40 Burst results for "People"

Fresh update on "people" discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:22 min | 8 min ago

Fresh update on "people" discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

"He was responding. Tio audio of President Trump, calling him a disaster. This back and forth comes as covert infection numbers are on the rise nationwide. And it's not just trump against douchey. There is discord, Division descent, whatever you wanna call it, among others on the White House coronavirus task force. That's the group officially tasked with helping the country through this pandemic. Joining us to talk about this is damn diamond. He covers health care of politics and policy for politico, and he's been following the government's response to covert welcome. Thanks for having me back. Good to have you back. Well, what do you make of what happened rather publicly with President Trump and Dr Fauci. Why would trump say all that stuff about Dr Fauci? When Really the public trust him. 70%, according to a recent poll trusts him, Dr Fauci. And holds him in high regard. Why would the president want to terminate the bus? Well, Madeleine, I have to point you to the headline that I put on our morning newsletter on Tuesday trumps inexplicable attacks. Unthought E to Your point. Doctor. Patchy is more trusted. He's more popular, and he is the career government expert who has worked with multiple presidents, not Donald Trump. Respond to crises. The fact that the president is choosing the waning days of his re election campaign to attack out you, of all people speaks to the discord and lack of strategy. I think in the White House about how to deal with Corona bikers right now. Dr Halsey has not been perfect. He's he's gotten something's wrong. He walked back from earlier statements he made during the outbreak, but I think on balance he's saying exactly what experts in other countries Countries that have done much better than the United States. He's saying exactly what they're saying to which is we need to follow public health guidelines me to wear masks. We need to stay distant from people that could prove it. And that's a message that the president can't seem to abide. Well. Meanwhile, on this White House current of Iris task Force, there is another doctor, Dr Scott Atlas, who seems to have the president's ear tell us a bit about him and why he's on this task force. Dr Atlas is a made for TV expert almost ordered up for the task force. He appeared on Fox News earlier this year, casting doubt on some of the strategies that Dr 1000 others were recommending. That caught the eye and ear of people in the White House and close to the administration. Before long. Dr. Alice was personally advising President Trump and President Trump prefers the advice someone like Scott Alice, who's much more optimistic. About the state of the outbreak, who has argued that immunity herd immunity may not be that far away the idea that if the virus spreads just a bit more, perhaps the natural response in the population will be Sufficient to curb the spread of covert in America. And he's someone who has usurped the health experts like Dr Fauci, like the surgeon general, dramatic doctors who Are in appointed positions or have spent their careers fighting infectious disease, doctor atlases or radiologist and someone who is more well known always recently. For speaking out from a conservative institution, the Hoover Institution at Stanford, so he has He has moved ahead of these career health experts in advising the president, even though he doesn't have expertise in fighting a disease like Coogan, 19. Right, not an epidemiologist and no experience and in public health, so apparently, according to a story in The Washington Post, Dr Deborah Burkes went to Mike Pence in said remove him from this panel because he is You know he's issuing these statements and he has the president's ear, and she thinks it's dangerous because he's promoting unsigned, unsound scientific advice. What is he promoting that She and others are so alarmed about? Well, I think Dr Alice has been on the leading edge of casting doubt on things like wearing masks or on the need for social distancing. And keeping some parts of the economy closed. Doctor Alice is argued instead that we are being overly cautious and that the science doesn't back up. What Lock down measures and shutdown measures Douchey Burkes and others have advocated for so that's that's been the Clash point and that has gone on for some weeks now. And he is proponent of something called the Barrington Declaration. And that's discussed a lot on Fox News. What is that? The Great Barrington Declaration is this idea that effectively promotes prude? Immunity Now the issue with us is most credible. Scientific experts don't believe that we're anywhere close. The herd immunity that if anything, Kurt immunity is only achieved by actually vaccinating people and that is still months away. Vaccines are not yet available. But Dr Atlas on the folks behind the Great Barrington Declaration have argued that we don't need to wait and we should be opening up. The economy now, even if that means somewhere, people getting sick because that will get us closer to this goal of just being able to cope with Koven 19 circulating. And again, herd immunity is achieved it around What 60 to 70% of the population. It's certainly possible that it could be at that level. I know that some of the experts that I've talked to Madeline have set that Tobin 19 being as contagious as it is, we might want her immunity closer to 90%. Again the way to get there be a widespread vaccination campaign, not letting people go out and get sick. Now we know that lots of Americans have yet to be exposed to cope in 19, and we also know that the long term effects Are unpredictable. So there might be people who get relatively mild cases of covert 19. But be sick for weeks or months to come. And that's something that scientific experts like Dr Berkson. Dr Paolucci can't abide it. So there's this division on the task force itself. We haven't really seen them much in recent months. What are they doing? Anything. I mean, the task force is kind of a fossil of the earlier effort to fight covet. It has been Left aside as other efforts have pushed forward, so the task force is still occasionally gathering in my understanding based on people who have attended or have helped organize that. Is. It's used moors and information for him now, Dr Fauci doctor books, some of the others get together and they share information about the response. Maybe they do make some decisions about guidance that is coming out from the federal government. It's the most action and energy is now with something called Operation Warp speed..

