35 Burst results for "People"

Aromatherapy spray linked to US deaths faces recall

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 hrs ago

Aromatherapy spray linked to US deaths faces recall

"There's a recall announced on a type of aromatherapy spray that could be linked to two deaths from bacterial contamination it was a health mystery that may have been solved for people in different states developed a rare tropical disease known as merely dosis although none it traveled out of the country now health officials are investigating a spray sold online and at Walmart stores called better homes and gardens lavender and camomile essential oil infused aromatherapy room spray with gemstones it's imported from India the centers for disease control is testing bottles of this break in various fragrances after finding the bacteria that causes melioidosis in the home of one of those sickened among the two people who died was a child from Georgia hi Jackie Quinn

Walmart Centers For Disease Control India Georgia Jackie Quinn
Giuliani associate convicted on campaign finance charges

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 hrs ago

Giuliani associate convicted on campaign finance charges

"A New York jury has convicted a former associate of Rudy Giuliani for illegal campaign contributions Soviet born Florida businessman left harness was found guilty after five hours of jury deliberations in New York prosecutors accused him of using other people's money to pose as a powerful political broker and cozy up to some of the nation's top Republican political figures after the verdict Parness denied the charges part of the case alleges Parness and an associate made illegal donations to Republican political committees in twenty eighteen that includes a three hundred twenty five thousand dollar donation for Donald Trump Pardis and a co defendant were also part of lawyer Rudy Giuliani's efforts to get you cranium officials to investigate Joe Biden's son during the twenty twenty campaign Giuliani

Parness Rudy Giuliani New York Florida Donald Trump Pardis Joe Biden Giuliani
Where are the workers? Cutoff of jobless aid spurs no influx

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 5 hrs ago

Where are the workers? Cutoff of jobless aid spurs no influx

"The end of the federal government supplemental unemployment benefits has not produced the influx of workers some had predicted business leaders and Republican governors insisted the supplemental payments provided a disincentive to working the three hundred dollar a week federal check on top of regular state jobless aid meant many received more in benefits than they earned at their old jobs cutting it off the argument went would bring people off the sidelines to take the millions of jobs employers have been desperate to fill but any P. analysis finds work forces in states that maintain the payment actually grew slightly more than the twenty five states that cut it off early the federal aid ended nationally September six yet America's overall work force actually shrank back month I'm Ben Thomas

Federal Government America Ben Thomas
Walgreens Says It's Closing Five SF Stores Due to Crime

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:45 min | 6 hrs ago

Walgreens Says It's Closing Five SF Stores Due to Crime

"It's an interesting question I posed here given that they are shutting down these Walgreens and targets in San Francisco. And due to theft theft is due to the fact that the Democrats are okay with theft. I hereby announce I risk my reputation as a thinker as a broadcaster as a decent human. When I state to you, theft is okay with the Democratic Party. Okay? So let's be clear, clarity is the essence of truth. The Democratic Party in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, Philadelphia is okay with stealing. Is that clear? If it isn't clear, you're lying to yourself and I can't help that. But I'm not lying to myself. That is how low we have gotten. In the moral sphere in this country. One of the two major parties is okay with stealing. Indeed, it makes it possible. Low lifes like George Soros fund people who are okay with stealing. That George Soros has the respect of Democrats tells you only one thing and that is the low level of morality in the Democratic Party. The man is loathsome, truly loathsome. He funds people who do not prosecute theft. But they laugh, they laugh at us religious folks who actually believe that do not steal comes from God. Oh, how silly dilly. You silly, religious people believe that God is against theft. Makes us Democrats laugh. You make us laugh your religious people. We are the sophisticates. Walgreens is closing 22 locations. KPIX channel 5 rereads back to Walgreens for clarification and Walgreens clearly stated the closure of all 22 store locations is directly due to an increase in retail theft.

Democratic Party Walgreens San Francisco George Soros Philadelphia Los Angeles Chicago New York Kpix Channel United States
CDC approves Moderna and J&J Covid vaccine boosters, allowing people to mix-and-match shots

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 8 hrs ago

CDC approves Moderna and J&J Covid vaccine boosters, allowing people to mix-and-match shots

"Millions more Americans are now eligible for Kobe nineteen vaccine booster shots and the CDC is trying to clear up confusion about just who can get them for people who got the Johnson and Johnson vaccine more than two months ago then they are eligible for about the time lines a bit longer for flies around the Georgia recipients more than six months ago you're eligible if you're over the age of sixty five and you're eligible if you live in a long term care facility and you're eligible if you're over the age of eighteen and you have underlying medical conditions or you live or work in a high risk place CDC cheaper shovel Lenski says that leaves millions of people not yet eligible so the definition of fully vaccinated will not change for now Sager

Johnson CDC Kobe Confusion Georgia Lenski Sager
In South Sudan, flooding called 'worst thing in my lifetime'

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 9 hrs ago

In South Sudan, flooding called 'worst thing in my lifetime'

"South Sudan is suffering from a third straight year of extreme flooding as the world meteorological organization warned of an increase in such climate shocks to come across much of Africa the United Nations says flooding has affected almost a whole million people across south Sudan since may I suggest your posse from the international red cross says on top of the flooding many south Sudanese are suffering from auto issues those people we are so affected by drought and many with a crisis so this is very critical emitted in house dressing in southern Saddam faced enough from U. N. H. C. R. says the issue is a human made ones also that has been very prone to cyclical droughts and floods sometimes happening the same time in in in a year and this is nothing but just the effects of a changing climate time Karen Thomas

South Sudan International Red Cross World Meteorological Organizat United Nations U. N. H. C. R. Africa Saddam Karen Thomas
Ransomware (MM #3866)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 15 hrs ago

Ransomware (MM #3866)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. Ransomware is a word that people have been hearing more and more about this year, even though the ability for usually foreign hackers to come in and lock up a computer system and force you to pay them a ransom has been around for a bunch of years. Earlier this year, everybody heard about the Colonial Pipeline and the ransomware they were inflicted with. This past week we heard of Sinclair broadcasting one of the major broadcasting companies across America, having their computer systems inflicted with ransomware, but we finally reached the point where I'm getting upset because it's going to affect candy corn. Ferrara candy company, the company that makes most of the candy corn in America, their computer systems, which do, in fact, impact their manufacturing process, they have been inflicted with ransomware, and these Russian hackers want millions upon millions of dollars. You're going to hear more and more about ransomware and we've got to figure out a way to stop it because they're going to impact and disrupt American business as much as they can. That's one of the ways people are fighting wars right now. It's not about boots on the ground. It's about computers and in the air. And that's kind of scary.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Sinclair Broadcasting Ferrara Candy Company Mason America
Ransomware (MM #3866)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 15 hrs ago

Ransomware (MM #3866)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. Ransomware is a word that people have been hearing more and more about this year, even though the ability for usually foreign hackers to come in and lock up a computer system and force you to pay them a ransom has been around for a bunch of years. Earlier this year, everybody heard about the Colonial Pipeline and the ransomware they were inflicted with. This past week we heard of Sinclair broadcasting one of the major broadcasting companies across America, having their computer systems inflicted with ransomware, but we finally reached the point where I'm getting upset because it's going to affect candy corn. Ferrara candy company, the company that makes most of the candy corn in America, their computer systems, which do, in fact, impact their manufacturing process, they have been inflicted with ransomware, and these Russian hackers want millions upon millions of dollars. You're going to hear more and more about ransomware and we've got to figure out a way to stop it because they're going to impact and disrupt American business as much as they can. That's one of the ways people are fighting wars right now. It's not about boots on the ground. It's about computers and in the air. And that's kind of scary.

Kevin Mason Sinclair Broadcasting Ferrara Candy Company Mason America
Report: Far-right anti-government group grows significantly

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 1 d ago

Report: Far-right anti-government group grows significantly

"A human rights organization is expressing concerns over the rapid growth in membership of a far right anti government group the group is called people's rights it was founded by anti government activist Ammon Bundy who was arrested twice last year for disruptive protests against covert restrictions at the Idaho capital he's previously known for an armed standoff in twenty sixteen at an Oregon wildlife refuge and a dispute in Nevada with his father over grazing rights on government land the institute for research and education on human rights says Bundy's group has members in thirty eight states and is spreading to Canada there are some thirty three thousand members of fifty three percent increase in a year the institute's expressing concerns that people's rights calling for taking up arms to defend against government officials and its alliances with groups like the proud boys could effectively work to overturn civil rights and shape public policy I'm Jackie Quinn

Human Rights Organization Ammon Bundy Institute For Research And Edu Idaho Bundy Nevada Oregon Canada Jackie Quinn
Ian Prior Explains Loudoun County Superintendent, School Board Knew About Rape in Bathroom

Mark Levin

01:22 min | 1 d ago

Ian Prior Explains Loudoun County Superintendent, School Board Knew About Rape in Bathroom

"Ian Pryor is one of the patriots leading this movement in loudoun county To take the schools back from the radicals Ian prior is on the phone right now Ian how are you sir I'm great Mark Thanks for having me Give a little bit of breaking news What is it Yeah that's right According to W COP for those that have been following the route and county controversy they received an email through the freedom of information act that showed that on the day of the alleged sexual assault back in May the superintendent informed the entire school board via email that there was a sexual assault in a bathroom Now people should remember that the same superintendent three weeks later said at a public school board meeting that he was unaware of any records of sexual assault in bathrooms and then the school board recently said they were not aware of any details of this story until news reports came out Of course the horrific part of this story obviously the first alleged sexual assault but this kid was then allowed to transfer to a different school where he allegedly sexually assaulted someone two weeks ago This is on loudoun county public schools This is on the superintendent This is on the school board We have been fighting these people for months And this is why we've been able to get to the bottom and get the truth out They have put students behind politics and this is the result

Ian Pryor Ian Prior Mark Thanks Loudoun County Patriots IAN
Ian Prior and Mark Levin Analyze Collusion Between AG Merrick Garland and NSBA

Mark Levin

01:24 min | 1 d ago

Ian Prior and Mark Levin Analyze Collusion Between AG Merrick Garland and NSBA

"Yeah again going back to Garland you know it was interesting when they asked him about this case and he said he didn't know about it but it sounds like a state issue No no what we're talking about is violating federal law title 9 perhaps more Meanwhile when we're talking about domestic terrorism what we're talking about is state law right State law things like trespass disorderly conduct Those are state issues The Department of Justice has its priorities all backwards because it's completely politicized by this administration And you worked at the department justice right I absolutely did Mark And I can tell you one thing that letter from the NSPA came out on September 29th and they were able to turn around and memo in two business days I mean those things take weeks You got to tell the U.S. attorneys You got to tell office of legal counsel obviously the policy You got to coordinate with other cabinets and departments that are involved Please that thing was done probably written well beforehand and given to the attorney general when it was convenient when they got that in FDA letter It's a complete inside job and the Republicans need to stay on this People by the way you can foia the United States Department of Justice and see the internally who wrote the memo who was responsible for the memo who signed off on the memo any other communications that took place too So I would just tell my audience you know hundreds and hundreds of you ought to pile on and file those frequent information act and fire them right into the Department of

Nspa Garland Department Of Justice Mark United States Department Of Ju U.S. FDA Department Of
Charlie Kirk and Professor Ben Burgis Debate Medicare For All

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:23 min | 1 d ago

Charlie Kirk and Professor Ben Burgis Debate Medicare For All

"So you want Medicare for All. Yeah. Yet HHS is the largest civilian branch of our government. So as we have expanded Medicare as we've expanded Medicaid, it hasn't been means tested as you want. We have hundreds of thousands of desk workers that are doing the means testing. Are you qualified Medicare reimbursements? And so under your example idealistic the point is that Medicaid is a test can not have a generous social program without a massive bureaucratic and dare I say corrupt administrative state. Well, I think Woodrow Wilson would even say that. Well, you need the industry. You think I like Woodrow Wilson? The guy who probably got college professors. Well, okay. And a college president. So he's kind of in your truck world. Okay, trust me, neither of those things weren't any points for me. But I think that. That's fair. But I did Woodrow Wilson as the guy who resegregated the federal law at the federal bureaucracy after trust me. Integrated speech. Dabs in jail, nobody on the left is going to say Woodrow Wilson is a hero. Liberals. Nobody on the left. But I was just going to say I know plenty of people that would, but that's fine. I don't think you're going to find a lot of LBJ. All these people believed in a strong administration. Well, maybe you're rattled off a bunch of liberals, but that's okay. We don't need to argue about historical figures. Let's just say this. If you're talking about administrative state, bureaucracy. Well, your example is Medicaid, which is a means tested program. And even at that, even despite the means testing, which is the part that gives the bureaucrats their power, which is also the part of objected to, even despite that, we're talking about bureaucracies as I think you mentioned earlier, bureaucracy, the government has no monopoly of bureaucracy as plenty of bureaucracies in the private sector. And if you want to know which programs have the smallest overhead, right? Even Medicaid, even despite the needs tested, Medicaid, Medicare, all of those have much smaller administrative overhead that any of the private insurance companies because the private insurance companies one, they have to plan out their strategy for competing with each other. And two, the private insurance companies have a vast bureaucracy that is dedicated to finding ways to deny people's claims because they've always got one eye on the bottom line for

Woodrow Wilson Medicare HHS Dabs Government
Professor Ben Burgis on His Proposed 'Baby Steps Toward Justice' in America

