18 Burst results for "Peripheral Neuropathy"

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

09:50 min | 9 months ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"That's a good question. Good question time for a Mayo Clinic. Expert's opinion on that and joining us in studio as Mayo Clinic. Dentist in prostate oddest. Dr Thomas Salinas. Welcome back to the program. Thank you for having me. Pro-saddam surprise. You did a good job before what does that. What does that process dot is due? Prosthetics prosthetic dentistry. As it were is. Just one of ten specialties. In dentistry that deals with replacing a full or official structures that could be teeth could be parts of the jaw number of other areas as well. So you do all those implants now. Does anybody get dentures anymore? People do Fortunately in this country that has gone down as the way patients present with needing dentures. Let's say present dentists without any teeth? That's becoming less of an incidence than it was. Maybe just even ten to fifteen years ago it was an upwards of twenty plus percent and in varying areas of the country. You'll find that that's different now. It's down to about eight to ten percent of what it was in comparison because of good dental care partly I think people are becoming more innately aware of what that really means. People living longer keeping their teeth for a longer period of time. So yes that's exactly right right. So what is a dentist? What is your dental health have to do with your heart? Health are the two mix has become really More aware now. If I in our medical community years ago The NIH in conjunction with the Dean of University of Southern California Herald. Slatkin put out a paper that connected the systemic nature of disease with oral health and this became to more in the years following that and I think that some of the pilot studies that have been presented recently. Look at that. There's not really a an implied nature of saying causation. In other words having oral health or diseases that does not really causative. In the fact that for instance cardiovascular disease is probably a little more common linked types of systemic diseases now. So that's really where we're at with. We're looking more of a causation. And that's difficult difficult to prove. Given the size of many of these studies that have become so there's no concrete evidence of a relationship. They are no concrete evidence that poor oral hygiene causes heart disease. Not At this point. There's so many confounding. Some patients present with multiple diseases. They may have osteoporosis. Diabetes and all of these do have sort of a link to oral health because of many of our patients have becoming certainly older now in comparison to twenty five thirty years ago. Many of them have multi system type disease. And it's hard to know exactly what causes what so. The causation really is not there but the association is and there was another paper another study. That came out. That showed that if you brush your teeth three times a day you are less likely to have heart failure and less likely to get atrial. Fibrillation HABITUAL FEB RELATION. Which is a common type of Heart Arrhythmia? That's correct that study was put out. Recently it drew a lot of attention but I think there are some innate flaws with it number one A lot of these patients were self reporting. And you know we all like to think that we have oral hygiene on a regular basis and many of us do of course but it's not as reliable as we think first of all. It's quite different than we. Compare some of the other studies that have linked professional period donald cleaning with cardiovascular disease those have interventions that are very different even one that linked diabetes and the effect of professional period apple therapy with the nature of diabetes. It's as effective as a triple drug regimen. Actually so people with diabetes benefit from having period dental care. They certainly do amazing. And it says affect gave as what it's effective as even using a third drug a third drug to control budget. That's correct. Yes wow I was gonna say it seems to me that if you taking good care of your dental health you'd be someone who takes good care of your physical health but there's more to it than that certainly and this was The basically the cooperation between the American Academy of period on policy and a European Federation period on college back in two thousand seventeen at showed this this finding at that I had heard a story a few years ago. That if you've lost your teeth it was good for your heart is at the same type of link Yes essentially I mean I think we have to look at period Donald Disease and how this is. It's it's sort of a growth of bacteria within the mouth. It's film on Teeth. Certain areas between teeth can actually depleted of oxygen. So it's not just a fact of removing bacteria through the physical act of floss but it's disturbing that anaerobic or without oxygen that tends to promote period donald disease. That's one of the real reasons to to floss. So if you have bacteria in your mouth because you haven't taken obviously there are a lot of bacteria anyway but you lessen the number of bacteria in your mouth by brushing lossing etc. then you reduce the number of bacteria in your bloodstream. You reduce the inflammation in your bloodstream. Which reduces your risk for heart. Disease the theory. That is the theory in. There's there's lots of levels to that certainly you. You actually increase the bacterial count in your bloodstream. Just by the nature of brushing floss your teeth as well. However some of the pathogens we find that are commonly found in patients that have extensive period donald disease pathogens meaning disease correct. In some of these bacteria also are found in cholesterol based plaques within the artery itself have been found to be sort of a confounder in this type of disease process. So it's not really clear if if it's a chicken in there or thing what comes first. Is it a common finding in both disease states and their other diseases that may have this this Effect as well by just by nature of of these types of bacteria nother story I saw and it said that tooth loss patterns are connected to coronary artery disease? Can you explain this is this is somewhat linked? So even though there's an association here it doesn't seem to be causal again is there's an association it's it doesn't mean that there's a cause effect type relationship with this but there is an association so patients that have advanced period. Donald Disease often have a loss of tooth loss pattern that will predict in some way coronary artery disease so it's not well understood Some of this is based on inflammation and the fact that some of the inflammatory markers seen with period Donald Aziz also are found with other disease states like diabetes. One happens to be coronary artery. Disease some of these pathogens also just by nature of their involvement in the bloodstream will actually elevate cholesterol and That's found so when you talk about a tooth loss pattern. What does that mean? I mean what particular pattern would suggest. You're more likely to get coronary artery disease. Certainly having a certain number of teeth that are lost within a given period of time for instance the most common missing tooth and the adult population in the United States is the lower first molar. Why is that well? It's been there since you've been six years old. However it's been subject to attack longer than any of the other teeth have been with regard to bacterial plaque poorer hygiene etc. But the idea of seeing multi rooted teeth being lost is somewhat of a sign of an advanced tooth loss pattern. All right if you ever ask a dentist okay. What do I really need to do to take care of my teeth and gums standard suggestion? This comes also from the NIH. It's looking at Seeing a professional every year at least for an examination a thorough examination that includes visual examination prophylaxis cleaning deep cleaning if it's appropriate period donal therapy if it's indicated also looking at the X. Rays as a screening mechanism to detect carries an advanced bone loss patterns in in many of the backyard's or cavities. So once a year for x-rays once a year for x-rays in some patients we we might accelerate that based on the incident carries. We're seeing lots of changes and carries these days. I mean some of us know all the vaping. That's gone on now. And the controversies around that many of these vaping products hold sweeteners in them and actually increase the incidence of Carey's as well we're looking into that in our own patient lossing flopping is is is essential. Once a day is sufficient it again disturbs that environment that bacteria tend to reproduce it all right and brush two to three times a day brushing at least two times a day. Three if it's possible is suggested to reduce the bacterial count as far as may bring you know what I've got some of those little ones that you can carry with you in your purse. Are Those those wisps? Are those good enough. Those are great. I'm excited those handed out when we're done here. I think you know it gets people into the cognizant habitat of regular oral care each day. So those right. We'll take good care of your teeth and gums is a good idea. We know that gum disease is associated with an increased risk of heart disease maybe not causing effect but there is a relationship there are thanks to Mayo Clinic dentist. Prostate honest. Dr Thomas Salinas. Thank you thank.