President Trump Dr Fauci Dr Scott Atlas Doctor Alice White House Dr Halsey Fox News Dr Paolucci Iris Task Force Dr Berkson Dr Deborah Burkes Politico United States Corona Madeleine Kurt Hoover Institution
Trump and Biden Will Be Muted for Parts of Their Next Debate

The News & Why It Matters

00:49 sec | 3 hrs ago

Trump and Biden Will Be Muted for Parts of Their Next Debate

"The next presidential debate it's GonNa have some changes and some people are happy about it and the trump camp not so much the commission on presidential debates they announced that it is changing the rules and cutting the microphone of each candidate when their opponent has the floor. The trump campaign of course, they responded immediately and they of course that it isn't fair they are saying that. To enforce the. Rule. The only candidate who's microphone will be open during the two minute period is the candidate who has the floor, and then for the balance of each segment, which is by design intended to be dedicated to open discussion both candidates microphones, we'll be open. So the trump camp said president trump is committed to debating Joe Biden regardless of last minute rule changes from the biased commission in their latest attempt to provide advantage to their favored. Candidate,

Donald Trump Joe Biden President Trump
Fresh update on "people" discussed on Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

01:06 min | 8 min ago

Fresh update on "people" discussed on Bloomberg Best

"They want to know why something may happen. Do you think it might be different and what it will mean? If it does or doesn't what's been the response So far? If you're one of those people we have your people give us a sense of what you're trying to accomplish. Bloomberg markets. With Paul's Winnie and Bunny Quinn are there enough Cos ticket founders of all these gay mornings at 10 Eastern on Bloomberg Radio. The Bloomberg business happened. Bloomberg radio dot com. Bloomberg, the world is listening. This is a Bloomberg money minute. It's a busy day for third quarter earnings results after stocks finished with modest gains is the haggling over an economic stimulus bill continued that have Jones industrial Average climbed 113, the S and P Rose 16. Then as that game, 37. The Corona virus pandemic was good to Netflix, but it's locked down. Z's subscriber growth is slowing, it added. 2.2 million subscribers in the third quarter, far fewer than expected. It's forecast also came up short. Snap surprised Wall Street with quarterly revenue and user growth that beat forecasts. The Snapchat parents said third quarter revenue rose 52% from last year as the number of daily active users climbed to 249 million. Texas Instruments is forecasting revenue in the fourth quarter. That beat estimates indicating a rebound and demand for chips used in cars and personal electronics earnings fell on revenue was little changed for the third quarter. Larry Kowski. Bloomberg Radio. Ladies and Gentlemen, we have arrived in Philadelphia local time is three or 5 p.m. and the temperature is 67 degrees. At.

Bloomberg Bloomberg Radio Larry Kowski Netflix Bunny Quinn Philadelphia Z Paul
Oregon sends Covid-19 vaccine distribution plan to feds, with phased approach

Buck Sexton

00:36 sec | 3 hrs ago

Oregon sends Covid-19 vaccine distribution plan to feds, with phased approach

"Its Koven 19 vaccine distribution plan to the federal government. Some states plan to have independent panel's review The covert 19 vaccine before it's distributed, state health officer Dr Dean Site Linger says they won't do that, but they will treat it like any other vaccine, which is reviewed by senior health advisors. I love paper and effective. Maxine. No distribution plan is centered around equity with review process to make sure communities of color are included. The priority will be people critical to the pandemic response and those at highest risk of the disease. A 16 year old boy

