sort of like a pyrrhic victory where it's like too little too late for a guy that's been screwing people over four years on, you know, unchecked. Yeah every now and then you get a Mussalini or Qaddafi where they get dragged out into the street and punished by the people that they spent decades screwing with, but that's almost almost never happens, usually, they die rich in villa somewhere. I'm really glad that you said this Robert because I was listening to the Ghaddafi episode, which I thought was fantastic. An still preparing myself to check out the Weinstein episode which is a two parter, correct. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That one's a big one. What we'd like to do is again. Thank you for giving us more insight on the life of Peter Hardiman, brunettes, screw that guy. Yeah. Right. But. We were wondering if you could tell our, if you could tell our fellow listeners here, a little bit more about behind the bastards and what they can expect when they tune into your show. Well, I mean, our goal is to tell you, everything you don't know about the very worst people in all of history. So, you know, you've probably that, you know, stoned or whatever in your underpants and watched a lot of documentaries about Hitler on the history channel over the years. But you probably don't know that he based, a lot of his military strategies in his like attitudes on existence in life on a series of young adult. Novels are basically, like the German equivalent of Harry Potter back in the eighteen hundreds. Oh, wow. You know, in in for that matter, while we're on the subject of novelist. You've probably haven't read Saddam Hussein's romance novels, but I have. And that's one of the things we get into in this podcast. I referred to it as a Roddick fiction that crows at a far. No, no. It is very Roddick. In fact, there's a long passage, where an elderly woman yells at children about how sexy mouths are. So that's it's fun. Yeah, those novels in particular largely considered these Meg, low maniacal analogies about his relationship with the country. Yes. And they're, they're, it's one of those weird things there's a lot of cases like with the Kim's in North Korea of being credited to dictators, didn't actually make it Saddam definitely wrote these books when we get into that, to an extent, but they're like, they're mix of rants about modern politics and like utopian fiction, and so it's like a mix of Saddam's screaming at the people he hates and trying to set up the ideal government that he never quite got to make an Iraq. It's, it's a really strange insight into what was going on in the man's head. That's fascinating. I wanna I wanna tune in no spoilers. But could you tell us a little bit about some episodes that are coming up soon yet today? Right now. There is a new episode on Paul Manafort, part, one of which just dropped and part two of which will be Thursday. So that's, that's a big one. I check that out. And we've, we've been doing it ongoing series about king Leopold of Belgium in the Congo, and we're recording episode today about what happened after Leopold, who is one of the worst people in all history and doesn't get enough acknowledgement for just how terrible he was agree. And we're also recording an episode about the serial killer Albert fish with his one of his descendants comedian in LA today. So that's going to be fun. Oh, man that's fascinating. We got a good good slate. We are going to wrap it up today. We wanna thank you so much for coming on the show. Robert Evans friends and neighbors the mastermind behind one of house of works newest podcast behind.

