35 Burst results for "Peta"

L'Oreal Group Bans Animal-Hair Brushes After PETA Push

Fat Mascara

01:11 min | 3 months ago

L'Oreal Group Bans Animal-Hair Brushes After PETA Push

"I have to say it's been a long time since i've been this excited about a headline like this. So l'oreal is in the l'oreal group worldwide. I'm not just talking l'oreal paris. His band animal hairbrushes across its entire portfolio following pressure. From petah cepeda documented the cruelty in the badger brush industry. They didn't excellent expose on what happens in china to these. Badgers you can google. It be warned as well as what happens what it means to get a goat hairbrush. If you're wondering. Basically they cut the skin off. The animals may stitch up the wounds. Right there on the floor. There's no like antiseptic or anything. Obviously and they don't provide pain relief so that's just a peak into this horrific industry and if you wanna know more you can certainly go onto pita or really any other kind of animal welfare source which will tell you a similar story so while this is a sad insight into the industry. I'm so happy. That loria has changed. Course and i'm really happy to see that. All of the lobbying has had a really positive impact on the

Cepeda Badgers Paris China Google Loria
"peta" Discussed on Change Lives Make Money

Change Lives Make Money

05:02 min | 7 months ago

"peta" Discussed on Change Lives Make Money

"I've attracted and worked with 550 online fitness coaches and you want to know what I do differently than every other business coach on the market right now is I go live on video five times a week Monday to Friday. No fucking questions asked 5 times a week live Monday to Friday at the same time every single day. And I promise you that my business is growing faster than like you can even imagine so I want you to think about something for a second if I did that wrong. My Fitness business and it worked and I'm doing that with my business coaching business and it's working wouldn't you say that is one of like a potential recipe for success and obviously guys, there's so many other things that go into it. I'm not saying that like the video marketing is the only way and if you're not video marketing or not, but I'm telling you it is one of the pieces of the complex puzzle that when it comes to organic business growth, like if I'm not getting on video for your audience to see on a consistent and regular basis you are leaving a ton of money on the table if you're making $2,000 a month right now and you're not getting on video Once throughout the week you can be making five to $7,000 a month if you're making $5,000 a month right now and you're not getting on video two to five times a week. You could be making $10,000 a month right now. And if you're making 10K month right now and you're not getting on video three to five times a week you could be making 28 video marketing is the way it's the secret. I did it with my Fitness business and you guys watch me do it with Peta domination because with video marketing I can actually get in front of you and I can have a khong Eastern with you video marketing is the thing. You need to get your face on video if you want to attract more clients. So why is it important for retention though? Like why is video marketing important for retention? I have a question for you guys. Those of you that are listening to this podcast right. Now. How many of you are my clients right now? So those of you that are listening to this right now my question for you is how many of you are my clients right now in this moment, I can see one I can see two I can see three I Can See For I can see five six seven..

Peta
Distributed In Memory Processing And Streaming With Hazelcast

Data Engineering Podcast

04:17 min | 7 months ago

Distributed In Memory Processing And Streaming With Hazelcast

"You hear about all these different data management platforms that talk about these things but Hazel casts advantage is around in memory and in memory isn't a new concept it's been around for a while but there have been some limitations about what it can do in the past and some of these limitations are being mitigated so that in memory speeds are opening up to more and more companies and Hazel cast was founded a little more than ten years ago actually in. Turkey by a couple of very smart engineers and they came to Silicon Valley to start his cast as a former company, and it was all about in memory computing, and so the first product was the I M D product which stands for the in memory data grit. So very much like a database, but a bit more capabilities in terms of distributed computing ways to simplify building applications that could be spread across multiple nodes in a cluster and thus enable paralyzation much more simply and so from the early roots. It was all about trying to get applications that ran faster, but at the same time maintaining some of these enterprise qualities like security and reliability and availability. So ensuring that you're not getting speed at any cost but getting the right amount of speed that you need to address your use cases while also protecting your data and with added on stream processing since and we have a set of technologies that work extremely well together and are fitting in quite well with some types of use cases that people are building today. and. You mentioned that it's not being built at the expense of some of the reliability durability guarantees that you might care about is particularly if you're working on mission critical applications so I'm wondering if you can dig a bit more into some of the benefits and the potential trade offs of in memory compute particularly for data intensive workouts and things that are going to be operating on stateful sets of operations. You have the benefits of computing have largely to do with the fact that you have fast access to data stored in memory, and so I've heard some people say that this notion of in memory computation or in memory processing is redundant. When in fact, if you think about it, the processing isn't done in memory. The processing is done in the CPU or these days increasingly more in the GP and the in memory simply means that all of the data is stored within memory and not necessarily spilled out to disk, and so when you have a system that's designed to optimize that pattern where you have all your data in. Memory that means that you can get fast access to a lot of fast processing and be able to deliver on some of these use cases that have very narrow windows for service level agreements. So you get performance the same time when you have fastest, you need to incorporate some of the typical characteristics of a distributed system like replication in a variety of ways and you need to have consistent replication. So we've after doing some research, some competitive research we've seen at least one technology where at certain levels of throughput, it pauses some of the replication to be able to handle the throughput and so most people won't notice it but. It's one of those things that if you're not watching, then you could potentially have a big problem when your dad isn't replicated and notes go down and you get failures then you might see a lot of unexpected data loss when you thought that all of the data protection capabilities were in place but for us, we don't make those trade offs when we run our benchmark. So we say here's what you get in a true production environment in terms of performance, and you can be sure that we keep everything retained for business news that you would expect, and certainly some of the trade offs are pretty clear if people from there. With these, it's mostly about how much daddy can store. So you wouldn't use Hazel cast as your say your system of record for Peta Bytes of data we're talking more about operational data where you want to process it very quickly. So things like payment processing or fraud detection are good cases where you might have a good amount of data in memory as a cup, but also have the engine processing in parallel and being able to use that data in it almost transient way. So it's it's data that persisted somewhere else, but we put it into our engines so that we can have those very stringent, very data intensive workloads running. My understanding is that the actual implementation is as a library that can be embedded

Hazel Cast Turkey Silicon Valley M D Fraud Peta
Homophonix Artist Interviews: Rainbow Riots

HOMOGROUND

05:39 min | 9 months ago

Homophonix Artist Interviews: Rainbow Riots

"We begin in Stockholm. It is true that Sweden produces an astonishing amount of legendary music small country. Third and world music exports after the US and the UK. No surprise that within the queer communities are Sweden there exists a bevy of talent. Rainbow Reports is a nonprofit organization using arts and coach as tools to advocate for human rights, LGBT Iq, plus people globally. Now. More than ever. Our focuses humane humans should be equality and acceptance for all. It is clear that social justice is not yet where it should be, which is why arts and coach organizations like Rainbow, riots exist if you're lucky enough to live in a country where there oiled ubt brides, a lot of times people get complacent and they think, oh, this is the norm. This is the standard while it ain't Jinnai they're like seventy plus countries in the world grades illegal with same sex relations and where people get killed where where. A death penalty sometimes. Free. Sometimes I think we have freedom, but the struggle still continues. The filed the torture still continues. The fight for freedom still continues. Let's put our hands together for freedom for freedom. Through Rainbow Riots Hitter Lemberg brings to light the ongoing injustices faced by LGBT plus family worldwide. With a background in music production visuals, events publication in community projects combined with an amazingly generous creative spirit. Is Well to use music and media to inform and educate. Rainbow riots invited artists from several countries to take part in a concert as part of the Stockholm pride two, thousand and seventeen. They also made their presence known within the pride parade from the back of a truck proudly blasting out there incredible musical achievements. I asked Peta which countries were represented. On the rainbow riots flow we had a representatives from Sweden what and we had Uganda Kenya. We had Malawi and we had Jamaica. One of the standout tracks from that for me was a song called freedom. See the crowd. Jumping into. Heard? Freedom. To it in such a way can you tell me up freedom came about when I started making freedom which I co? Bro With? Lesbian rapid called you'll be she's A. Legendary rap group in this in the states called. And when we wrote it, it was kind of like part of my old project housing Wallenberg and kind of thought. It was going to be part of that. But then as I started gravitating towards doing something with Queer activism around the world I, started turning my movement Rainbow Rides into a creative project and I thought well, freedom should be part of that. Really. So that's when I went down to Uganda and started working in Uganda 'cause I thought if I'm going to make this album with queer voices from the world's most dangerous places I've gotta go to the belly of the beast which is Uganda. So I thought okay. Well, I've got to go there ain't going to be nice in preschool ad. And before I went like my passport was running out, so yeah, they add to reissue a possible at the Swedish apple before my flight and they gave me a pink. And I thought. How appropriate with driving along well, exactly Scotland I'm going into Uganda practically waving rainbow flags. This is not going to end well because I was not sure what to expect the anything I'd seen and heard was that nobody nobody in Uganda who was queer was safe and everybody was you know hiding whenever you saw an interview with somebody they will always hiding behind a blood pixellated sort of thing and and not just come to know people going to want to be part of this project. Is it going to be really difficult? What am I going to expect? So therefore came prepared with a song that I'd already written which with freedom I thought at the best maybe I can get some people to dogs in the video at least will have something. But when I arrived, I found a thriving queer community with love creativity and that's how the project started. When I arrived in Uganda realized wow I could really make a whole out I could turn this into something much bigger or they're already artists to establish themselves within the community who were making music. N You lots of quiz singers and performers an artist, and I ended up right in the middle of it. So you know I arrived armed with one song and you know it turned into an album of freedom was starting song, and of course, a features my my old correcting partner you'll be of your majesty but also features a Ugandan singer cold deep lack on bicycle and also on the spoken word intro and the thing about freedom was the I always knew that it was really instant kind of be happy pride song and I just wanted to dot context to put it in. Something else. So it's not just the body, song? To. Put it into context of something really really important life and death and I kinda thought what what better way to to get the message out to make people ons. That was to make them listen.