Dr Dean Maxine Officer
Fresh "People" from KYW 24 Hour News

KYW 24 Hour News

00:46 min | 10 min ago

Fresh "People" from KYW 24 Hour News

"Evening. I'm Jeff Ash. Charlotte Reese is at the editor's desk. Many states across the country or seeing a surge in Corona virus cases. There are now over eight million of those in the United States with over 220,000 deaths. Dr Anthony Fauci says he's particularly worried about the national trend, as the weather turns colder is that as we enter the cooler months, which we're in right now, In the fall, and ultimately, the colder months of the winter. Living out of necessity, be doing more things indoor and outdoor. You're dealing with a respiratory infection. With this degree of efficiency has spread being indoors when you have a large community spread already going on is really arrested people getting into trouble and that's what concerns me right now, pal, she said. Doing something different might mean things as simple as public health measures of universal wearing of masks, maintaining 6 ft distance. Avoiding congregants, settings in crowds and doing more things outdoors, then indoors. Health care providers in organizations in Delaware are getting some relief $100 million.

Dr Anthony Fauci Charlotte Reese Jeff Ash United States Delaware Editor
Safety Board Blames California Diving Boat's Owner For Fire That Killed 34

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:22 sec | 4 hrs ago

Safety Board Blames California Diving Boat's Owner For Fire That Killed 34

"Federal investigators say the lack of oversight by a Southern California boat owner led to the fire that killed 34 people on a scuba diving excursion on Labor Day 2019. National Transportation Safety Board ruled to place the deadly fires blame with the conceptions, owner Truth Aquatics. The SB Board also said inadequate coastguard regulations contributed to the high death

National Transportation Safety Sb Board Truth Aquatics Southern California
Fresh update on "people" discussed on Tim Conway Jr.

Tim Conway Jr.

00:39 min | 10 min ago

Fresh update on "people" discussed on Tim Conway Jr.

"And you know, since we're talking about cops, Ah, do you want me to let you in on a little thing that was going on at Dodger Stadium today? Oh, yeah, Well, we got to take a break Tuesday. Yeah, all right. So if something happened at Dodger Stadium today, Let's just say something that was going on that not not written. Many people knew about it that way, and it has to do with the Los Angeles Police Department. Okay, alright, Excellent. And also, you know those people going to Dodger Stadium to watch the Dodger game on the big screen? Is, Are the the courts getting all that money? They own that stage? You know what you are you and I talked about that whether the covert testing and and what not, and I can't get anyone to answer that question. So it's probably true. I'm sure that they're getting paid. Because they own the parking lot, right? Right. So I remember everybody that goes to those parking lots. All the money goes to the courts. Well, Yeah, I'm sure there's some sort of a fee structure worked out. I'm sure they're not giving that to them for free will. No, I'm sure there's a licensing agreement to run the Dodger game. About them just to the game. I'm talking about covert testing. No, no, I'm talking about them watching the Dodger game 75 bucks to watch the game. That's you know, that's a that's a no brainer. That's them. How many people have been going to that? You know. I don't know. I thought it was. I thought it was a 500 or maybe less Enitem Couple 100. I don't know whatever we come back. Just some have a Dodger Stadium and you'll tell us about your bet. Okay, Very good. Steve Gregory is with us for a live on Ko Phi. More now Ju.

Dodger Stadium Los Angeles Police Department Ko Phi AH Steve Gregory
Nigerian Forces Shoot at Demonstrators Against Police Brutality

The World

00:33 sec | 5 hrs ago

Nigerian Forces Shoot at Demonstrators Against Police Brutality

"In Nigeria's largest city. Lagos. Reports are coming in of security forces opening fire tonight on unarmed demonstrators. The demonstrators had been protesting in fact against police brutality. According to several eye witnesses. The live rounds hit several people. Details on casualties have not yet been confirmed. This evening's violence erupted after the Lego state government imposed a 24 hour curfew in response to the growing protests against police violence. Yesterday, protesters blocked a major expressway in Lagos and also targeted the main airport, shutting down terminals

Lagos Nigeria
Fresh update on "people" discussed on Lars Larson

Lars Larson

00:32 min | 10 min ago

Fresh update on "people" discussed on Lars Larson

"With horns with signs were playing with everything. So I just thought that would be something you might wanna share. Well, Bill, I'm glad to shirt and in fact, Indian is not alone. There are a lot of states now that air having boat parades. They're having car parades. And these are massive demonstrations. But the key thing you wanna ask yourself Is Joe Biden's campaign having anything of the kind No. And what does that tell you? If the enthusiasm for Donald Trump is so solid that people take I mean, when you ask about all the trouble that we have to go to go through to vote in this day and age, whether it's vote by mail vote in person. Early voting, people are willing to take their own Saturdays and go out and line up in a parade to indicate their support for a great American president. And when his competition and Joe Biden doesn't have anything of like kind, you understand the enthusiasm gap between one and the other is absolutely substantial. Thanks. So much for the call from Indiana. I'm glad you're listening in a great state that produced our vice president coming up. We're two weeks away from.