Diabetes Donald Disease coronary artery disease Mayo Clinic Dr Thomas Salinas NIH official United States bone loss Slatkin European Federation Donald Aziz University of Southern Califor American Academy donal Carey
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

06:51 min | 9 months ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Tingling sometimes burning sometimes more painful like electrical shocks or sharp type pain so it's really helpful to kind of clarify both the negative and the positive so there are three different kinds of nerves. Is it mostly the sensory nerves? The one that provides sensation to your brain that are involved. Yes so that usually the sensory nerves are often involved the most earliest in a performer apathy. So they're typically the first ones at patients will have after that or and some cases predominantly they can have voter involvement in so motor involvement. Typically patients will describe weakness and so and the most common types of neuropathy it affects the longest nerves the most severely and so that would be the nerves to the feet so people will describe that they're tripping or stumbling over their feet and maybe a severe enough that they actually get a foot drop where they can't lift the ankles at all. Other symptoms of weakness could be difficult to getting out of a low chair going up and down stairs or trouble. Opening a bottle Things that involved grip the last an type of fibers that can be involved in the fibers. And those are what I think of as the automatic functions of the body. So the things that happened that you don't think about so some of the symptoms of those can be what we call pasta lightheadedness or feeling like you might faint. When you stand up people can have dry eyes dry mouth Some of the gastrointestinal symptoms like early society. Feeling full right after you eat or a small amount you feel bloated or actually vomit diarrhea constipation and then people can actually have changed in their sweating so they may notice they don't sweat anymore or they can have in men erectile dysfunction so those are some of the common autonomic symptoms. Yeah a lot of things go wrong. It'd be hard to pin it down. Is it hard to identify this or to the history is really key and so I think the most common things people in the garden variety most common types of neuropathy described sensory symptoms in the feet imbalance? Because when you have a lack of feeling you also don't know where your feet are and so it's particularly apparent when people close their eyes or they have to walk an area because now you've taken away the visual cue. They have an abnormality in their sensation. So they don't have as much to rely upon so some of those symptoms are some of the earliest things so imbalance loss of sensation and it should affect often the feet more than other places. Why what are the causes of this? Yeah so there's many causes I would say there's over. Two hundred causes of neuropathy. So that's where it can be difficult but certainly there are things that are more common so the most common things in the United States particularly be diabetes. You know worldwide. We think about things like leprosy. Do We know why? Or how diabetes affects the nerves. Yeah we do So prolonged hyperglycemia. We know High Blood Sugar. Thanks contributes to the damage It's also goes along with the other micro-vascular vascular complications of diabetes. So things Brussels this small blood vessels like the kidney and I so. Those are often commonly affected together especially in patients who have type one diabetes. Which is the kind you caught often. Think about is occurring in young childhood. Or they can't make a deal so diabetes the number one causing the United States. That's correct what else the other things we think about our some vitamin deficiencies so like B twelve deficiency. So that's more common And if you're a vegetarian or if you've had some kind of stomach surgery that maybe don't absorb the vitamin well. And then some patients it's an auto immune problem other that we commonly think about our monoclonal proteins so those are abnormal proteins produced by your bone. Marrow everybody makes them but you shouldn't make too much of one particular type. We call that a clone and we know that ten percent of patients with neuropathy will be found to have one of these monoclonal game up these and then the problem is then trying to figure out. Are they related? But that's common in something. We typically screen for all right with regard to diagnosis. You mentioned how important the history is physical exam. I assume is also important. Yes so when we're looking at a performer apathy. You know the three key parts of the exam really are the motor exam looking at reflexes and sensation looking at sensation. So you know. We're doing a manual exam checking people's strengths And the arms and legs particularly were tapping on the reflexes and the arms and legs and typically. They're reduced especially you know the ones that the ankles and then sensation because there's different sensory modalities. Were doing different things. We're checking. How will they feel dislike touch with like a cotton swab? We're testing. How well they feel pin with like a shirt pins pain sensation. We're looking at temperature. So we use warm and cold and then we test sometimes called vibration and where the joints are in space so there's different sensory modalities and then we look at how people walk and how they balance. So let's talk about the treatment options because fairly common problem particularly since there are so many people with diabetes in this country right. What can you do for them? So for the most common type of neuropathy again the symptoms are in the feet. So they're simple things you can do. I saw people are having a lot of painful symptoms. Or Burning Tingling. You know it's uncomfortable for their feet to be touched. Simple things like soaking the feet in a cool bath of water for ten minutes can be helpful. You know simple analgesics like Acetaminophen or ibuprofen. If it's more severe than that you need to take it. A step farther. There's topical agents so those are things that we can actually mix into a cream or a gel and they have annals anesthetics and then As well as Medication that we can actually give orally as well but it's just Some of the anti-epileptic medications or the antidepressants. It can be soaked up right into the nerve endings and so you don't get other systemic side effects which is nice and then if people still need more than that or their symptoms or more widespread than we may use some of the oral medications. Things like tricyclic antidepressants. Some of the NFL uptick medications Some of the antidepressants that work. On both what we call Serotonin nor epidemic pathways. What about any therapies? Or what about acupuncture? Yeah so I think a lot of my patients who have pain they WANNA try acupuncture. Some people have good benefit with it and so I think it's something that's reasonable to try as an adjunct to their treatment. All right peripheral neuropathy. It's a painful condition of the nerves most affecting defeat but also the hands fortunately multiple treatments available Dr Michelle Marmot neurologist. At the Mayo Clinic. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you for having me. We're going to take a short break still to come..

diabetes sensory nerves United States peripheral neuropathy foot drop Burning Tingling Brussels hyperglycemia Dr Michelle Marmot Mayo Clinic ibuprofen NFL epidemic
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

01:34 min | 9 months ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"The face hands there the wounds in an annual battle with dry winter air. Dr Don Davis Mayo Clinic Dermatologist. Says when the temperature drops the humidity tends to drop with it and your skin. Dehydrates dry hands are especially vulnerable to cracks and cuts? They can put you at risk for infection. Dr Davis Says Winter Clothing can help keep moisture in. If that's not enough you can try one of three categories of moisturizers ointments which contain oil creams. Which may have oil and water and lotions which are generally water-based she says if your skin is extremely raw you may want to start with the mets want. Skin improves rubbing a hypoallergenic fragrance. Free Cream or lotion may provide enough moisture to prevent further problems and remember these products only lasts for a few hours at maximum. See a need to hydrate and moisturizer at minimum two or three times a day for the Mayo Clinic News Network. I'm the Dean Williams. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom Chives. And I'm Tracy mccray peripheral neuropathy now if you don't have it you're lucky and you probably aren't familiar with the term but unfortunately it's fairly common and worth knowing something about your nervous system is divided into two parts the central nervous system that includes the brain and the spinal cord. Hey and the peripheral nerves which come out from the brain and spinal cord and we'll be talking about the peripheral nerves. I've already learned something new today. If the peripheral nerves are damaged and that can.