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 1 d ago

Professor Ben Burgis on His Proposed 'Baby Steps Toward Justice' in America

"With us tonight is Ben or doctor Burgess or Ben Burgess, however you want to say it. We're going to be debating and we'll see where it leads us. Democrat socialism versus conservative populism, super thrilled, that Ben is here tonight to have this discussion. It'll start with some opening statements. And then we'll take it from there. The two minutes is yours? Doctor bridges. Thank you, mister Kirk. Thank you to town circle for setting this up. So I'm a democratic socialist because I don't think anybody deserves to have less power or dramatically worse life because of factors that are outside of their control. So that's the first part. That's the philosophical basis. Concretely, I think it's obscene. The way we have an economic system where workers at Amazon warehouses skip bathroom breaks because they're worried about falling behind in their quotas and their boss literally owns his own spaceship. Now we can argue about what a fairer society would look like. I can contrast what I would see as utopia with what you would, and I'm always up for that kind of thing. I'm sure we'll get into some of it later. But what I really like to start out with is not so much that end point as the baby steps towards justice that we could take right now. Things like raising taxes and rich people to pay for social programs that would benefit the rest of us, things like raising the minimum wage for the working poor. Things like make it easier for ordinary people to organize unions so they can have at least a little bit of a say at what happens in the workplaces where they spend half their waking lives, and I got to say, what I was confused with me about you, Charlie, is that I see you say that you're not like an old style kind of corporate Republican and the rigging Bush William F. Buckley kind of mold and certainly the politicians who seem to be most enthusiastic about people like Donald Trump or JD Vance now, make a big deal saying they're populists. They really want to help struggling people in the heartland. And if that's true, I don't really get why you don't support any of those things that I just

Ben Burgess Mister Kirk BEN Burgess Amazon Bush William F. Buckley Jd Vance Charlie Donald Trump
Stacey Lennox: Democrats Are Already Crafting Their Excuse to Losing in the Midterms

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 1 d ago

Stacey Lennox: Democrats Are Already Crafting Their Excuse to Losing in the Midterms

"Anyway how do you know that Democrats think they will lose the House majority in the midterm she writes Because they are already crafting the excuse And they have Stacey Abrams who cause lies about her race in Georgia but that's okay She's allowed to deny an election What do you think about that Liz I bet Liz Cheney is no problem at all But about Benny Benny Johnson the chairman of the committee is he concerned about that No not in the least it's Benny Everyone knows Benny Once again Abrams was confident she could be the governor of Georgia and would have been if not for voter suppression of course Then the Senate majority leader such as he is schmuck E Chuck E. Schumer brought S 27 47 also known as the freedom to vote act up for a cloture vote Republicans filibustered the bill unanimously voting against it Because they're obviously all white supremacist who support Jim Crow I want you to listen to this The bill is senator Joe Manchin so called compromise bill to replace the for the people act When you hear it as a compromise bill you may assume Republicans were on board according to Jason sneed executive director the honest elections project mansions only compromises were between the left and the radical left Just like HR one this bill overrides state voter ID requirements Bans election integrity measures for absentee voting makes it harder for states to maintain updated accurate voter registration roles This is the mansion you see the moderate compromise I don't trust this guy mansion I don't trust this guy

Stacey Abrams Liz Cheney Benny Benny Johnson Benny Everyone Chuck E. Schumer Georgia Senator Joe Manchin LIZ Abrams Benny Jason Sneed Jim Crow House Senate
AG Garland Admits to Rep. Gohmert That No One Has Been Charged With 'Insurrection'

Mark Levin

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

AG Garland Admits to Rep. Gohmert That No One Has Been Charged With 'Insurrection'

"Little more I've never spent this much time on a hearing But I thought this hearing was very very important And I felt the Republicans did a really wonderful job My man Louis gohmert was there too of course And so he asks well I'll let him ask Cut 9 go But I want to take you to January 6th It's a very common topic here people has any defendant involved in the January 6th events been charged with insurrection I don't believe so Well that is the word most used by Democrats here on Capitol Hill About January 6th but no one has been charged with it that we could find either Doesn't matter they want to call it an

Louis Gohmert Capitol Hill
Joe Biden Overhauls Power Across His Administration to Control You

Mark Levin

01:22 min | 1 d ago

Joe Biden Overhauls Power Across His Administration to Control You

"Now you can imagine the power that Joe Biden wants to give this department And the Treasury Department in the other departments in terms of tracking your checking accounts and savings accounts and you're borrowing habits loans that you might take Or if you sell a pickup truck that's where $12,000 And they want you to pay income taxes on it They want to track it and they want to be able to question you not all of you They want to hire Listen to me 85,000 new auditors 85,000 new IRS auditors 85,000 To track you Mandates with people losing their jobs even though they won't harm anybody because they have natural immunity 85,000 new IRS auditors The FBI Fredo investigate parents at school board meetings The southern border wide open MS 13 Drug cartels fentanyl pouring into the border Americans dying like never before The murder rate through the roof Through that damn roof You want to give these bastards more

Joe Biden Treasury Department IRS FBI
Rep. Steve Chabot Presses AG Merrick Garland on Alleged School Board 'Violence'

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 1 d ago

Rep. Steve Chabot Presses AG Merrick Garland on Alleged School Board 'Violence'

"Now let us continue with this hearing today at the House judiciary Everybody wants to talk about the January 6th committee That is a fraudulent committee Fill with never trumpers and American marxists I don't mind the Department of Justice going after violent rioters Why would I pose that I've never opposed that What I mine is the way people are being treated who weren't violent rioters and this rogue Nancy Pelosi Soviet style committee where everybody's made up their mind Now they're just throwing subpoenas everywhere and trying to jail people They don't like That's the world list Cheney wants for America I guess Now Steve chabot here he is also going back and forth with that Steve schopen with Merrick Garland cut 6 go So mister attorney general let me ask you this According to the Sarasota Herald tribune one example of a so called terrorist incident was apparent Nearly questioning whether school board members had earned their high school diplomas Now that might have been rude but does that seem like an act of domestic terrorism that you or your Justice Department ought to be investigating Absolutely not And I want to be clear that Justice Department supports and defends the First Amendment right of parents to complain as vociferously as they wish No no you don't Because the letter that you put out that memo that you put out was intended to chill speech It had no other purpose

House Judiciary Nancy Pelosi Soviet Style Comm Steve Chabot Steve Schopen Merrick Garland Sarasota Herald Tribune Department Of Justice Cheney Justice Department America
Jessie Jane Duff's Hardcore Response to the Concept of Women in Combat

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:31 min | 1 d ago

Jessie Jane Duff's Hardcore Response to the Concept of Women in Combat

"And we're back one on one with Jesse Jane Duff. Okay, we discussed it at the beginning of the show. Let's open it up a little bit further. The NDAA, the national defense authorization act the Republicans who are bending over backwards to facilitate the crazies in the Democrat party. Well, not crazy. The crazy Democrat party told us about this idea of the draft for women. And who's behind this insanity and give us your take justice? Well, you know, there is so much disarray with this current administration that I couldn't tell you the logic behind any of it. Other than they have been enabled by our enemies. I mean, I look at this as just watering down the capabilities of our United States military one drip at a time. And people, you know, I get on Twitter and I get these guys. I wanna say, well, you all wanted equality. And I'm like, stop it. Stop it. Don't sit here and argue with someone like me. I wasn't one of those lieutenants that went to go to the courts and protest ensues, so I could become a general one day. The odds of you becoming a general in the infantry are slim to almost zero. Number one, number two, what is your motivation for this? It's not going to impact combat readiness. On one level. So first of all, there was a study done by the United States Marine Corps when Obama had lifted the combat exemption for women. And I believe it was 2015. April 15th, I remember was tax day. And it went without nobody cried. Nobody cried. Civilian women didn't even care. And I'm sorry, civilian ladies, you never care till it impacts you. And the fact is, as they've taken it for granted that their daughters wouldn't get drafted, but I told that many radio shows and TV shows as soon as you put women in ground combat, how are you going to be able to say you can justifiably stop putting it having them in the draft? So here's the thing, the bulk of the women don't want to go in the infantry for a multitude of reasons. We have 45% less muscle mass 20% less won capacity. And I hear women in the army particularly want to get mad at me and say, oh, you're against women's rights. Say, you are not thinking this out. Even if a woman can get through the training, what are her odds of surviving hand to hand combat with the enemy? Because that's what Fallujah was. This is equivalent to putting a woman in a mixed martial arts cage with a man. You can not believe pounds or 80 pounds of equipment. And not only that, the enemy tends to fight on methamphetamines and other drugs. So that right there. Two. Even if you pass the training, your odds are you're going to be at the lower percentile of the men. Unless they've done so many accommodations, they've lowered the standard. You now have

Jesse Jane Duff Democrat Party Ndaa United States Marine Corps Twitter United States Barack Obama Fallujah Army
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

06:40 min | 6 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Should be really good. I'm a super super aside. That's great especially as you expand in. You're able to work with more people. I think that's fantastic my next question. What drew you to this work. Initially so i studied is relevant politics unique and then what's in a few different organizations in london. Gop is asian adored determine based flag and then ended up wacky co at different sanction Came up actually really enjoyed putting people with employment and sculptor season. Just met people from the kind of walker moffat crowns grace. What about you. yeah. I think me very similar stories. Jody in the. I didn't expect the i would be by now. I didn't expect. I love working with people as much as i do. I think i has struggled my own mental health and been on a real journey with that. And i think only when i was in working supporting people did i really understand more about me through the people that was working with who kind and so understanding and had so much an insight into themselves and into other people i really learned so much and i think from then i couldn't really imagine doing anything else. We are providing opportunities to people we are offering support for these people are the most incredible people who have the most incredible skills and amazing insight into things on the just about providing those opportunities. So yeah always am curious about that. I feel like. I've spent twenty years trying to figure out what i wanna do with my life and one thing that you mentioned at the beginning was you're helping the people that you implied to figure out what they want to do with their life thinking really hard to do. It's always disobedience to see how people land up where they do any work that they enjoy by really loved the selection things that should pull quick for ourselves. Bosses in this process is a huge driver. we wanted with an orange skills in that on business rate exciting div any stories of those employees that have gone through your program that you could share one of the best trainees we have. We actually on as an employee in september. She came to us that she even love animals that washes with us really sized to think about. Actually i really like during is in other people and supporting kind of pretty wanting programs so on off actually to help us develop the training program which is amazing to have flood Off very prego when it started the now managing that program. She's incredible she's absolutely just thrived in this role on is during my drove to phrase to challenges with our ideas and days and we hopeful she had taught she fulltime. Actually thirteen assisi Full with is where to get on polite. You're saying they won't sue and trying to think things out if using bites it to see if it's something you wanna do day. I foresee a proud she. She's Yeah we'll have them one of our recent trainees who's just been with us a few weeks. They really talk just the other day because she came to us and she said that she feels like she's achieved more in the last couple of weeks coming to pose chaz The last five years and that she actually feels really happy and then she takes photos of the dogs and she looks at them throughout the week to cheer off before she comes back again on. It just really touched us. Because i think it was racial as well that we actually delivering what we hope to deliver on. Yes this makes Late night snow. No holidays what he credited beyond with it when you get that kind of bra and it sounds like you have a lot of experience from everybody. Who's there having gone through issues in your own life that you can share and understand what people are experiencing at a much deeper level while he's growing and figuring out our own life but when we can share that with others i think there's a powerful effect of everybody growing from that and learning from that. So that's super cool learning and the growing like works both ways and he realized that. Then how can you not like 'cause average eyesight annual. You'll learning so what's your vision for pas and pause while donation. We definitely wanna expand across london and fluid to like big. We'd love to franchise or guy we really believe in what we're doing and we think it combines lazy grace stuff so yeah at the moment wearing bake i think world domination would be perfect because dogs were running this planet. I think would be just so much better off. It'd be much happier more at peace. We all know how to sit down and just be quiet. That's super exciting. That you've got a second location. That's coming up in two thousand and twenty one. And i just love all the things that you're doing. What's the best way for people to find out about you. Instagram polls in pools cools in doak polls polls in stoke on instagram leads a key content and the color social stuff. We're doing it's well i should have sputtered out earlier. Because it's paws and be a usc spent confused. Who's listening to and not reading it by steph fantastic organization. Thank you so much for joining me on the podcast today. It's fun to hear your story. I lived in london for nine years. And so i just always love things that are happening. Usually not especially where they both dogs. Thank you save much. Wiggle ranks we've been talking about. They got what is fantastic. Thank you so much for..

london twenty years september nine years instagram today Instagram thirteen Jody two thousand both dogs second location both ways one thing twenty one last five years one steph last couple asian
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"This look like how do we <Speech_Music_Male> adjust right <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> also true in this <Speech_Male> time now racial unrest, <Speech_Male> right? Like <Speech_Male> how do you create the conditions <Speech_Male> or the environments <Speech_Male> that people can <Speech_Male> really really <Speech_Male> experience being <Speech_Male> respected at her in <Speech_Male> their workplaces so <Speech_Male> I think that's that's <Speech_Music_Male> one that I that I offer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that does that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Another pre-primary <Speech_Male> offers <Speech_Male> is called creating join <Speech_Male> the workplace in. It's <Speech_Male> really it's really <Speech_Male> a primer to give people <Speech_Male> some beginning <Speech_Male> vocabulary. So <Speech_Male> we talk about what is diversity <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Male> is inclusion <Speech_Male> what is unconscious <Speech_Male> bias, and it's just <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> it's very high <Speech_Male> level from the <Speech_Male> purpose of what <Speech_Male> does this mean <Speech_Music_Male> a team in house at <Silence> practically applied <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Right through it lets <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> get a sense of what <Speech_Male> these terms <Speech_Male> are. We <Speech_Male> also dig into <Speech_Male> what does <Speech_Male> that mean <Speech_Music_Male> in a workplace <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> What does that mean <Speech_Male> what you're working together to <Speech_Male> solve problems <Speech_Male> as a team? <Speech_Male> What does that mean <Speech_Male> you know when <Speech_Male> addressing things like <Speech_Male> conflicts or misalignments <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> right. So <Speech_Male> even just having <Speech_Male> things like <Speech_Male> vocabulary <Speech_Male> terms is also <Speech_Male> usually where <Speech_Male> I start with people <Speech_Male> and I'm developing <Speech_Male> additional things <Speech_Male> to on what <Speech_Male> it means to be an anti-racist <Speech_Male> would it means create <Speech_Male> anti-racist team <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> doing that work now <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> because something people <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are requesting? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> That the clients <Speech_Male> are asking for <Speech_Male> so I'm putting those things <Speech_Male> too but <Speech_Female> typically I start <Speech_Male> with a cavalier <Speech_Male> insured shared terms, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and then you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> know what is this? <Speech_Male> What does this mean <Speech_Male> to your <Speech_Male> daily decision <Speech_Male> making your daily life? <Silence> Right? So <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it's it's <Speech_Male> a pride and also. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Giving people <Speech_Male> questions they <Speech_Male> can ask or things they <Speech_Male> can pond their <Speech_Male> rice they can do things <Speech_Male> in real time. <Speech_Male> That's great. <Speech_Male> How <Speech_Male> do people <SpeakerChange> find out about <Speech_Female> you? Yeah. Well, they <Speech_Female> they can come right website <Speech_Female> Jennifer scanners, dot <Speech_Female>