Joe Biden Bill Vice President Donald Trump President Trump Indiana
The Town Of Asbestos, Quebec, Chooses A New, Less Hazardous Name

KYW 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 7 hrs ago

The Town Of Asbestos, Quebec, Chooses A New, Less Hazardous Name

"CBS NEWS New York, A little town with a lethal name is changing it. The Canadian town of Asbestos will change its name, followed by a vote by residents yesterday. The town of 7000 people formerly home to one of the world's largest minds for asbestos. Then considered an essential construction material now recognized as extremely poisonous. It's now

CBS New York
Taraji P. Henson Says She's Single After 2 Year Engagement

Daily Pop

06:43 min | 9 hrs ago

Taraji P. Henson Says She's Single After 2 Year Engagement

"Lot of everyone and welcome daily today, we may have uncovered one of Hollywood's dating secrets. It turns out there is a not so subtle way stars have been letting us know that they are newly single it's with their straps and she hinson might be the latest led to do it. So during a recent appearance on the breakfast club to rise, did admit she was single. Here's what she had to say about her split from former NFL star Kelvin hated. The. Wow said it yet but it didn't work out. You know what I mean. Side I was like bear left do their thing. But if you're both not on the same page with that, then you feel like you're. Taking it on yourself at Mathematics Fair position for anybody to play in a relationship. she did it on a breakfast. Daddy's you already for everybody to know you were a single. Everybody I mean potential suitors as well Oh. Yes. One hundred percent because four. She made that announcement she started a little early because fans are already speculating. Something might have happened because last month after her fiftieth birthday celebration she posted some sexy bikini pigs and Calvin was not in any of the photo. She looking really hot. There's Chapman her way when you first trap is that kind of your deadwood say like guys I'm single just. I'm single at hot. I, mean I I feel like I I'm trying to think back to my last break up. Yes. For most people that is the move when you look like she does with trump even i. if I was happy in their relationship like I can't even believe that this woman is fifty years old like. That's the whole thing but I mean, yeah, I guess. So I feel like what she said was really true. You can't take on the burden of a relationship and if somebody's not going to put the effort with you the way you're gonNA put in the effort with them and finally you're like, okay Su this is my hot body for instagram else will take this on if you're not going to what hundred percent, I don't necessarily think that your thirst trapping to let people know you're single I think as human beings we need validation whether we get it at work or at home are. Like. Raji Behan is getting right now but I think you're going through a moment in your life and there's a big life change. You need that affirmation from people that it's going to be okay and that be you still got it. Again. Exactly what it is, it is a little like. Thirst trap he may be or even if it's not a bikini, you're right it's something that gives you like a positive look some makes you build your confidence because you've got a now face this new chapter in your life and your that confidence to do that, and it's the same way as back before the grab me call your girlfriend and They'll all say like you're so hot don't worry about it. You're gonNA find someone look at you. You're smoking yes. That's go out because I want all these guys have looked me and so I feel like, I'm smoking hot one hundred percent. Look let me be petty real quick because I tried to let people know that I'm single trap to the guy who I want the attention from that. Hey, I'm saying go and try to let the guy who broke my heart know that hey, I still got it body but everybody used to track back in the day before social media when you knew that your man was going to be at a wedding at a party. You yes. You're normally do you put on the heels. Be made sure your hair was like nicely qua-. People would trumpet in the ninety that was the best is. Did you get Morgan fact me up on this? You do all that work and for whatever reason the X. Show. I've let me let me explain to me. This is the give the audience life lesson that I have learned. No matter what you think his plans might be no matter how heartbroken you are you stick to what you were originally going to do. So you were going to go to the club and you heard he wasn't going you still go because then. He goes after and then you go I bit. They just happened to be so many times stick to your original plans and always look during breakup. No matter what. Then initiative you stick to your original plans and you divert you make sure you get met photo with that one friend who posts every? On the incident. Hold on let me look at that limit looking up. That's. The most fun and miserable time with my entire life. Totally one hundred percent. We all have to go through that phase in our lives I'm. Jamie Lynn Spears is getting real about getting pregnant at sixteen. So Jamie Linton talked to nylon about the Zilly one one reboot and how much her life has changed changed since the show went off the air in two, thousand eight, she says, she found out she was pregnant after the show finished and she was quote mortified to have to tell my parents this and my family this I do not care what TMZ thinks of. Other. CELEBS feel the same way it's it's not the world finding out. It's your family and your friends finding out. It's so interesting because for me if I was in that position, I really wouldn't. Be, so, scared to tell my family because I know they would love me no matter what and I know the support me they would be disappointed but. I would be more afraid to tell the people who worked on my team, my agents, my publicist, all those people who worked really hard to build this brand that was supposed to be so wholesome and was supposed to be one of these things teens looked up to those are the people i. We'd be more afraid to tell. I. would be also more afraid to tell the whole world because that's when the comments of all your insecurities to take over. Securities Will arise whenever you find your pregnant too soon or your self conscious about something or you've made a mistake and sure enough there's going to be a good good chunk of comments on your. Point those out exactly and you're like, yeah, that's how I was feeling. That's what I was worried about and I'm exactly right. I am going to get that hate I against the world that would be more scared of because you said it right most your family and friends. Disappointed they all come around especially when the babies born. They see the baby they say, Oh, you they rally run I mean if I went to my mom and said I was pregnant at sixteen I don't know how happy she would have been with me. She probably would have real I don't know what that would been but right she would eventually. I think have been. Okay. That woman's a little insane I don't know she would have been. So okay with I agree with you guys like your family at the end of the day. Loves you no matter what mistakes you make, and then the then the world judges you even if you say the wrong adjective on TV sometimes so You can't expect them.

