36 Burst results for "Pepsico"

Fresh update on "pepsico" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:18 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "pepsico" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"A sign this week that historically high inflation may be cooling off the latest consumer price index came in lower than expected at 8 and a half percent, but the latest earnings reports from the biggest consumer names tell a more complicated story. Their prices are going up a lot, but their volumes are going down. That's Bloomberg, big box retail reporter, Brendan case. What? I think you're starting to see there is just the kind of demand destruction from rising prices. A sign of stagflation, the case says is showing up in earnings from PepsiCo, Clorox, Conagra Brands, and Kraft Heinz, companies that could hardly keep up with demand during the pandemic. He says executives aren't pushing the panic button about slower growth, at least not right away. The decline in the unit volumes is not really serious enough yet for companies to start saying, wow, this is going to be a big problem for us. You could start seeing that next year. But Kay says companies are betting the economy will settle down and more of that consumer demand will return. From the Bloomberg newsroom, I'm Nathan Hager on WTO. Coming up after traffic and whether the release of court documents related to the search of Mar-a-Lago is prompting new questions about what the FBI was looking for and what former president Trump was storing in his residence. It's one 56. Imagine a world without breast cancer, if we could raise one more dollar, take one more step, share one more story. Think of the impact we could make. That's the power we have when we come together as one for the Susan G komen DMV tri state more than pink walk on Sunday September 18. It's the power one more action can have the power every one of us has as an individual. The power we have as one community, it's for our mothers, sisters, Friends, and coworkers. So no matter how you make your impact, let's make 2022 count. Because it's not just about physically being together, it's about every one of us understanding the impact we can have when we commit to going $1 story and step further. The power of one starts with you. Join us on September 18 for the DMV tri state Susan G komen's more than pink walk and witness the power of one. For more information, visit common D.C. walk dot org today. Is always on, even when

Conagra Brands Kraft Heinz Nathan Hager President Trump Clorox Pepsico Brendan Susan G Komen KAY Lago WTO Bloomberg FBI Breast Cancer DMV D.C.
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

01:50 min | 8 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"For better performance and my hard work, et cetera, et cetera, but I'm also a proud product of the many mentors and I'm an extremely proud product of America as we know it. That's Indra nooyi, former chairperson and CEO of PepsiCo. In 2018, Indra stepped down as CEO. She currently serves on several boards including the international cricket council. Indra is a huge fan of crickets. He actually helped start the first women's cricket team at Madras Christian college back in India in the early 1970s. Although since moving to the U.S. in the late 70s, she says she fell in love with.

Indra Indra nooyi PepsiCo international cricket council U.S. Madras Christian college cricket India
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:38 min | 8 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Is it I mean, do we expect different things from women CEOs than we do from men CEOs? I think we expect different things from women period. You know, we think women are responsible for kids, women are responsible for families, not true. In my case, Raj and I both felt we were responsible for the kids and the family and our future. And so I think it's very, very important, everybody who has an idea designed to get married and have kids has a conversation with the espouse about who's going to do what have the honest conversations because it can not be done alone. And women in particular have to let go of perfection, because very often, we women want to be perfect at everything. It's in our DNA. And, you know, at some point, you may have to give up things that you want to do. They might have to say, you know what, I'm not going to keep the house spotless. I'm just going to let it go because I'm just exhausted. And many of us run ourselves ragged because we want to be viewed as getting everything right. And I think all of that is a formula for failure. So the best thing is for us to have the honest conversations with this pass, make sure that both are on the same page when it comes to who's going to do what to support the family. In my case, I had an added advantage a guy. I had my husband's family that unusually decided that they're going to support me whatever happens. So they were my biggest tailwinds. They would call and say, you know, don't quit your job without help you. And, you know, tell us what kind of help you want and we'll be so proud of you and what you've accomplished. And so it's not just my husband. I had wonderful in laws. And I think all in laws have to stop and think about the future and say, if you're going to let the women and men both fly. We have to also lean in. This becomes an intergenerational responsibility. Injured, it's amazing because of all the things you accomplished and the fact that you started life and where you got to. I mean, the top of the corporate world and yet you write that at times in your career, you really felt like you to downplay your achievements. Um. Why? I think that goes back to The Crown of the garage comment that my mother made. Way back in 2000 when I came home. And I just wanted to share my big deals and how point was you into the house and you leave The Crown of the garage. I think that we still live in a society where the woman's achievement is downplayed in the men's achievements are elevated. We are making changes, but we still live in that society. I think in our home, you know, the dialog and discussion was different. My mother grew up at a time when it was that way you know, you play up, the men's achievements and your downplay the woman's achievements. That's how you keep a harmonious family. In my family now, my husband was celebrated my achievements like it's all Nobel Prizes that I've won. Okay? Just as I would his. We both lift each other up. Maybe that's the future generation. Because if we don't do that, then what happens is we basically telling women, we're all going to keep one foot on the break and one foot in the accelerator. And the foot on the brake is going to be a little heavier than the foot on the accelerator, which I don't think is fair. When you look at the future of work, you one of the things you wrote when you stepped down after 12 years a sea of Pepsi record and amazing amount of time. I think the average CEO lasts for 40 years at companies, most companies. You wrote about how you wished you would have spent a little bit more time with family and you encouraged people to think about that in their own careers. And you've been more vocal more and more vocal about that since you've stepped down running the operations at Pepsi. About focusing on our lives. Thank you, even I think I'm perfectly our lives are short. We don't have that much time on this planet. And we have to focus on what actually matters. Work is important. Careers important achievement is important, but it's only one part of our of our lives. I think, you know, I sit on various future of work committees and we talk about how things are going to change post pandemic. And I have to tell you, one of the things that we never talk about in this committee meetings is the whole issue of care. Who's going to do all the caregiving? How is it going to get done? How are we going to make sure that we have a pathway for highly educated women to also contribute to the economy? As much as they are family builders and help nurture and develop the family. And I really believe that the issue and care is a big blind spot among global leaders. And I'm a missed opportunity, and I now speak as an economist not a feminist. A guy. Because when I was PepsiCo CEO, and I was in the rooms of power with all the men CEOs. We talked about the future of work as if it's about technology, the world, GDP growth, retraining of employees, we never mentioned family and care, and who's going to do the jobs and how are we going to do it? In a world where we've got a lot of aging people. My belief is that if there are more women in the room, in those groups and rooms of power, this would have come up sooner. It's a big missed opportunity. And I think that we have to elevate the discussion from quite discussions that don't lead anywhere, to make it in front and center to say, hey, with the aging population. And with a need to have children and young people to build families at the same time, the best and brightest to be deployed in the service of furthering the economy. If we don't focus on care as a critical support system for the country. We're not going to have a society that's happy. We'll have another Japan or South Korea where the birth rate is low and the requirements of jobs and children conflicts so much because what's happening is young people are now delaying having kids or choosing not to have kids at all. And if that happens, it's going to debilitate our economic system down the road. And so I think that we should stop framing this as female and says about families and is not a feminist argument is an economist argument. When you think about the journey you have taken and your book has really just terrific and inspiring story to have come from where you came and grown up where you grew up and not only to come to the U.S. and build a career in a family, but to get to the highest levels of business. Could you ever have a imagine that? Was there any part of your early life where you could have envisioned that? No, because I never thought I'd come to the United States. And I will tell you one thing. I don't believe my story could have been possible in any other country, but the United States. So it's only here that somebody like me can come here, work their tail off contribute, be acknowledged, promoted, mentor, developed, and then ultimately, even selected, to run such a big iconic American company. So in many ways, I'm a product of my upbringing my own drive.

Raj Pepsi PepsiCo South Korea Japan United States
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:59 min | 8 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"A big shock. It was a shock for Mike with the shock for me. I mean, and you're 12 years in, so the board knew you the obviously that you were known within the company. You had already achieved so much at that point, but when you were named as CEO, you write about how some of the reactions from writers and analysts and media really kind of got to you. You know, some of the descriptions about you or the anonymous quotes in articles about you really, you really kind of bothered you and understandably. And I could laugh about it now. Then when they write about this sort of funny person, it walks around bare feet, singing songs to herself and that's what they would write about you. Yeah. So we're sorry to work. I know we're sorry to work, but doesn't matter. You are at that time. They were painting me as absolutely exotic person who had come into the boardroom of the staid, prim and proper PepsiCo. I guess they wanted to draw a major contrast. To everybody else out there. I don't care in retrospect. I laugh it off. But at that time, I'm like, see me, I'm one of these totally conservative people who has long skirts and jackets and shirts and always the same kitten heel shoes and I don't smoke. I don't drink give me a break, guys. Maybe a 6 o'clock a kick off my shoes because the heels hurt and maybe when I'm stressed out or how much tune but relax, don't write about me as this hippie kind of a person. But it didn't matter. You know, they painted me in interesting ways. But to be honest guy, that's all behind me because as the company went on as my ten year old CEO went on you know they were supporters and detractors. The detractors are usually louder than the supporters. But then, as long as the board was behind me, I felt I could do anything, which is what I did. You had several big sort of initiatives that you put out while you were a Pepsi. One was sort of reclassifying the products with a fun category for chips and soda and then a better category which was the diet and low fat drinks and low fat foods and then the good for you thing is like oatmeal and other products. And you really push this initiative called performance with a purpose. What was that initiative about what was the idea behind it? This was way back in 2006 and we were beginning to do things to move the portfolio to a healthier mix. Quaker roads was an example of an acquisition that helped us get there. We had bought naked juice that was another example. Tropicana was in our portfolio. And so we were making all the right moves to add calcium to tropicana juice. Take sugary drinks out of the vending machines and schools. So there were a lot of actions that we were taking to make the company a better company if you want to call it that. And future proof it. But when I became CEO, the environment for companies like ours in the marketplace is very different. The talk on obesity was very, very high. There was a big noise about it all over society in every country. We're talking about suing beverage makers. Exactly right. And, you know, countries were threatening taxes, a portion control drinks. I mean, all kinds of noise on our industry in our industry. There was also human cry about plastics. You know, how much plastic was being. There still is. There still is, but then it had started. So, and then in many, many countries, we were viewed as a water parasite, used too much water. The town doesn't have water to eat or drink, and there's a Pepsi plant or a Coke plant close by using a lot of water. So we had to worry about water. We had to worry about plastics. And then those were also the days where it was very hard to get good people to come and work in traditional consumer products companies. People wanted to know what the purpose in life was. Why? Because they were going to the best people going to the tech sector. Totally take or someplace else. But there was a new found awareness about purpose and what do we want to do with our jobs? Why should we work at this company and give it all our time if the companies aren't going to do something to make the world a better place? There was a conversation that's happening that's happening again now today. And it needs family. It needs to. And so because that consciousness had been awoken, you know, to me, the only way the future proof PepsiCo to make sure that we would remain successful well into the future was if I found a way for the company to deliver great performance because we're always about good performance, good financial performance. But figured out how we can transform the portfolio to healthier products, more good for you and better for your products. How do we reduce our environmental footprint? So we reduce our costs and we get a license to operate in societies around the world. And then how do we create an environment inside PepsiCo? So people feel they can really come in and feel like they brought themselves to work. So we worked on every aspect of purpose and performance and put the money behind sugar reduction, salt reduction, dialing up zero calorie products, making healthier products taste great and be ubiquitously available. We did a ton of work on water reduction in our plants. How to make thinner bottles, how to think about recycling in a whole different way. And what kind of programs you should be offering our employees so that they knew that PepsiCo looked at them as an asset for the company, not a tool of the trade. So we changed a lot of things in the company, and it did good things for us. Our performance was good over the period. Our attention rates went up. Our attrition rate was way down. And PepsiCo is once again viewed as a phenomenal talent bank for industry as a whole because we were so filled with outstanding leaders. You were during your ten year often the only or one of just a few female CEOs of a Fortune 500 company and with that came..