Mayo Clinic Dermatologist peripheral neuropathy Mayo Clinic News Network Dr Don Davis Mayo Clinic Radio mets Dr Davis Dr Tom Chives Tracy mccray Dean Williams
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

12:38 min | 9 months ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Who Do not have a family history or do not have a genetic predisposition to hit the disease also on the program peripheral neuropathy and what is the connection between oral health and a healthy heart. All that along with the health minute from Vivian. Williams march is colorectal cancer awareness month and the term colorectal cancer is used to describe cancer of the Colon or the recommend both Colon. Cancer is the third most common cancer in the US can affect virtually anyone. It's most commonly founded people over the age of fifty but not always right. The number of people diagnosed with colon cancer younger than fifty is on the rise joining us to talk about colorectal cancer. Risk Factors diagnosis treatment and prevention is Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist and colon cancer expert. Dr John Kissel. Welcome back to the program. Thanks for having me back. It's a pleasure to be here. All Right Detrick Kissel. This is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. I'm afraid it is so Lung cancer affects both sexes proportionately men are more prone to call to prostate cancer. Obviously and and women will have a fair number of deaths attributable to breast cancer. But when you add them all up and average across both sexes colon cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and its increasing. Actually it's decrease so our efforts at prevention and screening have made a significant impact in colorectal cancer incidence so the number of new cases are diagnosed and the number of people who die from the disease are fortunately decreasing with the advent of the availability of population level screening for the disease so it should be a success story but that's accessible only half full because there are substantial number of people who are still not getting screened. Is it true that if you don't smoke this is the cancer that's most likely to take your life? That is correct and I suspect. Maybe you're catching up to lung. Cancer deaths Even though the number colon cancer deaths is declining but there are fewer smokers so lung cancer is less common dying from lung cancer common than it used to. Fortunately that is true. So the rates of fatality for lung cancer and colon cancer are both decreasing with screening for colon cancer and with fewer people. Smoking with lung cancer That doesn't explain all of the story. But those are very high level trends. Screening starts at age fifty. But now we're starting to hear maybe age forty five as we said in the INTRO. Is that just so that you have a head start on catching of these cancers or is it because you're finding that people are being diagnosed with it earlier So that is a a complicated question to answer right now. there's very compelling evidence that screening beginning at age fifty will lower the mortality rates from colon cancer. There are some emerging science to suggest that the rates of deaths and new cases among patients under the age of fifty in the United States are increasing. And we don't really know why maybe due to trends in or other exposures that began with people In the early seventies or late sixties The national guidelines that look at the risks and benefits of screening patients In in many circumstances disagree on this topic so because the rate of advanced polyps in patients age forty nine or forty five to forty nine is somewhat similar to what we see in fifty plus patients The American Cancer Society Made A recommendation Few years ago to consider screening patients beginning at age forty five in order to catch advanced polyps and early stage cancers before patients develop symptoms from cancer. Was that an everybody or just people with a family. History that is for average risk patients so persons without family history In patients with family history or for certain high risk predisposing conditions such as hereditary colon cancer syndromes or inflammatory bowel diseases. We don't talk so much about screening as we do about surveillance so those are patients who are increased risk And they have customized approaches to pre K. to cancer prevention in each of those specific settings. Can we just as little offshoot? So if the American Cancer Society says forty five instead of fifty have insurers agreed forty five instead of fifty or are we still in a little limbo land. They're great questions so it depends on who you get your insurance from the American cancer. Society guidelines are binding To patients who receive insurance coverage on a statewide basis if you receive insurance coverage from your employer that falls under federal regulations in which the United States Preventative Services Task Force guidelines are the law of the land Let's talk about risk factors because I think a lot of people are under the impression that if they don't have a family history they're unlikely to get colon cancer but in fact. Most cases are so-called sporadic. The don't have a family history right. That's correct seventy five percent of all new colon. Cancer diagnoses are occurring in persons. Who Do not have a family history or do not have a genetic predisposition to get the disease has that seventy five percent is amazing. Has that changed over the last few decades or is that just been the standard as people have been diagnosed. I think as molecular genetic testing is advancing. We're starting to find out that some of those younger patients that are being diagnosed may carry hereditary predisposition that they didn't know about but we don't learn about that from the family history. Won't we only learn about that? Those individuals after they've been diagnosed with the disease so This landscape may change over time as a broader audience of Of of average joes out there are getting Genetic testing done for other reasons but for right now really we want to screen the average risk person who have that family history because that's where the majority of the disease is still occurring if you had a close relative let's say a parent or a sibling. Who had had cancer of the Colon? When would you start screening? And would you get genetic testing so typically? The person who needs genetic testing is the person who gets diagnosed with the cancer. That's where the genetic testing has the highest yield After that when we're assessing a family member of that individual we want to know For your first degree relative A are they a first degree relative so that affected family member needs to be someone close to you sibling. Apparent or child Second how old were they when that cancer was diagnosed so most people in the United States with average risk colon cancers are diagnosed in their mid sixties when patients are diagnosed age. Sixty or younger. We start to worry that that risk is going up in that family and that they may actually carry a predisposing mutation in terms of the Recommendations for you as the of the family member of that person affected with the disease we typically would start Screening our surveillance in this case ten years before their diagnosis. So let's say you had a brother diagnosed with colon cancer at age fifty nine we would either start ten years before that individual or ten years before you would have been due to start programmatic screening so your recommendation would be to get a colonoscopy every five years starting at age forty all right now if you did have genetic testing. Let's say you had a sister who had colon cancer at age fifty nine. What can genetic testing actually tell you? Genetic testing on the affected person that the individual who has the disease say the fifty nine year old sister if she is carrying a hereditary mutation that increased her likelihood of getting colon cancer Having yourself get tested for the same mutation will tell you whether or not you need to follow the average risk guidelines or whether or not you need to follow the surveillance. That's tailored to that disease. The most common predisposing mutation to hereditary colon cancer occurs in a variety of genes that fix damage to our DNA which writes the structural code of our cellular biology and those Repair ENZYMES WHEN THEY ARE DEFICIENT. There will be Proofreading mistakes in that. Dna that can lead to unregulated cell growth That cluster of genetic diseases is called a Lynch Syndrome and is probably responsible for about five to ten percent of all colon cancer individuals with Lynch Syndrome have a very high lifetime risk of colon cancer. And so if you carry that mutation we actually do colonoscopy surveillance on those individuals every year or two so. It's a big difference in what we would recommend for the average risk population and it's important for people to know when it comes to the risk factors. How long does it take four Paul up to become a cancerous polyp? I assume it's five years because for the general population you go in every five years doing to have any idea how long Apollo can sit there before it goes bad. That's a great question We have several lines of evidence to suggest that that that life cycle of going from normal appearing healthy colon tissue to a cancer might be closer to ten years individuals that have hereditary predisposition like Lynch Syndrome. I mentioned earlier there on an accelerated growth patterns. So they if they develop polyp it can go. Bad much faster There's some old data from From even from Mayo Clinic from the area of of Barium x rays to more recent data using cat scans to detect colon cancer that very small polyps those five millimeters or smaller. Many of those will actually just go away on their own and only really about one in every six of those really diminutive polyps will ever actually progress into a larger polyp. That could eventually one day become cancer. So let's talk quickly about symptoms. And what percentage of patients who are diagnosed with colon. Cancer actually have symptoms Fortunately few probably only about thirty or forty percent of patients will actually have symptoms that lead to their diagnosis. And really you. Don't WanNa wait until you develop symptoms of the disease in order to get diagnosed The symptoms are vague non-specific and be could be confused with a variety of other things such as Fatigue abdominal pain difficulty going to the bathroom blood in the stool usually any of those. When they're present they could signify something else if they're associated with colon cancer usually they're associated with late stage colon cancer. That may be either difficult to treat or may no longer be curable. So really. That's why we want to encourage screening. Which is not identifying the patient who has symptoms but the the person out there on the street. Who's feeling fine? That person still has a one in twenty lifetime risk of developing colon cancer and we want to prevent that our guest is an expert on cancer of the Colon and the rectum. Dr John kissel gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic. One thing we've learned in probably the most important thing we've learned is that you want to catch this disease before you have symptoms so let's talk about screening options and by the way Tracy had it done yesterday so and you survive did. It was my second call one is. Everybody says it's the prep that'll get you. But I recommend a diet of three three days ahead of time instead of just waiting until twenty four hours ahead of time and why do you say that because then you have less content to move right so call it ascot still the gold standard Colonoscopy is what we call the criterion standard so it is the test that all other options are measured up against. It does have some Some noteworthy limitations but in general It's a test that is preferred in most guidelines due to the fact that it can not only identify cancers but it can identify precancerous polyps and remove them in one step the other screening options that are available Flexible sigmoidoscopy really only looks at the left side of the colon. It's short too. That's a short a shorter scope that it can be combined with some other. Non Invasive Test Options for greater sensitivity the non invasive options include.