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Put it in all on zoom everything's online now. Some structure, it's like it's a six week series for ninety minutes every week plus they have small group assignments between to put together this strategic plan at the mantle of another inform how they manage their teams across departments writes his vision as relates to diversity inclusion and then we know we have a piece that is a rapid response coaching intervention, which is really as things are emergent right with the organization that system were able to manage them head on. So I say that because you know that's what I I have a whole swimming pool this work there's the shallow end. The medium in the deep end shallow wind is really people are kind of dipping their towing and like what's the sinkhole diversity vary like entry level like one on one pre pre one I'll wine. That is the middle of the pool where people have done some the work with don't quite know how to translate that into data practices in actions, and then there's the develop was very complex. You know these are these are companies in organization teams that have attempted to do this multiple times over the years to variable success. Maybe even done some harm unintentionally and so they just require a high level engagement and care. So I would say in this example, say this is a deepen of the pool analogy example in terms of there's a lot that's happened that predates me. And there's a lot of intervention that's required life support. Is required and you know it's also because of that, we're looking at all I talk about the small W end. But what are the ways that we can see some changes and they can be simple as A change they're hiring and be as simple as An, intern classes completed like they were using some things they were taught and just recruiting this intern class, which is wonderfully diverse robust experience, right? So we can point to things you can say, okay, this is how what they're learning is being applied in real time and when it comes to things like how to change hearts and minds and behavior I, think that's just a longer process in that comes with you know going through the planning process people asking like we're asking release have questions of people, right? And their questions after do the organization, its vision, its mission, and you know how these principles show up relying to this this mission and vision that's been around for a while and what's the vision of their leadership and those are the things i. think that are important. People wrestle with especially those sewer decision makers and. Others if they really want to. Move into the space of how do we make this environment more equal. How do we? How do we credit space of true belonging right whereas it mean to belong here You know, and if you can do that, then the diversity piece actually ends up being an outcome. So. Yeah. Let's not not nearly as head count thing right? Like it's literally that's an outcome because you create the conditions. Can we wade into the the shallow? Careful? I'm really amazed during the nineteen time You've taken your Pajama activism on Youtube into sharing. To really cool definitions around what it means to be an anti-racist. Between Equality Equity and justice and. I'd love to just kind of capture that a little bit Is it actually mean to be an anti-racist part of this work there so there's so much information literature out there. Right. So I think for people who really wants to do the work you know they can read the book, right? That's like how to be an anti racist like that is something that should be on people's booklets I think what's really important just looking at individual people stepping outside of the scope of organizations in teams to get organization or a company needs to really define what this means for them. Along with the complexity is who they are and what they do and how this can be actualized. So I'm I'm actually very much about taking theoretical making it practical. But you know we're talking about what you know how can you be an anti-racist or what does that mean part of this is you know we are we're looking at actually lifting the lid or lifting the hood of our systems of our structures of our policies of how how. Communities and governments didn't all these pictures. Constructed and configured ever looking at you know the things that are. causing. An equities threat we're looking at the disparities a real way. Doing to Navel gazer doing it to dismantle its great something new and also I think which is really important is this is a something like a badge you wear. So you can feel better about yourself individual it's actually looking at a house. So for doing this, you know this for doing this dismantling rafer disrupting things that don't work there causing harm based on race right? Through that Lens of race and racism. Then part of it is, what are we? What are we doing to to fix or change or Iraq or build? That is just so that it fundamentally changes people's outcomes right and and like that's what we're looking to do such as people can feel better like where badge and their chest was like well, what are we doing to funding changes these outcomes and I think that's what's really really important and that's what separates people who. Want to kind of like be along to get along with what we're going on. Now people who are really all in who are very. Sewing like they call effective ally ship and I used it for Japan the. Space I'm in Hebrew resonate with but essentially I want people to sit alongside me who were Kirghistan alongside me through the thick of it who are you know working alongside me to make things more just right that's what I want. I don't want people to stay alongside me because it's convenient where it looks good today but as soon as it gets hard To. Be found right and I think in time. You know I think a cautionary tale? Is there a of you know I think Residential Death George Florida's weakening for a lot of people and I'm and I'm glad that you know they were awakened to what's happening if they if they were unaware. And we saw Arado statements from different corporations and entities about what this meant to them, and some were very vague and some are very clear. Now, it's not just about putting out statements. It's about how are you gonNa live your values as let's say in a company right and what's actually going to change and how are how are their practices going to change both internally and externally setting those commitments and goals and doing it in a way where there's accountability right like if Like a company, they put out this this really beautiful statement about how you know they stand up to racial injustice anti-racists Company Organization. But then there corporate board is all white. and. They're just hired some new executives who also all white. Then it's like Whoa what was that statement about like as an example, right? Because because people are now looking into What's changed here? Actually Don here right as an example. So there's gotta be. There's gotta be some proof and the actions right and there's gotta be able to show. Show don't tell right in terms of what you're doing and I think this is true for organizations teams also individual individual people too. But I think. It's it's really about the actions that people can take moving.

intern Youtube Company Organization Don rafer Iraq Kirghistan Arado Japan George Florida
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"The authority is supposed to be doing a systems analysis and in theory, according to the jargon that I heard one of the meetings I attended. In theory says that you're supposed to be able to get to work within a forty five minute period and I know for a fact that that is ridiculously wrong, and unless they do some serious overhauling, it will not happen. they'll routes a cumbersome And when you need them, not always, are they. They're they and for those people who solely depend on You know transportation, the misnomer that minority people don't like to go to work in a misnomer that people don't. Get up ally. I know because I too have worked and gotten up and gotten on buses and four and five in the morning and they're packed. Packed like Sardines Sea and you know. There's supposedly having a ride happy, right, free campaign, but that in itself is a big joke to you know so there some serious reforms, but statewide you, our listeners ought to know that the writers of public transportation are so important that they've appropriated a Ho sixty three cents a year for you in a supplement to whatever revenues the city's derived from US writers exte- three cents a head. You should think about that The next time that we go to vote some of those people in from the state legislature perspective 'cause they're the ones who appropriate the money, yeah! Yeah I love to go back and talk about these opportunities zones. you said something very profound there that they've invested huge amounts of money into these opportunities owns and yet. They're not benefiting any of the people. Locally. So years ago, there was one of the best public service in the city of Cleveland. Her name was Feni M Lewis. She wasn't much to look at, but I'm tell you some. She got things done and she didn't kissed. Anybody's behind in order to get it done. She passed legislature. That's sad, then any major project coming into the city. Those people warded. The contracts were supposed to hire local people and show them they don't have to be. unionized people you understand and by doing so. You would allow people in the neighborhood to work. You know I work for a privately owned subsidized. State in management and I thought it abysmal that they put up some plain fences just would stacked up on each other on the stakes, and they called in a company to do that is stead of outreach to the community, and and helping people to have pride in where they live. You know and so like I said you before. The last sixty years..

Feni M Lewis legislature Sardines Sea US Cleveland
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Meet ups at bring out this little mysterious plastic bottle filled like my concoction and the first batch tasted like quite terrible like pine Sol. Perhaps because I was inspired by Italian Lemon cellos and as I preface. The place where I live was famous words limes so I made like a like a lime liqueur from the peace go and I just kept experimenting. Experimenting is over those two years I created a product that people were demanding and so through that whole process after committing myself to making to launching this distillery. I had to figure out how I was going to raise the money for it. And as a foreigner in Peru I didn't have full access to the financial tools such as like small business. Loans or grants and the economic system in the banking system was a lot slower and so I figured Crowdfunding would be a great way to raise money and not have to go beneath equity had and so initially just reached out to people who had done other successful crowd funding campaigns and took notes and learn from them. And that's how I figured out some tools and tips and tricks and how to launch successful crowdfunding campaign. Hey called and it's one part of that that you said was you didn't just validate your your product before you even got into go. You were iterating. You were really getting feedback from a lot of people and you finally got somewhere where people like yes. This is what I want even before you got to that stage of looking for funding. Oh definitely that's that's one of the keys in In entrepreneurship is like you know. It's it's forming a hypothesis and not trying to prove a right trying to disprove your hypothesis and my hypothesis was that you know craft distilling is going to take off and in particular with this piece go and craft liqueurs that they called mass autos and so. I basically just started experimenting creating different flavors and I landed on four different flavors that I knew would be big hits and that was through testing and offering samples. Not just to like Peace Corps volunteers but also to the local Peruvians and also to random tourists. That I run into as well so I had a big pool of data to to pull from but once I knew I had something I just went for it and I was able to successfully launch One of Peru's spread craft distilleries. That's cool and what was your experience like on the Gogo because you done any crowdfunding before correct. Yes so this was my first crowdfunding campaign ever an even though I had like all the lessons learned from people who had successful prior campaigns Mine was very unique because a it was a distillery but then be is like it was really tough to craft the campaign because oftentimes crowdfunding is nothing but pre sales people create some type of product and they pre sell that product to use the money to actually make the product which gets them in trouble and in many different ways but because my business was located overseas and then be my product was also alcoholic. Those really no way to give people any type of perk or like free sample site to get really creative so some of the things I did is. I created some like tasting glasses. A customized tasting glasses. I saw bricks in my in my distillery like I had a exposed brick wall etched people's names into that supported my campaign but I also opened up the option for people to just simply donate instead of like getting a park also sold t shirts but what really got people was like the story that I created because this wasn't just a for profit distillery because many the suppliers that I used to create my products were many of the farmers that had relationships with in my community. So as my distillery was growing I was also economically empowering the locals that I had prior relationships with but then again I had to get creative with the campaign and added costs on my network. What really put my crowdfunding campaign over. The edge was cold calling seven different owners of minority distilleries here in the United States in pitching my story because About a week left until my campaign. I was only halfway funded and so indigo offers flex funding. We can keep all the money you raise. But if I didn't hit a certain number it was it was going to be a complete waste time so A cold call. They'll seven owners got.

Peru pine Sol Peace Corps Italian Lemon Gogo United States
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