Jamie Lynn Spears Hinson NFL Hollywood Raji Behan Kelvin Jamie Linton Chapman Calvin Morgan
U.K. Preparing COVID-19 Vaccine Trials That Deliberately Expose Study Subjects

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 12 hrs ago

U.K. Preparing COVID-19 Vaccine Trials That Deliberately Expose Study Subjects

"Out of London about work on a Corona virus vaccine. The UK government has signed a contract for the first human Challenge Studies were healthy Volunteers are infected with the virus on purpose, so some of them can be given an experimental vaccine challenge trials require fewer volunteers and allow scientists to figure out sooner if the vaccine works. But critics call it unethical to infect people with the virus when there's no proof and treatment for it yet

London UK
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 13 hrs ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 13 hrs ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
How to Write Perfect Cold Emails That Dont Get Ignored

Marketing School

04:19 min | 13 hrs ago

How to Write Perfect Cold Emails That Dont Get Ignored

"Do is increase your low time. This is really important especially, because Google has mobile I indexing go google dream hosts. You can check out their site they not only a really super affordable reliable but they're hosting improves your low time converted most hosts out there which increases your seo ranking. So check them out. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to be talking about how to write perfect cold emails that don't get ignored it. You just get cold email earlier neil I did someone was trying to tell me how it was something about helping the United States you know I live in the United States for anyone listening. Okay let me open it up and the guys like guy. I'm Dan you know I live in the united. States we need your help and pretty much long story short he tried to get me to link to one of his websites. I didn't respond to Dan. I was like this isn't really hoping the United States. This is more so helping you but I did up because it was just so creative. The other thing that I've found with creative subject lines is I short to the point does well, like sometimes Brian Deane will send emails would just. Be Site audit or Seo template or something like that. Those do well anything that's casual lower case like your friends would send you do well putting people's name in the subject line does well to what have you tested Yeah you. Looking at this email from Nathan Lot guy, he sends me this email and it says five hundred K. Twenty Twenty ytd. So that basically I'm like, okay he's probably talking about a business that maybe things I'm interested in. Right. So I'm like, okay I'm going to click on it. So to your point short sometimes it might be like we've talked about just putting the person's first name with a question mark that's been used quite a bit now. So a lot of things we. Talked about on this podcast will tend to get over US really quickly and you have to move onto the next thing. Let's see I'm doing a cold email and I'm trying to get a client. I might say three issues with your website, right? It's it's short. It's to the point and it's something that you know that they care about. So if I'm the CEO of the company reach out to me, you tell me there's problem with my website on my own God. I'm. GonNa. Do I'm at the very least I'm probably if I'm responsible CEO, I'm GonNa Ford that to whoever's responsible on the team, and that's actually longtime ago. Here's a better example Neil and I hit a Zingo when they're are thinking about getting into poker and we just think the email is that was we've grown a poker websites before and then we getting a call with on a call with like four or five of their executives unfortunately day ended up scrapping the program but. It just shows and this is at the time Neil and I were I think it was twenty, six, twenty seven still sitting out the cold email you gotta think about what people care about and go from there. Neil. You even talk about the cold email that you sent to someone that kind of got into like a issue, which is call it that way. Yes. So there was a billionaire who got into a issue bad press I literally send a cold email on like. You're. GonNa run into more trouble unless you do this like something generic like that in decline and then I broke down. How my company can help them with PR you end up hiring me but I got him to respond to the email and he's prying but I quickly got from it that he didn't WanNA spend any money. So I kinda stopped messaging him back. But in general short catchy subject lines do well and anything that is very relevant to the time or something that they're facing problems that they're having do extremely well, and you don't need to know the person like if I'm sending you a cold email to fifty one hundred people in a space and I know I'm an SEO and I'm trying to get him for s you're related stop. I know people always want more traffic like I m saying like, try this hack. Your traffic will just go through the roof. And just like something that simple and a lot of people end up opening it, and then you can have a conversation and get responses. The final thing I'll add from my side is that the body of your email just you only need a personalized ten to twenty percent of it, and then it's personalized. So you don't need to go that far but the personalization goes a long way 'cause anybody and I promise you anybody that has a decent brain will know but it's just a template, and so you got to figure out how you can make it look legit and by the way you WanNa make. Sure your