Cancer colorectal cancer colon cancer Lung cancer American Cancer Society breast cancer prostate cancer United States Dr John Kissel Mayo Clinic peripheral neuropathy Detrick Kissel Williams Tracy Lynch Syndrome United States Preventative Ser
Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

Sounds of Science

09:46 min | 1 year ago

Speed vs. Safety: Rapid Approvals from the FDA

"Why is the FDA's rigorous testing so necessary. Well I I think you're aware that a lot of drugs fail From safety concerns we all know about getting sleepy with antihistamines. Or you know that's the actual aside side effect that comes from the action of the drug on the brain. That's at the senior centers that we would like to counteract allergy. So that's what we call pharmacologic based aced toxicity. It's an effect actually on the target. But it's in a way that we don't want it to act GOTCHA. So as we're working on very new drugs we often don't understand like where there's receptors are in God or the brain or the immune system. There's a lot of things we don't understand about the basic mechanisms of action of disease and there's lot of things that we don't understand sometimes about where the receptors are in the buddy. I mean it seems great. Yeah but that's why. I'm kind of glad if my original training and classic Comic Anthology Because you have to ask questions okay. where else is the receptor? Who else could hit end so? FDA trained to think about those nightmare scenarios of what it could do that. You don't want it to do right and ask those hard questions to make sure that we have the checks and balances right a lot of the early drugs That were used in AIDS. Patients Cause Peripheral neuropathy and that wasn't shown very well in the animal models models but it caused intense pain in the patients at the same doses that was needed for the virus. It wasn't until later that we got the protease inhibitors that really counteracted the road. And that's the basis of the lifesaving therapies that we have today I was really fortunate to be. FDA during that time when the protease inhibitor came through so switching gears a little bit what is personalized medicine. When it comes to patients like for example adjacent armstead and meal Amac? I understand that Jaycee is a twenty five year old with Lou GEHRIG's disease while meal is a young girl with batons disease who have both recently benefited from personalized medicine. He I think we have come to the place in drug development where we understand a lot more about genetics of disease so so yes switching away from viruses and into genetic Madison we have a lot of inborn errors when we learned that there is an inborn Gene that was missing in a patient has always been there born like that and as soon as we can diagnose them and with that replacement gene product or the enzyme of interest interest. We can save their lives so. LS has also been learned to be a whole series of different mutations responsible for LS Um and so you have to look at those different subsets according to their genetic diagnosis. But we also know that Batten's disease is a specific mutation and there's also something like fourteen different forms of Batten's disease that are mutations in same pathway that result in the same type of phenotype of neurological article degeneration some earlier some younger and some an older kids or adults in the case of Mula. She has two mutations that are different on both of the wheels that caused the dysfunction of a particular protein. Batten's disease six seven and there's only a handful or double handful of kids worldwide. They're known to have that particular subtitled batons and Jaycees case she has a very aggressive form of al it lasts called F s mutation and it has a particularly bad course people with F.. US typically sadly succumbed LS typically approximately a year. Because it's so aggressive. It's very hard to intervene soon enough. And there has never been a medication that could actually address the fundamental gene problems in these two cases so we need to design whole new the truck when we find the particular mutation and it turns out depending on the molecular biology and that control mechanisms around them. A tation some all of them are amenable to go nuclear type therapy and both of these girls have been their particular. Genetics have been amenable to A strategy she of using nuclear tight enter equally sadly we did not know that. JC had this particularly bad ale ass us until she was twenty five. Her family had lost her twin sister at the age of seventeen and Alex add add. Actually he contracted the symptoms of L. S. at age eleven so the two girls were identical. They had the same mutation but one got symptoms at eleven on the other at twenty five. JC I guess Through some grace right. Her symptoms arose during time in which a drug was already available in unaccompanied show that happened to be appropriate for her. So I understand and that in this case she got lucky. Well in a way because the drug already existed otherwise we couldn't have intervened quickly enough. Yeah it was an act of considerable effort on the part of the patient advocacy group project. LS The head of Columbia University's LS LS center. Dr Neil Snider in the company who originated the drug and all of us that were helping around the sides trying to support like an exoskeleton including Charles forever and I was helping with the regulatory strategy and also trying to make sure that the drug that was chosen was actually appropriate to the most expedient animal model so as a result of that we were able to put together a very lean and mean I N D for JC and get her approved through the FDA. I have to say. FDA was understandably cautious but when they heard her situation detail and how she'd lost her twin sister the understood of course about a few and they made a lot of exceptions to the usual toxicology regulations. Well I know that she had been she and her family. They had been advocating pretty publicly for a while up until it was approved. I if I'd been in her mom shoes I would have done the same thing called. She lower local congressman. The Stephen King and there was actually quite a response. In Congress. There is a bill that was put forward to ask. FDA to move expediently for JC. I don't know that that had specific impact but just to say that they got some considerable public discussion. And how Camilla's case different in her case Tim you At Boston Children's Hospital recognized that her condition was suitable for an exon skipping being drug very similar to Isis Been Raza and he was able to use a similar backbone and design a drug from scratch within several months it was quite remarkable global. We've done the testing for it and then we've Were able to get started with just a acute data and then I designed a type of a program in which we would update the FDA very regularly on the progress of the toxicology studies so that we could extend her dosing and again. FDA's group group that does an enzyme replacement was wonderful. In working with us to customize that I approach how do you envision cases like these being handled in the future after all not everyone. Everyone has a congressman. That's willing to go to bat for them. Like Jaycee did not. Everybody should take one. There's definitely a sea-change coming is really exciting. And it goes back to the changes brought about by the AIDS patients who identified that they were an extreme unmet medical. Need we see the finalization of the L. S. guidance. We see a lot of guidances have come out on rare disease from the agency in the past twenty four months. And I'm very excited about this because we're really getting to the place where we custom tailor the amount of upfront non clinical research. That has to proceed to human trials customize. That the patient's situation well do you think that each was going to require its own uniquely designed non clinical research at will or will there kind of. Okay you're not gonna be able to have like a standard version that works for most Aso's typically called platform toxicology in kind of a dream. Right now when you look across all a good nuclear tides you find out remember. I mentioned early in this talk about the pharmacologically driven toxicity. Let's say there's another place in the genome that has has a similar sequence. We end up having the drug acting by its intended action bit at the wrong place which is an off what we call an on target but unwanted toxicity existed that could arise by modulating genome which is a little scary right to put something into the spine or once. You invoke gene therapy. What's done is done so you need to have really careful toxicology evaluations that look at the animal as if it were a miniature clinical trial? And you know you're basically siklie handling the animals has patients and so we get as much information as we can vary from each particular experiment and try to make sure that Ed's translation Lee accurate for predicting patient risk. We need the parents to know that right. If if you were me. Resigning are up to our child. An an in-and-out shoes