10:19 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Think it helps people just kind of take an extra step back to make sure that the actions aligned with the values. I just have to throw it out there. The easiest thing I think any company can do and I don't know why every company doesn't do this is there has to be equal maternity. Leave because you're just putting forth as a company that it's the woman's responsibility and that's not the case. It takes two people to make a baby. I'm sure we all know I mean I think that's the easiest I step in. It should be mandatory. That makes a lot of sense and just setting that speculation that it's it's it's a two person job. There won't be a penalty for doing. I think a lot of times if a woman does take her full maternity. Leave then when she comes back. It's like well you've been out of the Office for too long. We're going to kind of start you off easy. Maybe like give you a little bit of a demotions. You can ease your way back in whereas usually no matter. How long paternity leave a man takes? That's not the same situation that they come back into So I think yeah. That's very simple fixes. Just eager policy should be equal across gender. Got On Thursday. Not a real reason that it shouldn't be that makes sense looking forward like what? What's the vision for level going forward so I think we have a lot of ideas so right now we're focusing on our three tiers of business? We want to get get that really down to a science. I think a lot of that we do the events. I mean. Come off seamlessly. We've been doing that for a long time. Same with the recruiting and the consulting is kind of self running and we have this model that we've thought up and everything and we're implementing with our clients going forward to really want to spend some more time focusing on those non-visible populations that we talked about So we're looking into as to helping second chance. Candidates actually partnering with Hurley. I'm in the state to do some things there. Tvd We're trying to get more entrenched with the community of people with disabilities and lgbtq communities and just trying to see what we don't know and right now. I think that we're kind of sponges soaking everything. We can trying to get as much information as we can to make sure that we're not leaving anyone out and we WANNA make sure that we're actually meeting a need in the community so kind of going back to you. Don't you don't now When we put together our board the volunteers help us with the events. We were very purposeful and getting a diverse board who has a very diverse background because neither of US assume that we know everything. We don't know the challenges. Let every person in different segments of population face so a big part of what we're going to continue doing. Moving forward is taking feedback from the community too if we have an event. Let's not helpful. We want to know that and what would be helpful And Yeah any ideas on what we can do. Were totally opened every now we WANNA WE WANNA be really like Proactive but also reactive to what's happening in the community and make sure that we are adjusting and flexing as we need to to make sure that we're still actually serving a need. That's I think there is definitely so many different angles to this. Because one just the general diversity. In and a company improving that goes a long way to just changing the culture and how people understanding relate to each other but then also being able to tackle some of these people with barriers to employment Where you know there are other things which would help them. Thrive in the work environment But it's very difficult for companies to make. That transportation is another one that we've kind of started to explore. I know that there's share and empower bus I know the Smart Columbus working on some different stuff to kind of use mobility as an equaliser. So that's an area. Were really interested in and to as either placing our events on really walkable areas so that fat population can get there without having to worry about driving or finding some way to ease transportation But the capabilities of work from home now too. I mean to say that transportation should ever be a barrier for work. I mean it's kind of crazy to me because anyone can work from home and then once you have your job for long enough and you can afford transportation. It's no longer an issue so I think that companies should be looking into those things and I know lift partners with companies to provide work transportation and a lot of cities In California I used to live in Los Angeles and they have a lot of different programs. That companies implement to have buses with Wi fi on. And that's more a traffic issue but I think that the city could look into doing different things like that and I'm sure Smart Columbus is looking into those but those are more kind of partnerships that were exploring to figure out and cocaine. We've kind of started to tackle the childcare side of things water some other obstacles and barriers for people either getting to work or getting to events or just kind of being able to move forward in their career and just looking at or whatever we can do to ease that so I think transportation is kind of the next big one. We're looking at and an education. We're trying to partner We we can't do it all obvious so a lot of what we're trying to do is be a connector for different organizations that exist that maybe don't get the spotlight the way that they should so partnering with. Different training programs Like apprentice and tug elevator and we can code it And A lot. Don't focus around tack as well and also with Ohio state and with the city schools and just trying to get at education programs readily available so when kids are growing up and getting into the generation. They don't have these problems. I mean one thing that I really love about level like what you're doing. Is You have strong community here in Columbus That you've just grown over the years and you're connecting with the corporate environment. Which really is has this kind of barrier and damping the to being able to bridge those gaps is really powerful just four really bringing people together in a new way I think Lennox Stab people in the community are kind of doing their work. They're attending these events they're creating these advocacy groups. They're telling they're telling the rest of the community where we're ready for the next step. We want to continue to improve ourselves and have these opportunities and so it's just a matter of making sure that the next step is there for them to take building the stair so stairs building the bridge the tight rope whatever it is to just kind of every other change. That's what we're doing your check us out on. Level D. I DOT COM and we're looking for mentors. So yeah if you can get in there and look at the mentor ship section. If you're interested go ahead and put your name in. We're going to have Beta version of our mentorship APP coming out soon. Excellent and what's the best way for people to reach you Level D DOT COM and. There's a contact section and also the mentor section. Will go straight task now. There's there's little forms if you want to put your name in your perfect you send one metre program. That's coming up to tender for mentors Mantilla's Not really so. The functionality of tender with mentors and Mantilla's being able to form long term relationships. Not just within your company but also just within the community Sometimes when you have a mentor in your company that's great but you can't necessarily talk to them freely and openly If they're somebody WHO's in the leadership role in your company have to kind of protect your role so we wanted to make a platform where people can get on and talk freely and openly. Somebody who looks like them who can relate to them and who can inspire them to build their career. The functionality will allow for people to kind of provide as much identifying information as they want and then kind of matched with mentors based on that. So it's really important for someone to have an African American mentor who is also a part of the LGBTQ community. There will be a way to kind of rank and see who matches with you based on those things with the functionality of a tender another eating out that just makes it really easy to connect with people. She hates that but I always say just because everybody knows what what I mean. Yeah I think just my one kind of little caveat with that as I think. Tinder has a reputation of being kind of like quick flings. And you know a one and done type thing whereas this hopefully will lead to lifelong or at least career long relationships that you have somebody who you can lean on and turn to the hinge. That's in the works and yeah right now. We're kind of just collecting mentors amenities to to do our. Beta testing how. I make sure that we got it right before we fully launch it. So that's that's another way to kind of get involved and stay up to date with what we're doing. Yeah well thank you so much some. That's a huge. Thank you to Chelsea in Christine. For sharing what they're doing with level to create a world that is more equitable and raises up the strengths that we have to share with each other once again you can find out more about them on their upcoming events at level the I dot Com. You can also find these resources in the show notes on people helping people about world and if you'd like even more check out our weekly newsletter for cutting edge social entrepreneurship news available at social. Good blueprint dot sub stack dot com. Thank you so much for listening. And until next time cheers..

Mantilla US Smart Columbus Columbus Ohio Hurley Proactive partner Chelsea Wi Los Angeles cocaine Tinder
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

08:28 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Step back to and beyond talking about diversity isn't always visible. I think diversity of thought is something that also kind of gets left behind and so someone who grew up in. A you know a different socioeconomic area than you someone who grew up in a rural versus urban plays like those present different challenges Different obstacles and kind of different different ways of overcoming them and I think a lot of that gets left out or forgotten about sometimes. And that's something that we kind of coach companies clients onto is when we ask what is diversity mean to you and they say well you know people color and women we say. Okay Loudwar. Yeah let's let's start with that. I had a client who was a white man. Say so your company what it just helps everybody but me and I kind of laughed hours. Like that's like the attitude that were working to fight against because for example your from the hilltop and guarantee you think a lot differently than somebody who's from Worthington even though you might look the same. Yeah even though you're both white men and that's diversity of thought and that's what we're trying to create equality for is just a platform where everybody no matter what color religion gender at that it's all equal and everybody feels included. So I have a question so if you're starting with a company that really lack diversity of any kind what's what's the starting point for them to you. Know Really Start taking initiative on this I think recognition They have to be willing because not that. It's an intrusive process because it's really not. It's not going to interrupt their day to day but like I mentioned earlier that productive discomfort it does cause discomfort within an organization to have people in there looking over your benefits and your salary structures and the amount of people have been in Iran numbers. Yeah and looking at exit interviews and all of these things that maybe don't shine the brightest light on a company but the goal is to improve that company over also so if they can recognize that this is a process that needs to happen and will be better for doing it Both internally and the external view of our company will be better. I think that's the first step and then I think from there what are step would be once we get kind of the go ahead to Is Why is there a diversity problem here is it? Are you able to get people in the door? And then they don't stay. Are you not able to get people in the door at all? And that's when we start to look at water your benefits. What are your facilities? What is what is the view. Put out there. Your commercials all Blake Hetero Normative White Families White picket fence like Mom Dad. Two Kids and you know what? I mean just kind of looking at like. What is the message that you put into the community? And why is that not attracting the diverse population you? Why and then from there. We can kind of address. How do we correct this because some people might just want to say okay? Well we're just going to bring on a ton of people of color and a ton of women and just throw him in and that's going to do it but right now. There aren't inclusion practices that you know if there aren't employee resource groups are associated resource groups where they can feel comfortable if there isn't representation and leadership than those people probably aren't going to stay and so then it's just kind of a waste of time for everyone so it's frustrating so if there isn't representation and leadership like what do you need to do in order to change that company culture so. I think that part of what we do is the executive search. We try to put that representation leadership and I think also just having paths to leadership within the organization so some companies are putting forward like leadership programs where it's an accelerated path or though work in different areas of the business and they'll accelerate that growth. I think that's really helpful. Especially if you're prioritizing diversity to get that into the leadership in your company But there's a lot of things you can do. I mean just going outside to recruit most promote from within for leadership And I think it's important to bring outside perspectives diverse or not because that's a diverse perspective and we work with a ton of clients that the average tenure of their employees is like twenty plus years. Which is awesome. It says a lot about your culture but for Niagara for innovation. That's not good at all. I mean that is a stagnant culture. So things need to change as the world changes and we don't expect a company to be fifty percent diversity When it comes to like ethnicity or gender or whatever because maybe gender well yeah probably gender but it depends on the area because there aren't as many women in tech as there are men. That's just right now. That's just the world we live in but it should be reflective of the amount of people that aren't tax a thirty five percent of tech graduates. Are Women so at least thirty? Five percent of your tech workforce should be women. Yeah and a lot of tech. Jobs are coding so there should be more women in Business Analysis and Quality Assurance and project management And is eighty percent white so we expect that we're going to have a lot of black and brown people that are within all of these organizations and equal to the amount of white people? It's just unreal. Not every organization can have fifty percent of that space. Yeah just the numbers. Aren't there no but Dylan an urban environment diversity? Yeah and it should be reflective of the culture and if we can create these inclusive environments. That's when you get people who migrate to Columbus. That's when you get people who here. Columbus is innovative and they are socially forward thinking and moving. That's a place where I would be okay to live. You know what I mean. That's a place that I want to go But if if we can't even get that we can't even be representation of the population. That's already here. We're not going to attract a more diverse population and that's bad for us as a city back to innovation and revenue and it puts us at a deficit. You see pockets of that happening around the city especially with the Honda plant here. Bringing in a lot of people from Japanese companies and a lot of the technology stuff that has moved here has brought in people from different areas just because the demand has been there to to hire people. And that's why I think it's more important now than ever if we want that to keep happening. We can't just supply them with only have one type of candidate for them. That's not gonNa work across industries and company sizes and company cultures and. Everything's just GonNa fizzle out a student that with a company to get people to kind of go across cultures to form those bonds where you know from your own Peer Group. You know if you're very much the same. It's very hard to kind of cross cultural boundary by the city of Columbus. Doing an awesome job with that already. I think we're just trying to take it to the next level no pun intended But there are so many groups in Columbus that are focused on bringing different sectors of people. Together Doug McCullough with the city of Dublin is a huge champion of this and the economic workforce development team in. Dublin is really trying to bring together not only the companies but also all the advocacy groups that are doing really great things in the city And I think that we're just trying to expand on that and create an umbrella over all these advocacy groups with direct clear pipelines into the company whether that's hiring into the company or helping them improve or attracting people from other cities to move to Columbus But yeah we're just trying to expand on that what already exists. There are so many meet ups and different networking groups and Columbus and sometimes it can feel a little disjointed and segmented and it's hard to know where is the one platform can see everything that's happening and then it's like oh no. This group is on that platform and so that's something again with Doug and with the city of Columbus that we're trying to work on. How do we present a really unified kind of FRY to not only people who are currently in Columbus with people who are looking to move here where they can say? These are the resources available to me and then again with level just creating that umbrella where at our event the reason we had such a diverse audience and panel at selection was because we worked with existing advocacy groups. We get.

Columbus Business Analysis and Quality Doug McCullough Iran Worthington Dublin Honda Blake executive Niagara Dylan Peer Group development team
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Problem you can learn whatever you need to along the way because especially in that really kind of Harry. Vague initial stage. We don't know what you don't know it's impossible to create the right team of people with the right background to be able to solve every problem. What needs are people who are willing to roll up their sleeves and have the grit to get the job done? As I don't think one imagining while Tiger tees I would have said here are the five people that you need with these background. But you know. In in retrospect does make sense So I'm very impressed by that. And I think that you've also done a great job inspiring the youth in that way too. I know that at least The day that I did visit to star House one of the youth was talking about. You know maybe I'd I'd like to be an entrepreneur someday like you this is actually really interesting and I walked out of that experience. My face her from all the smiling that I was doing because without missing a beat you just looked at that youth and essentially said like hey like this. Sunday is actually. Now you're talking about someday. You'll be an entrepreneur like what you're doing here is being an entrepreneur. And here's how when you started talking about the different steps of the process that they were engaged in and working through and you guys are like what does it look like. We're doing a ton of stuff outside of here without you. You're a really big part of this process So so it's I think it's great That you've kind of experienced things in the community that lower the barrier to entry for entrepreneurship in the community and have kind of replicated that yourself in a different spot while at people helping people both do a really good job. I think of of amplifying individuals. You know through the podcast. You're telling the story of entrepreneurs doing great work which means that you're providing more between for the community support them to understand who they are what they're doing but also inspires people to get started themselves with different types of initiatives from hearing those stories while Tiger teases is similar you bring in use And really focused on on coaching in providing them with skills to move into their next stage of life. Is that something that you recognize as a theme throughout the different type of work that you do you know working with people as a way of putting it? I think that was always my hope of like the more he can share these experiences in these stories. The more that enables people to say. Hey here's his path actually get there? I'm a strong believer that When you know a better way to get somewhere you'd better out and if people say okay yeah this is how could actually start a social enterprise and something that I care about the. They'll go and they'll do it. And they'll make an impact so yeah. That is truly my dream. You're doing it. And that circles around to another community member Clayton Nelson. Who's one of the lead organizer? Back Columbus when our chatting with him about the impact on the work that you've done he even narrowed it down to the simplest. The t shirts that you all produce with wild tiger ts he was saying you know I wear those everyday continued source of inspiration for for him as he wears them like knowing that you as a social entrepreneur created them but also that they are A mechanism for people to ask questions. He said that he gets a lot of people. Were like you know. What's that shirt And in addition to being able to To talk about giveback because while not prince all of the shirts for our give back events at least sincere founding uh he gets to spread our mission by talking about it but also gets the opportunity to talk about yours to which he finds really inspiring love. It I love the change. That's happening and I love how people are getting so involved in. This community is really inspiring. It's really people helping people. Yes all right. Well thank you so much for taking the time to share your story with us. I'm really excited that The world finally has the context it should have on wild tiger dis How people helping people was founded. I Know I learned a lot today. and I continue to be inspired by the work that you do Ungrateful that you'd do it Social Entrepreneurship is not an easy thing. Especially when it's on top of the state of the work and I know it takes relentless grit and and a lot of hard work to get through at all And I I'm going to go ahead and represent the community and I say thank you. It's been great. Come in thank you so much for coming out. You're one of the people I look up to. In in terms of you know great movements that are creating more change And I just I love your energy. The podcast with you in Louisa was just so much fun being the road. The two of you everyone connected with Quebec. Hack is just fantastic. So I I love the people that you've pulled together through all of this But thank you so much for coming out. Thank you so much listening to our story on starting wild tiger ts forever ordering feature. It's reached out to us at wild tiger. Ts DOT COM. Yes that's our email us at wild tiger teeth dot com and thank you so much to Susie bureau from giveback for coming out to dive into a story if you haven't been involved in get back. The next event is April twenty fourth two thousand six two thousand twenty here in Columbus Ohio more events can be found on their website. Giveback DOT COM. And always you can find these resources in the show notes on people helping people the world and you can also check out our weekly newsletter for cutting edge social entrepreneurship news at social. Good blueprint dot sub stack dot com. Thank you so much for listening to our own story. And until next week cheers..