Oregon Peter Burnett California Robert Evans Saddam Hussein Facebook Hitler Saddam Colonel Gladwin bolan Gladwin Missouri rube Goldberg United States Portland Paul Manafort Peter Hardiman Peter Josephine county Albert fish Joseph Smith
"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:33 min | 3 years ago

"peter burnett" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the show. Ladies and gentlemen. I'm Ben I'm no. Wow. This is like a very standard intro. We're trying today. Yeah, we're going we're going straight for it. But we were only able to make this show, of course, with the assistance of our esteemed third member of friends, neighbors, super producer Casey. Peckham. Sort of a vanilla opening would you white bread a little homogeneous bay? Yes. Yes. Today. We are well let's, let's start in the modern day for a long time. Neither of us had ever been to Portland until pretty recently true, I only spent a little bit of time there. I think you had a little bit more of a fully fleshed out Portland experience. But we tell me then is the dream of the nineties. In fact, still alive in Portland. Yes. I thoroughly enjoyed the town at the root surprising. I was diplomatic enough, not to directly mention the comedy show, Portland area to anybody that gets really old. I am sure does, it's like when people visit our city and call it hotlanta. Yeah. This is even more. Agreed. Just probably people running around. They put a bird on the yes. And Portland has this national reputation at least for being a very progressive city right, face tattoos or cool. Marijuana's decriminalize. The streets are paved in marijuana. In fact, and Portland. It does have a particular smell. And in general, people would see it as sort of a bastion of left leaning culture. Yeah. Super chill, you know, you can be can buy a sandwich. I song. In Portland, literally. You have to be a good song. It's just a song a song or a little soft shoe. Or maybe you got a one man band kinda Dick Van Dyke situation going on. Did see a one man band when I was there. Did you see that guy? No. I just pulled that out of my of my year. We'll you are correct. And there are one man bands in Portland. There are also numerous amazing things amazing. It's of history. One of our co workers, a guy named Nathan is actually from Oregon. And he assured us that Portland is more of a cultural exception to the rule nowadays. Yeah. Actually wearing my Timberline lodge hat right now. I bought at the Portland airport. And as you might imagine Portland airport, not a chain restaurant incite my friend, all of the shops sell handmade artistic goods. I bought some really cute little pieces of pottery. They're for me. Mom. That's sweet of you, man. And this really DOE, Pat, it is a great hat. So it's safe to say that you and I are fans of Portland and would travel there again in the future. Sure, at least modern Portland. Right, right. I don't think I would want to travel there in a time machine to past. Yes. Yes. Today's episode is about the origins of Oregon Portland in particular, well, one take or as it's called here. I'm in some of these articles that we're looking at the Oregon country. Yeah. Oregon country, it might sound weird to some people. What is Oregon kept seeing it? And it was a little weird, sending computer, but I figured it out with my internet sleuth skills. What would now be modern day? Oregon Washington state, and Idaho, was all kind of cluster together in this one big old chunk of land collectively referred to as the Oregon country. Yeah. And this was, let's see way back in eighteen eighteen. Right. The US and Britain agreed to jointly occupy this seems like a odd couple a situation. And then I think the US started getting a little greedy and being, you know, we kind of want this. For our own went turn this into some states. Yeah. Because the British wanted to be in the area in Oregon country, mainly to engage in the first trade astray, and James k Polk who is an expansionist president. Right. Really wanted to make this our own and not not share now go have with the Brits anymore, so that ultimately happened they negotiated. They decided it wasn't worth going to war over the Brits. Did anyway. And there was some back and forth. And there's a really great slogan that the northerners used it was fifty four forty or fight, and fifty four forty was talking about the coordinates the latitude that Mark the northernmost part of this territory and during these negotiations. The US is first proposal. Was that the territory be cut in half? Right. With that, with that border at the forty ninth parallel, and the British rejected it. And so the expansionist many of whom were anti slavery northerners, which is super important for this part of the they are the ones who called. For more American aggression, get out there, be a big dog fifty four forty or fight. It's hard to say did really well with that fifty four forty or fight. It's tough. Fun when you really get it right though sense of accomplishment, as I'm sure they've gotten when they finally arrived at a pretty decent deal with the Brits, where they divided the territory along the forty ninth parallel yes, pretty close to fifty four. I guess what's the forty though fifty four? Forty minutes divisions of the grease like a decimal. Okay. So this is where we end up with Oregon needing to become a state. And when you become a stay, what do you do you have to have a state constitution? And as we know constitutions are not generally made overnights. They often reflect common practices goals or even existing