PepsiCo Pepsi Mike Tropicana tropicana obesity Coke
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:35 min | 8 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"I mean, he basically read them the riot act. That's what he did. It's really interesting because it sounds like the decision he made wasn't like this sort of strategic power play. You were just you just said, you know what? I don't need this. In my life. That's all. And you said, hey, this is great. I enjoyed it. I'm gonna carry this project out and then I'm gonna step down. It's clear that there are people who don't want me around. And he either was not aware of this or was not willing to do anything about it, but you were you were too important for him to let that happen. You know, he knew exactly what was happening because it happened in London when we were at a meeting. And I just walked out. Right after I finished my presentation, I just you were just treated with disrespect. It seemed so weird. I mean, these are colleagues. I mean, I guess in the context of today, we think of it differently. This is now in the mid 90s and corporate culture. It was different. Back then. And that was the only woman in the room to be honest. And I was surprised that a couple of I wouldn't say all. I shouldn't define all of PepsiCo by a couple. A couple of people were downright just not okay. And I felt roger could have put them in their place, but he didn't. And so I told him, I said, not only are they constantly attacking me, you don't put them in their place. And his point was, you always have two thinner skin. And I told him that your oblivious to what's going on. And so if you're not sensitive to how I feel, shame on you. So I'm just telling you thin skin and no thin skin I'm leaving. Wow, but when you made that decision to say that, it actually by kind of standing up for yourself and taking a stand saying, look, I'm not going to take it, but I'm not going to fight you. This great and I'll take my work somewhere else. That actually cleared a path for you to do the work that you needed to do. Most certainly because it actually, it was like a lightbulb had gone off and I've never looked back from that day. Wow. All right, so you would go on to kind of guide some really big decisions that Pepsi took over the course of the next ten years to divesting from the restaurants. Pizza KFC Taco Bell. And a big move, which was buying tropicana in 1998 and I think at the time there was a lot of internal opposition to that decision to find tropicana because it was expensive and people were like orange juice, but it turned out to be a hugely important acquisition. You know, again, all of these acquisitions were made with a very strategic framework in mind. The strategic framework being, we needed the future proof this company. We needed to make sure that everyday part was covered. And so all these acquisitions we made to transform the company were huge. And in the case of the restaurant business, it wasn't really a divestiture of restaurants as much as we were unfettering the restaurants from the packaged coast culture, because restaurants were a service business. PepsiCo was a packaged goods culture. And so we unfettered the restaurants from the packaged goods culture. That was the big move, but the right move. Another acquisition, quake roads, which included Gatorade. Which dominated and probably still does the sports drink category. I'm curious, was at that time maybe even to this day. Were and are a lot of decisions made. By Pepsi driven by its competition with Coca-Cola. You know, beverages are only about 45, 50% of the company. Right. So I think because it's snack foods right lays and fritos and Doritos. That's right. Huge justice. Amazing products. I think that because all the analysts who cover us are the beverage analysts. They tend to put us into the Coke versus Pepsi, you know, frame. In reality, Pepsi was like a company like no other because we are a very different portfolio than our beverage competitor. But if you took Pepsi out of the beverage universe, these beverage analysts won't have anybody to cover. So that's the challenge. And also business schools thrive on a Coke versus Pepsi competitive competition case. Yeah. They still teach it as if it's still a current competition of two beverage behemoths, which is really not the case. But that's okay. It makes for good reading and good commercials and good everything else. It is remarkable that Coca-Cola is in Pepsi R obviously they do different things. But Coca-Cola is a larger company, but not that much larger than Pepsi. Coca-Cola is a larger company in revenues and beverages. As a total revenue we are much larger, Coca-Cola's market capitalization is slightly bigger than ours only because it's a largely franchise company and makes different sort of returns versus PepsiCo, which is also manufacturing company. So PepsiCo is a more diversified company with a very steady future because we're not dependent on food service or restaurant business to grow. We can grow and breakfast items like Quaker. We can grow in Frito lay. We can grow in beverages of all kinds, carbonated and non carbonated. Our namesake brand Pepsi is only 15% of our revenue. For the other company, the namesake brand is a huge percentage of the revenue, more like 50 or 60%. In 2006, you were named CEO of PepsiCo, when Steve ranman stepped down, you mentioned in the earlier in this interview that a week before that happened, you would not have imagined that that would be the case. But I mean, you must have had some inkling that you were among those being considered. You know, it's interesting and this may be a surprise to most people. There was no point that, you know, the potential candidates were told that there was going to be a CEO Succession. Because he was still young. And we were having a great time working together. And so the fact that the board was contemplating Succession because T wanted to step down was a big surprise to us. And we were never called in to present our blueprint for the company because my quiet and I who are both on the board at PepsiCo and would make presentations to the board regularly. The board knew us, we were known commodities. But we were not asked to appear in front of the board and lay out our future plans for the company and whether the two of us could work together. Nobody asked us those questions. And so when Steve walked into my home on a Monday morning and said, on Saturday, the board is going to meet and vote you in as CEO and I'm stepping down. I'm like, wow, what for? Why are you doing this? It was.

Pepsi PepsiCo Coca Cola KFC Taco Bell Coke tropicana roger London Pizza Steve ranman Frito Quaker R Steve
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:00 min | 8 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor Splunk. Today in business, unpredictability rules, so you need to be resilient, secure, and innovative. To do this, you have to make sense of massive amounts of data. Enter Splunk, Splunk gives you the data foundation to thrive in today's hybrid world. They help you handle complexity and clear the path to innovation. With one data foundation that gives you full stack observability and consistent security, you can be innovative and meet goals faster. More at Splunk dot com slash Y. Hey, welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. So in 1994, Indra nooyi was recruited by PepsiCo CEO Wayne Calloway to join the company as a senior VP of strategic planning. And from an outsider's perspective, it might have seemed like an unusual move. After all, she'd been working in technology in electronics for more than ten years. And here she was, moving to an industry she'd never worked in. I didn't know the restaurant business one bit. And you know, interestingly, I did tell that the vein you know, when I talked to him, I said, wait, I don't know the restaurant business. And to me, you get deep into the business when you stop. I'm not even meat eaters. House is going to work with me and Taco Bell and KFC. Pizza Hut I can get by. His point is, I'm not hiring you to formulate products. I'm not hiring you to taste the products. I'm hiring you for a strategy position to help us think where Pepsi got to be going globally. He was right. All right, so you join PepsiCo. I'm in presumably the first two years or the first at least year. You kind of spend time digging into the business, trying to understand all parts of the business. To me, it doesn't matter how senior you are. If you don't spend the time, learning the nuts and bolts of the business. You're actually not doing a great job for the company. And I honestly believe that every point in time I had to zoom in to learn the details of the business and then zoom out to understand what the implications of your actions could be on the day to day operations of the business. So I was constantly zooming in and zooming out. So I spent the first I would say 6 to 9 months. Learning the nuts and bowls of each of the businesses. When you were sort of tasked with leading leading strategy from the beginning and that's a huge responsibility. So how do you approach it at the beginning? You mentioned obviously diving into the business and really kind of educating yourself about all the different aspects of the business, but did you also spend the first year or two kind of listening before you set out a plan or were you a kind of expected to deliver a plan fairly quickly? I had a big benefit in my first year one. Roger and RICO returned to the company and he was running restaurants and so I was working with him directly. So I was providing the strategic perspective, but roger was providing the implementation the practical perspectives, how to make it work at PepsiCo. So I kept my ears open and I learned as much as I could from roger. But then this is where the BCG experience comes in and is invaluable. Because we really think about consulting. What consulting does for you is provide you a way to approach an industry and understand the strategic levers of that industry and then that company. So it doesn't matter which industry of which company are thrown into. You know how to look for what drives competitive advantage. What drives superior profitability? What drives success? And once you approach PepsiCo that way, you learn the fundamentals of the business. At a 15,000 feet very, very quickly. And then you start tinkering at the implementation level. How do we land this? If, for example, in restaurants, same store sales growth is a critical driver of profitability. How do you drive same store sales growth? So now you go to the restaurants and figure out why is it your same store sales is not grown. So you take the value drivers then you land them into each business to understand why they're working or not working. So it's all of the entire set of experiences I had before PepsiCo. I could now apply and deploy at PepsiCo. You write that about two years in. You actually, for time, consider leaving PepsiCo. This is during roger Enrico's tenure CEO. And you had felt some tension with colleagues around metrics around your role in what was going on. Well, you know, I was in corporate and corporate is always a bad word in most companies. And the people before me were very, very qualified people who had the job before me. But they also tended to be hands off from the divisional heads. I wasn't intending to interfere on what the division presidents were doing, but if I felt that something was not okay in terms of the target was too high or too low, or I thought they were going to miss their forecasts. I spoke up. You couldn't just have me be a people pusher. So I'd say, well, I tell you what guys, you say you're going to grow ten. I ran all the models we do at corporate. I don't see you growing at ten. And they say, who are you to second guess us? I'm not second guessing you. I'm just telling you what the model saves. So don't question me question the models. And so there are a couple of people in the senior management ranks that would sort of destroy me at every division presidents meeting where there would be rude. They would say things like corporate planning is trying to run a company. We're destroying the culture of this company. And when roger was CEO, he would just listen, do nothing about it. And I put up with it for a while and then I said, okay, I've just finished this massive piece of work on restaurant strategy, which I'm going to present to the board. I'm going to present to the board and I've had it. I'm just going to walk out because I can't take this anymore. I was not afraid about walking out. So when I walked into roger's office and said, guess what, roger, the presentation's done? We're going to share it with the board tomorrow, but I got news for you. After the board presentation, I'm walking out. And it's been wonderful working at PepsiCo. I'm not expecting anything. I don't want severals. I don't want anything. I'm just leaving. Wow. He just looked at me and pencils started to twiddle on the table and he just gave me that look and he said, I'll talk to you later. He was furious. And he knew exactly why I told him why I was leaving, too. And the division presidents meeting that was supposed to start in the afternoon. The meeting that typically attacked me all the time a couple of people was delayed by several hours. And roger, I guess, had a chat with all of them. Then the meeting actually started, it was a love fest. Absolutely love fist. And the next day I presented to the board and then roger came to me after the board meeting and said, we're all in business. Let's get on to the next steps. I just looked at him and said, what next steps? He said the next steps, you're just in charge of all the next steps. All of the subjects are closed. And he just walked away. Wow..

PepsiCo Wayne Calloway roger Indra nooyi NPR Taco Bell KFC roger Enrico Pepsi RICO Roger
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:26 min | 8 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"The best decision I made going to work in Motorola and really this was the first in a series of steps you took that was based around your family that was based around wanting to be closer to your home, your kids, and that begins as kind of real career trajectory working in the corporate world. What do you remember about that time working from a role? You know, Motorola at that time was just a fine, fine, fine technology company. I was writing the rules on wireless communication, was leading in pages and two way radio and the cell phone was first launched by Motorola. And it was just a company in a huge and semiconductor government electronics. It was a very, very exciting company. I know injure that you spent the next few years working in the corporate tech world first at Motorola. And then he moved over to a company called ABB, which is this sort of international tech and electronics company. You actually became a senior vice president there. And you've written about some key mentors who helped you along the way. But I don't think it's immodest to say that you did phenomenally well with these companies. And he's so well that you started to get noticed by a lot of other big companies, including GE and they did from what you write. They really wanted to hire you. But how did Pepsi come on your radar? Well, one fine day, I head into calls and says, will you talk to PepsiCo? I got PepsiCo. They own KFC and Taco Bell and Pizza Hut, and I don't even need meat. What are you talking about? They go, well, you know, it's a very youthful company, a fantastic company, and this is hell of a job, and you've got to talk to them. So I came in and I, my first interview was with the person who had the job as head of strategy. And he was moving on to a big business leadership job. And after an hour with me, he said, you're not going to meet bob Edmund, the CFO, and I'm going to get into you and he won't get along. I said, oh, that's a great introduction. I said, why not? He said, because you both are so different. He said, bob dymer is your quintessential New England wasp and you are just not that. You guys are not going to get along. I said it's too late. I'm here, so I'll go see him. What a strange thing to say. Well, I heard a lot of strange things at that time. So I went to see bob date bar and the one hour interview stretched to one and a half hours stretched to two hours. We both struggled to end the interview because we got along so well famously. I mean, bob, that mo was fantastic. Not only did he charm me about PepsiCo, we started to map out ways we could work together to make the company even better. He made me feel welcome. He and his wife embrace Raj and me and basically said, even if you choose not to come to PepsiCo, we're going to remain very close friends. And then I went to see Wayne calibrated CEO. Wayne is a remarkably quiet guy. Just a beautiful human being, but in my 60 minute interview with him, I must have spoken for 57 or 59 minutes, not because I wanted to talk. Let me assure you. Because Wayne has a habit of throwing one line and then waiting for you to talk and then talk again because he's not saying much. That was just rain. And then the conversation ended, and I met a couple of other executives. And I said, you know what? Let me go home and think about GE or PepsiCo. And I told both companies that give them an answer on a Wednesday or something like that. And then I get this most amazing call at ABB. And my secretary picks up and she says, interesting. Somebody called Wayne calories on the line. They're all somebody called me in California let me pick up the phone and I say yes, when we start talking. And then he's talking now for 5 minutes. Which, you know, it's an unusual amount of time for him. Yeah. And he ends by saying, you know, I just came out of the G board meeting because Wayne was on Jack's boat. And he said, Jack indicated to us that you are likely to join GE. And this is Jack Welch. Yep. And then he said, gee is a great company. And I can understand why you'd want to join them. Yeah. GE at that time was the hottest company on the planet. Jack Welch was the hottest CEO in the world at the time. Totally. And so when goes, I can understand why you'd want to join G and Jack and I would too if I were you, but he said, let me make PepsiCo's case one last time because you said you'd make a decision on Wednesday in today's Monday. He said, I'm going to assume you're still having made the decision. So I want to make my case. And he said, my case is simple. We don't have somebody like you and our executive ranks. I need somebody to come in here that has a global perspective. That things differently with the viewpoint of other industries and help PepsiCo get to a different place. And he said, I commit to supporting you, developing you and making sure you're successful in PepsiCo. And all that I ask you is give us a chance. That level of humility and outreach touched me enormously guy and I tell you what I did, I drove over to PepsiCo and I said, I accept your job. Wow. I mean, amazing because everything would have indicated that GE was the natural fit that that's the industry is you'd come from, you'd experience in those areas they were recruiting you hard GE was such a hot company. I mean Jack Welch was writing best sellers and everybody knew who he was. People didn't know who the CEO of Pepsi was at the time. I mean, that was an almost like a counterintuitive move, but it was that call. That pushed you over the edge. I will say something, this also made me realize that you can draw all kinds of matrices on companies.