Uganda Sweden Stockholm Peta United States Lemberg Partner UK Malawi Kenya Scotland Jamaica
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 9 months ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago, but we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous. Huxley's Utopia and not finding it. Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades and we're increasingly lonely. whereas in a utopia, everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen, forty-three, the psychologist Abraham Maslov developed a theory of Yoga. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in a utopia we decide for ourselves what we need and how we're going to get it in Huxley's Utopia. Citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds pretty good right then. Why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society, to work, we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism, even family. See for yourself if a utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch, brave new world now streaming only on peacock. This is advertising content. Hey. This is bowes I'm a podcast or By, I, a Gamer Five G. is changing the gaming world in really unexpected exciting ways with the help of Samsung Five G. I'm getting a peek at how gaming is getting faster smoother and can even improve our lives well. Let's dish some secrets about the future gaming. Dr Jean Mechanical Direct Route Game Research and development at the Institute of the future. She's also a bestselling author game inventor. She's optimistic about gaming impact on us and our minds. The biggest thing that we've seen in research is that. We need to be able to game in the moment wherever we are. So, what happens when when you're playing when your favorite games is that it fires up than her logical pathways, it's kind of like having a of caffeine and a pet dog from your favorite coach, and you've just meditated for an hour. This emotional neurological power up is called the game transfer effect, and that effect is heightened when using five. Five G. The game transfer fact requires you to be totally immersed in the game, so you want to have the most amazing graphics and the most immersive audio and with five G. to do that anywhere anytime, be one of the first to harness the game transfer effect with Samsung Galaxy Five G. now available on Galaxy, S Twenty-five g and a seventy one five G. feels good to be I with Samsung. I love to play the game of like. Imagine the meeting and imagine that the one set of meeting which is like the actual hackers finding the vulnerabilities figuring out how to jump from Windows, eight computer to some sort of physical hardware controller that actually runs like that. That's a very hard problem in and of itself, and then the other meeting. They're like what we're GONNA do is claim to be a guy called Gucci for two point, Oh and like those are. Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
Porpoises On The Brink Of Extinction Face Daunting Odds For Survival

Environment: NPR

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Porpoises On The Brink Of Extinction Face Daunting Odds For Survival

"Marine Mammal is on the verge of extinction in Mexico's Gulf of California. Conservationists have been trying to save the the Keita Porpoise for years but that work has been complicated by the nets and even drug cartels from Arizona public media in Tucson area Brosius reports seafood restaurants. Colorful mosaics line. The Boardwalk in downtown San Felipe pay fishing is a mainstay of the small northern Mexico. Town love I keep. The restaurant is just a couple blocks over a framed photo of the little porpoise that could be. The town's mascot hangs in the office of Ramon Franco the as head of a local fishermen cooperative representing about five hundred and seventy families is sending. Well it though this earth announced that animal as you must know only lives here in this area and it's ours belongs to us. Mexicans for decades of akitas population has been declining as fishermen inadvertently catch them while pursuing fish and shrimp but dea says many local fishermen treasure the animal when it rises above the water with its characteristic. Black rimmed is he says That causes those do those. It's as if it was smiling with you. So real fishermen don't WanNa harm them. It's the opposite in the last few decades. Mexico has established of Akita Refuge and backed research into the species but lately the number of Akita has plummeted around just a dozen or less as poaching for another endangered fish called. The Toba has ramped up. Fishermen use large Gill Nets to trap the toe to Wada. Which also killed Akita in two thousand fifteen Mexico's then president banned Gill Nets in the Vicki habitat increased enforcement against poaching and started paying fishermen not to work so the species could recover. This little sanitizer came to an agreement that we would leave the sea so that the federal government clean up the illegal boats but Diaz says enforcement was insufficient. Problem got worse. He says he's filed numerous complaints with the government to no avail then a year ago. The payments fishermen stopped those. Odi The liberal Emma. So now we have a serious problem. Because we don't have a fishing practice that is permitted. And we also don't have any compensation. Last September Diaz announced his fisherman had no option but to return to the sea to support their families. He says two thousand eighteen. Us Ban Mexican seafood caught with Gillnets has only made life harder for legal fishermen. Mexico missed an opportunity to be a world leader in shifting a fishery over from Gillnets to alternative gear. Barbara Taylor is marine conservation biologist with the US government who studied the Makita for thirty years. She says the Gillnet Ban wasn't very effective. Because some fishermen hurting financially were tempted into the illegal Totowa Trade F- Iquitos and Gill Nets are completely incompatible. And the fishermen needed to be able to make a living and so developing alternative fishing methods. Were really the only way for Bikita. Survive Louise Mendosa is working on it in his centrally bay office. He pulls a large thin strand net from a milk crate. Wait to the bottom. He's a member of pesca obeys. Say A small nonprofit group of fishermen working with the Mexican government to test alternative driftnets like this one called suit. Peta for this war with the current only with but Mendoza says using these nets can be nearly impossible because of the sheer number of illegal gill nets under the waves. He says even though it's cheaper it will be hard to convince fishermen to use it. They've become very effective. The Gill Nets and with this kind of equipment. You have to get money. The Keita Researcher Barbara Taylor says Mexico needs to support legal fishing if alternative nets prove less profitable and crackdown on poaching. Akitas prime habitat. She still has hope for the species but there are fewer of Akiba every year though. Two of poaching is rampant because the fishes swim bladder is highly prized in China. As a medicinal food. Because there's a little money is more money than drugs. I mean we're talking about twenty thousand dollars twenty five dollars for one soon blind. Jp Geoffroy leads the Conservation Group Sea Shepherd's Makita protection efforts. He says that money has attracted international drug cartels and during high season there can be dozens of boats fishing illegally inside the Vicki to refuge for the last five years sea shepherd has been working with some local fishermen to collect Gill Nets. Trying give the species a fighting chance to recover important. Centrally Bay Crew Members. Use a hook to move huge bags of fishing gear. They've pulled from the ocean. All these boxes contain all Guinea. Gotten it that way we move from riveted by Kedah not all local support sea shepherd's work recently suspected poachers fired shots at a sea. Shepherd vessel in the Makita refuge despite that tension. Geoffroy says they support local fishermen who just want to do their job. We are just trying to work with them and explain to them to. At least respect the small rectangle release the critical area. Geoffroy says if they can just protect the remaining Makita the species can recover but for now observers. Say there's little evidence that current efforts to stop poaching will be enough for NPR news. I'm Arianna Brosius.