FDA Congressman Jaycee Batten Protease Inhibitor Ls Ls Center Peripheral Neuropathy Lou Gehrig Dr Neil Snider Aids Alex L. S. Stephen King Congress ASO Camilla ED
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"That's a peripheral neuropathy Bell's palsy where your face troops, like stroke. That's a pretty rapidly. You get ringing in your ears tonight has that's a peripheral neuropathy. The auditory branch of the eighth cranial nerve. Is facial nerve the seventh grade Bell's palsy, these are all per phone robberies caused by squeezing the nurse osteoperosis scholar causes twenty five of these diseases and their caused by us here prosise are degenerative disk disease. Vertebrae get closer together smashing the roots of the spinal nerves 'cause Abe, and of course, in the lumber, Harry when you have these just 'cause easy lumber verbiage closer together they smash through. So the sciatic nerve causing sciatica down the and when you get numbness and tingling your fingers. It's you get just because he's in the disk between your cervical your neck vertebrae. In the first couple of vertebrae in your upper back your ex. And again, we have osteoporosis of the skull. You can even get what's called gastric Paribas where you get terrible cramping your stomach, and you're throwing up mucus, and you have. And this is caused by squeezing the Vegas comes out of skull by the osteoperosis, the skull. And I'm actually coming out with a major paper on the twenty five diseases that are caused by ask you a process of the skull people. Go to dentists they go to a little twelve year olds they'll go to a aren't the donnas to get their teeth, straightening out. Well, they're all crooked because of osteoporosis. Call saying with ringing ears are attacks. Many years is easier. You feel like you're have motion sickness. You lose your sense of smell because of the first cranial nerve, the the olfactory nerve is being squeezed that you can lose your vision because the optic nerve is getting squeezed is going through the skull because these tunnels at these nerves come through when you get asked you posted gonna get filled up with connective tissue squeezing herbs, so reverse the osteoperosis go and these things all go away. Don't need all these surgery implants in and this sort of thing by just getting rid of the osteoporosis, which is a simple nutritional deficiencies, and of course, we have programs for that doc Wallach with us from critical health, news dot com, who is continues to travel all over the place. Are you going to be at contact in the desert this year? I won't miss it for the next three hundred years, and you got a birthday right before me. Don't you? Well, we have the same day June fourth is just a couple of years difference. Who's older me? Okay. Good. That's why you're young and beautiful. Tom will take your text in tweets and just a moment. In other words, Email in from Elroy who wants to know what you can do for insomnia and knocked take drugs. What can you say? That question your. Yeah. Okay. Well, we have a new a new division. We have okay and hemp affects and CBD oil and RCB deals. It's not like what grandmas sells on the street Connor and the liquor store the tobacco the store are your local grocery store are from young Jimmy. We've added half a dozen other herbs Valerian and camomile and things like that that actually induce sleep along with the. TVD oil, and it's just outrageous. The benefit you get from the people are just calling in. They can get out of ship. It just comes all the time. People are getting off a CPAP machines. It's just amazing. How things are going by trying this CBD oil. And of course..

osteoporosis facial nerve peripheral neuropathy Bell doc Wallach Harry gastric Paribas Vegas Abe Elroy insomnia RCB Tom Connor Jimmy three hundred years twelve year
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"That's a peripheral neuropathy Bell's palsy where your face droops, look, like Hannes stroke. That's a pretty rapidly. You get ringing in your ears tonight is has that's a peripheral neuropathy of the auditory branch of cranial nerve. It's facial nerve cream. Bell's palsy, these are all per phone, rob has caused by squeezing the nerves osteoperosis skull causes twenty five of these diseases and their caused by osteoporosis RG Jenner. Disk is as we get closer together. Smashing the roots of the spinal nerves 'cause eighth ebb and of course in the lumbar area. Just 'cause easy lumber verbiage closer together, they Spanish the roots of the sciatic nerve causing sciatica down the legs. And when you get this, numbness and tingling your fingers. It's you get do you just disease in the disk between your cervical your neck vertebrae in the first couple of. Vertebrae in your upper back, your thorough checks, and again when you have osteoporosis of the skull. You can even get what's called gastric Paribas where you give terrible cramping your stomach, and you're throwing mucus and you have. And this is caused by squeezing the Vegas nerves. Attention. It comes out of the skull by the osteoperosis the skull. And I'm actually coming out with a major paper on the twenty five diseases that are caused by osteoporosis of the skull people. Go to dentists they go to a little twelve year olds. We'll go to a aren't the Donald to get their teeth straighten out while they're all crooked because of osteoporosis, go same with ringing the years or eight taxi many years disease feel like you're have motion sickness. You lose your sense of smell because of the first cranial nerve, the the olfactory nerve is being squeezed that you can lose your vision because the optic nerve is getting squeezed isn't going through the skull because these tunnels at these nerves come through. We get asked you posted it gonna get filled up with connected tissue squeeze nerves so reverse the osteoperosis go and these things all go away. Don't need all these surgeries and implants in and this sort of thing by just getting rid of the osteoperosis, which is a simple nutritional deficiencies. And of course, we have programs for that doc Wallach with us from critical health, news dot com, who is continues to travel all over the place. Are you going to be at contact in the desert this juror? I won't miss it for the next three hundred years, and you got a birthday right before me. Don't you? Well, we have the same day. June fourth is just a couple of years difference. Who's older me? Okay. Good. That's why you're young and beautiful. Tom will take your text and tweets in just a moment. In other words, Email in from Elroy who wants to know what you can do for insomnia and not take drugs. What can you do me answer? That question yours. Yeah. Oh, okay. Well, we have a new a new division. We have hemp. Okay. And. Hamernicks and CBD oil and RCB deals. It's not like what grandma cells extract Connor and the liquor store. The tobacco store are your local grocery store or CBD oil from young Jimmy. We've added half a dozen other herbs Valeria camomile and things like that. Actually, induce sleep along with the. TVD oil, and it's just outrageous. The benefit you get from the people are just calling in. They can get out of ship. It just comes all the time. People are getting off a CPAP machines. It's just amazing. How things are going by trying this CBD oil. And of course..