Neil Patel United States Brian Deane CEO K. Twenty Twenty Google DAN Marketing School Eric Su Ford Nathan S
How To Help Professionally Successful Women Survive a Divorce  With Allison Jeffereys

Top Advisor Marketing Podcast

05:01 min | 16 hrs ago

How To Help Professionally Successful Women Survive a Divorce With Allison Jeffereys

"Hello and welcome to another top advisor. Marketing podcast. Some of you have said to me on podcast, you know Matt. My Niche is focusing on women that's not an itch. It's fifty. One percent of the population is actually the majority of people on this planet. But today we're going to dive into how you could actually focus a lot more on women in an area that is very, very important and I believe is entirely underserved Alison. Jeffries is a divorce coach and author of a woman's guide to surviving divorce. A woman's guide to surviving divorce, she's also at the end when everybody hanging to the end because she's going to give away something that we'll have link in the show notes but and I was reading to prepare for this and if you know anybody who's been through a divorce if you've been through a divorce, it doesn't matter if you're a man or woman, you'll see yourself in these questions. She's really created this magnificent spreadsheet that will help you navigate conversations. But Allison. Let's let's start at the beginning. What do you do I mean how did you get here? Why are you? Why did you publish this book? Why did you want to become a divorce coach? Well I publish the book as a Personal Passion Project. We all go through life. Everybody has one book in them, but I think the important part of that story is, how did we get to the book? So I headed thirty five year career in the corporate world worked for Fortune One hundred companies Merrill Lynch prudential. Citigroup Wells Fargo worked in the financial sector worked in the securities area at Citigroup was. Managed a part of the country educating financial advisors on how to work with women in a group called Women Company. During that time it was in the middle of all the changes in the laws and regulations around financial advisers and tracking and documenting, and all of a sudden I had one month to take my seven and get it to continue to do my job. I did it. Couldn't believe it. But I, did it. They told me I had to take it I figured whether I failed or not. At least I'd taken it up pass. So I did have my seven had my sixty five. Loved the education of how women relate to money my degree is in psychology. So that was right up my alley really worked a lot on the difference in how women approached things how we make decisions, how we manage or don't manage our money those barriers between ourselves in money, the cultural issues, the professional issues, and all of those things that men had a hard time understanding about their women clients and why it was important to work with them. Left that career and honest to goodness. Being financial adviser with something I never wanted to do. So I. Let all that Go. I. Went Back into the corporate world in at a certain point in my life, I had a chance to stop. Rethink about what I wanted to be I. was on my second divorce. and. It was kind of one of those things where you common denominator here would be meat. So. I had to fix that become a big belieber marriage in I like men so. It was a it was self revelation process did a lot of writing. It became the book and it is a fictitious version of what a woman experiences when faced with divorce. Based on those common cultural and. thinking process. Things that are totally women. That we do. And so that's where I am. Okay. Why why should financial adviser scare? Why should insurance agents care? Why should financial adviser scare? Why is this such an important focus for people who have discussions surrounding money? Well. As you said, women are fifty one percent of the population. I don't know that math works for me the other reason it. Is More critical to financial adviser is back when I was it women company years ago we always cited that statistic that by twenty, fifteen, fifty percent of US wealth was gonNA transition into the hands of women. Well guess what it's happened. So whether women have come up with all this money through death divorce or old fashioned way we aren't it. We control a larger percentage of the investable assets in this country. But because of the cultural barriers because of the social morays that women have been raised with if we're anything over twenty five to thirty years old. We might not be managing them very effectively. And It just makes sense to me if you're a financial adviser to understand how to speak to women to get them engaged in Manning, they're managing their money.