Gill Nets Mexico Nets Jp Geoffroy Makita Barbara Taylor Diaz Keita Porpoise Akita United States Ramon Franco San Felipe Arianna Brosius Conservation Group Sea Shepher NPR Tucson Bikita California Brosius
Wuhan coronavirus cases spike again as outbreak shows no signs of slowing

Hard Factor

03:34 min | 1 year ago

Wuhan coronavirus cases spike again as outbreak shows no signs of slowing

"A few thought men. This corona virus is probably just GonNa Peter out and go away like I did. That was misguided thinking king and I am glad that I'm never going to be trained to be a doctor because I would be a shitty doctor so you just you just. Don't listen to a word I say on this podcast. Don't listen I thought so. You were over blowing. This turns out you weren't on Wednesday alone. China reported thirty seven hundred new cases of the Corona Virus and seventy three new new deaths bringing the overall infection. Totals to over twenty eight thousand cases reported while in mainland China and the death toll to almost six hundred in May not mainland Amen China so far. That's only a few weeks in. If you got some of the dams I got for being the krona virus. Guy You wouldn't be able to sleep at night. Well I do want to say one thing. You would be shitty doctor but you'd be a real fun doctor because you'd be one of those doctors that doesn't judge you know what goes until you're dead. You buy power only live once. Dm from someone on that. Got A notification from Chinese national that worked at a crematorium and said that fifteen busloads of dead bodies time all sorts of fucking only only used to busloads those those rumors okay. There's tons of those tons of 'em this I'm saying what's reported by the Chinese government to the media. It's all right so Almost four thousand of those twenty eight thousand active cases in China of the Corona virus are considered critical so the death toll is going to continue to climb the official shaw the unofficial whatever. It doesn't matter a lot of people it's a bad situation. The US has twelve known cases. Total nine people have been detained at our borders. I do too the new travel ban of trying to keep people with the krona virus out in hundreds of Americans who were evacuated from Wuhan. That's the epicenter are being held in quarantine AH and military bases in California until they can be certified for reentry so the. US is doing a pretty good job trying to keep it out of our borders only twelve cases in the country country. Not so bad hell. Yeah we are why we built the wall man those practice. That's right yeah. The walls walls really paying off now. Hong Kong is also doing a fourteen day. Quarantine is they have twenty. One cases confirmed in the city and they do not want any more same with Taiwan. Basically China is aware they need to isolate themselves and contain heinous bread as much as they possibly can because they need to contain it even within their own country And they Chinese experts expected it may take about six weeks to stop the spread from continuing to grow and then of course after that six week period. If you can stop it from continuing to grow then you can deal with all of the thousands and thousands and thousands of people who are infected stuff. Tell you what's scary. Suffer people in China. They be able to do that in four weeks. They've just everyone not sit got on the other side of their wall which is is pretty impressive. One if I know my history correctly I don't know if that I don't know if that checks out see what I'm saying. Oh I don't I don't think it's already have the wall. Think about it with right but they I only have it on like between them in one country. I it's leading to nightmare situations like the diamond princess cruise ship. That's being held off the coast of Japan and Quarantine. This is thirty seven hundred people on a cruise ship who got held because ten people tested positive for corona virus. They can't go back to Japan now. Twenty are sick with. They're going overboard if I'm on being held four thousand people on a fucking cruise ship. Just continually getting corona virus. And they don't know what to do with him. That's insane shift from. I know what you do your royal rumble. Them it's over the top rope for those events are connected and

Taiwan China United States Japan Chinese Government Peter California Wuhan Hong Kong Shaw Official
Prince Andrew Offers ‘Zero Cooperation’ in Epstein Case

Brett Winterble

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Prince Andrew Offers ‘Zero Cooperation’ in Epstein Case

"British palace officials were tight lipped over word that prince Andrew's given zero cooperation in the Jeffrey Epstein investigation CBS news Vicki Barker has the story from London in the BBC interview that effectively ended his days as a working royal prince Andrew was asked if he'd cooperate with US law enforcement agencies investigating his former friend the late convicted peta final Jeffrey Epstein if push came to shove and the league's legal advice was to do so then I would be duty bound to do so well push did come to shove it appears the legal advice Andrew got was not to

Prince Andrew Vicki Barker London United States Jeffrey Epstein CBS Peta
Pope removes shroud of secrecy from clergy sex abuse cases

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Pope removes shroud of secrecy from clergy sex abuse cases

"Pope Francis removes the shroud of secrecy from clergy sex abuse cases pope Francis has abolished the use of the Vatican's highest level of secrecy and clergy sexual abuse cases victims and their advocates say the move to get rid of the pontifical secrecy rule was long overdue but they caution that proof of its effectiveness would come when the Catholic hierarchy is forced to respond to inquiries grand jury subpoenas and prosecutors who want all internal documentation about abusers Francis had faced criticism that the high level of confidentiality on abuse cases has been used to protect peta files silence victims and keep law enforcement from investigating I'm Walter Ratliff

Pope Francis Walter Ratliff Peta
BrainStuff Classics: Are Plants Conscious?

BrainStuff

05:13 min | 1 year ago

BrainStuff Classics: Are Plants Conscious?

"Hey rain stuff. I'm more in Vogel bomb and this is another a classic episode from our former host This one deals with the question to which the answer may seem obvious but research has made more complicated. Our plants unconscious Abe rain stuff. It's Christian Sager. So there's this old episode of Star Trek called Wink of even I. You may have seen it. There's this race of aliens that live in hyper sped up acceleration so when the crew of the enterprise appears to meet up with with them they seem so slow that they're unable to move. Now imagine that scenario if you were the aliens wouldn't you assume humans humans were unhurt objects with no consciousness. Now let's take this and apply it to our relationship with plants. When we watched videos of plant life sped up we see their lively movement but even though plants move and respond to stimuli? They're not conscious right otherwise. Every time time we ate vegetables we'd be causing them pain. Wait wait a minute Kim. Plants feel pain. Well okay there is. This guy wants his name was Charles. Charles Darwin you might have heard of him and he wants proposed. Something called the root brain hypothesis. He proposed that the tip of a plant's root could act like a brain does in some animals receiving sensory input and directing movement in the years since Darwin made this proposal. There's been a growing movement in science called plant neurobiology and it debates the way we think about plants and consciousness justness other scientists hate this term but who cares because here some of the things we know about plants because of this really unusual research research. Let's start with plant senses. We know that plants have a variety of sense. Some that can actually act as analogues is to our sight smell touch taste and hearing in fact. There's evidence that when plants here the sound of a caterpillar chewing on a leaf life. They respond defensively by producing chemicals. Like mustard oil. This happens even if the sound is a recording and nothing is eating the plant creepy right. Plants can also communicate sometimes plant. Chemical production is like a method of communicating communicating with other plants. So here's an example that smell of freshly cut grass that we all know that's actually a distress call to warn other plants chance of danger. It's true in gardens. No one can hear you scream now. When this distress call reaches other plants they will also emit the chemicals to warn their neighbors as well and these calls can even work on different species of plant? For instance a sage plant can signal a tobacco acco plant to emit an odor that's noxious to animals. That are eating the sage all right. So you hear the term plant neurobiology and you say but plants plants. Don't have brains. Well one of the reasons why many scientists hate that term is because plants don't have neurons but they do produce neuro active chemicals that act like those in the human brain glutamate receptors form memories in humans and they're also also found in plants and some hormones are transported around plants similar to how neurotransmitters move through animal brains likewise some plants are vulnerable to drugs that disrupt neuro transmitters in the human brain like PROZAC or methamphetamines. Peta means they even produced their own ethylene which is possibly used as an anesthetic. When they're stressed out? Plants even have a kind of nervous system in that may allow information to travel around the plant via electrical signals. So if plants have sort of brains brain's do they remember stuff. Well yeah plants also have their own kind of memory. In fact there's a plant called the Mosa Deka plant in closes its leaflets immediately after their touched but because this requires energy. The plant won't do it if it's unnecessary. However when researchers dropped potted mimosas fifteen

Charles Darwin Vogel Bomb Christian Sager Mosa Deka KIM Prozac Peta
Two jail guards for Jeffrey Epstein charged with cover-up in his suicide