giveback Tiger star House Harry Columbus Ohio Clayton Nelson Columbus Susie Quebec
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

09:43 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"People helping people the podcast inspire creator social change in the business world and give you ideas on how to take action action. I'm your host Atom Morris and today I'm talking with Sam. I do Cereal Social Entrepreneur. Who left behind the familiar hustle a building businesses and communities in in West Africa they become part of a new generation of change makers in the mid west of America right now? He is co-founder restart where he leads. A team of passionate people reinventing the way people find greer's the restart mission is simple helping people finding grow careers they will love. They support individuals with resume to help personal branding apprenticeship opportunities and resources develop their skills. But unlike other workforce development companies they have a unique and inspiring approach. So let's try straight into this SAM. Welcome on the PODCAST. Thank you very much chatter. Really appreciate your medication. Yeah I'm excited about this. Can we dive live in and could you give us just a quick overview of what restart is so restart is a social enterprise. First of all this part of the reason why we're here But it's also a workforce development company that is helping people find and grow better careers. Now what's unique about Audet. 'cause there's so many different ways that that can be done is where we find them and connect them with the help. We approach people and and connect them with the help that they need at the places where the spending the most of the money we do this with the businesses that they help help with that money. So if you think of the healthcare systems if you think of the residential real estate your apartment complex your mortgage company. The Bank van called the Financial Company. With whom you spend your money. We focus on reaching out to customers helping connect the customers the better career opportunities better the jobs and better employers so that they're able to better meet their financial obligations to these companies. Grow if you think of it. It's really about customer value and experience in today's world. Everybody really wants to know how the business where you spend. Your money is going beyond a simple transaction with you. Got It if you think of your healthcare system your hospital. They're helping you get better. They healing you taking care. Serve you as a person now. You want to know that. In addition to that you're just not a number with the figure attached a bill to send you WanNa know that they deeply care about how you're able to pay for that bill. How you afford the healthcare so imagining charging and think of going to any hospital system? Ohio health is a pretty good one and get a nod. They're getting out of surgery coming home and getting a letter from Ohio health saying Hey Adam we know that you just went through this experience but we want to make sure you're getting back on your feet. Then you have the resources to help you land on your feet. Well so we have a career development platform and resources to connect you with employers to to grow your career to make sure that your financially sound and this helps you but it also helps that hospital because a better patient at better met a pain. Patient helps them and helps you. That makes a Lotta sense for the company. It's in their best interest to make sure that the people that are using using their services are thriving you can say a better than that think of it in terms of yourself. How would you feel about going to live in a place? That wasn't just a community where you slept but it was also a community that was invested in you finding your next best opportunity your next career your next job interview and all you had to do was actually to live there. You know. That's the kind of value that the companies that we work with. Our sponsors are providing for their customers patients. Dear residents you know and that's what really matters because there's going back to what business was meant to be Helping people with value and then you coin as a result of that. That's a community unity. Where you'd you'd want to give back just because that community was given back to you nasty to you and if you think of all the things that while tiger t does does if you think of all the other great companies that you've had here are doing they're all finding not new ways entirely but but just different ways to do the same things that people used to? But in a way that elevates adds value and changes people's lives for the better because because a better community is a place that's better living people. Yeah that's cool so I just I really love your story and I'd love to kind of dive live in this isn't your first entrepreneurial venture. Can you tell me a little bit. How you got started how I got started? So maybe I'll give you a blue background into how I ended up here And then meeting my co-founder Chad in how we start Went on from there so par to you. The age of seventeen. I grew up in Ghana West Africa. I lived there went to boarding school and then I had a UN scholarship that took me me to Morocco where I live for five years And studying Arabic steady French and then went on to business school now. All there I became really interested stat in mom Eunice and what he was doing with Commune Bank model that he had sat and how businesses were changing today. A It's become a lot more common but back then a company like Kiva seemed out of this world you know and so I ended up using that as the basis of my thesis published in to Books as a result of that on how social entrepreneurship changes. Economics automates In developing countries. But not just there was seeing even much more developed economies in matters and as a result of that ended up going back to Ghana started Company heal the world with a group of our friends who had the same mission you know so we all got together there and we really wanted to empower people to build to create to build businesses that would empower others to follow the same suit. I moved on from that starting a second company which failed grocery delivery business but you learn and then my third Venture was consulting firm Porn. Dale was helping small businesses and startups skill beyond one one or two founders. That really was mission. Giving people the tools the knowledge and the strategy to be able to go beyond their core capabilities. I did that for two three years. And one of my clients Boating which is now a very successful ethical eyewear company in Canada. That really got me thinking with the work that we had done. And how much impact creating with the World Vision and the national moving. Hang on a whole production hub back to Ghana and that was starting to help me understand that those are much bigger place for what I was interested in which is starting companies that have a social mission at the very core of it so I ended up moving to the states After a couple of years going back and forth I got back into what I really loved joined on Empire Bas with as Leland Jerry. Doing wonderful job with changing the way people have access to transportation which is a very fundamental Part of going to workforce That led me to meeting my current CO founder. Chad who had on this other side of the world being transforming the world and with this idea of a debt collection company that could help consumers find jobs. That was ridiculous. You know if you think about it it and you think of any debt collection company. Nobody is ever going to say something. Good right from the bat but no you meet chatting. You hear what his opus has. Big Vision is and then you realize that you're not so crazy. There are people who want to help people and do things differently and we wanted to take this message of maybe business can be done differently to other companies. He's and that was how The kind edition of what restart is took hold so we started focusing on the businesses. We start I focusing on the people at the center of those businesses and we really got to the point where we realized that every single person no matter who you are. Dr Has Three very core relationships. A financial institution where the either borrowing money or keeping money a healthcare institution or. We're a healthcare system where they're getting healthcare when they get sick whether they can afford it or not in a place.

Ghana co-founder Chad Ohio West Africa Audet Atom Morris greer Financial Company Sam America UN Adam Dr Canada Morocco Kiva Eunice
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

11:08 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Them navigate that this is sometimes an idea will stop start take a left turn start again. They don't have to happen in a six month time. Line the mentoring. The Kid can continue to work together. But it's been pretty common in our experience that the mentor is actually more valuable than the money. Because they're able able to help a student navigate those twists and turns of bringing an idea to real life and I think roughly seven or eight of the ideas that we've launched out of thirteen of have actually come to life in some form or fashion. It's a great success rate entrepreneur. Yeah it amazes me. And here's what's also awesome about the others that haven't is that. In many cases the ones who that haven't launched have not launched for really good reasons they. They have realized that their idea was not going to be the solution to the problem. They were trying to fix and they should learn what they can learn from this round of experience and then channel all that energy and learning into a new effort some other time. One student was trying to bring students voices into the mix and make people realize that they have more in common than unless and was trying to unify students and adults together in the process. You learned that the way she was going to pursue that actually would have torn people apart and made them more divisive and so she hit pause and said. I don't think this is the right path. Forward wow it makes a lot to actually stand up and say yes idea that I'm invested in Yeah that's not gonNA work. Let's energy somewhere else. The super proud of her proud of the mentor. Who helped her get to that realization? Point or just wrestle with that Because oftentimes this as people we when we pursue something like that we put our heart and soul into it and then it doesn't happen we feel like we failed but what I would say to her over and over again. was you totally one. And you are community actually one. Because you didn't do something divisive. He did something in step back from it and now you have an opportunity to to maybe contribute in a better healthier your way moving forward you understand the issue. I'm grateful for even the ideas that don't fully launch. Because students are getting a chance to this conference inference to try to risk to fail to learn and then their next endeavor. We'll have a better chance. The fun part of getting connected to to further people in the community is something we talk further about you because I have found Columbus to be such a supportive social entrepreneur network and ecosystem there are so many great organizations in Columbus that just by starting this conference the we're into our third year now and just by getting out there and meeting people like yourself I don't like it has been so encouraging to know that other people want to see our city thrive too and they're just going about and all these different ways I've heard about the midwestern midwestern way where people can make time for each other and support each other I've never seen it anywhere else but here in Columbus people really do make the time to help each other out which is fantastic. Yeah I think it's amazing. I would highly recommend anybody to you know go check out give back to check out seachange social ventures. I mean Dare to Heart's been awesome with giveback Hack Lauren. Edwards has been amazing to see change Molly and Allen over assist ventures are incredible it's Kinda endless in a beautiful way like I just got a phone call from somebody that social ventures connected us with this past week an organization of a new New York cool and they're called. We thrive and immediately. I was like wait a minute. There's that word again thrive We WanNa see that happen to you. We'll we'll they're running Sixth Sixth through twelfth grade incubator entrepreneur curriculums in underprivileged schools. Albury they're doing amazing work It sounds like they're going to endeavour to start to start a chapter here in Columbus so that are underserved schools wherever they may be around Columbus can have an opportunity for the teacher to lead them through a curriculum where they learn how to start the business of their own. What an amazing set of skills and experiences they'll have if that if they can launch that here what happens again with the students get to that point right and they kinda launched something in its infancy? Where can they go next if they want to pursue that further got it? Well Yeah and so We're we're all gathering together in ways that I think are really encouraging. Can you tell me a bit about how the conference started sure. Yeah our church. A couple of years ago was really praying seeking to understand how we should you know our mission is to be to make disciples of Jesus that is czar thing that never changes but in any time period. What is the vision that you have for the next three to five years? You know any organizations trying to figure out what's our our most important thing to focus on her spend energy on or What's are rallying cry? For the next period of time it became really evident to us as we all work together across many layers of this church. I mean We did this really broad survey of the carnation and received a lot of input like literally thousands of pieces of input about who we are. And where we're going and who we should be. There was a whole leadership group that got together and spend more time working through those those inputs and what came out of it is that our DNA has a church has always been to serve families and children really well mm-hmm we have a long history of investing and innovating and lots of different ways vacation Bible. School is not new anymore but decades ago. This church was Leading into serving children and families really well in the summer with this innovative program and there were literally two three four thousand kids. who had come through you are buildings experiencing this thing that was bringing life to them and their families? It's like wow okay amazing. Another way that we've been innovative is that there's a community garden here on our campus at mill run Hilliard area that produces about ten thousand pounds of produce every year that Over time has linked up with our ESL program. That meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays. And that's in partnership with Sun Ministries and son ministries is doing amazing work. All over Hilliard and Columbus You would if you heard about their summer lunch program go look it up. You'll be amazed at what they do over the summers and to serve children children who again During the school year they might get a free or reduced lunch but what happens to those families when the summer heads how will they eat now. Will they have activities that are fruitful and educational in positive Son Ministries has met a lot of needs Through this summer lunch program but they do other things besides that so we're like five hundred are going through them or something like that and then your future for winter they do a lot of great stuff back to the conference. You're exploring of ways that you could get more involved with the community and thank you so much of this dovetails and connects to other things. It's amazing how it all connects but So yes we were. We were trying signed Think through all of that about what our focus should be and it became evident that serving the needs of our community was really high there. It's always been what we've been about and on top of that as a strong emphasis on children and families and youth was there too and so I've been sitting on this idea for a number of years I've been in Columbus for five years now but when when this bubbled to the surface as a church leadership group I said. Hey guys let me share with you this concept and tell me what you think and it brought a lot of these things all together in one concept where we could put our vision into action and so it gives us an opportunity to actually live about what we want to be about. It's it's in many ways our faith in action. How did you come up with the name? Yeah the O.. Two is is fun that way so it has a couple of different ways to be interpreted. Obviously oh two his oxygen and so with that whole idea of breathing life into things Is Part of the tagline of all of that but the two O's actually stand for two different words organized and organic. Okay so if you see an organic need that needs to be met. We get a little bit organized around enough to actually make a difference in that organic need cool in the faith perspective you say I I see got it work over here. I want to get a little organized around that and join in that you know it's It's not a pressure thing or duty thing it's it's an excitement. It's a response bonds. It's like hey let's go after this very cool. Yeah so it's a concept that I like. Teaching young people in general is have is to see the people around them the needs around them and then are they being called into action or or to do something about it is like what the wrestle with next because man there's a lot of needs in the world you can't catch all. Yeah so what are. What are your gifts and talents? What are you uniquely called to do? What's your voice you know? And what kind of things are you looking for at the moment The the conference is about six months out. Yeah so against students should apply before January sixteenth. Okay and then these are sixth. Through twelfth graders that could be any from any part of Columbus The thriving environment theme again is intentionally broad so that we can hear lots of different ideas so if you saw a need that didn't relate really clearly the theme it would still be okay to apply. Anybody can apply to the conference in that regard with a need and a solution but if the theme helps you get a little more practical about it. A thriving environment could be as broad as global warming. It could be a worldwide issue that we're facing but has local ramifications here in Columbus or it could be as local and contextual as your family or your house or your neighborhood you know what what is not thriving in your environment around you that you that bothers you or that you want to see different and you are passionate enough to See Change gotTa make sense. What's your vision? For what what this will become and where we're headed. I'm so grateful for the community's response so far because everytime we've held this event it really has has been a very broad mixture people who are in the room Who have bought tickets and the opportunity for all of us to get to know each other better across I different community lines? People would never bump into each other. Without this event are having a chance to interact and built new friendships. I posted on next door. We're about this event and one of my neighbors down. The street responded to it and said you know what if a if I wanna see my city better. I need to participate so I'm going to come to the event and I was like. Wow that's an amazing like you're the man and And he's trying to make his community better. His name is sued here and he does a great job of running a a an educational center near Dublin and Sawmill and.