osteoporosis facial nerve peripheral neuropathy Bell Tom RG Jenner gastric Paribas Hannes doc Wallach rob Elroy Donald Connor Jimmy Hamernicks insomnia RCB three hundred years twelve year
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"I'll tell you this one of the big side effects that. Can eat away at the Mylan. You are correct. And wore the number one side effects is taking statin drug long-term is peripheral neuropathy. The literature. So yes, the question is. Yes. And yes, can it be reversed? That's that's. That's a tough call. I will tell you this. Let me give you let me give you some hope the hope is that you can eat every single day a substance that creates and produces the mile in in the body. It is it is there's a milk sugar and goat's milk yogurt. It's called galactosyl. Now, that's the milk sugar and dairy, however in goat's milk. It's a lot more tolerable to the body. It's anti-allergenic is non allergenic. And it's it's really good for the body of the proteins. That are in there. The probiotics that are in goat's milk yogurt. Very good for the body. But the galactic milk sugar is what produces Mylan. So can regenerate mile. And yeah, will will it go Recode itself around the areas where it pulled it off? They'll no, but the worst that should you be using long-term or forever? Hopefully, the goal would be not to do that. But for the short-term, they're very good. So here's some ways to get your. Cholesterol, where it needs to be to twelve not bad at all. Just remember one ninety two to twenty is a good range, a healthy range, your hormone levels functioning. Well, but what I would encourage you to do is nicotinic acid is a version of nice, and it doesn't flush in the body, and it works very, well, it keeping your HDL. Good and your bad cholesterol down the LDL's and also innocent will sustain those work. Good together to organic eggs eaten every day helps lower cholesterol as well. And maintain that you wanna take coachie ten to repair any damage the Staten, ditch your heart because it pulls away Cokie tenths of the body that will be really beneficial. And I would encourage you to increase on not only not only the galactic milk sugar, but vitamin B six is the deficiency the statin drugs create remember these six you wanna take heavy amounts of B six.

Mylan peripheral neuropathy Staten milk
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

09:23 min | 2 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WJR 760

"Peripheral neuropathy in my feet and my fingers? It ends up feeling like I'm wearing socks that are two inches thick. I guess is the way to describe it is not particularly steady on my feet and then with the fingers, it's a lot of numbness that is causing problems with if things like just typing on a computer or trying to tie fishing line, bits and pieces like that. And I was wondering they they're going to set me up for acupuncture beginning in September. I'm sorry. In November rather on a week on week. A weekly basis. But I didn't know if if you're process with the laser would give me any long-term relief or even temporarily. So that's a great question. And you know, congratulations on beating your cancer. First of all, I know how they lost my mom to cancer when she was thirty six. It's part of why I do. No, that's okay. It put me on my life's path. And now, I'm driven to help people live a better quality of life. So there's good there's good, and I am straight up in there. So there's good news and bad news that I have for you. Okay. So I I the good news is neuropathy is the second most common condition that we treat and we see a lot of people with diabetic neuropathy, and we're seeing more and more people with chemotherapy induced neuropathy because it is a side effect of chemotherapy. The that's the good. The good news. Is that? Yes, I I can help you, and I can treat you and in will. So what happens with neuropathy is? It's the deterioration of the myelin sheath that covers the nerve in nerve nerve tissue gets lease amount of blood of any tissue in the body. And so what your body's doing is? It's taking all of blood that it has in his protecting your liver, your kidneys, your heart your lungs, your brain, you know, all your internal organs. So your extremities are getting less blood in the myelin sheath is deteriorating along with the chemical of of that they've put in your body to fight the cancer. So if you're if you're a diabetic patient, I would tell you that we could get you somewhere between ninety and one hundred percent better because the laser will allow the mind lunch, sheath regenerate. So why are you imagine? Like have you ever strip the wire like, yes, sir? Okay. So imagine like the protective coating that's on a copper wire. That's the my line sheath that's gone in its deteriorate. Trading in and it will in your legs and your feet, it'll it'll ascend up to the knee area. So so my my advice to you get in front of it. When I deal with people with perfume or apathy, that's caused by chemotherapy, I'm very conservative in in what I tell them, and I will be honest with Jonah if we can get you thirty percent better. We're going to be doing really well. Yeah. It's it's a it's a long term of fact that will not heal on its own. And and I and I say thirty percent we've seen better results. Right. But I don't wanna I wanna like under promise. I don't want to over promise because it's something that you have to deal with with the chemotherapy from, you know, the results from the chemotherapy, I treat it all time. And the results vary. Not diabetics. I would say, you know, diabetic rapid these get people off their Lyrica. I get them off their rotten. I get them off their Gabba Patton. And those that's what I was concerned about they were talking about Davos. I want to stay away from drugs, particularly anything that's opioid and that gap panther stuff. It's an anti depressant, and you read the side effects of it. And it's like, well, you got to this anti depressants deal with Irv issues, but it may make your suicide. Yeah. See some and Jeff Jeff you've taught Jeff you've talked about some of those disclaimers. The from the ads that you see on TV. Just exactly what he's talking about. John Lewis idol, John pub, PubMed dot com is a great place to get some information on the side effects of whatever drugs. They wanna put you on. Okay. But the only thing that's an acupuncture will will be temporary relief. But the only thing that is going to actually allow the cell to heal is high dose leaser therapy. And it's a very long process because nerve tissue will will regenerate. And it will he'll but because it gets the least amount of blood in the body. It takes long time and John did you get the phone number down for them? Yes, sir. I did. I'm driving right now. But and I, and I know you guys are on a regular basis. I listened to you a lotta times driving home from work. I work up in the Detroit area. And I just thought well, heck, I'll give them a call tonight. See what what they could do for me. How granted it's a. Offen- prognosis. But after I after I finish up this acupuncture. I got a hunch. I'll be calling you have to see what you can do for me. Well, well, let's not spend the time with me. It's Jonathan honest prognosis. I mean, you might get fifty percent better. I don't think you'll ever it'll ever heal. I mean, I'm just being honest. And I know that's not what you want to hear. But we can if we can stop if we can stop it from a sending up the leg, it'll keep you off a cane and a Walker. That I mean, that's the thing. But my thing is getting front of it right away. And then, you know, we have we have people that dry from bowling green, and mommy, and you know, all over Ohio. They they can't they come up and they see us. So you're not. That's what I said. It's not it's not a long distance. I work at near metro airport. So it's, you know, get there, isn't that? That's not an issue. Okay. Help related thing. I will chase you down. It's something going guys. I appreciate that spending. The time with me, Jeff and Warren for continuing varieties. Interesting shows, thank you very much. Thanks a lot and the number to call toll free one and get it in quickly here too. Because Jeff going to go away in about fifteen minutes. One eight hundred five nine zero nine five seven and very quick. You can do it quickly or not. But at least we can we can bring up the opioid that we you've been mentioning and alluding to here, that's growing. The I just saw new statistic the other day that drug overdose deaths in America. Have killed more people than the Phnom war. And I was I was in his happening here in Michigan to the impact crisis has healthcare workers in the environment. And the epidemic isn't limited. Interestingly to to patients, you got healthcare workers who have easy access to this. And it's just proliferating. I just watch special on sixty minutes two nights ago about was that where I saw the statistics how how how the opioid epidemic started in. How these doctors are making all these excuses mallet changed laws. So even though prescription the number of prescriptions written are less the overdoses are higher because people are turning the street drugs. That are laced with fat all in one hundred percent stronger than morphine. And that's why people are overdosing it. And it's terrible. And listen. I decided, you know, I am so sick and tired of listening to people talk about the opioid addiction problems country, and nobody ever talks about what the solution is in painfreelifecenters is the solution to the opioid pain problem in this country. And I'll tell you right now within a year, I will have sixty minutes out doing a special on us. And then you get laugh at it. You can let you know. I am with a veterinary passion with their VA veteran, and we're talking about what the hydrocortisone and and actually around that are almost synonymous with prescriptions that are given to those who have had surgery. What do we say, maybe two three days after some surgeries in may be acceptable? But after that, well, it it takes the body months for soft tissue to heal. Once you have surgery, and here's the thing. Anybody that's listening. If you've ever had stitches when is it hurt the worst two three days after because all the blood is going? To the area of the trauma and trying to get it to heal. So now, they're giving your five days worth of. I got a guy that used to work for me. Just head to have his knee replacement ex college football player head to have his knee replaced. He went four years by doing laser therapy without getting his knee replaced. Finally, he he said, okay. He's going to do it. They gave him five days of pain meds. He's out. He started laser therapy less than a week after his surgery to manage the pain because it's incredibly painful anytime, you cut the skin you're cutting through the skin the nerves the vascular system the tissue the muscle that all stuff takes time to heal. If you think about it, you'll get your stitches out within seven or ten days. Right. You think the tissue underneath the skin is healed. It's still healing. It's causing the pain. And so high dose laser therapy is the alternative to the opioid problem in this country. All right. We're closing down. Our our here. Let's hear. From you those of you who are going through pain as we speak member of your family. You can't take that anymore..