Chuck and Kelly

03:08 min | 1 year ago

Two jail guards for Jeffrey Epstein charged with cover-up in his suicide

"Some big developments Kelly in the death of Jeffrey Epstein to jail guards responsible for monitoring in the ninety according to the corner killed himself they've not been criminally charged in this case yeah they are accused of falsifying the records because they weren't supervising him the day before he had been moved off of suicide watch when you're on suicide watch a twenty four hour surveillance both in terms of video and a guard right there when they moved him back into the general population they were supposed to check on them every thirty minutes the two guards you were right fifteen feet away were either sleeping or online shopping and then they falsify the record to say that they had checked on him when in fact they had yeah and that's that's that's awful so their charge now I'm I'm I guess I'm hoping I'm not a conspiracy theorist but I still have questions about this case I'm hoping that these actually these these this case goes to trial and we can maybe shed more light on exactly what didn't didn't happen there because people are saying you know how could this happen to such a prominent inmate who was on suicide watch also we know that people allow inmates don't like peta files it after he was accused of being such and also he had a lot of powerful friends who we could may be implicated in Syria Iran so you have all that intrigue all right plus you have his family hiring doctor Michael Baden to do the autopsy and their and their own investigation and he determined that the marks on the neck were not consistent with hanging it was consistent with strangulation there were no cameras ally on his cell at all so there are a lot of questions that I'm not a conspiracy there is either I tend to make fun of those people who are you know I I I do think that in this particular case I could see a scenario playing out where you know what there is a somebody is a has this to the pata file who is you know allows another inmate to come in looks the other way and pretend that they don't know what's going on and there's no camera and there's no record of anybody so I mean or somebody from the outside comes in and says Hey we'll give you I will facilitate a transfer to a nicer facility or will reduce your sentence if you know you you go in there and do what you need to do and and will look the other way yeah I look at it if if I had a gun to my head right now I still think it was a suicide he finally got a chance to do what he did it his future is bleak but but I don't know I'd like I'd like more information of interesting interesting yeah hearing yesterday in Washington where the what one of the committee's handling it is looking into and they they they talk to the the head of the prisons there care of Kathleen hawks Sawyer she appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee and she was not asked about hello all things in the federal prison system including the F. sting case in in this exchange with the committee chair Lindsey Graham senator from South Carolina they they were talking about this conspiracy theory and she confirmed that there is the FBI is looking into a quote unquote criminal enterprise possibility with the case this high profile there's got to be their major malfunction the system are criminal enterprise it for that to allow this to happen so are you looking at both the FBI looking at both if the FBI is involved and they are looking criminal enterprise yes so I mean that is sort of obvious but it's interesting the FBI does have a formal investigation those are the two possibilities either there was incompetence or something

Kelly Jeffrey Epstein Twenty Four Hour Thirty Minutes Fifteen Feet
Seth Rollin

The Rack Radio Show

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Seth Rollin

"Cancelled the WW network trended for over I think twelve hours in the United States brought this up on the post show but it's worth mentioning again how long it actually trended in the US on twitter that's that's equal to give divas a chance it took a long time go away and wwe heard the message loud and clear that the fans were not happy with the decision of for Seth Rollins to retain the title at helmets L. and it wasn't even that seth retain the title it's the way that it happened where you had a referee stoppage in Helena sell first time I think ever for a rest pitch for what Rock Nestor coming in and killing two people but for basically what happened is Seth had br on the ground he had a bunch of stuff piled on top of him takes out a sledgehammer he questions himself the restaurants talk me out of it says like no no no I'm going to do it seth hits the stuff with the sledgehammer and bray and Aref immediately calls for the bell a call for stretcher for Bray which I don't know I go back I've gone back and forth on this because at one hand yes he's absolutely human being a medical attention he does deserve a stretcher but at the same instance he's a Hor- character do you really want horror character stretchered out no but I need to read something before reaching you okay Rod Peta the official art with Bray motionless and Seth clearly doing whatever is going to take to win that match I had to think of the competitor safety and at that moment I did I thought was best and I was getting to that because I was gonNA bring that up next so Monday night they waited until ten thirty to talk about the match and they just sort of highlighted didn't said that seth had one and then that came out like two Wednesday on the new network and social media show the bump you go there's at ten am eastern on Monday mornings on Wednesday mornings the bump is actually decent show different but yeah so they put that out which didn't really help the situation no it's just pissed more you know it's kind of like just just let sleeping dogs lie on this one don't don't try to defend decision because I feel like this was somebody somewhere that made this choice we have to defend our decision they're wrong that's what it honestly feels like he was actually pissed off that the fans were angry at this and so they made this poor man who was the referee in this match like defend his quote unquote choice to stop the match even though it was really his choice and he's like he's taking the brunt of this and we're all pretty much like double finger no no that's not accept into vote because I mean this led to this whole situation has led to people going on the network which I'm sure made them very happy but when on the network and pull photog- and gifts and stills of past hell in the cell matches and pretty much the most violent ory about even though they filled every sledgehammer they did they did they pulled every sledgehammer moment they pulled every gory violent moment from hellenise Allen Trust me there's a bunch of them long blades they did or take a lot of weight were either triple h you're taker but they pulled this and then proceeded as posted to social media as basically like w t f like this okay but this wasn't and I mean you got it from the human perspective Brian is a person but this character the fiend that he is portraying is not no and he is monster from your nightmares and he's relentless and he's unstoppable in the fact that you had seth rollins get him on his back for probably I five five or so minutes and proceeded to do this while seth running around in the rain like that's the whole thing that was really bothersome about this was not that seth got breakdown that's fine that's totally cool like seth is the beast slayer sess should be very difficult to beat it shouldn't have been easy for for Brady to just walk in and kick crap out of Seth but the fact that breaks laid there motionless for ten minutes now or not to miss but like five minutes is seth proceeds to pile ladders and chairs into boxes and everything else on top of him like that's that's what made this really really hard because it's like well wait a minute this is the guy two months ago or whatever at summer slam massacred Fin Baylor just like eviscerated fan valor. Now he's doing this with seth it just it didn't make sense nothing about this made sense

Seth United States Twitter Five Minutes Twelve Hours Ten Minutes Two Months One Hand
Justin Bieber slams PETA after they criticize him over exotic cats

Drew Garabo Live

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Justin Bieber slams PETA after they criticize him over exotic cats

"For Justin Bieber just drop thirty five thousand dollars on to exotic cats cats cats what kind of cat J. be adopted a pair of Savannah kittens a little more than a month ago which he named sushi and tuna and revealed the brother and sister felines on Instagram as my children much to the dismay of pizza. St statement chastising his ox exotic pets. and he clapped back saying either go focus on real problems like poaching an animal brutality your trip in because I want a specific kind of cash your check when I got my dog Oscar and he was a rescue every Pat we must get must be a rescue.

Justin Bieber Oscar Thirty Five Thousand Dollars
Buckingham Palace, Jeffrey And Andrew discussed on Gary and Shannon

Gary and Shannon

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Buckingham Palace, Jeffrey And Andrew discussed on Gary and Shannon