Columbus Sun Ministries Hilliard Dublin Edwards New York Molly Allen
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

08:36 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"You eliminate the trash in single use plastic in your life so toothbrushes Reasonable face towels or Keratin pads different. Things like that. I've seen a lot more of these companies popping up that are about upcycle there or or kind of products being reused What do you see happening in that space because that seems like something that's starting to almost exploded in a new way? Yeah so with the idea that people are taking something that some people will call trash and turning them into products or items I think that that is definitely growing. I think that it goes along side of the really. Oh you re reduce reuse recycle. which is you right now? You know people are really getting on that which is awesome of not only creating less ways by purchasing secondhand. I know that this kind of the original eco-friendly environmentally friendly conscious shopping. That people did that. We didn't even really think about. I grew up shopping secondhand and I didn't really realize allies impacted actually had until way later in life But I definitely see that an hope let that area grows. I hope that we see more business like that. I know that there's a lot of jewelry. Businesses seem to be huge right now with that of taking. You know either Ole jewelry that would have been thrown away or recycled metal recycled anything like that and reforming coming into this awesome jewelry. That people get to US And then I also see a little bit Sometimes scandal companies will do it sometimes Even if it's just not their whole product but it's a small aspect of their product the containers that they make the candles in or the specific part of what they're doing. You know. Hey this was recycled. This was reused this which is awesome. I think quite often people don't realize that even with recycled goods like there's a huge energy costs to taking the material L. processing it and getting it ready to be reformed so when companies actually take consider essentially trash and reuse them. One A lot of energy that goes into that manufacturing goes away because you re using it. You're not recreating products cuts down on a lot of waste east. So what you get with. These kind of upside cycle products is something which is saving you from buying something else and clogging up the manufacturing system with waste. Yeah definitely getting more life out of the stuff that we already have. Yeah definitely that's cool. So what's your vision for Consciously bus over the next couple of years yes so the biggest thing that we obviously want to stand for ongoing is businesses just doing good and small businesses doing good And again connecting those consumers to those businesses connecting those businesses to each other down the road. I think that we will do a little bit more consulting businesses a little bit more hands on with them and sharing Ideas again like we discussed earlier about how they can do. Better And again mm simple methods. It's nothing that's going to be breaking the bank or this big huge turnaround or anything like that And then of course we would love to do our blog and possibly down the road open somewhat of a conscious market where people can continuously come to the website and there's a spot on there with specific businesses in the area. That are doing good. So when they're thinking. Oh Hey I wanNA shop for my friend to super socially conscious they can help on our website go to the market page and everything would there and then they can pick their gift from there because right now for me. I am purchasing Christmas gifts for people but I luckily have my pool of resources right now but bye. I love to keep everything socially conscious and if I didn't have conscious Columbus I would be googling day in day out conscious business near me how to do conscious. Christmas is all that kind of fun stuff off. So I'm trying to kind of ease that for people and not only that but I'm also trying to turn around and make it look like. Hey this is the way to go like you. Don't need to purchase all this stuff from Walmart or Amazon. Even though I love Amazon you compared from you can get a candle. That is socially conscious you can get a zero waste kit that socially conscious inches. You can get clothing. You can get jewelry you can get anything socially conscious Even just gift cards to coffee. Shops bakeries or restaurants in general there's so many farm-to-table able restaurants in Columbus different places. There's yeah there's it's a growing community I would say a couple a couple of popped up here now and in you know there's more but they are difficult to find. It's usually when I'm there already eating. I discover it versus me googling for an hour farm-to-table restaurants near me 'cause that doesn't always work out but usually Just hearing about them or meeting people and also played it as one of them that I recently got to try skill. Gila is another one. That's really good. Yeah they're really cool and usually again. They're supporting local farmers. There a lot of organic products there A lot of their alcohol if they have the bar is locally sourced have a lot of ideas in mind four conscious Columbus and one of them is a conscious or sustainable restaurant. Spread hopefully down the road So we'll we'll keep you in the loop on that if we get that up and running in posted on instagram and hopefully our blog so one. What's the best way for people to find you? The best way right now is to get on instagram and search conscious CIBA's that is our handle That's the way to find us right. Now follow us on instagram. Or we are on facebook as well We'll post on both of those when it is live and give you that active linked to go to facebook facebook it would be just conscious Columbus spot out. I believe I think our short name is consciously bus on there as well so if people are interested in their conscious gift guide they can find that on on your your website which we will put in the show notes and please go on. Check that out and hopefully get inspired with some cool ideas which you've never heard of That will make a huge difference just for and local businesses here in the community. But you'll also be making an impact with the gifts that you do and quite often. These guys are very call their different Their unique because they're made by it local artisans so yeah I see some of the best. And then if you're looking for further resources also please check out the marketplace on the social ventures website website They list a hundred social entrepreneurs here in Columbus They're not all product-based. They have different businesses. But it's a great A directory to go to just to see what is available here in Columbus for companies that are specifically designed around making a social impact. What other words of wisdom behalf create less waste shop social enterprises than small businesses? Doing good and I think the biggest thing would it really comes down onto is just thinking about your purchases just kind of realizing respecting what went into that and what who may have you know. Oh possibly suffered because of it or what may have possibly suffered because of it. I think that that's really the biggest thing that it comes down to is purchasing clothing. And you just think like you see the Tagore Gore was made and you just know like this. This is not good. This is not made ethically and so. That's a big deal for me so I try to think about my purchases before making them you know. Do I need this. Is it necessary or you know. Does it have a purpose and then thinking further than that you know who is impacted by this and how how and making sure that it was a positive impact in not a negative impact. I think that's that's really what it comes down to. I think once we start our heads around that mindset that will all transition towards making purchases that have greater impact instead of just buying what's convenient or quick or easy or doing.

Columbus facebook US Ole jewelry Tagore Gore instagram Amazon Gila CIBA Walmart
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

10:44 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Unusually cold foods fresh. thyme there's a couple of smaller ones Incumbents that also offer spices and bulk You know even salt. I've seen him book before which is really cool to think about that. You can get that much in bulk But that eliminates a lot of the plastic and a Lotta trash and then simply just bringing your own cup to is a huge thing. That's that's what. I'm a huge advocate for. It's again super easy to do. And a creates a three or four or five less pieces of trash. They're going to be thrown away if you think about the straw draw the lid the COP. Sometimes there's asleep sometimes. There's you know you get a Napkin with the or if you put sugar in your coffee all that extra trash that can be eliminated. That's that's one of the most Big forward basing problems. I think that just day in day out everybody can contribute to and it doesn't cost a whole lot it doesn't make it's not as huge hassle. It's just just a simple bringing your own cup with you somewhere really cool So that's one of the biggest ones. I think that my next one not necessarily addresses specific problem but I think the entire idea that several things that you would buy on a daily basis or you would do. Do you know social activities. You can do them in a way that you're impacting others positively and that's kind of where conscious Columbus comes into play with you you know. Hey you wanna go for a cup of coffee with a friend. Here are five socially-conscious coffee shops in Columbus Ohio. That you can do that at and Your Cup of coffee in your time with if your friend is going to have this much greater impact than it would if you just went to McDonalds or to Martin's so places like the Roosevelt Coffeehouse House bottoms up coffee There are a couple even outside of Columbus That also have positive impacts but we the always posted on our page of course but even if you just google them or if you look in you know social ventures Just asking too when you do get to a place you know asking asking. Hey do you guys do anything. Socially conscious do you guys have an impact anyhow in just making your your day to day life and your activities have a bigger a greater raider impacts crosses the mind for a lot of people have. Hey when I go out I can find out if the companies I'm doing business with are are doing good in the community So that's very interesting. Just ask and say. Hey what are you doing and yeah because I think when people are doing something they looked to talk about it. Yes definitely yeah definitely and I will say if you ask them and they're not doing anything please point them in our direction and we will help them do something cool. We love that we love helping people be more conscious and especially businesses and working with them and everybody just having a greater impact so if a business came to you and they were like. Hey we wanna make a better impact tenor Jenner community. What what what type of work would you do with them? So it'd be several different avenues. Obviously there's really simple once again going back to trash Asia and less waste. That's just always. The simplest swap people can make So I the first thing that I would honestly encourage for instance. We'll use the coffee shop example since we've been talking coffee shops A lot of times in Columbus. It's not as big of an issue but elsewhere they offer mugs. They will offer you know in house equipment to use if you're sitting there I know starbucks is kind of a fight them on that. Sometimes is you know I know I just wanted them up. I don't WanNa pay anything So you you know. Making small swaps like that would always be encouraged. Hopefully ideally maybe pairing them up with nonprofits could be another opportunity. They're saying hey whether hi there. It's once a month. Your whole team goes in volunteers. Or you donate a certain percentage of your profits to them or you even just have food driver diaper driver clothing dry for them. There's so many different small opportunities that really don't cost anyone anything in the long run because people typically already have those things there But just kind of making that stands in standing up and making that impact and pushing things further Um Soobee a little bit of both of those and then obviously the more if they have specific ideas this we'd love to chat specific ideas and kind of go further into that aspect as needed score. Because I think quite often one of the big barriers that people have is they just don't know what's possible right so you know just sitting down and saying. Hey here's what you can do and if it doesn't cost you money in it. It's something better than what they're doing doing. People will generally do it unless it's a lot of effort or really complicated because people do want of a better communities living in so definitely. I think when you make that easy for people and find out exactly what they can do they make that choice. Yeah Tall Yup. And that's what we love to try to make it easy. Both for the consumer and the businesses of just connecting them together and making sure that everybody knows that they have that option and that that choice of having their purchase at a greater impact. Now I'd love to move on and talk a little bit about some of the great things that you've seen in Columbus what people people are doing either productwise or our mission lies because he took a lot of stuff in. Yes I do. I love exploring learn. Columbus Encompasses a great place to find those socially-conscious enterprises businesses and individuals in general Some of the biggest just one. I think that I constantly going back to Roosevelt Coffee House. Of Course Milo bottoms up coffee house. There's a lot of even smaller. You're not smaller. But I guess different businesses that are also having greater impact Cova Co working is a new one co working space. They have a really positive impact in what they're doing. Um and they're really have a program down the road that will be focusing on social enterprises and helping them get up and running and continuing the work that they're doing so it's kind of a cool idea that it's your heard working with a business. Whose further working with more businesses? Who have all those long term impact on everything And it's really cool to think about that. There's other additional resources. Well well I'm conscious. Capitalism is one. I recently went to an event of theirs and got to learn about what they're doing that to me again like minded people doing over there so conscious. Capitalism them is focusing on kind of similar to what we're doing but on a larger scale they really focus on businesses that operate with conscious means so again. Go back to that idea that you can operate or you can operate and have a greater impact in the cool part about them that they pointed out a lot of really big companies. That we're doing this at. I didn't even know about Ben and Jerry was one of them but it was just really cool to hear like hey. They're socially conscious I had no idea by. A bunch of Benadryl various cream. Yeah and and they don't. I don't think that they really brag about it. Which is fine but I definitely didn't know and actually that's very interesting too because they they did a lot of work? There was a bakery called the greystone bakery which had a model of hiring people will who had barriers to entry so a lot of people have been incarcerated or head issues with drugs and originally they Ben and Jerry's bought Brownies from them to sell along with her ice cream. But when they received the boundaries they're all clumped together And there there's no way for them to separate and actually sell them. And that's how the double Brownie chocolate ice about. What are we going to do with these bounds? They put them in there and I think they've been working percents. That's so cool. When Jodi Lhasa's looking for for a model of a company that he could start up he modeled hot chicken take over at least Justin Bakery so it's very interesting how successful social enterprises inspire other social entreprises? Yes yes it definitely is. I mean I'm inspired by all of them to be honest so I love. I love taking notes and I've had the opportunity to talk with the owners of a couple of them too and kind of just take notes about you. Know How I'm going to do my own some day okay and get to learn from there But yeah bakeries. He made me think about that. There's a lot of socially-conscious bakeries in the area. I think Freedom Kamala car is one of them that socially conscious and then for the hiring clean turn does that third way cafe does that I believe A couple of other organizations around around them there's so many so many businesses in Columbus and once you start to look you kinda feel like sometimes you hit the Jackpot. 'cause you find one and then you find five fantastic attack like I have to go visit all of these as soon as possible and so it's really cool to to really get to explore them and find out what they're doing that's cool now for the holidays you've put together a guide for conscious shopping. Yes correct so he'd conscious Holiday Guide is a guide. kind of your one stop shop for learning about conscious businesses in the area and giving you the opportunity to patronize them. I'm for your holiday shopping. Our focus is a little bit more small-scale with it there's a lot of really small businesses in the area that are doing good but aren't you know as is big as some of the other. You know huge companies I will say eleven. Candle Co isn't it and they're pretty big company. We've got a lot of smaller ones of A couple of zero waist one such as re-use revolution full circle so a couple really cool even smaller scale businesses. That not only. Are you supporting a good cause but you are supporting. Somebody is small little dream that they're working on in their kitchen they're working on in their studio And trying to help them you know take it a little bit further over. Can you tell me a little bit. About what some of these companies are doing yes so eleven. Candle Co is a candle company. They fight human trafficking with their operations. which is awesome They I have several other candles. I Love Them. Yes I do. Love their candidate candles. When I'm editing? The podcast Yeah Yeah. There's a couple of different conscious candle companies he's in Columbus but they all kind of have their own thing which is really cool that way. They're not competing really against each other. They're kind of with each other on it A couple of the other ones that we have are the ice cream. One for instance. They do Vegan ice cream and they have less waste operations and you can currently purchase coaches their items I think out of the Bexley market which is cool because they're still pretty new full circle and we're used Lucien are both them all about zero waste or less with lifestyle so they provide products. They provide resources that help..