PepsiCo Motorola GE Wayne bob Edmund ABB bob dymer Taco Bell Pizza Hut bob KFC Pepsi Jack Welch Jack Raj New England mo gee California
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:51 min | 8 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Stories of crisis, failure, turnaround and triumph from some of the greatest leaders in the world. I'm guy rise and on the show today, Indra nooyi, former CEO of PepsiCo. I wasn't intending to interfere on what the division presidents were doing, but if I felt that something was not okay in terms of the target was too high or too low, I spoke up. So I'd say, well, I tell you what guys, you say you're going to grow ten. I ran all the models we do at corporate. I don't see you growing at ten. You couldn't just have me be a paper for sure. Indra neue went from selling textiles and thread door to door to running one of the world's biggest food and beverage companies, PepsiCo. As recently as 2020, there were more people named James and Michael running Fortune 500 companies, then there were women on that list. In 2021, the number of women leading Fortune 500 companies hit an all time record of 41, or about 8% of the biggest companies in the world. And when ingenuity joined PepsiCo in the mid 90s as a senior VP of strategic planning, there were exactly zero women on that list. In our first years at the company, she was frequently second guest by her male colleagues. She remembers being told that her ideas were quote destroying the culture of the company. But she had a spark, a super sharp mind and an intense determination to modernize and future proof Pepsi, which would help her push past the doubters and the naysayers. And in 2006, Indra was named CEO of Pepsi, becoming only the 5th CEO and the company's history, a position she'd go on to hold for 12 years. During her time at Pepsi, she was consistently ranked one of the 100 most powerful women in the world. Today, she serves on the boards of Amazon and the international cricket council, and she's just written an autobiography called my life in full. It's a storied career that started at the ground level. At one point, just out of school, Indra was selling textiles door to door in her home country of India. Intra was born in 1955 in Chennai. Then called Madras, and she was born into a world pretty far removed from where she'd end up. I was born barely 8 years after India got independence. So this is very early in the days of India as a young democracy. And the country was still getting its footing. And in those days, Madras and the south was really a nerdy, sleepy town. Social life was almost nonexistent. And the city came to life around four or 5 in the morning and promptly went to sleep at 8 o'clock. 8 o'clock would be stretching it. There was no restaurants that really were open on the streets. All stores were shot. The roads were absolutely empty. It was a whole different life and a environment that I grew up in. Your father worked for the state bank. He was a bank manager, then he became an internal auditor, and just had a very steady job and performed very well in that job. And your mom was sort of the manager of the household when you were growing up. My mother was the CEO of the household and he has a better name because she run around doing so many things at the same time while keeping music going and singing along with it. No task was too difficult for her. And that was my mother. Can you describe a sort of how your parents interacted with you? Were they very strict today, presumably they had high expectations for you and your siblings, but were they sensitive empathetic or they stand offish what were they like when you were a kid? Sensitive. That word didn't exist. I think the times that we were growing up and the society and certain environment culture that I grew up in, the emphasis was an education. As long as you studied and got good grades, you were okay. If you didn't, everybody came down upon you, like a ton of bricks. In my family, really, the head of the family was my grandfather, my paternal grandfather. He was a retired judge, very firm man, when he spoke nobody else spoke, and if he said something nobody dead, question what he said. The wonderful thing about my grandfather was that he believed that women and men should be treated equally given all the chances, and nobody should be held back from pursuing their dreams. And that philosophy permitted through the whole family. My father was that way, too. And he believed that, whether it was daughters or sons, I didn't matter the children should be allowed to dream, and we should enable all their dreams, as long as it related to education. If it's about going and having a good time in our party or a restaurant, that was not allowed. As long as you wanted to take more courses, study languages, do stuff related to school work, that's all great. My mother was a bit of a disciplinarian. But she was sort of a study in contrast because she had one foot on the break and one foot in the accelerator. I think the fact that she didn't go to college, and she couldn't realize her dreams. Made her want us to do all the things she couldn't. So she had her foot on the accelerator when it came to encouraging her daughters to do whatever they wanted to do. And she gave us the confidence to dream. At the same time the society around us said girls should be treated differently than the boys. And so she had a foot on the brake. And she always had to apply the break and the accelerator. Judiciously. So she allowed us to fly at the same time, he be careful. I'm going to give you a frame. You have freedom within the frame. Don't push the frame too much because that'll break the family. You mentioned that the brahmin culture that you grew up in, which, of course, is sort of traditionally the class of precent intellectuals and teachers in India. Was achievement. Absolutely, you know, Paramount at home was at.

PepsiCo Pepsi Indra neue Indra Indra nooyi Madras India international cricket council Chennai James Michael Amazon Paramount
'Let's Go, Brandon' Goes Mainstream

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:35 min | 10 months ago

'Let's Go, Brandon' Goes Mainstream

"You type in let's go brand into Google news, it is everywhere. AP news. How let's go Brandon became code for insulting bought Joe Biden. The Washington Post, let's go brain and is Republican vulgar governing agenda. By Dana millbank. Oh yeah, but drag queen story are perfectly cool. All right, the fact that 6 year olds get exposed to dudes that are in dresses. 22 hours ago Trump campaign joins the let's go Brandon trend. The NPR national public radio. Here's what let's go Brandon actually means and how it made its way to Congress. Fox 8, let's go Brandon, here's where the viral meme comes from. Three days ago, how the anti Biden song let's go Brandon became a shadow smash. And I can continue. The left is perplexed that there would be a grassroots non centralized non CNN non AT&T, by the way, this is what's so amazing about this is Black Lives Matter is totally corporate. It was top down centralized, every corporation was behind it. This is totally let's just say not coordinated. There's no central command center for let's go Brandon. There's no multi-million dollars spending campaign. There's no pledges from PepsiCo or from Coca-Cola, Goldman Sachs, saying we're going to pledge $30 billion to get rid of let's go Brandon equity in our country. No, this is just kind of bottom up. Where the Black Lives Matter thing B 11 incorporated was totally manufactured. It was absolute top down, and yet let's go Brandon thing is happening why because people are feeling the reality of Joe Biden's

Brandon Dana Millbank Joe Biden The Washington Post AP Donald Trump NPR Google Biden FOX Congress CNN Brandon Equity Pepsico Coca Cola Goldman Sachs AT
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:28 min | 10 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Guilt are there. Is it. Do we expect different things from women CEOs than we do from men CEOs? I think we expect different things from women period. You know, we think women are responsible for kids, women are responsible for families, not true. In my case, Raj and I both felt we were responsible for the kids and the family and our future. And so I think it's very, very important, everybody who has an idea designed to get married and have kids has a conversation with the espouse about who's going to do what have the honest conversations because it can not be done alone. And women in particular have to let go of perfection because very often we women want to be perfect at everything. It's in our DNA. And you know, at some point you may have to give up things that you wanted to do. They might have to say, you know what? I'm not going to keep the house spotless. I'm just going to let it go because I'm just exhausted. And many of us run ourselves ragged because we want to be viewed as getting everything right. And I think all of that is a formula for failure. So the best thing is for us to have the honest conversations with this pass, make sure that both are on the same page when it comes to who's going to do what to support the family. In my case, I had an added advantage a guy. I had my husband's family that unusually decided that they're going to support me whatever happens. So they were my biggest tailwinds. They would call and say, you know, don't quit your job, without help you. And, you know, tell us what kind of help you want and we'll be so proud of you and what you've accomplished. And so it's not just my husband, I had wonderful in laws. And I think all in laws have to stop and think about the future and say, if you're going to let the women and men both fly. We have to also lean in. This becomes an intergenerational responsibility. It injured it's amazing because of all the things you accomplished and the fact that you started life and where you got to. I mean, the top of the corporate world and yet you write that at times in your career you really felt like you were to downplay your achievements. Um. Why? I think that goes back to The Crown of the garage comment that my mother made. Way back in 2000, when I came home, and I just wanted to share my big deals and how point was you into the house and you leave The Crown of the garage. I think that we still live in a society where the woman's achievement is downplayed in the men's achievements are elevated. We are making changes, but we still live in that society. I think in our home, you know, the dialog and discussion was different. My mother grew up at a time when it was that way. You know, you play up the men's achievements and you downplay the woman's achievements. That's how you keep a harmonious family. In my family now my husband was celebrated my achievements like it's all Nobel Prizes that I've won. Okay. Just as that would his. We both lift each other up. Maybe that's the future generation. Because if we don't do that, then what happens is we basically telling women, we're all going to keep one foot on the break and one foot in the accelerator. And the foot on the brake is going to be a little heavier than the foot on the accelerator, which I don't think is fair. When you look at the future of work, you one of the things you wrote when you stepped in after 12 years a sea of Pepsi record and amazing amount of time. I think the average CEO lasts for 40 years at companies, most companies. You wrote about how you wished you would have spent a little bit more time with family and you encouraged people to think about that in their own careers. And you've been more vocal more and more vocal about that since you've stepped down running day to day operations at Pepsi. About focusing on on our lives. Thank you even I think I'm perfectly short. We don't know how much time on this planet. And we have to focus on what actually matters. Work is important. Careers important achievement is important, but it's only one part of our of our lives. I think, you know, I sit on various future of work committees and you know we talk about how things are going to change post pandemic. And I have to tell you, one of the things that we never talk about in this committee meetings is the whole issue of care. Who's going to do all the caregiving, how is it going to get done? How are we going to make sure that we have a pathway for highly educated women to also contribute to the economy? As much as they are family builders and help nurture and develop the family. And I really believe that the issue and care is a big blind spot among global leaders. And I'm in a missed opportunity, and I now speak as an economist not a feminist. A guy. Because when I was PepsiCo CEO, and I was in the rooms of power with all the men sees. We talked about the future of work as if it's about technology, the world, GDP growth, retraining of employees, we never mentioned family and care, and who's going to do the jobs and how are we going to do it? World where we've got a lot of aging people. My belief is that if there are more women in the room, in those groups and rooms of power, this would have come up sooner. It's a big missed opportunity. And I think that we have to elevate the discussion from quite discussions that don't lead anywhere, to make it in front and center to say, hey, with the aging population. And with a need to have children and young people to build families at the same time, the best and brightest to be deployed in the service of furthering the economy. If we don't focus on care as a critical support system for the country. We're not going to have a society that's happy. We'll have another Japan or South Korea where the birth rate is low and the requirements of jobs and children conflicts so much because what's happening is young people are now delaying having kids or choosing not to have kids at all. And if that happens, it's going to debilitate our economic system down the road. And so I think that we should stop framing this as female and says about families and is not.