"So the palace is once again on the defensive Buckingham Palace all over this Jeffrey abstain prince Andrew situation well a huge document dump right a couple Fridays ago all about that defamation lawsuits between Virginia Roberts this seventeen year old woman who claims she was a sex slave for Jeffrey up steam and people are still going through all the documents or what's in there and slowly little bits are trickling out here and most recently it was the information by the pilot the pilots David Rogers is sixty six and he was the pilot on Jeffrey abstains private jet I have a question I want to know more about that guy yeah because he's like a Dottie Sandusky he was flying that plane he was living in that house and he probably had that door polder the curtain pole right he knew what was going on willing to overlook this right for the money he flew the chat he also talked about having seen some very high profile guests on this child rape airplane child rape air president Clinton Naomi Campbell Kevin Spacey a number of times now in this one specifically he talks about the the woman who was involved in this original lawsuit are really miss got free right Jeffrey it turns out that the deposition is among the court documents that we've been talking about like like a Shannon just mention this is the first time that both prince Andrew in Virginia Joffrey work on EPS teens that at Jack at the same time now that the pilot said that I was very careful to say listen I was in the car you know why in with my yoke I didn't see anything going on back well I don't know if anything bad happen I don't know if he said that but he all they say is that he did not accuse prince Andrew of any wrongdoing on the flights so I don't know if he said I didn't see anything he certainly didn't say I saw prince Andrew doing anything but why would he was flying the plane Virginia Roberts Jeffrey is this woman's name sure I think her Roberts is her maiden name and Jeffrey's now her married name that's why it's a slightly confusing but Jeffrey I've seen prince Andrew gill lane Maxwell and this young woman wore passengers on a flight from New Jersey down to Saint Thomas to go to Pat a file island had a file island now why would prince Andrew be on the flight to a file island if he wasn't engaging and peta file things or at the very least ladies and let's say he wasn't engaging in it but he knew what was going on I was happening under his nose that's the part that was also report yesterday that I read it prince Andrew would defend Jeffrey apps dean in yelling fights with friends who would say to him Hey you got to cut ties with this Jeffrey Epstein character he is bad news and he's a registered sex offender any was convicted of raping girls and prince Andrew would say something along the lines of you don't know him like I know him see and it's that kind of behavior at that points to him engaging in the same child rape stuff that that obscene was I mean him on the flights now in the flight logs as being passengers to that island coupled with the video that came out over the weekend it showing him in twenty ten to years after everyone knew I've seen was a child rapist in his home in New York is bad for the palace this is the guy that's forth from the throne and they had to release another statement disputing the pilots claims the statement said the evidence statement was submitted in a case in which the Duke was not a party and which any suggestion of impropriety with underage minors is categorically untrue the statement shows a number of inconsistencies between the dukes alleged location and its actual location when checked with the court circular in some cases he's on different continents prove it okay well here's a here's the other part of that the woman who gave this deposition her lawsuit was not contemporary wasn't done in two thousand one so I find it very likely that you're gonna be able to trip up on some dates like that I mean this woman was said to be what nineteen years old at the time that she was super seventeen years old I think when she was on these flights what what do you remember what you were doing on a Tuesday and when you were seventeen years old no but I wasn't getting raped on a jet by billionaires I think if I was then maybe it would stick in my brain a little bit more for that scrambled your brain even more you were unwilling to to remember those those states I don't now a different different impacts on

Buckingham Palace Jeffrey Andrew Seventeen Years Nineteen Years Seventeen Year
Jeffrey Epstein's death ruled a suicide by hanging

Hammer and Nigel

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Jeffrey Epstein's death ruled a suicide by hanging

"Jeffrey upstate what's are with that state that state's gonna initial we've got an official cause of death in that in that case the pervert peta final billionaire lot of conspiracy theories was he murdered you know the broken bones in his neck raise some questions the autopsy came back and said it was a suicide have been ruled a suicide Jeffrey Epstein hanged himself in a jail cell was not a homicide ruled a suicide by the

Jeffrey Upstate Jeffrey Epstein Official Peta
Secretary, Alex Acosta And Harvard discussed on Markley and Van Camp

Markley and Van Camp

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Secretary, Alex Acosta And Harvard discussed on Markley and Van Camp

"Because the US labor secretary has resigned now Alex Acosta here comes the to the cause yeah that the delay to cut with that billionaire peta file here yeah president trump standing shoulder to shoulder with Alex the cost after Acosta resigned had this to say about him just want your reaction from this the figure all that out the fact is he is secretary of labor called me this morning and I wanted to see me and I I actually said well right out here so perhaps you just want to say to the press but I just wanna let him not because I'm with them he's a tremendous he went to Harvard great so many ways not

Secretary Alex Acosta Harvard United States Peta President Trump
Trump Labor Secretary Alex Acosta resigns amid pressure from Jeffrey Epstein sex traffic case

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Trump Labor Secretary Alex Acosta resigns amid pressure from Jeffrey Epstein sex traffic case

"Labor secretary Alex Acosta has resigned as labor secretary for the trump administration labor secretary at cost is stepping down after coming under fire and defending his two thousand a plea deal with millionaire peta file Jeffrey M. sting this week a Costa served as U. S. attorney in Miami Florida during the two thousand a plea deal that critics saw as remarkably soft for abstained abstain was recently charged by the Southern District of New York for new charges of sex trafficking has new evidence came to light which only put more pressure on the Costa ABC's Tommy honest tells us at scene is pledging to put up his seventy seven million dollar Manhattan mansion in a private jet as collateral to secure bonding get out of jail while he awaits trial in their legal filings at Steve's attorney say that he would agree to home detention in Manhattan G. P. S. electronic monitoring and would not seek or obtain a new passport prosecutors have called obscene and extreme flight risk because of his vast wealth the charge is a very serious in the car with a maximum sentence of forty five years in jail which to someone of absence age is basically a life sentence so we think he has every incentive to trying to flee the jurisdiction but it's unclear even the prosecutors how will the FTC exactly is his career is taken several twists and turns from being a math teacher at an elite New York prep school to becoming a Wall Street insider then a private wealth manager his real estate holdings alone are worth hundreds of millions besides his mansions in Manhattan in Palm Beach he is in a state in New Mexico analysts to private islands in the Caribbean and a home in Paris he traveled in private jets like this one which according to flight logs from court records he used to try but with celebrities and world leaders of philanthropic trip to Africa in two thousand two including president Bill Clinton actor Kevin Spacey and Chris Tucker in civil litigation it's been alleged that he used his planes to shuttle underage girls around the US and overseas he has pleaded not guilty to the allegations in the indictment Tommy

Palm Beach Bill Clinton President Trump New Mexico Miami U. S. Peta Tommy United States Chris Tucker Kevin Spacey Africa Paris Caribbean Alex Acosta Manhattan New York Prep School FTC Steve
What did Jeffrey Epstein's friends know and see?

John Batchelor

04:46 min | 1 year ago

What did Jeffrey Epstein's friends know and see?

"Okay let's start with Geoffrey obscene okay sweating powerful people are sweating that's what we're told yes and I don't know if you caught any of the interview on the today show with the young lady that was abused starting at age fourteen just a horrific story yeah didn't you walk at a school and then somebody just kind of came up to her and said Hey I know somebody if you want to go give him with a massage and that turned into an escalating series of events it was even more nefarious than that because the woman that befriended her it's like she targeted her and became friends were there over time and then lowered **** in yeah I know and now that we know they're going to be people that knew about this guy knew what he was up to for years and years the names will come out they're gonna have to pay for that they should but I any does reprehensible it doesn't matter who it is but yes no somebody was involved in it they need to pay Democrats though in the media are trying their best to make this Jeffrey abstain scandal all about Donald Trump because well as labor secretary Alex Acosta worked out the slap on the wrist that at sting got first child sex crimes more than ten years ago and also because trump new on like a lot of people did and here's what trump said just if you didn't hear it on the show yesterday here's what trump said about Jeffrey F. Steen well it roll it Roland Scott dot everybody involved with people in Palm Beach you and me was a fixture in Palm Beach I had a falling out with them a long time ago I don't think I've spoken to him for fifteen years I wasn't a fan I was not a long time ago I I'd say maybe fifteen years I was not a fan of his that I can tell you yes but did you see the pictures well it looks like they were coming back then let's see what trump said about a two thousand ten right he's a great guy that's what they want with I know any and it's ridiculous and so you had James Patterson who I can't imagine is a huge fan of president trump but he wrote a book about Jeffrey obscene and as well billionaire peta file ways and was asked about trump's relationship there and James Patterson backed up trumps account that's what was amazing to me about this well I know that there were some complaints about that scene at Merrill log out and also I I spoke to the the head of the spot there and she said that I said did you ever meet that seems you know yes he said he would company was an appropriate was probably on the women there and she said I went to Mr Mr trump and and trying to find a club just like that so there's a there's a problem with this guy you could imagine in some circles that's where a guy like trump might take Jeffrey aside Hey is there any truth to this that sort of thing that from Patterson's account was pretty immediate yes but you're gone your you know what third been enough there did enough things that just downright you're gone and in the whole need to era and all the accusations about trump's behavior and how he might act in situations like this it sounded like a lot of the people in Hollywood that are criticizing trump on a daily basis really acted much more irresponsibly than this guy did you know you think about the Harvey Weinstein's of the world who are allowed to operate everybody you know you take forty you take Kerr the aside and you just kind of say Hey don't do that please don't do this anymore Harvey I mean will help you pay out the women who are accusing you of all these things trump said no you're gone right you're talking about the Ben Affleck generals right that is heard the things yes there is a difference there again that's not to say you all trump was always require board for crying out loud you know I mean but at least the hell this situation it seems like in the right way at the right time is Bill Clinton set a flight risk now well I you know when you're talking about flights where there were no secret service and they were underage girls on the plane and tastes like yeah yeah that's that's interesting I thought also significant maybe we'll have the are you a little bit later was apparently James Patterson says he knows that trump didn't know about at Steens criminal activity he believes that Bill Clinton didn't now I thought that's it maybe I'm reading too much into it but I think that's an interesting distinction there little wiggle room there is as well I believe that Bill Clinton know anything about it I know trump did they didn't Patterson also have a book about Bill Clinton Anderson wrote a book with Bill Clinton and they were out on the tour together yes and so when people were asking bill about Monica Lewinsky even passions like Hey can we just let that die right so yeah I had to your point I don't think he's a big fan of