Jeff Jeff cancer Peripheral neuropathy diabetic neuropathy Jonah Davos Detroit Gabba Patton drug overdose Irv John morphine Jonathan Walker John Lewis Ohio football painfreelifecenters
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The voice of how Dr Robert pray third of the prey their practice. Well, we get to the root cause of your health issue. We're in part to the two part series and peripheral neuropathy and causes and treatments. And we just got done in the last segment talking about diabetic neuropathy, which is there is a lot of different causes. Right. A peripheral neuropathy, diabetes tech one and type two being one of the major things. But let's talk about why is circulation important to prefer neuropathy. Well, that's one of the major causes of. It's not just the nervous system, which is critical. But you have to look at the circulatory. And oftentimes when you have damage to the nervous in yours. We're gonna have damage the circulatory system, we have had people who were diagnosed with perfume or apathy that had very little. Involvement in the nerves is a little bit rare. We have both, but approaching it from the a matter of fact, there's several different types of medications that you can use for performer apathy that are designed those those lines with they all work on the nervous system. So this person it wasn't. They hadn't determined that. It was mainly circulatory not neurological. And so none of the medications were obviously working. So we started some a program on the circulation along with some therapies to increase circulation in got really really excellent results matter of fact, one of the things I would I would like to point out. You know, there are quite a few medications for that. But they are they never reverse it and understanding the difference again about structure function versus pharmaceutical pharmaceutical is only for the simple mythology..

peripheral neuropathy diabetic neuropathy Dr Robert
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on KSRO

"Learn how to deal with over nine hundred different disease, including all these these using vitamins and minerals and trace minerals in rare earth has his Betty as therapy wells. And then don't forget, the news CD immortality. Forever. Young. And then rearers been cures really goes into peripheral neuropathy these in the book, rearers ventures and the newest DVD is called praise the Lord and pass the ninety praise. The Lord and passing on us to take off on the first World War prayer with their soldiers were charged across appeals against the Germans seen runs and their prayer was praised the Lord and pass ammunition. So we changed a little bit and call it praise. The Lord and pass the ninety as the book rare earths been cures. But again, you're looking. For these peripheral neuropathy, there's dozens and dozens of them were the problem is really the cranial nerves are being squeezed as they go from the brain through this goal to the outside. There's twelve pairs. Okay. And then of course, the spinal nerves in your neck. Numbness and tingling in your fingers, your hands and all this kind of thing. Oh, hiccups is another one. Of the of the recurrent branch of the tenth cranial nerve, the Vegas nerve comes out of the skull is one of the two twelve cranial nerves and goes down your stomach, but as it goes through your child's. There's a branch comes off called the returner. And when that's being squeezed coming out of the skull is what you get the hiccups. He heard of people they get the Higgins you can scare them and do all that kind of seven seven on the back. They just hiccups won't stop because at recurrent nerve is being squeezed. It's another peripheral neuropathy osteoporosis of this call. So the first thing you're doing people have peripheral rob disease is what you get them on the ninety s nutrients get him on.

peripheral neuropathy rearers ventures Higgins Betty
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Sixty percent oil bad, bad bad twenty percent wheat flour gluten alert gluten alert and only twenty percent powder, so you want to get eggs, where you can see the yolk center let them post yourself wild How are you wanna watch some crack, as to make the four Rebecca writes from Little Rock she says a. Doc I thought I'd may have injured the bottom of my foot I, woke up one morning and could barely walk on my right leg. But I've? Concluded it was? A cramp because eventually it went away what happened Cramp on the bottom, of your foot. And you wake out yes that's quite common charge cramps. Your feet and of course it could be a peripheral neuropathy could, be sciatica and, showing up more than one leg than the other. That's a possibility they're also going to be a cramp your foot swimmers, oftentimes gets easily, could be, a simple. Calcium deficient magnesium so we like to. Do is take people that. Have either again sciatica. Peripheral rob these all kinds are they have just simple cramps. They need to give all the bad stuff sitting maximize absorption of nutrients, particularly the minerals no food no process meanwhile glutinous one healthy brain. And heart Hundred pounds. Of, body weight and then of course Controlling that soothing, from our him, f, extradition applied. After the foot the lower back hips any place. This is really cramps and just, for the moment so that cramping or go away this is what this is. Far from our fence Exhibition relieves a pain and and prefer All, the harsh side effects things, like aspirin. Which bleeding in your stomach anything die let's, go to, MAC and, Joplin, Missouri. Now hey MAC, go, ahead hey good good gate thinks hey so I grew up in a household where my, parents. Grounds are on flower betas wheat bread that's. How we got to eat for snacks and now everything. You say is gluten gluten gluten dads so my mom. Had a book called week for man back in the seventies Deal with gluten. Gluten bad now or has it always been that there's. Always been bad because it causes an inflammation your intestines and when you know All things are susceptible, to it and, when you eat. Gluten it makes your, intestines look like you've been eating poisoned ninety percent it's really ugly and reduce the efficiency absorption and you know you get diverticulitis she get, Crohn's disease you get Your own inflammatory bowel disease you get appendicitis collided social call has. All these things are caused by Luton tolerance and they're just given different names because of different locations in the. Digestive tract Putin. Is one of the worst, possible things that come along for human beings because it produces, so many diseases diseases people get such as diabetes and arthritis and how the. Pressure nutritional deficiency, diseases caused by having a gluten problem you're tesla damage, so even if you're? Supplementing, you cannot efficiently sort the. Nutrients and you, get all these these and it's due to damage the small. Intestine lining? By, the, glue duck in my case I. Don't think I've ever had, any reaction to gluten but is that unusual well you, don't get. A reaction you don't get you know something, like aids and, all that kind. Of stuff what happens, gradually gradually Gradually over time you, go from having ninety.