Raj Pepsi PepsiCo South Korea Japan
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:12 min | 10 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"And that's what they would write about you. Yeah. So we're very sorry to work. I know we're sorry to work, but doesn't matter. You know at that time, they were painting me as absolutely exotic person who had come into the boardroom of the staid, prim and proper PepsiCo. I guess they wanted to draw a major contrast. To everybody else out there. I don't care in retrospect. I laugh it off. But at that time, I'm like, see me, I'm one of these totally conservative people who has long skirts and jackets and shirts and always the same kitten heel shoes and I don't smoke. I don't drink give me a break guys. Maybe a 6 o'clock kick off my shoes because the heels hurt and maybe when I'm stressed out or how much tune but relax, don't write about me as this hippie kind of a person. But it didn't matter. You know, they painted me in interesting ways. But to be honest guy, that's all behind me because as the company went on as my ten year as CEO went on, you know, there was supporters and detractors, the detractors are usually louder than the supporters. But then, as long as the board was behind me, I felt I could do anything, which is what I did. You had several big sort of initiatives that you put out while you were a Pepsi. One was reclassifying the products with a fun category for chips and soda and then a better category which was the diet and the low fat drinks and low fat foods and then the good for you things like oatmeal and other products. And you really push this initiative called performance with a purpose. What was that initiative about what was the idea behind it? This was way back in 2006. And we were beginning to do things to move the portfolio to a healthier mix. Quaker roads was an example of an acquisition that helped us get there. We had bought naked juice that was another example. Tropicana was an up portfolio. And so we were making all the right moves to add calcium to tropicana juice. Take sugary drinks out of the vending machines in schools. So there were a lot of actions that we were taking to make the company a better company if you want to call it that. And future proof it. But when I became CEO, the environment for companies like ours in the marketplace is very different. The talk on obesity was very, very high. There was a big noise about it all over society in every country. We were talking about suing beverage makers. Exactly right. And, you know, countries were threatening taxes, a portion control drinks. I mean, all kinds of noise on our industry in our industry. There was also human cry about plastics. You know, how much plastic was being. There still is. There still is, but then it had started. So, and then in many, many countries, we were viewed as a water parasite, used too much water. The town doesn't have water to eat or drink, and there's a Pepsi plant or a Coke plant close by using a lot of water. So we had to worry about water. We had to worry about plastics. And then those were also the days where it was very hard to get good people to come and work in traditional consumer products companies. People wanted to know what the purpose in life was. Why? Because they were going to the best people going to the tech sector. Totally take or someplace else. But there was a new found awareness about purpose and what do we want to do with our jobs? Why should we work at this company and give it all our time if the companies aren't going to do something to make the world a better place? There was a conversation that's happening that's happening again now today. And it needs to only it needs to and so because that consciousness had been awoken, you know, to me, the only way the future proof PepsiCo to make sure that we would remain successful well into the future. Was if I found a way for the company to deliver great performance because we're always about good performance good financial performance. But figured out how we can transform the portfolio to healthier products, more good for you and better for your products. How do we reduce our environmental footprint? So we reduce our costs, and we get a license to operate in societies around the world. And then how do we create an environment inside PepsiCo? So people feel they can really come in and feel like they brought themselves to work. So we worked on every aspect of purpose and performance and put the money behind sugar reduction, salt reduction, dialing up zero calorie products, making healthier products taste great and be ubiquitously available. We did a ton of work on water reduction in our plants. How to make thinner bottles, how to think about recycling in a whole different way. And what kind of programs you should be offering our employees so that they knew that PepsiCo looked at them as an asset for the company, not a tool of the trade. So we changed a lot of things in the company. And it did good things for us. Our performance was good over the period. Our attention rates went up. Our attrition rate was way down. And PepsiCo is once again viewed as a phenomenal talent bank for industry as a whole because we were so filled with outstanding leaders. You were during your ten year often the only or one of just a few female CEOs of a Fortune 500 company and with that came. As a symbol, a model, an example, all of the things that tend to happen when somebody is the only or one of a few of a group representing a larger group. And at the same time, you from what you write, we're kind of roiling internally because of your on the one hand you were incredibly successful running Pepsi. And sort of held up as a amazing model on the other hand, kind of struggling with your own feelings of guilt about the time or whether the lack of time you had with your family. That's push and pull is inevitable. Because every one of the jobs I was doing was a full-time job. Being a CEO was three full-time jobs, being a wife and mother was all full-time jobs, each one of them being a daughter was a full-time job. And the days till 24 hours, and believe me I was using that day to its fullest because I didn't sleep much. I learned how to multiplex. I could do three or four things at the same time. So I was going fast. But there is no way that you can do a job to satisfaction level that makes you feel great about it. There's a constant juggling act. And you had to do the juggling, maybe three or four times a day. Because some priority had to shift something at home, had to get precedents or something you're doing at work. So you go through this juggling. And because of this juggling act, you know, you don't feel guilty about work, but you feel guilty about home. Especially my two kids. I'd say my God, when I left home today, they looked at me long English saying, I wish mummy wasn't going. One of them has got the flu, I'd run home every two.

PepsiCo Pepsi Tropicana tropicana obesity Coke jobs flu
"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

18:23 min | 10 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Where the international airport maybe had three gates and there were more people sending you off than they were passengers. So and you come from that environment in land and JFK. None of the chaos that you see in Indian airports. None of the sounds, everything is orderly the airport of clean. The immigration line works beautifully, then you get into this bus called the Connecticut limousine which takes you to New Haven. Your motoring through organized traffic. No animals on the road. I look at all this and I go, wow, this is unbelievable. Everything is so clean and there's actually lines on the road where the traffic follows these rules and regulations. How is that possible? So now I'm like a kid in a candy store. I'm just, I'm my jaws dropping looking at all this. Then I land in Yale. The majesty of the university is breathtaking. But, in those days, Yale did not have a support structure for international students. They had an office of international students at process two into the university, but then you were single swim. Now all of a sudden a suitcases those days didn't even have wheels guy. That's a new invention. So I'm there with this gigantic suitcase that's fell to the brim with all the wrong stuff. And one up bag that I'm carrying no backpack. And I have to carry 6 blocks over to my dorm. That I know nothing about. And they tell me, go east on this street and turn, I don't know where east investors over there. So this was like a new language, a new approach that I get to haul a graduate studies, this huge imposing dorm. Quiet, nobody there. Hollow, I mean, you could hear a pin drop. I go to my room and I am ready to take the next plane back because there's nobody talk to. I'm hungry, hungry, hungry, like you won't believe it. There's nothing in the room except a bed and a chair, and I have to put on sheets and things like that. And figure out how to get some food. And so the first week was really, really heartbreaking. The second third and fourth week were okay. After that it was like, wow, my glad I came here. When we come back in just a moment, how Indra Nui graduated Yale with a ton of ambition and a mountain of student loans and quickly became one of the most sought after executives in the country. Stay with us. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message is brought to you by NPR sponsor, Airbnb. Millions of people earn extra income by hosting their extra space on Airbnb. Income that can help with home renovations paying for vacations or saving for retirement. Maybe you have questions about whether hosting might be right for you. You can now ask a super host and get free one on one help from Airbnb's most experienced hosts. Go to Airbnb dot com slash ask superhost and start asking. This message comes from NPR sponsor farmed together. The high cost of buying an entire farm has put this acid class out of reach to all but big institutions and the ultra rich. Farmed together dot com allows accredited investors the opportunity to invest in fractional ownership of farmland across the U.S., impact and income through farmland investing, grow your wealth, grow our future, learn more at farm together dot com today. This message comes from NPR sponsor Airbnb, where millions of hosts earn extra income. If you're curious about hosting two, you can now get free one on one help from Airbnb's most experienced hosts. Start asking at Airbnb dot com slash ask a superhost. Hey, welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy rise. So by the late 1970s, ingenuity had packed up her life in India and moved across the world for the chance to go to the Yale school of management. It was a bold move, especially because at the time, there were not a lot of people that looked like her, in corporate America. I read that when you one of your first internships, summer internships while a student at Yale was with Bruce Alan Hamilton, the consulting, the management and consulting firm. You would come in to work every day in a Sari, because that was who you were, that was you were being authentic to yourself. And but it was also very different, right? Because people were not many people had never seen that before. But I actually give boz Allen Hamilton of those days, a lot of credit, because I was the only one in a Sari, I think in the entire system. And I was wearing a Sari to say I was being authentic would be a little bit of an overstatement guy. I'd say that I desperately wanted to fit in. But I didn't have the money to fit in, and when I did try, I had a dreadful experience because I bought the wrong clothes that didn't fit well, and I looked like a freak of nature. But I also realized that there was not one day that booz Allen made me feel different or unwanted. So I have a lot to thank both Alan Hamilton for. When you, when you finish when you graduated and you began your career, because your first job was at Boston consulting group. Was did you could you have imagined at the time in your graduating class at Yale and when you started working at BCG, would you have imagined or could you have imagined that you would one day be running one of the 50 biggest U.S. companies? I mean, one of the biggest companies in the world. At that time, do you think you would have said that about yourself or people to sit around you like, oh, that's Indra, watch her. She is going to be one of the most successful CEOs one day. You know, it's interesting. When I was in my first year at Yale, people just looked at me as an oddity. Bright, when she speaks, she says the right things, but boy, these international students speak, we are in the dress weird. So we were viewed as, you know, nice people, but really don't belong. In a second year, because of my booze Allen Hamilton, credentials. I was looked at a little bit more respect, and people said, you know, she's more than smart. She got into consulting, and she did well and she's got another offering consulting. So she must be pretty good. And so there was newfound respect for me, but give me a break. Being a CEO for company, I'll be honest with you guy, even the week before I was appointed CEO of PepsiCo I didn't know I was going to be CEO of PepsiCo. So no. I mean, if I told you that when I was born I knew I was going to be CEO. I mean, no, this was just one of the most improbable trajectories. It sounds like when you thought about yourself and who you were at the time, you weren't thinking, I'm going to do something enormous one day. No, because my husband, Raja and I got married in 1980, the year I graduated from Yale. And we both had nothing we were starting from zero. And so all that we are focused on is how do we pay off our student loan? Right. Because the fact that I had a student loan and I owed that money made me feel very uncomfortable. So any money we had we first tried to pay as much as we can towards the student loan, we always saved a little bit because we believed savings was important. And then we lived live for the rest of the money. And it wasn't about clothes, it wasn't about having a good time, it was just about living life within our means. And we balanced our checkbook every week. I mean, we were meticulous in how we manage life. And at that time, you don't think about bigger and bigger jobs. You think about holding on to the job you have. Doing a phenomenal job in our respective jobs. Both of us were working. And figuring out how to make sure that, as a is interesting, I'm not going to use words that I hope don't come out wrong. I felt that I was at that time a guest in the country. As did my husband, and we felt we had to earn our way. To be a citizen of the country. So we worked very hard at that. You pretty early in your you'd move Chicago to Chicago to work for BCG and your husband Raj was getting his degree at the University of Chicago. And I think at the time your mom eventually came to live with you and your husband in Chicago, your daughter was born a lot was going on in your life at the time. What do you remember about that time? You were presuming you were traveling a lot as a consultant. Was it I mean, it sounds like there was a lot happening. A lot to kind of handle. But, you know, when I became a consultant, my husband and I sat down and talked, consulting those days, especially in Chicago, all your clients were in different parts of the Midwest. And without Internet without face time without any of that technology, you had to rely on long distance calls in the night with your AT&T card. And you couldn't connect otherwise with your spouse. So, you know, I was gone for three, four days at a time, but we both had an understanding. That we both were going to work hard to make some money, so we could save some for our own future of something went wrong. We never had to worry about how the other one would manage. So for both our sakes, we said we need to have savings. We need to pay off our loans. And we always wanted a family. And when we had kids, we wanted to make sure that they would be comfortable and they could do whatever they wanted to. And we just worked towards that. So there was a constant reinforcement of our relationship because we talked about what we both were doing. It seems it's very strange to even say this, but it seems like fate intervened in your life twice in similar ways in both were car accidents, the first time, of course, was your father's when you were a young girl. Second time was your own in 1986 that was a pretty severe accident, but it sounds like that also prompted you to make some different life decisions about the way you want it to live your life. You know, it was tough leaving consulting. But at that point, with the accident with the two year old daughter at that time, I realized that being away from home constantly, even though my mother was not living with me and helping care for my daughter, I was just not going to work because first, I was on a walker and crutches for a good 6 months and the prognosis wasn't great. And I realized that traveling was not an option. And then Motorola came calling at that time. So a combination of factors made me sit back and say, it's time to hang up my boots and consulting. The best decision I made fate intervened and the best decision I made going to work in Motorola and really this was the first in a series of steps you took that was based around your family that was based around wanting to be closer to your home, your kids, and that begins as kind of real career trajectory working in in the corporate world. What do you remember about that time working from a role? You know, Motorola at that time was just a fine, fine, fine technology company. I was writing the rules on wireless communication, was leading in pages and two way radio and the cell phone was first launched by Motorola. And it was just a company in a huge and semiconductors, government electronics. It was a very, very exciting company. I know injured that you spent the next few years working in the corporate tech world first at Motorola. And then he moved over to a company called ABB, which is this sort of international tech and electronics company. You actually became a senior vice president there. And you've written about some key mentors who helped you along the way. But I don't think it's immodest to say that you did phenomenally well with these companies. I mean so well that you started to get noticed by a lot of other big companies, including GE and from what you write, they really wanted to hire you. But how did Pepsi come on your radar? Well, one fine day head under calls and says, will you talk to PepsiCo? I got PepsiCo. They own KFC and Taco Bell and Pizza Hut, and I don't even need meat. What are you talking about? They go, well, you know, it's a very useful company, a fantastic company, and this is hell of a job, and you've got to talk to them. So I came in and I, my first interview was with the person who had the job as head of strategy. And he was moving on to a big business leadership job. And after an hour with me, he said, you're not going to meet bob detmer, the CFO, and I'm going to guarantee you and he won't get along. I said, oh, that's a great introduction. I said, why not? He said, because you both are so different. He said, bob that Murray quintessential New England wasp and you are just not that. You guys are not going to get along. I said it's too late. I'm here, so I'll go see him. What a strange thing to say. Well, I heard a lot of strange things at that time. So I went to see bob dat bar and the one hour interview stretched to one and a half hours stretched to two hours. We both struggled to end the interview because we got along so well famously. I mean, bob dettmer was fantastic. Not only did he charm me about PepsiCo, we started to map out ways we could work together to make the company even better. He made me feel welcome. He and his wife embrace Raj and me and basically said, even if you choose not to come to PepsiCo, we're going to remain very close friends. And then I went to see Wayne Callaway the CEO. Wayne is a remarkably quiet guy. Just a beautiful human being, but in my 60 minute interview with him, I must have spoken for 57 or 59 minutes, not because I wanted to talk. Let me assure you. Because Wayne has a habit of throwing one line and then waiting for you to talk and then talk again because he's not saying much. That was just rain. And then the conversation ended, and I met a couple of other executives. And I said, you know what? Let me go home and think about GE or PepsiCo. And I told both companies that give them an answer on a Wednesday or something like that. And then I get this most amazing call at ABB. And my secretary picks up and she says, interesting. Somebody called Wayne calories on the line. Somebody called Wayne Caroline let me pick up the phone and I say yes, we start talking. And then he's talking now for 5 minutes, which, you know, it's an unusual amount of time for him. Yeah. And he ends by saying, you know, I just came out of the G board meeting because Wayne was on Jack's board. And he said, Jack indicated to us that you are likely to join GE. And this is Jack Welch. Yeah. And then he said, gee is a great company. And I can understand why you'd want to join them. Yeah. Gee, at that time, was the hottest company on the planet. Jack Welch was the hottest CEO in the world at the time. Totally. And so vein goes, I can understand why you'd want to join G and Jack and I would too if I were you, but he said, let me make PepsiCo's case one last time because you said you'd make your decision on Wednesday in today's Monday. He said, I'm going to assume you still haven't made the decision. So I want to make my case. And he said, my case is simple. We don't have somebody like you and our executive ranks. I need somebody to come in here that has a global perspective that things differently with the viewpoint of other industries and help PepsiCo get to a different place. And he said, I commit to supporting you, developing you and making sure you're successful in PepsiCo. And all that I ask you is give us a chance. That level of humility and outreach touched me enormously guy and I tell you what I did. I drove over to PepsiCo and I said, I accept your job. Wow. I mean, amazing because everything would have indicated that GE was the natural fit that that's the industry as you'd come from. You'd experience in those areas they were recruiting you hard GE was such a hot company. I mean, Jack Welch was writing bestsellers and everybody knew who he was. People didn't know who the CEO of Pepsi was at the time. I mean, that was an almost like a counterintuitive move, but it was that call. That pushed you over the edge. I will say something. This also made me realize that you can draw all kinds of matrices on companies and criteria to decide which company you should join. In fact, I had a piece of paper which said, Monsanto, GE, PepsiCo, criteria, and.