Geoffrey Fifteen Years Ten Years
CSIRO shines a rainbow under the Milky Way

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

05:50 min | 2 years ago

CSIRO shines a rainbow under the Milky Way

"Sydney has always been Austrailia party city and next to its knees fireworks celebrations. The biggest party on the harbor cities. Calendar is its annual gay and lesbian mardi graphist of all as part of this. You celebrations Australia's National Science agency. The C Siro has lit up its economy Australian square kilometer array Pathfinder radio telescope in a rainbow of colors, six of the twelve midday dishes, located in the remote within the strain outback and displaying different color of the rainbow against the backdrop of the Milky Way to Mark the CSI rose in our world participation in that she's mardi gras parade. At least fifty hours staff will March in the parade on March. The second holding a giant DNA, double helix. Silla breeding organizations commitment to diversity the theme being diversity is in our day. Dr Sarah is deputy director of SIA Siro astronomy. And space sciences says us. The strain square kilometer rape Pathfinder was appropriate because it points to the futures space research, the Pathfinder at located the Murchison radio astronomy observatory some eight hundred kilometers north Perth is testing technologies which will be incorporated into the massive multibillion dollar square kilometer array project, the world's largest radio telescope now being developed in outback Australia ad in South Africa pieces. The pathfinders used by diverse group of strontium is from ride around the world. So it's an appropriate setting for rainbow display of ask cap dishes 'em in rainbow colors dish. And we've done that to demonstrate really commitment DeVos to celebrate that were walking up mardi gras and also because he uses telescope really diverse and we want to demonstrate to them as well that we're inclusive and welcoming to everybody important is diversity in an organization as large and diverse itself as the space IRO you have fingers. So many pies from astronomy through the marine sciences geology through engineering yet. Look absolutely do it. And so a really wide range of science and in order to attract and retain really the best talent internationally thing. We have to be very welcoming people have to be comfortable able to bring that whole best selves to work. And there's also a lot of evidence that suggests that diverse teams more innovative, and they make more revenue and then more effective. How's that going? We'll re up to that in its commissioning phase now, so it's thirty six fishes and innovative radio cameras rule starting to work together. But it's already delivered some really great science. For example, we've detected more than twenty fast radio bursts ready with the telescope, even though it's not quite fully working at. And of course, the good thing was asking is. You haven't got microwave ovens there to accidentally opened up before they've finished cooking. You get any false ratings. Now, if I kept we think is on what's the world, best radio observatory? Because extremely quiet. It's around three hundred fifty kilometers from the newest town. And so that's why we've gone left because it's very radio, quiet. Are you knew the Murchison world through to raise? That is that. Yes, that's right. So we're both both on the Murchison and registrar observe a tree which is managed by CSI Arroyo. And we're very pleased to be able to share it with with them delight Murchison's of different type of radio telescopes setup, isn't it? Yeah. That's right. So much than why field array is a low frequency telescope, and it does Catholic precursors for the square kilometer. Right. Which will also be the same site when it gets built in Australia in a couple of years that's already up and running the early stages of that for the square kilometer array, what about the astray inside of things. So we've been running up precursors now as I say caps. Nearly nearly am open running and w is bemoaning number of years. But we've also been working on the design for the telescope. What we've learned from us Cap'n MWA, we'll be fading into the K design the two. Functions of what's being built in Australia, and what's being built in South Africa. You looking at different ends of the electromagnetic radio spectrum out you low frequency radio waves and winds looking at midway prince radio eight. Yeah. That's right. So they'll be complementary and what happens then once you collect that data. Somehow there's going to be an awful lot of data to try and process and determine what you want, and what you check out, and what you cave and Hetty dual letting witty store it. And how do you simply get that amount of data from one place to another as an S k- Tecom. Oh, absolutely data radio telescope producing masses more data than we've been used to radio. Astronomers Esca will have an archive that something like two three hundred PETA bytes of data year, so solving that big data challenge is one of the key things will be working on over the next year. That's the big problem isn't Hetty. You know, what you keep his worth keeping headed? You know, what you Chuck out stuff that you can afford to get rid of you can afford to lose. So that's a really key challenge. And for the first time with these telescopes the computers, the supercomputers that when the data were really part of the telescope because we have to process the data more or less at the same time as it's taken. We just can't afford to stole the data anymore in this curse. We're talking about a new generation of computers. Some of the biggest in the world. That's right. Look will require for k x o scale kind of computing. So they'll be those will be big computers than anybody has now. Fortunately, we've got a few years yet to get this is all being coordinated from Manchester England S K headquarters in Manchester. There were ten member countries all over the world, and we really very much enjoyed that international. Collaboration. In fact, in two weeks time, we'll be doing in Rome to sign the treaty fast. It's too syrup. His deputy director of SIA Sira, astronomy and space science,

Australia Murchison Radio Astronomy Obse Deputy Director Mardi Graphist South Africa Sydney Murchison National Science Agency Sia Sira Csi Arroyo Devos Hetty Manchester Dr Sarah Rape Manchester England S K Perth Rome Esca
"peta" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Idea come from your history long background in consulting for big brands in marketing and you've talked verde talk at length about your love for cycling which is obvious but where did that sort of moment com where we decided to strike out on your own yeah a muffin asked about the moment and i'm not sure how many will found his have a moment like this the light bulb goes on and they have this moment for me there wasn't really a moment was a a drip drip that grew into a stream and then a river and then then ac it was something i was doing without really even knowing i was doing it when i was developing in the ideas but it all came from my own personal passion for the writing itself and and for watching and qassimi the sport and it just meant so much to me and it it added to my life in such a significant way i just couldn't get round the factors there is nothing going on in this bull why was that and why when i was looking at consumer brands where they will focus on something else hot wide no be done it for cycling i guess in early days of the brand or even in recent years people have talked about rafeh being a bit of a polarizing brand and i know you've been thrown that question many many times in the pass but is it a relevant now that there are so many other players in the market it has it seems a bit flooded now there's so many other brands that have come along since since rafa doesn't matter anymore that the kid is expensive i think we're polarizing for a number of reasons and price is one of those i think it's still important that that's the case i think is important in a good way in a bad way a bit of polarization is essential to be really shulte brand i think and the brand that i always wants to have with something that meant a lot to some people and you can't achieve that with i think without going against the grain for some people so a little bit we always going to have but on the other hand we do want to reach more people and people have more choice so we have to be a little bit careful not to boxall cells into a corner and become too polarizing rava was standalone for for some years but now as i said there's there's plenty of competition has that changed things for rafeh and where you're going with the company it hasn't changed anything really i think in many ways it's a brilliant thing there were so many copycats and so many good brands coming along in slipstream if you like only means peta choice for the customer better.