Women Company Citigroup Advisor Merrill Lynch Matt Jeffries Alison United States Allison Wells Fargo Manning
People are Flocking To These Weird JOBS!

Work Matters With Ken Coleman

05:08 min | 21 hrs ago

People are Flocking To These Weird JOBS!

"Fifteen throwback industries making a comeback this year. Why am I, sharing this with you? Well, for those of you that are thinking about that entrepreneurial venture that you've always kind kicked around your head, you don't have a whole lot of ideas maybe no winning idea yet for some of you who are looking for just a side Hustle to dip your toe in the water to see do I wanna work for myself or do I just want to make some extra money here are fifteen throwback industries making a comeback and this? Is. So. Heartwarming. This is from business insider I. Love this list. Nathan. This is so good. The first one drive in movies this has been great. Obviously cove is kind of forced this onto us, but the drive in movies are great. Especially if you're classic car guy like me and you got the convertible classic car and you got the awesome lady to watch the movie with that's fun puzzles about puzzles. Now, I personally have never been a big jigsaw puzzle guy mainly because I lose interest quickly but I've taken on many. Not, completed very many but that's fun and by the way great creative outlet for kids I laughed when I saw this one, Joe Roller Skating he you know I get some great memories from the eighties at Roller Skating rinks leave it at that but it was never good roller skater stationary now actually very much excites me. Andrea, Bell. Is the director of insights at a trend forecasting company commented on this for town and Country Magazine on the rebirth of the boom of stationary. Again, she said everyone is experiencing digital fatigue. So we are turning into tangible things. And this is very exciting to see handwritten notes. The stationary returning by the way stationary is is great not just because it's allowing you to to handwrite things which I'm just such a big believer in, but also the personal style that you can add to the personal note board games are back on a big board Game Maniac I love Board Games. The reason this is significant is because it involves community and. When we're playing board games we're looking at each other we're talking to each other were listening to each other we're laughing with each other we're competing with each other. Hopefully, we're not arguing with each other, but I will tell you many Coleman, when I was growing up with my brother he and I would compete to the death even over a board game. So there are many times while my dad had to say dudes. Chill out but great memories their role through the rest of these really quick bread baking Genn very labor intensive activity. But a lot of craftsmanship, their house plants, Arcade Games, bicycles, getting out, exercising, and feeling the fresh air inflatable pools. As a dad I have a love hate relationship with inflatable pools lots of love setting it up. Kids are excited about it, filling it up. Kids are excited. You get to watch him play the minute they're done with it. The hate comes out for the DADS right? Because then you got an empty, the stupid thing ruins, your lawn gotta dry that nasty money thing out and put it up. So there you go I get some therapy on that issue video games I I didn't understand how this made the list. I really didn't because in my world with three kids. Video Games didn't go way but I think more adult probably playing video games that I will tell you confess that I have one video game I love playing I did love playing madden, which is the football and the NBA live with my boys until they started to destroy me. At after I would get whipped every time Joe I decided I'm not interested in getting my teeth kicked in every time I play my boys. So I've gone to video game golf and so places a great and so I can zone out for about twenty five thirty minutes rarely does this happen? But every once in a while and the kids are all doing something dad likes to go up there and play eighteen holes of golf and it is very relaxing. I must say so all for that surfing. Vinyl records very exciting that vinyl records and trading cards. The last two of the fifteen things let me tell you why like that. Joe. You know this Madison. This is a word she doesn't even understand. I think Nathan gets his little mass. There's some ageism going on here. Poor Madison is that anything vintage? I'm in. I don't even have to have a personal interest in it but if you talk to me about vintage or show me something vintage, I'm very intrigued by and so the baseball trading cards. Football cards, all these sports cards coming coming back. And the vital records I've always. I've always loved the good vinyl record so. Joe, if, you're looking for that hard to get Chris President for me record player I think would be good.