Airbnb Yale PepsiCo NPR Indra Nui Boston consulting group Sari Bruce Alan Hamilton boz Allen Hamilton booz Allen Alan Hamilton Motorola Chicago America Yale school of management New Haven Allen Hamilton gates Connecticut
"pepsico" Discussed on Blank Meets Blank

Blank Meets Blank

03:31 min | 11 months ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Blank Meets Blank

"He doesn't have a lot of confidence and gets very nervous. Like as far as like a like a real performance so we could build off of that where everyone else might even be kinda goof on even his friends goof on him a little bit or they're trying to push them in the right direction and then we see him in a private moment and we see that he has the skills that he doesn't realize the power of his own talent. I that's so good. Because what's that show about a white jewish rapper guy. Who's our dave dave. The first step. Sort of dave ends with like all episode. He's been like kansas rob on command. Or whatever and then at the end of the first episode he wraps and it's actually good. I feel like that's kind of the arc. We see there where pepsi doritos lipton her hanging out. Just on the side of the curb or whatever. They're really excited about an upcoming show. Or what have you For some artists that there were all impressed with but then there's a rap battle to like open for this big artists. There's going to be this big evect coca cola bengals and bully overhear them like how you think you have skill and they just casually own them and maybe doritos tried to spit a verse back or whatever but they just laugh and walk off and lipton's like way to help us out pepsi and he's like and he talks to mr quaker right and get some of his confidence back or whatever and then as you say and the first episode because it's just ten minutes we can't fit in that much stuff. He's like in his own room. We see like poster of the artists who is big is going to be performing probably. Mc donald right because mc donald's i make sense actually that's not bad 'cause we can even have mc donald. Oh that's perfect. Because we can have mc donald be like like a hero to pepsi and he myers to and he doesn't realize like it's very similar to his own arc of realizing the own talent he has in himself and then he when he sees quake his His grandpa quaker like really kick some ass and on a hero like that never meet heroes saying when he finally does read them meet. Donald mc donald's a piece of shit and he doesn't live up to pepsi's expectations plus he's in with his rival gang and then it's like seeing the in his own inner talent bhai seeing it through the people around him like you people are like. Oh this is a goofy adult swim. Ten minute animated show now. We got themes bro. We got themes and arc's where we got a story of del kokin chips. No i love that because maybe then you know you we flip it. The last episode doesn't end with him winning and huge climax. You know maybe pepsi and his friends win in the next to last episode or maybe pepsi like goes over to the dark side maybe as he joins the other side and wraps with them or whatever. But point is in the last episode. Coca-cola and bring goals have talked to mc donald. And he's like yeah. Fuck this kid. And he starts rapping shit against pepsi. Who fucking hero. And he just gets vice hero on stage. But he again. He's tongue-tied just like in. The first episode could reconnect those dots and mr quaker comes in drops his cane like android sick verse mc donald and pepsi joins in and are all wrapping at these this fucking scoundrel and they run out of town because this fuxin pepsi country bitch. And that's what co- and pepsico stands were pepsi country name of the show. I actually yeah. That's great f c country.

pepsi mc donald dave dave mr quaker Donald mc donald lipton Mc donald rob kansas dave myers Coca cola pepsico
You Want To Talk About Hot Cheetos?

Latino USA

02:02 min | 1 year ago

You Want To Talk About Hot Cheetos?

"For over forty years. Richard thing is had a successful career as a motivational speaker. I realized that as much as i wanted to fit in. I was never credit fitted. I was granted to stand out. That's why a lotta young people your whole life. You felt like. I don't feed in because you're not supposed to is supposed to stand out as vice president of multicultural sales and community promotions. At pepsico. he'd been called the godfather of hispanic brandon and was considered one of the most influential latinos in corporate america. His rags to riches story was truly the stuff of legends. He's one of ten children or into mexican field workers in wa steve. A town in southwestern california were italian and mexican immigrants ones all shared the same ocupation. Picking grapes richard began working as a janitor at frito lay in nineteen seventy six when he was just eighteen years old eventually. He climbed the ranks to being a top executive at the fortune. Five hundred company. He says his happened after he presented an idea to his superiors. It was pitched that he says would later be turned into the trademark flaming. Hot cheetos line. This spicy injured. Red snacks are today. One of frito lay's top celine flavors fairness. What if. I put chili on cheeto. So i went to work. You know i'm actually made up my own seasoning and all that and put it on a on season cheeto. My wife took some to work. I took some to work. Everybody fell in love with it. All of this was an american dream like story that most people knew and loved up until very recently in may of this year the times published a story under the headline the man who didn't invent flaming hot cheetos. In a five thousand plus word investigation. Business reporter sam. Dean revealed severe inconsistencies. In the timeline of richard. Storytelling

Frito Pepsico Richard Brandon Steve America California SAM Dean
Stop and Shop's Scamboni with Soda prices

The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Stop and Shop's Scamboni with Soda prices

"Charges soda prices like stop and shop. Maybe giving great prices on on grapes. Maybe their price on cold cuts are good. Yeah they're sorta prices right on the fucking world okay you. Thomas isn't a skim bony. Got a yellow sale little yellow tag sale sign right. It says sweet tea four five dollars price right to twenty five. Yeah i would say so right. It's like two or three fifty at the quick quick mott's at seven elevens and the quickies. Whatever this always like three for five to five seventy five h dot twenty five four five. That's great read the fine print. now sometimes. The fine print says only four for deals per person right. So you only by twenty. Sometimes it says must spend you know ten dollars in like you go to target. They'll sell like you get ten dollars off. If you spend ten dollars on men's grooming products right Here's what i gotta buy to save the fifty cents on the fucking sue pure leaf tea for five dollars. Fine print when you buy four pepsi two liter bottles now. Who's drinking four liter bottle toledo byles pepsi if they wanna ice tea. I don't see the correlation there now or pure leaf eighteen point five ounce bottles or rockstar. Sixteen ounce cans all made by pepsico. Probably i'm assuming that purely is made by pepsi. I guarantee without even looking at it is. That's why they gonna by rockstar rockstar. Drinks i just want to buy some fucking bottles of purely feist daughter. Nope not two liter bottles of pepsi. I don't want at stop and shop. Two dollars and fifty cents a bottle prices or whatever it is ridiculous prices for soda. Yeah i got by rockstar rockstar rockstar.

Mott Pepsi Thomas Rockstar Rockstar Pepsico Rockstar Rockstar Rockstar
"pepsico" Discussed on PepsiCo ads

PepsiCo ads

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"pepsico" Discussed on PepsiCo ads

"If your pets per your Stewart first and foremost, everybody's from Pittsburgh My Father's Side him. My mother's side all users and proud of it off the year after the Immaculate Reception 1973. We got season tickets and I've been going to games ever since. Patrick's my son when he got to be sixteen years old. The stipulation was well, you can go you have to drive. Okay. Well, it was worth passing kind of Seventeen years 18 years or whatever, you know, which is a blast. We're 5:00 rush from the talk. Just out of habit. He sat on the left off on the right and to celebrate the good and go through the bad with your dad. You can't beat that. With my lovely wife Mana love of my life. You got married, maybe 5 she was against her too. She loves the Steelers. She made on her Terrible Towel that was there ready to grab when necessary she Drew and scream and yell and her last three years. She had been in the hospital every three or four months or something. So she passed away last October 18th. I mean I miss her tremendously, but the memories are there and nobody can take that away from me always have those pictures. That's what you want. Finger, I got a chance to it was actually their anniversary of 2018. There was an episode that he had here the week later that he was diagnosed with cancer. I went through the chemo and radiation. So hopefully it doesn't come back last year over the end of last year was sort of just a blur. So I'm going to kind of start fresh with this season. I'm in kind of the games this past Thursday morning came up. I just missed that being there. That's why I'm really bummed for this year that you gotta look out for the greater. Good could really use a few games with 60,000 plus together. But what else do you do then just adapt and make the best of it. Down here. How you doing? I'm doing wonderful. It's a pleasure to me than they do pleasure to meet you wanna thank you so much. First of all, I want to tell you on behalf of Pepsi and distillers. We know you can't make it to the game this year. So we wanted to bring the 60. You got a beautiful girl. I know what it's like to lose something you love. So we just want to make sure we brought it to you. Thank you. They feel the same. I kind of felt my modem up there for like, yeah, it's like off a moment and a girl front of you them. Even the toughest times you leaned on the people that you love the most. Yeah, we have each other and that's good enough for me.