peta
"peta" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Using small and then all of a sudden you're back to composition which becomes a problem so civilised doesn't have a composition approach and that doesn't matter at some scale and then at some scale it will start to regain has as part of its naturally it's a workflow engine so composition as part of its model so in that sense it sort of makes sense what i would say also brigades the civically supposed disturbance which definitely is being used on mass or a certain leads in my experience is that brigade because it's so powerful in yet not server la's in kind of obvious way we're seeing a lot of use in people who appreciate the functionality at brings but i wouldn't say it's you know splashing the tech world on fire yet i actually think it'll have longer legs in many cases than a lot of other things simply because of the powered brings indeed and so that notion of the function as a service sprawl where you stay start to use lots and lots of them and maybe you don't really have a big picture view of where all the different places in your application you're using different functions as a service that would not occur as easily in brigade right because you have your tomic unit or at least one of the atomic units is the workflow which is a chunkier piece of functionality than that function yeah there is a fundamental problem sort of restated 'cause i love sir less because it's another tool and i get a use it for things that it helps me with right composition is going to be a problem with service and in addition to which once you start running serb listen bills by the second or microseconds nanosecond peta seconded some sack at some point you're running vm and running a whole vm becomes less expensive than being billed by the second and paying for all those you know standby vm's that actually are underlying the service and so there is sort of a trade off both.

peta
"peta" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Using small and then all of a sudden you're back to composition which becomes a problem so civilised doesn't have a composition approach and that doesn't matter at some scale and then at some scale it will start to regain has as part of its naturally it's a workflow engine so composition as part of its model so in that sense it sort of makes sense what i would say also brigades the civically supposed disturbance which definitely is being used on mass or a certain leads in my experience is that brigade because it's so powerful in yet not server la's in kind of obvious way we're seeing a lot of use in people who appreciate the functionality at brings but i wouldn't say it's you know splashing the tech world on fire yet i actually think it'll have longer legs in many cases than a lot of other things simply because of the powered brings indeed and so that notion of the function as a service sprawl where you stay start to use lots and lots of them and maybe you don't really have a big picture view of where all the different places in your application you're using different functions as a service that would not occur as easily in brigade right because you have your tomic unit or at least one of the atomic units is the workflow which is a chunkier piece of functionality than that function yeah there is a fundamental problem sort of restated 'cause i love sir less because it's another tool and i get a use it for things that it helps me with right composition is going to be a problem with service and in addition to which once you start running serb listen bills by the second or microseconds nanosecond peta seconded some sack at some point you're running vm and running a whole vm becomes less expensive than being billed by the second and paying for all those you know standby vm's that actually are underlying the service and so there is sort of a trade off both.

peta
"peta" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Read my my true secrets i'm i feel like they're interesting and i feel like i wanna share them with people because i feel like this is what i have to give i don't have that much to give on many spectrums but if you wanna talk about the desire to be intimate with someone at the same time have your own space and how to figure that out i've dedicated my life to that with my brother and my wife and my children my parents i mean for god's sakes my brother and my parents we all live within three miles of each other and we get together every sunday at my mom's for my mom and dad's for for you know dinner and our kids play together like we are going for it and and so i do feel like with this book you know i feel confident to say like all right the things i wrote in here i feel like i'm gonna i'm gonna thority on this stuff i know this there's also an interesting bit of what do you want to call it self awareness i'm hovering around the right word and the new movie duck butter miguel peta directed for from a script he wrote with its star aaliyah shaukat and at the beginning of the film you guys play yourself yep having hired a elliott to to be the leading lady yeah in this movie and it's not working how yep it was miguel i really i really loved the idea i said would you guys come compla yourselves in this that have been trying to figure out a scene where we can we can put the lead character alliott in this situation where she's not self aware you know and she and he's like you guys are the most aware people on the planet i know of it doesn't environments let's just put you in it and just do it and there was no script for that and we improvised it and we shot it right downstairs in this house in our offices you know and it was a blast you know i think that there's a a playfulness to that movie and us wanting to do.

miguel peta aaliyah shaukat elliott
"peta" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"They do the same nature thing like these two agents the talking together like they've seen this a million times of four instead it particle and he said he realized how those early visits as a child were almost like the way that the child molester will groom its victim that's awful he said peta falls ingratiate themselves into the victim's families to gain the trust he said it took until now for the mosque of my abuses to come down i had been groomed those would terrifying but briefing count as in my childhood but they were not nearly as brief as our amended they damaged my soul he said in the way that a child molester robes children of their innocence this was an a penny for him at explain his childhood explained what they were doing to him voa grooming him making him ready for these continual experiences that happened through his life i think that's one of the most disturbing elements of this phenomenon is that you know maybe if someone sees an alien alieno they have a ufo experience what's your exciting batir find itself but the fact that these people caught seemed to escape it for you know it's a lifelong problem that they have is horrible absolutely it's terrifying it's absolutely terrifying and as as this interrogation continues suddenly something and twos terry's mind and it some kind of peace stoff concern he suddenly angry and he in his hypnotic state he bursts out at brad this major and says look this something's when allowed to talk about when a let's talk about this we're not supposed to talk about this he no we're not supposed to talk about this he says it's a secret and there are consequences if he disobeyed them they'll make his pay wearing danger and this caused quite a stir the major tried to calm him down and said no terry i've asked the commission they let me talk to you they've said it's okay for you to tell me these things see that's what i um in investigating police officer would say to a child has been abused because the child was i i talk about on allowed to and as stated in view intake.

terry brad peta officer
"peta" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on WDRC

"If in this gets be so aggravated i mean we've got so many laws on the books in this country already and and and this is the fight some people just turn up at it and they don't want it bill by the law while i am by though you know it just it just aggravates you and uh especially if if we're talking about people that are in this country illegally starkly up and their child sets peta fouls and and also on you know what what does this oh yeah you know we make a great point if they're willing to imf they're willing to do this how far will they go you know we talked about and are as we talk about energy in the anarchy is that that exist right now that want to create anarchy will what kind of anarchy or what type of anarchy mind said you have to have to actually believe but a legal immigrant criminals have more of a right to freedom and the security of american citizens innocent men women and children think about that think about that what what it has to be what are your other thoughts how do you go about your daily life how do you govern what what do you wish to protect in your community what is important if that is a part of your mind said so i'm so happy that you called and framed at the way that you did which was you know how far do you go if if this is your mind said within how far would you go and that's that's it o i if if if we don't put a stop to the policy now then frankly it's and if we don't as the nation's say it's enough then frankly than we're we're going to be part of it i mean that's the you we have enough of us on on the conservative side the question is does it rise to the level of the republican party or those that are against it doing something about your ears ears and other one through so many people in jail you have to have fewer jet will rise me will no it's not the jail's aren't the problem it's people to commit crimes that are the problem exactly and that's the thing is that are eager.

republican party peta imf
"peta" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"It's an all these groups that i found it was great really that's club really descriptive um from my experience of of hanging around with with poly people um you know like y'all said we we are they do like to kind of sex geeks probably people do kind of like to nick up terms for things and describe things um i also heard peta more recently which is like you're metamorphised pet or maybe you're your pet and you're not a more you're partners pet or something and just like their relationships it's pretty cute um but so yeah so iit cue to meet it sounds to me like amount of practices and word that um poly folks use it could just benefit anybody i agree and i generally think that if there is not a word that accurately describes what you're feeling or who you are you should make one up i i think they're useful all around i liked the first neil edges and that i coined was booby sexual to describe uh with you all right booby sexual so it well how i described myself which is women that are not particularly interested in other women below the waist but who really just fucking love booby because who doesn't want do behave and the germans later apply to also refer to for example gay men were really into boobs but not interested in women below the way so you know maybe sexuals basically somebody who uh has one particular orientation but in terms of women is interested in bubis and um you know that just that worked for me it's kind of a silly term but you know it's descriptive and if you want it if anybody wants to use it by the way feel free.

peta neil
"peta" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on RobinLynne

"King the two one ubuntu lau dean a wrote a poem those likewise night the brain even peta display before say in these saving can of all coming off with a denser life could dential fired from a mob binches omen those themes to gene weber in crabs bucket be better done should on matt of yogi them i wonder what a day of prayer he met at the okay that he grew up one of what it's like the be god one of whether it be for the okay could it be dry gin and they can lay low blood flow blood noninvasive modality of the word in a negative way.