Columbus Candle Co Columbus Ohio Roosevelt Coffee House Ben starbucks Jerry Jenner community McDonalds Asia Um Soobee google Roosevelt Coffeehouse House Cova Co Lucien Jodi Lhasa Freedom Kamala Justin Bakery
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

10:30 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"You ideas on how to take action. I'm your host a Morris today. I'm talking with Heidi Rumble. It conscious business activists here in Columbus Ohio. She's passionate about reducing waste and making in purchasing decisions that have an impact and she's also has plans for own social enterprise. She's just released her holiday guide to help you. Purchase conscious gifts chiefs and I'm very excited to have her on the podcast. Talk about easy ways that you can make an impact while you do your holiday shopping so without further Ado Heidi welcome on the podcast. Thank you nice to be here. You have quite a social impact mission that you're developing in your life as if we could just start and talk about some of the projects that are you working on absolutely so again start with Conscious Columbus since that's my kind of most recent and most active one I started at conscious Columbus to really connect consumers merge with conscious businesses in Columbus Ohio. So kind of a little bit of everything social enterprise nonprofits Even those small non-classified businesses that actually are giving back with their business in some way or another so started that on social media just an instagram page. Really to get with people meet new people and connect everybody together. I'm always say I'm not necessarily creative. One behind the scenes doing arts and crafts but I am a loudspeaker and I'm very passionate so I can really amplify their voice and their existence So sort of that and just started posting starting to meet people doing a lot of networking with it and then going from there We are slowly transitioning into a full blog and a couple of other little fun things that are coming along this holiday season to really highlight those businesses and those people and individuals doing good in Columbus. Very cool you have big dreams as well with plans to open a coffee shop down the road correct. Yes yes I have a social entreprise of my own Called the solar being cafe and currently were seeking a home in a small village outside of Zanesville Ohio it's an an impoverished village with a lot of social issues going on right now and they're looking to revamp it so we are really looking to hopefully find a home there and be a late in the community and operate again with those same social impact mindset of giving back to the community. You know hiring troubled use hiring people who've been through and really just trying to help the community in every way that we can and be a business that's more than just profit. Cool what kind of experience have you had ed with risk youth so with at risk youth I have done a little bit of volunteering on my own and then I actually worked for the Star House in here in Columbus Ohio for about about a year. I was a youth advocate so I was on the floor with them constantly talking with them helping them And I was very again with my personality ended up being very loud. They're very very optimistic very jumpy but I really loved helping them with their resumes. I really loved helping them. Just sit and talk with them. Even I sometimes would sit with one youth for an hour our and have a really long discussion. And you find out that there's a person behind that homeless youth are at risk youth. You find that there's somebody there. And they have the story. And then in my mind I just start formulating. How can I help them? Here's the story but let me help you so that I would be like we'll all these places are hiring and there's this other resource center and there's this and you should read this book and really just trying to help them in any way that I could which I'm sure a lot of them thought I was crazy but I love doing it. I love that now I talk about. It's our house a lot on the PODCASTS. Because I'm a huge fan but for anybody who does not know. Can you give us a description of the star houses. Yeah so star. House is a drop in center for Homeless Youth for at risk youth in Columbus Ohio It is open twenty four hours a day you can come in. They can get necessary resources to just have a eh basic lifestyle so there showers laundry. There's clothing there's things like toothbrush toothpaste all those kind of day-to-day items. That we all sometimes take for granted they can go in and receive counseling. And then there's a youth advocate such as what I was that they can discuss with oftentimes are there to help. Always there to help. It often times they will help them with their resumes. Such as I did or help them with the basic skills of like. Hey let's figure out how to go online and find jobs. Let's figure out how to cook something So it's just a really all encompassing place and kind of kind of a home for a lot of them in a way because because they don't have one so it's a place for them to stop and kind of reset and rest and and then be ready to go back now. I have a lot of misconceptions when when I first went to the Star House. I'm just curious from your point like what you learned about. The people that came in was different from people might expect. Yeah I think the biggest biggest thing that I really learned was that there are people behind that idea of a homeless youth and we often don't think about homeless people being youth sir. How serves the ages up to twenty five years old so their under twenty five years old making me in there and a lot lot of times? They have kids themselves so then. It's not only this single youth that you're serving by their our youth beneath that that are also being impacted by this so I think that it was really the realization tonight. They're all humans and they'll have their own story and they all have something somewhere in their life and they can pinpoint you know. This is exactly what happened in a lot of times. They're like I don't know what happened. I'm just here and I know it and And I myself have been in a position where I have been bouncing between people's couches or you're just not having a solid place to live. I had a car thankfully in half my hanging in my car but so I had just a little bit of an idea of how it can be to be all right. Let's find somewhere to go. Let's make sure we've got this leads. You know go call my siblings call family members call my friends and be like hey. Can I stay here tonight. Which is definitely a lot better than a lot of them had but it was Really just eye opening to meet a lot of them and then here about you know. Where did you sleep last night? Okay and where that was and it's like Oh my gosh is really shoe and real people. Here they really need our help. That's always surprised me like when we go in for our work work programme with wild. Tiger ts Everybody is really different. And I'm always amazed that people are very articulate about their situation. They typically know l. what they're going through but from one person to the next like what they struggle with varies a lot and and so it's really working with people one on one. They're not that different from you. Know how how Iowa when I was twenty you know this kind of trying to figure things out and complicated. They're betsy and for them. It's just more complicated and messy. I think the big thing that I realized is that I've had my struggles but I've always had someone there. I thought family I community. I've had friends a lot of them. You know they don't have family or their family has turned on them and all the friends in the same situation as them so star house can kind of be that buffer that bouncer for them. It's like hey you can come here and you can talk with other people. We can also talk with people they had counselors and stuff on staff so I think that was another thing too is realizing like even if I I lost everything I had today like. I have people there that are going to help me. And they didn't and they don't often and that's that's the kind of the harsh about it. That's really rough part about it. It is really tough. No I definitely developed a huge appreciation for everything. My parents did when I was growing. I don't think I realized it at the time until he. Yeah until much until you realize that. Hey when people don't have this this is what you know. They're facing has working at the Star House shaped a bit. What you WANNA do in your own career? It has a little bit so I have always been a little bit of I. Guess an oddball when it comes to to my passions and wanting to help people I yes I did very young age I really loved writing and I really loved drawing maps maps and images and graphics and things like that And I just started kind of formulating all these ideas. How to help people? When I was older and a lot of times it had something having to do with you know? I'm going to build the community. I'm GonNa Build House for people I'm going to have a place. People can come and stay. Do all this really fun stuff. And of course I was young at the time nine ten eleven years old. They can't really do a whole lot at that age In so from there on how. It's just been a simply a matter of. How can I get this final goal? Where am helping people in what I do? And I've taken a lot of different paths to get there and start houses definitely one of those where it gave me insight on what they were doing themselves nonprofits in Columbus just just meeting other like minded people and working in a place where other people have similar mindsets of. We want to help people and that's why we're here so it's definitely a big part of. It's very long journey of getting to a place where day in and day out. I am just simply living to help other people and make an improvement on where I'm at in my community and my world and so on and so forth and I it seems like you've dug really deep into the community in Columbus and you have a really good understanding standing of some of the things that are going on here and I was just wondering if I could pick your brain on what you've seen are some of the big problems that are outstanding People could jump in and address. Yeah definitely definitely so one of the biggest problems I think the automatically comes to my mind when I think of Columbus or any really big city is trash rush and I think that everybody kind of has that similar mindset If you go to any festival and he gets the other and gathering even on the street and stuff and the trash cans they're just overflowing with trash and I think there was one of the first things that I started doing when I kind of move towards his conscious lifestyle is realizing that. Hey I don't have to make as much trash as as I am So simple quick changes that I made. were no more grocery bags using reasonable straws bringing my own containers when possible Bulk Food shopping thing. That can be a hassle but it is very rewarding and the end and if you get your system up and running than it really works out for you Chopping Book Food Shopping. So uh-huh buying simple things like oatmeal popcorn grains nuts and seeds like your dry staples you can purchase in bulk..

Columbus Star House Columbus Ohio Ohio Heidi Rumble instagram Morris Zanesville House betsy Iowa
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

13:33 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Kim prepared for the discipline. That is required to do that so with help us to fearless. That's the bread and butter strike. Labs well it it. So root strike labs works in three realms one realm is what I would call the cultivate realm it's would be most closely associated with culture and so to start with where organization are and if if the culture is kind of one of scarcity. That's not a place to think. Abundant it's sort of like if you were to scatter seeds on soil that was aired and had no nutrients. That's it say you bring a new idea seed is a new idea. It's it's more likely to die in so hopeless fearless fearless would be in the cultivate realm. Then we have the canned to the core realm and so the tend to the core is what we're already doing. What is our existing purpose? Our Vision mission core values. Where does your likely codified in some fashion and our practices are born out over relate to our vision mission core values? They're the manifestation of those so that might be programming. It's also internal systems. What's our management system like when it's our fundraising system like but then we're kind of the core nonprofit Corbett any organization? I should really. I mean any organization regardless of how they're organized from legal structure has these components central high debut for example they had up upper twelve fifteen program areas that I worked with them. So those program areas were a part of the core. Then the third realm is stimulate progress And so I think that's where you new things. What what do we need to abandon from the core most specifically programming programming or systems. That aren't serving anymore. Frankly haven't served us well and we need to look at doing things a new way Less is likely that you'RE GONNA Change Your Vision Mission of core values meetings in your anchor to your vision mission core values if you have a practice that's not serving that that's nice surveys Beijing's so we work and all of those three realms and so we've been doing some consulting in the traditional style consulting but my ideal is not to have traditional style consulting. Be The be the driver. It's more the learning circle. How do we take groups? oops of folks in organizations that have a wealth of knowledge. Let's help each other. Think bigger and broader. Let's help each other understand. Understand our value. The idea is in the in the cultivate realm the culture around to the extent that we that were aligned. Meaning Rio across across our stakeholder group were rowing the same way were enthusiastic about our strategy. You know how we're going about about enacting our ideals and were thinking expansively. As opposed to limited the ideal is that an organization Asian is in accordance in those areas in a positive way as that's happening take a fresh look at what we're currently doing right so if I come into an examination what we're currently doing with a limited view and kind of scarcity mindset. I'm GonNa see something much different. I've just got a different set of glasses on so I'm more apt to be able to say but we're really struggling in this program. I can see the at now where I wasn't seeing before and now because I'm more versed in how to think creatively I'm thinking divergently about how might we fix it. How might we improve it instead of either-or thinking which is we're gonNA have to go find another funder or we're going to have to go back or we're GONNA have to cut the program and we're going to have to eliminate this getting out of that? Scarcity mindset mindset. So here's what I have to calm down onto saying. Hey there's a lot of possibility out there. A lot of possibility out there in my experience the most immediate gains in terms of strengthening tangibly the strengthening and organization come from looking at what we're currently doing an in a fresh way gotta and it's the least risky right. I mean you're already doing it and you're already the in it and so in those are those are not sexy fund quote unquote innovations but they. It's it's sexy and fun to get the returns that's for sure and so you develop you develop confidence in it. It becomes more of discipline and then you feel better about. It doesn't feel as risky to look at something new I think far too often were jumping over to the to the The stimulate progress and looking at something new. And you're not ready for it or not ready for it and so and what happens can happen. I've seen it is it doesn't work and it becomes kind of A. We tried that before. It didn't work and so so it feeds into the scarcity mindset so if a nonprofit has handy to go and start a social enterprise and they just go on startup but they're not they don't have the mindset for it. What can happen as soon as you run into a snag in? You're going to run into a snag. It can contribute to spiraling downward related to it. And if our organization were soil in a garden what nutrients that we have in place. What can we accommodate? And if we're not ready that's not a bad thing. We have the awareness as to why and what we need to do whether we ever started as social enterprise again. It's beside the point. I mean you can be innovative on your internal practices. You can be innovative in the relationships. You have with stakeholder groups you can be innovative on the board level when gets most most oxygen is standing up something new which is again not a bad thing. It's part of the mix but I think it it's become the thing instead of a whole spectrum of things so not it's not necessarily abandoned all your problems over here and add a new in Asia to worry about. Ah I was talking about this. I think I could get in trouble here saying this nonprofit friends. I think I've seen too many organizations go explore social enterprise when what they really needed to do was be rigorous in deeply analyze. How are they valuable? Starting where we really valuable and Being real about that which is not a comfortable thing I mean this is like really getting down to the bones of the organization is what what we're currently doing born out of what we're really good at Nand is a value based on some some objective breath measures More likely than not. There's a lot of things that could go a lot of things that could be re engineered and the good news is all of that is can be done in a creative way and exercising. You know creative capability that you have in an organized disciplined fashion and you come out on the other side of that likely to be successful at standing up something new and so oh. It's a harsh way of saying it but I think in some cases were overly were mediocre and all of our. All of our programming doesn't mean we have some really core value in some core potential for delivering exceptional value. We have core or competencies and we have assets. But we've let ourselves sort of just be mediocre Get to a point where we're being mediocre partly because of our own mindset and so it becomes competitive now now there are too many funders or too many nonprofits. It's harder to raise money so we're going to go over and dip our toe and social enterprise and in practice what we're doing is sort of extending that mediocrity into a new initiative and we know this just the market is not friendly to mediocre businesses. That's just sort of a general. That's what I've seen and I think it for me. The route to strike is the mindset the three things things that are embedded in hopeless to fearless so right. Now it's a core offering but it's a starting point. Now what's your vision for rich drake. Labs yeah get his to have a model that is lightweight such that any the community can plug it in and it's driven by appear learning coaching dynamic. And so I as as a guide or facilitator what I'm doing is something that I can train an individual and their dozens of individuals Israel's in any community of any size right now that are working with nonprofit organizations and so to have a model which we can take and say. Hey you can do this here. Here's how to do it because it's a much lighter. Lift financially much lighter lift from a standpoint join of expertise required. I'M GONNA make a general statement just about society is. We've become overlying on the expert dismissive of the Guru within and our ability to navigate. An uncertain world requires us to have some what I call way finding adding ability to be self directed learners to learn on her own and one way to do that is to share talk communicate you take in something new you try it a little bit you share it with others compare notes and then you teach someone else and that's my that's my ideal make lot of sense. I mean especially if you can tap the the knowledge that people have been working on the front lines where you know they are directly involved. Oh I it just. It's phenomenal so in the private sector. There's a lot of focus on human center design design thinking all sorts of program me and that starting to bleed into the nonprofit sector. How do you learn design thing? Human Center design and I saw an interview with the founder of Idaho founder video it was part of Stanford D. School Design School and he kind of sheepishly confessed in this interview. He said you know design. thinking is the scientific method. It's so it's intuitive we know this. And one of the one of the core foundational things of Human Senator Design is empathy and not from an altruistic standpoint from a business standpoint is more. You understand your customer. It can empathize with where your customer isn't more. You're likely to create something that is consistent with what they might want but it seems to me that if for for profit organizations want to be more socially impactful through whatever means those direct frontline and middle tier professionals who are every single day. They forgotten more than I'll ever know about their beneficiary. It's an obvious seems to me. An obvious connection action to make and so and I recently revisited a talk that Jim Collins gave. And you've referenced. Peter drucker aging myself here. But he said you Peter Drucker Jim. Collins agrees says the businesses have much much more to learn from the social sector than the other way around. And I think that's fantastically right on It's so much harder I think to get something done and an argument could be made. Well that needs to chain. nonprofits need be able to move it what I call market speed. So how. How can they be more quick and agile and that's a valid question but the complexities of the the double even triple bottom line and the legislative nature of nonprofits and the need to be much more collaborative? Forgive I'm generalizing. Collaborative across stakeholder groups jumping over into the field of mythology the goddess is making a comeback. Because I don't know this empirically empirically but I think most non profit organizations are led by female female CEO and when I read the conscious capitalism material there's a whole section but the the male CEO.