Every Game is a Home Game Pepsi

PepsiCo ads

04:08 min | 1 year ago

Every Game is a Home Game Pepsi

"If your pets per your Stewart first and foremost, everybody's from Pittsburgh My Father's Side him. My mother's side all users and proud of it off the year after the Immaculate Reception 1973. We got season tickets and I've been going to games ever since. Patrick's my son when he got to be sixteen years old. The stipulation was well, you can go you have to drive. Okay. Well, it was worth passing kind of Seventeen years 18 years or whatever, you know, which is a blast. We're 5:00 rush from the talk. Just out of habit. He sat on the left off on the right and to celebrate the good and go through the bad with your dad. You can't beat that. With my lovely wife Mana love of my life. You got married, maybe 5 she was against her too. She loves the Steelers. She made on her Terrible Towel that was there ready to grab when necessary she Drew and scream and yell and her last three years. She had been in the hospital every three or four months or something. So she passed away last October 18th. I mean I miss her tremendously, but the memories are there and nobody can take that away from me always have those pictures. That's what you want. Finger, I got a chance to it was actually their anniversary of 2018. There was an episode that he had here the week later that he was diagnosed with cancer. I went through the chemo and radiation. So hopefully it doesn't come back last year over the end of last year was sort of just a blur. So I'm going to kind of start fresh with this season. I'm in kind of the games this past Thursday morning came up. I just missed that being there. That's why I'm really bummed for this year that you gotta look out for the greater. Good could really use a few games with 60,000 plus together. But what else do you do then just adapt and make the best of it. Down here. How you doing? I'm doing wonderful. It's a pleasure to me than they do pleasure to meet you wanna thank you so much. First of all, I want to tell you on behalf of Pepsi and distillers. We know you can't make it to the game this year. So we wanted to bring the 60. You got a beautiful girl. I know what it's like to lose something you love. So we just want to make sure we brought it to you. Thank you. They feel the same. I kind of felt my modem up there for like, yeah, it's like off a moment and a girl front of you them. Even the toughest times you leaned on the people that you love the most. Yeah, we have each other and that's good enough for me.

Stewart Pittsburgh Mana Patrick Steelers Cancer Pepsi
"pepsico" Discussed on PepsiCo ads

PepsiCo ads

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"pepsico" Discussed on PepsiCo ads

"If you're black is the solar system the bodega is decide Hood orbits the bodega boys Jesus might you said I'm the kid. Well with the bodega boys remember them old like cowboy movies when they had the General Store. Yeah, you can go and get anything. It's a general slow Halo ended on the same page two beagles. I ever got home. It's like you part of family bodegas more than a store is the lifeblood of the community. I'm saying single genetically end in Trenton Joachim Walker's knee nobody. I've been coming here since I was about four years old, at least I've been a customer at this store for twenty nine years. I've been going here since the eighties. My mother would send me to the edge. She didn't have the money they give it to us. They trust us enough to bring it back which is it's not like every other store over here. That's why the store bed for so long. They look over the hood hard. All the big stores were sold out when you don't got it the same day guy had a shout to the bodega Thuggin it through and being there for us during these unprecedented times now real. But unfortunately this Brenda megado our wish if I could come out the house to see my grandfather maybe a few days before he was gone. But I was unfortunately I was unable to do that. I was only able to mourn his death. Yeah a little. 1:40 a.m. When he calls it affected all of us, we must have really had nowhere to go at times with him saying it was hard. This is the oldest or on a block from here to at least four or five blocks down. You won't see another story was very difficult for me to move around to certain places when the store was closed down by Andy Mineo. Finally did open up. It was just a blessing. Everything War has been four people over here will come back some cuz people respect that I'm getting choked up about it though, but it really serves Community it comes back to you in different ways when you get off when you live in New York City, you find a bodega that become your Bodega. You linked up bond with that person. That's your spot to loom my guys going on. Yo, we've heard good things about this Bodega. We heard you've been holding down the neighborhood. How long have you been here at a year? Maybe Batman a superhero Jesus you have done so much to the neighborhood on the behalf of Pepsi. We want to give You need something. From d r y this year has brought a lot of challenges. But if we learned anything is that being there for each other can mean everything because you've gone out of your way to help others have she's proud to provide me with financial support to help cover the cost of one year of rent for your store. Love your Pepsi family. My guys I'll be seeing you guys deserved it. You need more people like you to keep the world a great place. Enjoy it he making these chopped cheese sandwiches keep the doors open down in neighborhood, man. So proud of you getting. Okay, so you're going to know we appreciate you mad libs.

Andy Mineo New York City Pepsi twenty nine years one year Brenda megado Batman 1:40 a.m. Jesus five blocks two beagles General Store eighties this year Trenton Joachim Walker single four people four years old Halo four
The Bodega Giveback Pepsi

PepsiCo ads

03:58 min | 1 year ago

The Bodega Giveback Pepsi

"If you're black is the solar system the bodega is decide Hood orbits the bodega boys Jesus might you said I'm the kid. Well with the bodega boys remember them old like cowboy movies when they had the General Store. Yeah, you can go and get anything. It's a general slow Halo ended on the same page two beagles. I ever got home. It's like you part of family bodegas more than a store is the lifeblood of the community. I'm saying single genetically end in Trenton Joachim Walker's knee nobody. I've been coming here since I was about four years old, at least I've been a customer at this store for twenty nine years. I've been going here since the eighties. My mother would send me to the edge. She didn't have the money they give it to us. They trust us enough to bring it back which is it's not like every other store over here. That's why the store bed for so long. They look over the hood hard. All the big stores were sold out when you don't got it the same day guy had a shout to the bodega Thuggin it through and being there for us during these unprecedented times now real. But unfortunately this Brenda megado our wish if I could come out the house to see my grandfather maybe a few days before he was gone. But I was unfortunately I was unable to do that. I was only able to mourn his death. Yeah a little. 1:40 a.m. When he calls it affected all of us, we must have really had nowhere to go at times with him saying it was hard. This is the oldest or on a block from here to at least four or five blocks down. You won't see another story was very difficult for me to move around to certain places when the store was closed down by Andy Mineo. Finally did open up. It was just a blessing. Everything War has been four people over here will come back some cuz people respect that I'm getting choked up about it though, but it really serves Community it comes back to you in different ways when you get off when you live in New York City, you find a bodega that become your Bodega. You linked up bond with that person. That's your spot to loom my guys going on. Yo, we've heard good things about this Bodega. We heard you've been holding down the neighborhood. How long have you been here at a year? Maybe Batman a superhero Jesus you have done so much to the neighborhood on the behalf of Pepsi. We want to give You need something. From d r y this year has brought a lot of challenges. But if we learned anything is that being there for each other can mean everything because you've gone out of your way to help others have she's proud to provide me with financial support to help cover the cost of one year of rent for your store. Love your Pepsi family. My guys I'll be seeing you guys deserved it. You need more people like you to keep the world a great place. Enjoy it he making these chopped cheese sandwiches keep the doors open down in neighborhood, man. So proud of you getting. Okay, so you're going to know we appreciate you mad libs.

Andy Mineo New York City Pepsi Batman Joachim Walker Brenda Megado General Store Trenton
"pepsico" Discussed on PepsiCo ads

PepsiCo ads

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"pepsico" Discussed on PepsiCo ads

"If your pets per your Stewart first and foremost, everybody's from Pittsburgh My Father's Side him. My mother's side all users and proud of it off the year after the Immaculate Reception 1973. We got season tickets and I've been going to games ever since. Patrick's my son when he got to be sixteen years old. The stipulation was well, you can go you have to drive. Okay. Well, it was worth passing kind of Seventeen years 18 years or whatever, you know, which is a blast. We're 5:00 rush from the talk. Just out of habit. He sat on the left off on the right and to celebrate the good and go through the bad with your dad. You can't beat that. With my lovely wife Mana love of my life. You got married, maybe 5 she was against her too. She loves the Steelers. She made on her Terrible Towel that was there ready to grab when necessary she Drew and scream and yell and her last three years. She had been in the hospital every three or four months or something. So she passed away last October 18th. I mean I miss her tremendously, but the memories are there and nobody can take that away from me always have those pictures. That's what you want. Finger, I got a chance to it was actually their anniversary of 2018. There was an episode that he had here the week later that he was diagnosed with cancer. I went through the chemo and radiation. So hopefully it doesn't come back last year over the end of last year was sort of just a blur. So I'm going to kind of start fresh with this season. I'm in kind of the games this past Thursday morning came up. I just missed that being there. That's why I'm really bummed for this year that you gotta look out for the greater. Good could really use a few games with 60,000 plus together. But what else do you do then just adapt and make the best of it. Down here. How you doing? I'm doing wonderful. It's a pleasure to me than they do pleasure to meet you wanna thank you so much. First of all, I want to tell you on behalf of Pepsi and distillers. We know you can't make it to the game this year. So we wanted to bring the 60. You got a beautiful girl. I know what it's like to lose something you love. So we just want to make sure we brought it to you. Thank you. They feel the same. I kind of felt my modem up there for like, yeah, it's like off a moment and a girl front of you them. Even the toughest times you leaned on the people that you love the most. Yeah, we have each other and that's.

2018 last year Pittsburgh Pepsi 60 four months Stewart Patrick 60,000 plus last October 18th Steelers this year past Thursday morning first 5:00 Immaculate Reception 1973 First sixteen years old week later 5
"pepsico" Discussed on PepsiCo ads

PepsiCo ads

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"pepsico" Discussed on PepsiCo ads

"If you're black is the solar system the bodega is decide Hood orbits the bodega boys Jesus might you said I'm the kid. Well with the bodega boys remember them old like cowboy movies when they had the General Store. Yeah, you can go and get anything. It's a general slow Halo ended on the same page two beagles. I ever got home. It's like you part of family bodegas more than a store is the lifeblood of the community. I'm saying single genetically end in Trenton Joachim Walker's knee nobody. I've been coming here since I was about four years old, at least I've been a customer at this store for twenty nine years. I've been going here since the eighties. My mother would send me to the edge. She didn't have the money they give it to us. They trust us enough to bring it back which is it's not like every other store over here. That's why the store bed for so long. They look over the hood hard. All the big stores were sold out when you don't got it the same day guy had a shout to the bodega Thuggin it through and being there for us during these unprecedented times now real. But unfortunately this Brenda megado our wish if I could come out the house to see my grandfather maybe a few days before he was gone. But I was unfortunately I was unable to do that. I was only able to mourn his death. Yeah a little. 1:40 a.m. When he calls it affected all of us, we must have really had nowhere to go at times with him saying it was hard. This is the oldest or on a block from here to at least four or five blocks down. You won't see another story was very difficult for me to move around to certain places when the store was closed down by Andy Mineo. Finally did open up. It was just a blessing. Everything War has been four people over here will come back some cuz people respect that I'm getting choked up about it though, but it really serves Community it comes back to you in different ways when you get off when you live in New York City, you find a bodega that become your Bodega. You linked up bond with that person. That's your spot to loom my guys going on. Yo, we've heard good things about this Bodega. We heard you've been holding down the neighborhood. How long have you been here at a year? Maybe Batman a superhero Jesus you have done so much to the neighborhood on the behalf of Pepsi. We want to give You need something. From d r y this year has brought a lot of challenges. But if we learned anything is that being there for each other can mean everything because you've gone out of your way to help others have she's proud to provide me with financial support to help cover the cost of one year of rent for your store. Love your Pepsi family. My guys I'll be seeing you guys deserved it. You need more people like you to keep the world a great place. Enjoy it he making these chopped cheese sandwiches keep the doors open down in neighborhood, man. So proud of you getting. Okay, so you're going to know we appreciate you mad libs..

Andy Mineo New York City Pepsi twenty nine years one year Brenda megado Batman 1:40 a.m. Jesus five blocks two beagles General Store eighties this year Trenton Joachim Walker single four people four years old Halo four
Pepsi Mango -Singles - Catalina

PepsiCo ads

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Pepsi Mango -Singles - Catalina

"Chrysanthemums Pepsi mango mango, perfect. Kunis our classic or the Pepsi Delaney Davis, Perfect. Yes U view Ur, highly welcome. Perfect. So normal sensible a Pepsi mango Catalina temperature is best to Perfection are two grammatical. This is wage go and go where the HR. So is that going? Well really? Well give Pepsi mango mango wage, but also see on T, but I'm at my nose me too risky choice. So perfect, is the numero that I'm clicking and let's go to shoot your shot put

Delaney Davis Kunis Pepsi
Pepsi Mango - Alison

PepsiCo ads

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Pepsi Mango - Alison

"Introducing Pepsi mango mango the perfect match of classic Pepsi flavor and a splash of mango also introducing me Allison Allison. I'm look up my perfect match and it could be you you see just like Pepsi mango is the perfect match of Pepsi and mango Alison is the perfect match of brains and bicycles. I own my own cycling studio and I studied Shakespeare poem. It proved. It's it's Allison. What's in a name that what you call a rose by any other name would still smell as sweet speaking of which Allison has an extremely acute sense of smell a challenge. Number two. I smell mangoes Pepsi and someone in here eating Wasabi able to use Josh knew it think Allison just might be perfect match call this number or click the link below to shoot your shot. You could go on a real virtual day. They know this is real, right?