sciatica Rebecca peripheral neuropathy Joplin Little Rock inflammation aspirin Missouri diabetes Crohn's disease appendicitis bowel disease twenty percent Hundred pounds ninety percent Sixty percent
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"All. Right I'll tell you this one of the big side, effects that drugs is it? Can eat away at the Mylan you are correct And one of the number one side effects of taking a statin drug long-term. Is peripheral neuropathy It's in the literature so yes the question is yes and yes can it, be reversed that's that's That's. A tough call I will tell you this let me, give you let me give you some hope the hope is that. You can eat every. Single day, a substance that creates and produces. The mile in in? The body It is it is there's a milk sugar and goat's milk yogurt it's, called galactosyl now that's the milk sugar and, dairy however in goat's milk, it's a lot more tolerable to the body it's. Anti-allergenic is non allergenic and it's it's, really good for the body of the proteins that are in there the probiotics. That, are in goat's, milk yogurt very good for the body? But the galactosyl milk sugar is what produces Mylan, so can it regenerate, mile and yeah. We'll we'll go Recode itself around the areas where it pulled it off though no, but the worst should. You be long long-term, or forever hopefully the goal would be, not to do. That but for the short-term they're. Very good so here's some ways to get your cholesterol where it needs to be to twelve not bad at all just remember one ninety two. To twenty is a. Good range a healthy range. Keep your hormone levels. Functioning well but what I would. Encourage you to do is nicotinic acid is a version, of nice and it doesn't flush in the body and it works Very well it keeping your HDL good, and your bad cholesterol down the LDL's and also in assisting those work good. Together, to organic eggs, eaten every day helps lower cholesterol is? Well and maintain that you wanna take co q., ten to repair any, damage the stat. And did your heart because it pulls away Cokie ten from the body that will, be really beneficial and. I would encourage you, to increase on not only not only. Just milk sugar. But vitamin b. six is the. Deficiency the statin drugs create remember piece six you wanna.

Mylan peripheral neuropathy Cokie milk
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Okay dr wash we had a caller talk about the some b vitamins are made in god is that true well there and understanding what that what that means is we have back area in the gut bacteria break things down and getting into homelessness teen when you break down home assisting and other amino acid you're going to cleave off some of the nutrients that can actually then ferment to be biden's mostly biden folic acid or full eight and so yes they can be made in the body but not in amounts that the body can actually benefit from enough to sustain right it's more of a process as the gut bacteria does its job which is supposed to do it can actually break down some other unhealthy components into smaller particles that the body can absorb in utilize so it's only three i believe that can be actually fermented into the in the gut but the b complex itself the body cannot make all those peace and we're talking about a b one b two b three b five six seven b nine b twelve b good it's about eight of them i think right yes there are eight seven of which can be coen's mated and we have all seven in coenzyme b complex bite and still does not have a coenzyme available and by ten is one of those things at the body will for mentioned the gut from okay there was a particular one that you wanted to highlight today i saw on your notes to me then so taya mean time what is that ben for timing is fat soluble be one and people say no bees are water soluble well technology always finds new things for us in ben for timing has not been out for a long time it's been out for a while but been timing is fat soluble be one and there is a website called benso timing dot org and what's so special about ben for timing timing helps with nerves it helps with peripheral neuropathy and.

ben peripheral neuropathy biden coen taya
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy since then i've been on disability and in i was taken to the hospital um with distension and massive stomach pain they basically it said that it was the gall bladder was a urine infection and was sent home and i juiced for twelve days and then went back to the hospital to emerge and they had said that my appendix had perforated on my first initial visit there and since then i've been trying to build up my immunity especially for the winter time and during all of this over the past three years i excuse me i take vitamin d vitamin k magnesium um elkhart and the puerta kassad i work out on a stationary bike and i have an inferred sauna i'm not overweight um i'm active to the point of exhaustion so that i can sleep with minor opposite the and actually yesterday i gave blood um and my blood pressure is fine it's just i want to boost my health and try to heal my my problems well you gotta sit back i think i think would would that kind of thing going on you just have to step back and you have to look at okay let's let's get back to square one see where the body is see what direction it needs to go right and build the body from there because if the body is sick it can get well right if we can make bad choices leading up to a certain point we can make good ones if we can go in the wrong direction we can go on the right direction right it's real simple and making the right choices to get you where you need to go is what's going to help you thrive so you don't want to feel like you're stuck and you don't want to feel like that you are going the wrong way wanna make sure going the right way and that's what we help you to here on the show so let's start with number one right so we are what we eat that's the case if you wanna cut down inflammation in the body and get things right i'm a big fan of.

peripheral neuropathy blood pressure vitamin d three years twelve days
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"The next the product is something um i'm introducing it now i've known about it for a number of years it's great for protecting the kidneys of diabetics and it's great for nerve pain but i knew that eventually they get to the brain i knew this product would be dynamic for brain health and recently they've started coming out which studies on brain ho and you just take one of these a day and it gives sensational protection for the cells in your brain neurons in your brain the she helped rejuvenate them healed them protect them it's called ben fall tioman been fulltime me it's a fatty soluble form of vitamin b one when you take this fatty soluble four it really gets into shirt and tissues at a very high concentration the nerves connected to your heart that's important diabetics and smokers did damaging the nerves and their heart that's one reason why they're more prone to uh arrhythmias heart attacks strokes blood clutch so it's good for the nerves in your hearts it's good for your kidneys at some shaking off eket but most of her early research was on nerve pain like diabetic nerve pain diabetic peripheral neuropathy it's very common diabetics stick nerve pain.

diabetic peripheral neuropathy
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Fear Based Life

Fear Based Life

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on Fear Based Life

"Uh no because he was already i mean surgery within an option uh at that point um and his body was already a weekend from the previous surgery uh so they they suggested chemotherapy um which he initially that really wanna do 'cause we had already had chemotherapy once and he got cancer and then we've like will wipe put myself through the but um i mean he was willing to do anything so he tried wonder of chemotherapy and it was actually just a half dose and um it it almost killed him uh you got really the high you know the the oncologists the entire time could talking about like peripheral neuropathy and so like numbness in his finger fingertips and he didn't have any of that but he did have like it just like destroyed his you know gastrointestinal tract use the bathroom all the time he couldn't hold anything down and uh and it was it was horrible and it was one of those things were again which seemed to be this issue like with this doctor where it's like not enough information given up front and then expecting us to do a million things immediately once a problem arises um the you know he was severely dehydrated from going to the bathroom all the time and the you know we call the they'd cancer center and say like hey what can we do for him here and then there's like well the doctor to bring in then i'm like he's having trouble getting off the couch and not going to make him walk down three flights of stairs to go to the cancer center.

peripheral neuropathy gastrointestinal tract
"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"peripheral neuropathy" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"You're on with dr shapiro really good warning a while back i wouldn't the phone with you on the order o how it was for new opportunity and i take an oath is the thing to do either temporary relief however i don't see it on your list the products now is the way you know you change to upgrade or something better than what you'd have now so so it had a lot of the six in the twelve in it near the heart three sixty supplement that has been uh sort of our remanufactured uh has b twelve mp six in it so i'd also has magnesium any and all those things together make me in the sixty twelve finding uh and and a bunch of the other vitamins will actually take the place of the niro health because that's basically what it had in it the sixty twelve and some other things to protect our nerves from became so small he eat healthy art healthy his overtime regarding dr arnn three sixty yes it's hard healthy on sites three sixty heart oh ho sixty okay that's what it is heart three sixty good is a is a uh sort of and what they did was they added coenzyme q ten in it the way and and and that's really important so if you want to keep your nerves healthier you want to keep your peripheral neuropathy in check uh emails may when i saw it on kick human ultra because there's a lot of inflammation alarm that's causing that neuropathy and aren't thing.

dr shapiro dr arnn peripheral neuropathy