dean King ubuntu peta
"peta" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Were were you at were you attracted to both genders and then you made the choice to be attracted to a girl or were you naturally attracted to a girl i've been attract olympia and go more okay has stagnated in kindergarten perfect perfect then is it that hard to understand that just as you are attracted to girls in kindergarten that there are dudes who are attracted to dudes in kindergarten but the same thing where i'm saying there could be uh uh uh uh i kid best attracted the kids and say i don't know why are so obsessed with kid torture's but try to get peta fouls out of your mind for a second listen my friend tried to get peta files out of your mind for a second you seem to be obsessed non pedophilia which i find bizarre and a little bit disturbing about it you are and when you should never have bet month at above but you are poorest delude you are born straight and some people are born attracted to the same sex forget about kid touches i know that's hard for you because you seemed to have a passion for talking about kid touches but let's forget about pedophilia let's talk about the two main sexual orientation zack homosexuals and heterosexuals you're are naturally attracted to women women's women's you love women's okay we all love women now all of a sudden from his guys we love women some dudes are attracted to other dudes why is that so hard to understand some people love kids but don't you think that ms a real italian fan of bear the reason no the reason is there attracted to umbro like just like you're in a women some dudes are in the dudes don't look for the nothing happened let me let me jump in for sacked do you think there can be born predisposed to being attracted to children no you don't oh no i don't think anyone is is born with a natural attraction to children man yeah you like man yeah can be delivered that's all i'm saying is if you saying that if you saying that people can actually be borne gay been that's actually opened up the opening of.

peta
"peta" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Boom the number one hit music station movin ninety two point five oh hitler as on this from the point of this thing going on now just mondanon from being obama comment on the left and peta was not exactly suits no you as stated market birdying six no feelings now now the malcolm hey their liabilities mcdonough grave we're not those who spoke cakes is not exactly suits how'd you on the list that moment indeed suits no ludi lin in antibodies enabling by by hopes of injury a group of by the deadline the only way out of hand china.

hitler obama peta mcdonough
"peta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wracked with angst because it's thinking i'm always buzzing around there the speed of light and never get to slow down and smell the roses no not like that peta thought his maybe photons might have some element of raw subjective feeling some primitive precursor to consciousness this is a pretty big idea right like that that matches flies but microbes are photons all have consciousness and i mean we look as humans we want us we want to believe that our consciousness is what makes a special right like different from anything else well ever to yesler let's hate the fact of consciousness does not make a special but maybe we've got a special type of consciousness casino consciousness is not on and off comes in all these wretched amazing varieties this vision this hearing this thinking this motion and so on so i'll consciousness is far richer i think than a consciousness af mouse or a fly with you if you want to look for what makes us distinct don't look for just albanian conscious look for the kind of consciousness we have for devil were selfconscious were conscious on ourselves that's not something which probably a an oath whim hands it's also natural do i ask about consciousness and other systems like computers what about the artificially intelligent system in the movie her samantha is she conscious well if you take the informational panturkist view she certainly has complicated information processing and integration so the answer is very likely yes she is conscious if that's right it raises pretty serious ethical issues about both the ethics of developing intelligent computer systems and the ethics of turning them off finally you might ask about the consciousness of whole groups the planet or the mall local level there's an integrated group led the audience ted conference we right now having a collective consciousness leaner movie for this ted group which is distinct from the.

peta
"peta" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"More other kinds of cells in their brain you know but they will have as many normal connections so you know i don't know if that exactly translates to how quote unquote smart the species is but that's a pretty good estimate unity good indicator it's pretty good indicator it will but once you got a hired neuronal density but a much smaller brain might kind of even out whereby great but these because they're all within the carnivora family their similar the other all pretty much on the same line in terms of the brain size the body size the role in the same curve are good to know that all right so let's see saw i will i will believe that dogs are smarter the cats love casper think in terms of pure smarts i'd go with the dogs domestication makes you stupid air can kind to see that you just now on on the ball with cure being fed and peta pettit all day all right so carnivores do not have i'm gonna go with i'm gonna go with three the finding that supposedly that carnivorous species do now have greater neuronal density than prey on say that's fiction okay j okay so bob you're talking about the uh on average domesticated species have significantly lower neuronal density and they're wild counterparts yeah how freaking smart is the dog think about it think about the life it gets to have hey dad through what you said pet all day dig at treats they don't have any responsibility come on come on.

carnivora peta pettit bob
"peta" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"peta" Discussed on KOMO

"The breakout performance of the game powered by ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire and this one pretty obvious the breakout performance of the game up brought to you by dante peta's three touchdowns to go along with a hundred into receiving yards and twelve catches what night third down and fourteen home on the tale back with browning out of a gun at the farmhouse drama writer j pump fake throwing down the air sidewalks hata's coming open found washington despite being held apply faye peta's second touchdown with an eye covers 34 yard coach dante medicines it started you know that he's pretty good yeah he's doing a nice job he really is here you know why i think i said this last week you know we we were so impressed with him last year you know john ross you know the combination of the john ross kinda got more of the headlines which is why did better but we we always went back to dot as much as john lewis two to really good players out there and he's picked up where he left off and then some i know you mentioned that dante may just be a little understated i don't feel like he gets as much recognition for vinas good as he re i mean he is stellar do field i know you care about that but how good he said he's one of the best q coach i i mean i care these at good yell at the people that all batter will though is that good yeah he's just super athletic he's faster than people give him credit for and he's got some of the best hands that i've ever been around i mean he he may want catch on the sideline knows kind of a subtle things jake was scrambling and he drugs foot stretched the rest of his body out his hands i mean he.

dante peta writer washington faye peta john lewis dante john ross 34 yard
"peta" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"peta" Discussed on WSB-AM

"All oh oh oh sza all those and oh that will live peta live herman cane through in villa lewis the marine this is harbin cain the the in the georgia race to cover atlanta traffic there's only one experienced accurate choice wsb triple team traffic and then fears ways these days after the brits collapse onto roads that were gridlock saad listens to w s the dry safely ways uses crowd sourced information that isn't video i like ways because it gets my son toby here's something to do whenever he sees something anti thick punches it into the ways apps and he gets points i'm really shire's wants in the road news reporters cod ways redhanded a traffic f ways purposely manipulate said he tries to convention not takes of streets ways dozen even live here behind the.

wsb saad toby peta villa lewis harbin georgia atlanta
"peta" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"peta" Discussed on KFC Radio

"It certainly don't make in drives who and you certainly don't make them go get icpm if you wanna come to dinner cool but that's it yet again everything has up front and then if you can't merson still comes and he's a crazy person majid if you were like yeah no you come to fill aegis for dinner and he said yes that girl doing all fox i definitely don't you're gonna say noted that that was one others present so as we know all of it seems like lunacy by our own if although if you're dealing with the czech who is going to put ice cream in the freezer like a cone of ice cream and the reason i love that we've just assumed it's one thing so last year i guess i'm now i'm on on on hubs zeid again because what a i i remember land rollercoaster project last layer how i met your mother experience i ask the next reverend into i was like we were either has taken a vacation some of that has a muslim vacationing together and limit what mrs i was like a happened i was drunk when i did it but it was like as as let's go away like this thursday night unlike will go away for the weekend i was drunk and i was like let's go away thursday to sunday and she's like a loved to a mike all right by pressure and said you know you're penis is going my mouth and i was like so we're out on vacation and that's what she peace yet there was all out for that was a respectable ex girlfriend at who's like you know like just coming on vacation we're not having sex beholden it's not a vacation all in is that's just a nuisance it's a it's a law it's a really long weekend peta's.

peta
"peta" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"peta" Discussed on KTRH

"Who serving them nurse practitioners and or peta's our physician extenders bless their heart so you have to be really bright enough to figure dole go to the emergency room but you're going to be i met by the triage nurse that's going to figure out the severity of your problem and then basically tell you to get line if it is not a serious lifethreatening problem you're going to be put at a lower priority now it is always good to go with somebody that's capable to communicate your problem when you go to the er because if you're getting more sick while you're sitting there this person could be your advocate talked to the triage nurse talk to the other staff and say hey my buddy bill over there his shortness of breath is getting worse he feels like is going to pass out his chest pain is worse he feels more nausea that he thinks he's gonna throw up ers do not want people throwing up and the general waiting area trust me and if it is a more serious problem for pete's sake do not drive yourself to the emergency room because of you drive you think you're having a heart attack or chest pain does many things that cause chest pain but man the one thing that gets a chant tension is having a heart attack so if you're you're thinking or you're at risk for heart attack dial nine one one you will get a much higher priority when an ambulance polls up so at one end of the spectrum if it is severe enough you call nine one one.

peta dole pete shortness of breath