Allison Pepsi Allison Allison Pepsi Mango Mango Alison Josh
Aunt Jemima Has a New Name

Business Wars Daily

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Aunt Jemima Has a New Name

"Oh what a difference. A year makes in the breakfast food. I'll at least and jemima brand of pancakes and serbs has a new name as we previously reported pepsico announced that it was overhauling the breakfast brands name and imagery which was under intense. Fire for being racially insensitive. The new brand will be called the pearl milling company. The products still look a lot like they always have. The company kept the packaging design with its signature bright red and mouth-watering images of pancakes drenched in butter and syrup but the image of a smiling black woman is gone and so is the name. The name is the original moniker of the missouri company that i developed the self rising pancake. Mix the company patented the product under the aunt. Jemima name you'll start seeing the new packaging on store shelves in june. You'll recall last summer. When the black lives matter movement shined a spotlight on inequality in brands were forced to do some self examination during that time. Many companies that were using racially insensitive or racist imagery vowed to make changes. During that time. Conagra brands switch manufacturers. The mrs butterworth's brand of syrups and pancake mixes issued a statement that it was undertaking. A complete brand review of its mrs butterworth's lines but unlike its competitor the company stopped short of saying it would drop the name and image critic said that the syrup bottle shaped like a matronly woman was also based on a racial stereotype. But there is no word yet on agra brands plans for mrs butterworth or the state of the review process.

Jemima Mrs Butterworth Pepsico Missouri Conagra
Aunt Jemima brand's new name revealed: Pearl Milling Company

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Aunt Jemima brand's new name revealed: Pearl Milling Company

"Oats is indeed releasing a new name and logo for. Its angie mine and jemima products. We knew we knew. That was coming retiring stereotype. That is adorned. It's pancake mix and syrup support decades the name and jemima long criticized as racist caricature of a black woman stemming from slavery. Well they've finally made the call. It will be replaced with the pearl milling company name and logo on the former brand's new packaging according to parent company pepsico. I wonder if you can find the old end. Jemima packaging for example on ebay. I wonder what that selling for these days. Pepsico spokesperson said. We're starting a new day with pearl millet company new day rooted in the brand's historic beginnings and its mission to create moments. That matter at the breakfast

Oats Pepsico Pearl Millet Ebay
Aunt Jemima brand's new name revealed: Pearl Milling Company

Glenn Beck

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Aunt Jemima brand's new name revealed: Pearl Milling Company

"A new name and logo for its Aunt Jemima products. Pepsico, which owns the brand, said this week that all Aunt Jemima products will be replaced with the Pearl milling company name and logo They products. New packaging will have a red, white and yellow color scheme with the photo of Aunt Jemima being replaced. By 1/19 Century Watermill. This comes as the brand has been seen as a racist caricature of a black woman stemming from slavery. The new packaging is scheduled to launch in June. I Mark

Pepsico Aunt Jemima Mark
Aunt Jemima brand's new name revealed: Pearl Milling Company

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Aunt Jemima brand's new name revealed: Pearl Milling Company

"She has been sent packing. Yeah, she hasn't. We now know the new brand name for Anjum. I'm a pancake products. Pepsico announced that the mixes and syrup will be rebranded as Pearl milling Company products. This new name will start appearing in stores in June. And you my most among several brand names that are being retired to do away with racial stereotypes. All

Anjum Pearl Milling Company Pepsico
Aunt Jemima brand's new name revealed: Pearl Milling Company

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:13 sec | 1 year ago

Aunt Jemima brand's new name revealed: Pearl Milling Company

"We now know the new brand name for Aunt Jemima pancake products, Pepsico announced. Pancake mixes and syrup will be rebranded as Pearl Million Company products. The new name will start appearing in stores

Aunt Jemima Pancake Pepsico Pearl Million Company
Aunt Jemima Has a New Name: Pearl Milling

Bloomberg Law

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Aunt Jemima Has a New Name: Pearl Milling

"Quaker Oats is rebranding its controversial aunt Jemima products. Pepsico announced today that all answer mama products will be replaced with the Pearl Milling company. Name and logo. The products. New packaging will have the photo of Aunt Jemima replaced by 1/19 Century Watermill. I'm Brian

Quaker Oats Pearl Milling Company Pepsico Aunt Jemima Brian
Skilled Creative: Helping Brands Build Best-in-Class Voice Programs With Brandon Kaplan

Voice in Canada

02:41 min | 1 year ago

Skilled Creative: Helping Brands Build Best-in-Class Voice Programs With Brandon Kaplan

"Brandon. So tell us. I'd love to hear about some of the things that you've done with your company. Some of the really creative stuff that you have have built and maybe even talk about some of these cases if he can some of the some of the really cool things were going on sure. I mean so When the company started doing a bunch of different technologies so we were doing voice. computer vision. Augmented reality you know. We were doing a computer vision in vending machines for pepsico where we could see. Like what different demographics were vending different flavors on these machines. We have seen that. Like men over fifty were vending vanilla beverages and everyone over a yet under twenty was was bending lemon with their pepsi. Really interesting and rejection mapping in hotels in new york city and you're doing chat bots voice and in about two and a half years ago. I completely shifted the agency. One hundred percent voice because i felt that Voice was really the only tech. That wasn't that wasn't an activation is really shifting consumer behavior. Since then we've been purely doing vote and we've been working with really cool clients. We've actually done quite a few quite a few projects with pepsico We've done some voice activated kiosks on college campuses. That engaged with college students During during finals month that was really fun. Motivational talks through vending machines. We we've done like really cool lifestyle experiences for pepsico We worked with meredith corporation's. Been one of our best partners and we've helped to launch a series of experiences for them so we launched all recipes into market. we launched entertainment weekly We just launched a really exciting project with health magazine. that's called my daily mindset and it's a fourteen day a affirmation so i think right now needs positivie so it's fourteen day Day and we put so much creative care love into that. It's a great experience and we we've also launched with a real simple real simple relax. Which was another meditation experience. We've done things with fan wall like interactive betting with fan duel. We've done simon and schuster rarity. Now we're working with The nba one Group in a couple of other media companies. So we've we've always been largely focused on media and entertainment and then cpg. Those are two areas of the industry. That are going to gain a lot of traction in the next six twelve eighteen months and where we have more of creative of flexibility to play

Pepsico Brandon Pepsi Meredith Corporation New York City Health Magazine Schuster Simon NBA
Coke and Pepsi Wont Advertise on the SuperBowl--But Pepsi Is Winning

Business Wars Daily

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Coke and Pepsi Wont Advertise on the SuperBowl--But Pepsi Is Winning

"From wondering. I'm david brown. And this is business. Worst daily on this tuesday february second. It's hard to find a whole lot of good to say about twenty twenty but at least there was football and after a season of twists turns and mask wearing the kansas city chiefs will face off against the tampa. Bay buccaneers this sunday in super bowl. Fifty five those who watch the game for football will enjoy an epic matchup between two familiar faces. The chiefs patrick mahomes versus the bucks. Tom brady but those who watch for the ads. Well they'll be missing a couple of familiar. Wins namely coke and pepsi. The cola giants flagship brands are typically all stars in the big games at lineup. And they've given us some of the most memorable moments in super bowl advertising history who can forget when an injured mean. Joe greene tossed his jersey to the young fan. Who offered him a coke. More when cindy crawford stop for a co pepsi with two young onlookers nearby great new pepsi can on introducing a whole new way to look at pepsi and diet pepsi beautiful but not this year coke announced earlier this month that it would be sitting out the super bowl. The company called it a quote difficult choice and said it had to quote ensure we are investing in the right resources during these unprecedented times. Variety reported the pandemic has been hard on coke especially since half of its sales come from stadiums movie theaters and other venues at have largely been closed since the pandemic began the company announced layoffs in december according to the associated press pepsi is also taking a pass on standalone ads for its cola brand but for an entirely different reason. The company is focused on its halftime show. Sponsorship this year marks a decade since the cola company started sponsoring the much anticipated event. It marked the milestone by the sponsorship into a national ad campaign just buying spots during other games and shows and add week. Report says it's worth noting that pepsico will have ads for some of its other brands like gatorade. The pepsi campaign features pop singer the weekend. Who is also the star of this year's halftime show the sixty seconds spot that kicked off the campaign aired during one of the nfl. Wild card games pepsi also has made some super bowl themed packaging changes to reflect its sponsorship. A report in age says at pepsi is also pledging twenty million dollars for projects that allow consumers to quote refresh their communities. The report said the company is worried that a splashy super bowl ad might not be in keeping with that socially responsible image with reported tag of more than five million dollars for a thirty second spot. You can hardly blame them especially because

Pepsi Coke Super Bowl Bay Buccaneers Patrick Mahomes Kansas City Chiefs Cola Giants David Brown Football Joe Greene Tom Brady Cindy Crawford Diet Pepsi Cola Tampa Bucks The Associated Press Pepsico NFL
Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

"Let's talk about the professional path and You are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career At the same time my company was so gracious that They paid for my mba. So i went to Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and all i need to go into marketing because marketing guides what we're doing in sales and i think they could do a better job and so i was lucky that my General manager at the time created a job and that was that was the beginning of my marketing career. So very classically trained at unilever and then pepsi around marketing from like you know the analysts all the way through up till now you know a vp gm. Which i'm really proud and excited about and And yeah i feel like i'm in a really great role. Right can make a big impact on the careers of our of our folks drive to mercy inclusion and drive the business results faster than general market because the population is growing so quick so and There's just so many things that are benefiting from being in this role that That i'm really grateful about. But that's kind of the the journey really. It was not linear at all Did not start off wanting to and marketing that side of my brain and that analytical process orientation i think does just a market yeah i think increasing edge to a home maybe ten years ago when you made the original switch i think today it's much more analytically rigorous than it has been in the past But yeah no. That's that's phenomenal. And i've had a few folks on the show. That have transitioned from engineer to sales marketing. And it's it's funny the way you went through that transition in how you described it because a few of them have described it similarly meaning they. They went from engineering the sales and then they realized my words not yours. How bad marketing screws it up. And they need to go help marketing. Try to figure that out because it it comes down to the sales folks at some level whether their marketing is getting it right or not so. It's an interesting learning curve and A pathway that. I've heard before. So what would what drove what drove the creation of the hispanic business unit. And how are you guys thinking about like measuring success. That's a that's a big scene seemingly to me as an outsider like it seems like a big big thing like a big shift in how you're organized. Yeah this was created. I believe in twenty eighteen by out. Carrie who at the time was still pepsi. Co when of are really incredible leaders kirk. Tanner who's our ceo and My current boss. Greg lyons our cmo and they just really realize that you know the hispanic Business is untapped potential and if we have a fixed mindset about it and we're not going to capture that growth and So what's the do different because in the past. Yeah we had a multicultural team. That definitely had A role but didn't necessarily have ownership and so the do different had to be to create an organization that was dedicated to this and have the right resources. And that's what they did and And it's been pretty successful. Ever since the the key measures to the other question you had really is around. Hey can we help grow faster with hispanic consumer than the general market. Can we help build equity with this fan of consumer and And those are some key metrics we look at and so far. We've we've been We've been pretty pretty successful doing that.

Mr Adrian Nouvelle Arment GM Pepsico Uconn Pepsi Stamford Unilever Connecticut Greg Lyons Carrie Tanner Kirk
A Girl Scout calls out child-labor link in Girl Scout cookies

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

A Girl Scout calls out child-labor link in Girl Scout cookies

"As 500 shelters open up. Girl Scout cookies are made with Palm oil and reports indicate the oil is being traced back to child labor and Indonesia and Malaysia. This you'll see to press reports. The mass production of palm oil is also tied to products distributed by companies like Nestle, Pepsico and Kellogg's. This was discovered by 14 year old Olivia Chaffin, a girl scout from Tennessee, who was investigating how the cookies were actually made. Since then, she has sent multiple letters to the Girl Scouts of the USA and the director of a company that certifies ethical production of Palm oil.