laws that a community has practiced or written down beforehand, and Oregon, had its own pre existing laws in eighteen forty four they passed something called the exclusion law. And this was this was enacted by the provisional government of the region at the time. What, what did the exclusion law do? Yeah, it was this guy named Peter Burnett, who was like, kind of Oregon trail kind of blazer, I guess Peter Hardiman, Hardiman Burnett. And actually spoiler alert, we're going to dig into him in a little more detail later in the show foreshadowing. Big time for shadowing. But here's what this dude is just to give you a taste of what his matter was, like he was a former slave owner and has, has a really crazy resume did all kinds of interesting things, but by all accounts, a alarming dastardly racist nearly through. So this exclusion law, that was enacted sort of pre proper government and constitution basically allowed slaveholders to hold on for dear life to those slaves for a maximum of for up to three years. And at I, I was like, wait is this is this because of emancipation? That was decades later. This is eighteen forty four that wasn't until like eighteen sixties. Right. And I realize, oh, no, Oregon outlawed slavery in the territory. Right. But here's the key, your thing is going to go. Oh, that's, that's nice. What a great bunch of people. Yeah. Okay. But, but there's more. So, yeah. This grace period of three years, but then all of those freed black people work required to leave. Yeah, that's the thing. The government of Oregon pass this. Exclusion law of eighteen forty four and in it, they did place, a ban on slavery, with a requirement the slave owners, eventually free their slaves, but they did this with the understanding that any African American who remained in Oregon, after they were freed would be flogged, whiplash and forcibly expelled from the country if they were caught in the Oregon country, again, within six months, then the punishment would be. Repeated. And then eventually the law was amended in another version to substitute forced labor, so essentially slavery, instead of flogging and then it was repealed in eighteen forty five. So this community was so racist that the, the didn't even condone slavery. They were so such white supremacist data's didn't want him around, like at all. And there's, there's some language we'll get into in a second. But I just want to point this out of the that law, you mentioned about flogging or that was called the Burnett lash law. Because our buddy Burnett was so into this that he, he wanted to brand with his own his name was like a signature thing, and it required that or declared rather that offenders, who refused to leave would be punished with, quote, not less than twenty or more than thirty. Nine stripes, and that would that would be a cycle that would recur every six months until they left. And fortunately, this lash law did get amended and repealed. So as far as we know today, a no people wherever lashed as a result of that law. But this was just the first of three different laws likeness that all were meant to ban people of color from Oregon country which, again at that point is like Washington, Oregon, and part of Idaho. A huge swath of land. That's right. And we're getting some of this information from a few different places wounded. My favorites was a Washington Post article by deneen, L Brown. Cohen, Portland band blacks Oregon's shameful history as an all white state, or as I've seen it referred to as an all white utopia kind of right after at least there's this weird history of intentional communities and utopian thinking. In oregon. So it's not, not all examples are racist. But this definitely was the idea for the people who were supporting this concept was that somehow society would be better, if they all felt like if they also identified with the same ethnicity. Now, did they have the same sort of racism, that would be common in the northeast at the time wherein, for instance, Italian or Irish immigrants or children of those immigrants are still considered not wide enough? I don't know. But what was on the books was specifically targeting people of color in eighteen forty eight this provisional territorial government passed a law making it illegal for any quote, negro, or mulatto to live in Oregon country, but they did have a provision for people who had native American blood, which they weird. Referred to as half breeds despicable people people. But it's interesting that all it takes just get a little white in. You really didn't like black people. Yeah, yeah. That's what it boils down to. All right. Then. Yeah. So it state time baby here we go. What do you need to make a state as established earlier? Get you need. You gotta have some dirt. You gotta have a delineation between your dirt and the other people's dirt, yet to have some people in both sides. Oh, that you can differentiate constitution. There we go. Yes. In eighteen fifty seven. The government of what would become Oregon was working on its constitution. They did a couple of things. They grossly plagiarized constitutions from other states at the time of that's just gonna be some of that, right. Constitution is not exactly. Great work poetry that you, you know, pilfering from is looked down upon. It's sort of like stealing a. Boilerplate release form our site. Yeah, I think that's a very good.

Oregon Portland Hardiman Burnett US Timberline lodge Peckham Dick Van Dyke Marijuana Idaho producer Casey Washington Post Pat James k Polk Nathan Peter Hardiman Washington president