Jim Collins CEO founder Beijing Peter drucker Kim Peter Drucker Jim Rio Asia Israel Idaho Senator Stanford D. School Design Scho
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

16:35 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"I'm excited to share some of the history and social entrepreneurship on this podcast. And how the challenges that nonprofits have have changed over the years as well as to hear hear about route strikes new workshop hopeless fearless so dave. Welcome on the PODCAST. Oh thank you appreciate being here. What got you into social entrepreneurship in the beginning? Well I was born in nineteen sixty six. Wow so I was a entrepreneur and The first ten years of my career was sort of in business in the for profit world and nonprofit sector was not on my radar screen in the least when I wrote a check every now and again but I couldn't have articulated in any meaningful way. What the role of a nonprofit profit organization is and I was a part of a technology startup a founding partner and while the the business was doing okay the partnership was really kind of fractured t to the point that it was extraordinarily stressful for me and I wanted out? A local nonprofit local here in Columbus was looking for someone to be on a committee that was charged with exploring boring how we can generate more of their own revenue and asked me be a part of that committee and I said No. I don't have any time for that and They came back and said well. Actually we want to pay you to help us think differently and I said well I've got the time for that and so it it really viewed it as something of just a bridge to get out of what I was doing and I i. Within weeks was fully fully engaged in captivated by the Double Bottom Line Challenge at nonprofit organizations have of course they have their mission obligation there Michigan imperative to pursue mission outcomes and results was but they have to resource it and and so you know that challenge of managing both of those and I also discovered in myself that that's really what I enjoy about innovation. Entrepreneurship is the the figuring out a way where there doesn't seem to be away or a straightforward way and so that was late late nineties. What was the nonprofit profit central? How Diabetes Association? Wow I worked with them For a few years there now a part of life care alliance so this late nineties. They were going through an eighteen months process that was led by by an organization called the National Center for Social Entrepreneurs based out of Minneapolis. And this is back. When Bank one was was a here in Columbus? There was such a thing as bank. One and Brian Gallagher. WHO's now the head of the United Way? Worldwide was the head of the United way here in Columbus Columbus those Best Best Bugles at the time. Renamed now Beth Kramer. She headed up the bank one community giving area in those two I think were the galvanizing force to bring on other funders the city was engaged. Limited Limited Huntington all put in a little bit of money to bring the National Center in Columbus so they could in an organized fashion systematically declare look at where there might be opportunity so I was just a small attachment to one of the twelve organizations that went through it But because I was captivated captivated by it I went to Beth bubus at the time. It said I I want to do this. You know I wanna I WANNA make a goal of helping organizations in this and she She was delighted that there was some energy here in Columbus even if it was just an individual that would sort of via continue and helping organizations Columbus after the National Center left and so it was a good start there. Never just some some serendipity in that and eventually became more closely affiliated with the National Center for Social Entrepreneurs and had the great fortune of being being there leading the Organization for three years like two thousand one to two thousand four and helped them shift their model all to one that was more distributed instead of the consultant flying in from somewhere else to work with organizations. How do we build the capacity and the community? Because there's lots of good talent knowledge in the community to help the community do more for themselves now. Why some of the obstacles that people are facing at the time in organizations or yeah so so in in you know back in the turn of the century I feel so old they determine? Now you know to me. The idea of social entrepreneurship is still relatively new. At that point it is and and and of course of course social being entrepreneurial to address common good challenges has been around forever. I think about I in fact I think You read a white paper. I think I wrote recently. I did write recently. I think you've read it. I highlight a an individual Nannie. Helen burroughs who In the Early Twentieth Century Tree stood up an organization for Young Adult Women. It really I think is a great case example of social entrepreneurship. She did so many amazing things without any resources in the face of tremendous headwinds which is an African American woman. Couldn't vote at the time stood up an organization in one of the ways. They resource or stem cells was during the they sold the equivalent of box lunches on Wall Street. They and the the girls and young ladies were involved in the operation of that and they learn skills data sell. They learned how to do customer service on all those things and this was during the depression. Her sort of mantra. Was We specialize in the whole impossible. Here's an individual. That was being very very very creative and without any resources and figuring out a way For these these young women to grow as individuals and be contributing members to society on their terms and so when I think about that in the early twentieth the essentially all of the all of the forces that that would have flown in her face and so I always push back a little bit this notion of how long social social enterprise and social entrepreneurship like anything else. There does eventually become some organization around the movement and so the National Center was formed in the early eighties. Nineteen eighty-three I think. One of the Founding Board chair at a guy named Bob Price who I had the tremendous good good fortune of having him be mentor to me. at the time he was CEO of a Fortune Two hundred company controlled Native Corp and he was on the Board of the the Minneapolis Twin cities united way. And you he in some other of his peer business folks. I sort of like you know. We're able to make money in some markets that are otherwise you wouldn't think their potential moneymakers honey makers and so they actually stood up. This organization in the original intent was to invest in nonprofit initiatives that were intended generate excess revenue time. I don't know that the term social enterprise had been used or social entrepreneurship for that matter. And what they found was Well variety of things. But they came around the fact that these organizations don't know how to sort of evaluate opportunity So different mindset for different different mindset and it was without going too far into the weeds kind of shifted. The MODEL said well. Why don't we help them? figure out a way to help them. Understand potential value that they can provide to markets that can pay and they were I think one of like four or five organizations that ultimately stood up the social enterprise alliance which started as the National Gathering for social entrepreneurs. So they're kind of forefather of of the movement at the time with you and I were talking about social enterprise or social entrepreneurship. We wouldn't be talking about. I think what we think of it now we think of it as a as a standalone Novo startup which you know. Oh maybe you're a social entrepreneur. You stood up an organization that organizes an LLC it's an LLC and you're just as an as an individual enterprising individual you've done that At the time that I was engaged in the late nineties here in Columbus purpose with. We're having this conversation. It would have been much more. Focus on a nonprofit an existing nonprofit that is he's probably starting something new within their organization. That's not separate from the organization but we might even think of it as a program that is strategically intentionally were trying to generate excess revenue There really wasn't so much talk about true net revenue so But it was if we're able to recoup some of the cost Or lose less say on a program because were were generating generating some fees than the donor. Dollar goes farther and so some of our target audience are beneficiary group. They're able to pay something something in fact based on a researchers dignity in that and we'd like to contribute something to that we feel better about it and say it's only dollar or say it's two dollars so that's almost like true net revenue it's almost like a donation to the organization and so it really started there you know. How do we think differently about our particular beneficiary client customer? However you want phrase it but we're reporting to provide value value? And how do we understand value all the way our across the stakeholder group and so that's what the conversation we were having Columbus. Let's start something brand new if I think back to the nineties like today we're sitting in compuserve's offices. This was kind of a heyday for for competence. So yeah it's interesting. Exactly I mean again. You're making me feel old but data but it it really. In that particular process. The National Center process was eighteen months. Wow so now. We have accelerators accelerators APP. Which is fine to some extent? I mean we could get into the weeds on this but I why do you not to go too far field but just as a very high level I think just society in general. We're going to fast and we kind of feel we're always in a hurry up mode and we don't take the time to choose sit and sort of contemplate on things in let our minds do some work While we're focused on something else and and W- we lose something there. I was joking the other day that we almost need a decelerated accelerator You know looking at doing longitudinal analysis and some of those organizations that the national center was engaged in when they had the more immersive long process They had some real tremendous outcomes. Were you could say there's a preponderance of evidence that they were stronger organizations because of that engagement. I don't know that we can say the same thing about some of these social enterprises houses that are lifted up out of a nonprofit context. We want stronger organizations that are able to flourish on their own terms. Self direct does much as possible and to be thinking big and come up with bold ideas and be willing to in the spirit of Nannie. Helen burroughs figure stuff out wrote and feel confident that they can figure stuff out In that that has new as creative imagination Marmara ability to be Your human ingenuity and we all have it so social enterprises kind of secondary to that it may be may be manifest in a social enterprise but I think too often social enterprise becomes the endgame. What is a prerequisite for being successful in a social enterprise? Is You have an agility the creative imagination. How has that changed from when you started to today like the issues that nonprofits are facing when it comes to the looking at social entrepreneurship? It's changed on on one level on a more tangible level in terms of like let's let's take Columbus for for example. There are a number of initiatives here in Columbus that are in play in the representative of what I see in other communities immunities to and we can just tick them off. I know you're a big fan of giveback hack And I think Columbus Soup is somewhere in that sort of beginning stages and then moving along. You've got things like Sea Change which is an accelerator? My former company. 'cause impact has has the Innovation Catalyst. I think they're calling it now and they've got five or six groups maybe right now going through it which is a little bit more of a deeper dive into to an examination of the opportunity. Well of course I help stand up Allen proctor. Social Ventures which originally was center for Social Enterprise Development and then philanthropy pitch out of Austin's coming into there's a lot of good energy energy and of course it all gets blurry I think most of the sea change cohort this year were four prophets and so it it. It really is a fun fun fun time and it was fun then but I think there's much more if we think of on the one end of the spectrum term. We have the five hundred thousand nonprofit primarily resource by traditional philanthropy and over on the far polar opposite. You have the Milton Freeman for profit. Money is what we're doing in there. Those are these are good things. And they're having you know they. It's Nice it's not. It's not placing judgement on. I mean you can. You can make a very credible argument that the business of business to make money in by making money you Employ folks the high taxes. Those folks are able to spend money in their communities. They're able to realize their own. Dreams are able all to support the charities and causes that are closest to them. They're able to shop with a purpose if they so choose news. And so say having that clarity and focus is a good thing but as we get closer to the.

Columbus National Center for Social Ent National Center Columbus Columbus Minneapolis Helen burroughs founding partner Social Enterprise Development Michigan Social Ventures Brian Gallagher Beth Kramer compuserve Diabetes Association Early Twentieth Century Tree National Gathering Milton Freeman Beth bubus
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"About presented to understand why this is such a big deal is that you know an put another can imagine it's a bunch of tough dudes and and tough guys you know you know don't hug don't cry still showing motion the motions weakness and and so the can you get them one on one on smaller groups things can break down in front of the bigger peers they have to pull that that toughness the second important piece in prison is that audience like what they had done to pull that off they fall into each other's arms into the spontaneous embrace I turn around and see the director of mental health with tears streaming down her face because of just the incredible incredible testaments of the safety that had that had been created in the room that day and honestly depicted credit on our team throughout the entire process that made it that these guys could break against you know prison culture and prison politics and do so even with those beyond the sphere recommend that could come later on the yard it's huge yeah and then just a cold off on on one of the things popping in my mind it's like that no shows kind of the transmission that happened within the prison residents and again I have so many stories about about that to happen individual collective levels but even people on the outside you know I'm I'm blessed receipt stories on a regular basis of people telling me how that one day that you know people can talk first or second events were whichever events and how about one day has changed the way they live and after taxes Ted the a survey to measure what they call the net promoter score and simply put some not medicine not everyone knows that promote score ah measures a a customer satisfaction with the.

director Ted one day
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

12:51 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Change in the business world and give you ideas on how to take action after there are break building up our own social enterprise wild tiger ts. I'm excited to return to the podcast explore new ideas but today I'm here talking to a company that was founded in nineteen in eighty eight is mission driven lender you'll stay consultant and developer that helps communities thrive they're unique in that they lead specifically to nonprofits and provide bite them wraparound real estate services that generally outside the nonprofits core mission their rapidly growing here in Ohio helping great causes to succeed in their own nations so so I am just ecstatic to have the chance to sit with the CEO Joe nearly and senior lender of Columbus Office Omar El Hajj Moosa so welcome on the podcast. Let's dive straight in. Thank you thank you and.

Omar El Hajj Moosa senior lender CEO Columbus Joe consultant Ohio developer