Olivia Chaffin Palm Indonesia Malaysia Pepsico Nestle Kellogg Tennessee USA
Interview With Carla Hassan

The CMO Podcast

05:52 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Carla Hassan

"Welcome Carla to the CMO podcast and congratulations the new city CMO. So happy to have you on his, you're just promote it and you were promoted about the time city named its first woman CEO. Jane Fraser did you to celebrate in any interesting or unusual way during Cova? We didn't well, we we We did celebrate over over a phone call. I am a huge fan of Jane's ever since I met her a couple of years ago. I just and I'm so thrilled for her I really really enthralled for her and I'm I'm honored to be working for her and alongside her and. And Look I think. This is just one of those times when you just really proud to to work at the company that you work at bright because the the the. The fact that we are putting our values to action by you know by by appointing Jane the CEO of the company is just such a huge huge nod to the wonderful leader that she is the greatest compliments that she's had and then also values we have as a company around diversity inclusion. I couldn't be more thrilled. I. Couldn't be more thrilled. We're going to get into that later but did you do any celebration with your family or friends? Yeah. Well, you know it's funny I actually. Back to your first question about whether I celebrated with Jane. So my announcement came out a believe it was on publicly on Wednesday and then hers was on Thursday and I wanted to email her and say, you couldn't give me twenty four hours to like celebrating. I. I thought that would be the right thing to do. But anyway she would have she would have gotten a kick out of if I'd actually said that you know we did celebrate at home we have a thirteen year old and I think for her it was a moment of pride in fact, I'll tell you. The week before that, we were driving in the car I was with her and I? And I saw the note that came out the president that came out to to the company about promotion and I. I kind of choked up a little bit and I handed her the phone. She said, Mama. What's wrong and I said nothing's wrong north and sometimes you know your life you know things happen in your life in a good way after you've worked so hard and I had her the phone and she read it and she said she just kind of looked at me. She said, you know Mama I am really proud of you and that was. Honestly, enough celebration for I mean. Obviously, we've got another marketer in the household who was also a very, very happy for me. So we just kind of had it real a quiet. Celebration at home. Sweet story what what? What was it about the letter that moved you? You know I think we all worked so hard right I mean we all just worked so hard and some days we we slug it out and leadership is hard and marketing his hard and. You know I've. I've had ups and downs my career I mean I started off at Kellogg's it at Pepsico and I took very traditional consumer packaged goods, marketing routes, and I kinda knew really where I was headed and then I decided to the one time in my life that I actually made a took a risk in my career. It was such a public failure right and so for me it. Took a long time for me to get when you went to toys R. us. That's when I went to are. Yeah and you know I would not change it for the world. It has opened up so many doors for me and it has taught me so much about the kind of leader I want to be the kind of team I want to be around and the kind of. The way I want to I, want to sort of lead teams in and Dr Visions but. Say was hard right I. Mean it was hard and you know in in the at the risk of being vulnerable, that was not a not a not an easy time for me personally for my daughter to see that and for my my parents who live in Lebanon to see that you know for me it was it just it wasn't a fun moment in my life, and so I've worked really hard to kind of come back from that and so I think it wasn't necessarily the. The words, per se but it really was kind of the moment for me. That was just like all right. You know what a few years after that happened. I worked hard and you know and here I am and so I think that that's more what it was from than than than specific words. Yeah. We're in a very big role now internally externally but that decision of Toys R. US to me is one of the more interesting decisions you made in your life so I wanna come back to that. The podcast. So I've got a lot to say about that. Super before we get too much further into this, this podcast is a first. You're the second member of your family to be interviewed by me. We released their husband Tareq podcast in July. Of course is a CMO at PETCO and our viewers or listeners can hear this but you have a beautiful dog taking a nap behind you on this new. So it's a dog starts to make some noise just bring him in. No, forgive me if he does I, guess. So, did you listen to your husband's podcast? I did I thought he did a really nice job. You know it's funny Jim. I. Don't know if you well, you did you did have conversation about this. You know we tend not. We have in our entire career tended not to talk about. The fact that we're married and in fact, I would tell you that there are so many people in. That will will hear me you mentioned my husband's name not saying who he is and and will will say wait a minute what that Tareq is your husband hold on a second. So we been pretty deliberate about. You know not. Not, sort of mean public about it but I do you know we follow each other? We do. We do love to hear what each other stay and and so I thought that was actually a really thought. He did a really nice

Jane Fraser CEO Cova Carla Petco Kellogg President Trump Lebanon Dr Visions Pepsico JIM
"pepsico" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"pepsico" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"It's all of those places where you are when you're not at home and frost, it's Marriott is Taco. Bell. It's wild wings Vail, metlife MSG with Penn, state, university in Hershey Park. It's now regal theaters. No. Those are the places that are food service. Those are our customers than when you think about food service and you think about those kinds of places you realize it's where you are often out having a lot of fun and you're together with. Other people in your having experiences in creating memories, there's a of moments in those locations that are are really important to people's lives, and as a result food services. This amazing place to think about how we can build our brands and do that in an incredibly contractually relevant way and how we can create unique experiences for people together with our brands and customers, and that's what makes working in food service. I think just a ton of fun I know it deserves a renaming rebranding. Potentially Food Service doesn't give the pizzazz that you think it should deserve because it is in my experience is one of. The areas in CPG has the most variety and complexity frankly because your point is experiential, your customers are B. to B. I mean that's true on the CG side. If you think about the retailers I guess but it's B. to B. Ambi to see on your side and you're trying to help their concepts in the restaurant or older the hospitality world performing better yet your rights it's we think of it is easy to see in you're right there's an analog with retail. The contrast with retail is you can hear from the way I described it as retail's more transactional is sometimes in this is Intended to cast dispersions some of our retail customers, we don't typically show up at the office on Monday when that used to happen when it will again and talk about the supermarket you went to and the experience you have barrier or light where you're talking about the restaurant you went to or the sporting event you went to or the movie you went to see or near the trip you went on in the hotel or resort you stated those are the kinds of things that were typically more connected to at an emotional level. Yeah. We'll change gears a little bit talk a little bit about. Things that are going on at Pepsico and I know there's been a journey I guess that the company's been on to reduce its plastics footprint to build various sustainability initiatives in curious what you could tell us about the impact of some of those and how they're coming to life. If you will yeah absolutely and I talked about ebsco being a mission driven company right up front and part of that mission now is that we have a vision of a world where plastic will never become waste and back in the spirit of journey is a commitment that we have made an journey we're now on. And we've got a range of different metrics and goals that we put in place by twenty, twenty five in most cases to go and deliver against, and it's exciting to be a big part of that and in particular, the area where my team is most on is around this beyond the bottle initiative and we'll talk a little bit more about some of the things we're doing there and reducing the reliance on single use plastic, and you know the way we think about Batum, the architecture of our strategies relatively straightforward it's reduced, recycle reinvent, and on the reduction front, one of the things that we've learned. That's really important. Is that consumers expect companies to be part of the solution in this regard, we all see the problem in our lives and we're it's incumbent on us to help. So we set a target to reduce our burgess plastic usage by thirty five percent across our beverage business by twenty twenty five. That's a big number at begin to some of the specifics behind that we're in twenty twenty going to be utilizing a hundred percent, our pet or recycled P. E. T. give it as recycled plastic material or non virgin material are lightwater brand are bubbly. Water brand is going one hundred percent non. Plastic in twenty twenty as well. So we're making Real Progress I. Think on that front recycling's of a really interesting one fun fact what think recycling or fingers it's complicated people think is more complicated. Be Try to stay at home more simple than doing their taxes fun fact, and it can be a little complicated right what's recyclable? What's not when you put it? Howdy, do that whereas the infrastructure etcetera. So we've set up a number of different partnerships and in made some commitments as well. The first thing we WANNA do I'm we're committed to is the make one hundred percent of our packaging recycle of. By twenty twenty five, if I use the example of our US beverage business today call ready ninety, five percents or well. On our way, we've gotta get one hundred percent across the board and then through our different partnerships were trying to enable and simplify that behavior. So let's say well, we'll try to make it as easy as doing your taxes by twenty twenty five that'll be our goal to do that. On that. And then the last grade is really reinvention and that's where a lot of our beyond the bottle initiatives and food service come in and we've launched our sodastream professional platform, which is a fantastic way that we I think have created and are prepared to launched a to help consumers meet a range of their different needs that we've identified including encima used plastic out of their behavior gotTa will through the research I was doing to prepare for this conversation I. Didn't actually realize that you guys had purchased sodastream. I have sodastream upstairs in my kitchen and use it every single day that it's the only water I can drink frankly as water with bubbles. And so it's interesting to me that you not only bought that platform from a consumer standpoint. But now you're turning you into a professional with the sodastream professional. What is that? Like help me understand where it fits in the portfolio and how you're how you're introducing it yeah. Absolutely and You know that we acquired sodastream in two thousand eighteen. It's actually the biggest sparkling water brand in the world by new and it's been just fantastic acquisition for EPA cow I think you're a great example of someone who uses and has a habit with the survey dream platform at home. We're essentially standing up and rolling out is a piece of equipment that allows people to. Have that when build that behavior when they're at work and when they're at school or when they're on the road in Marriott Hotel as an example so that fundamentally is what we're creating and the piece of call it equipment of product itself is what we would call a mobile enabled hydration platform and what it does is it really meets people's demands or the kind of water products that they want when they're out and about so it's got a variety of different capabilities find it that are really really exciting. So this product variety in a range of different variables the ability to lines those products save those. Products and then come back in essentially or those products. Again is an ability to digitally connect and do that in a seamless and now contactless way Nazi there's the ability to do that without using single use plastic bottles. So we're excited about all those things and it's all grounded in in some of the insights work that we've done over the last couple of years to build. Yeah. So I'm envisioning the same sodastream formula that I want at home I can get on the road at work wherever I WANNA go and in this contactless version I guess, I can somehow walk up in it knows what I want. Is that is that the the gist of what you're trying to build with the platform? Yeah it absolutely is it's mobile APP enabled. So just UBS enter the experience you it's fairly simple APP download you enter some fairly simple information about what your hydration.

sodastream twenty twenty Vail Marriott Bell ebsco Pepsico Hershey Park Penn B. Ambi US Taco Marriott Hotel Batum EPA
"pepsico" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"pepsico" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Americans out of work in the scope of nineteen pandemic one here we are hiring pepsico and target among the companies putting out the help wanted sign president trump meanwhile wants automakers to make that'll be very shortly because we're working with one in particular the wants to make ventilators they called us yesterday and they're already working on it the transaction they gonna make ventilators they say they've done it before which surprised me but they can do it very easily GM says it's going to work with Ben tech life systems on at three AM says it's doubled its global output of N. ninety five respirators to an annual rate of over a billion per year or nearly a hundred million per month and fashion designer Christian Siriano immediately responding to New York governor Andrew Cuomo's call to help make masks the Senate still working on a third stimulus package Majority Leader Mitch McConnell all businesses need to keep making payroll while in many cases the government itself is chasing away their customers for the sake of public health test posted for Sunday a California city warning residents the state state home orders for real in San Jose police say they will begin deploying order compliance cars will drive through their city looking for those who are not complying with the shelter at home order they'll be focusing on businesses that have failed to shut down like nail salons and restaurants that are refusing to close San Jose police say they will begin by educating violators but will step up their enforcement if they have to Alex down ABC news mayor bill de Blasio says New York City is the epicenter of the pandemic the firm in New York City five thousand one hundred fifty one cases confirmed a coronavirus a third of all U. S. cases a member of the vice president's staff testing positive south Korea's military says North Korea has fired two presumed short range missiles into the sea of Japan you are listening to ABC news there's nothing small about your business that's why dell small business technology advisors are ready to give you trusted advice one on one partnership and Taylor Texas Lucian's like computers with Intel core processors call eight seven seven by down to speak to an adviser today the firm three hundred sixty yesterday the ball here in South Florida one hundred twenty four in Broward one hundred thirteen in Miami Dade Florida state fire marshal and chief financial officer sounding off on the corona virus crisis state lawmakers passed a ninety three billion dollar budget Thursday but it will need some major tweaking as the crisis continues Florida CFO Jimmy Patronis says she's having the revenue estimating conference meet monthly instead of quarterly to make recommendations to the governor on how the money in the budget should be spent we don't slow down or spending we could be at a deep hole that unfortunately is going to be incredibly painful to dig ourselves out he says every dollar that can be used at a later date for nonessential things like construction needs to be deferred until further notice that's corresponded Wendy Grossman with the story South Florida congressman Ted Deutch along with Florida's agriculture commissioner Nikki Frieder hosting a telephone town hall tomorrow representative George will discuss the federal response will be joined by doctor Nicole live in from UF health Shands of Dr.

pepsico