Dads Joe I Nathan Football Bell Madison Skating Golf Director Coleman Country Magazine NBA Andrea Chris President
In Order To Change Minds, You Have To Overcome Heard Immunity

The Bacon Podcast | Brian Basilico - Marketing Strategy Expert Interviews to CURE Your Marketing

04:44 min | 1 d ago

In Order To Change Minds, You Have To Overcome Heard Immunity

"Peeps. So today I want to talk about how to change minds. And in order to change Minds you have to overcome herd immunity. Now, I'm not talking about heard heard immunity as in what happens if everybody gets, That kind of hurt immunity. Anyways, I was working and I got this call and somebody says hey, it's Kim there. It's my wife wage. And I said no. Oh, well, you know, I just wanted to talk to you about the fact that with all the police and defunding, you know, we're collecting money blah blah blah, and I said Hey, listen, we don't and as I was talking about he kept talking in other words. It wasn't a real person. It was a robocall and so I hung up. Right when I hung up on another phone call comes in and it's another salesman set this time. It's a real guy. Now this podcast is more of a rant than lesson but hopefully you can find some golden nuggets in it. So the salesman comes right out of the gate and says, hey do you ever take birth records? And I'm going no, I don't. Oh well, have you taken him in the past? Would you consider taking them now? It's like no, I generally get most of my payments from EFT electronic funds transferred checks. Now, I didn't want to get into it that you know, I do take credit cards, but and the, you know, if you thought about it, you know you with the changing environment the way that the world is going right now, you know people are going to want to stretch their dollars and pay you via credit card just like no I don't want to do it and he says, do you know anybody that could use what I sell you off? And I said dude, it's not my Niche. I work with big B2B businesses. I don't work with business-to-consumer. That's where most of the credit card processing happens. He says off. Hey, have you ever thought about expanding your Niche and business-to-consumer? And I said no, I just shrunk it and so he just kept going on and on and on so three things came to my mind is this guy was talking. The first thing is he was not listening to me. He didn't even try to build any kind of relationship. He was completely heard immune. He did not hear a single thing that I said and it takes time to get people to listen to you too. Slowly to change their point of view a good sales person listens twice as much as they talk but this guy went the opposite direction by 10 a.m. I said to him I said, you know, I belong to some networking groups and one of them meets locally. Maybe you might want to come to one of those meetings and I told them about it and he says, oh that took her jaw. I know everybody that your gender the past or I grew up in the town and yada yada yada and it's like dude. No, you don't get it. It's not affiliated with the church. It's a networking group that meets them and he kept going on about how he knows everybody. So what I tried to do in my mind is slowed down to say okay, how do I get this guy to listen to me and to understand that trust takes time. So I asked him I said, have you ever been burned by a referral cuz oh, yeah, this one guy recommended them and you know completely took advantage of all these people and yada yada yada and it was really bad and he just kept going on and on and on and on and finally said so, you know the short answer to your question is yes, and I said, okay, but you know, the bottom line is if I'm going to refer you, I need to know who you are and what you offer and that you're going to fulfill what it is and that's why we need to build a relationship first need as well. No. No, you can trust me. I mean, I've got all these people to trust me. I've made all these great deals and I said look, you know, I know what you do. I've been part of an organization that job Actually use your type of service and he goes, oh, I hope they didn't did my competitor because you know, they're robbing them. They're taking advantage of them. Will you weren't part of that word you you know, it's like, oh man off can this get any worse?

Salesman
A Conversation With Brenda Nguyen

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:16 min | 1 d ago

A Conversation With Brenda Nguyen

"This is Brenda win. She works in pharmaceuticals and writes a food blog wandering Boston eater I born and raised in Boston. It was where I went to school was where even when I was in college I commuted from my parents house too. So I've known since living in Boston you know all throughout college that I'd eventually want to explore somewhere else. That's always been a goal of mine for almost last decade and then my sister got married she had a very intimate wedding in Florence. Italy. I had always dreamed of studying abroad in Paris. So for me to have the opportunities now go to Europe I even though I was in Florence Italy I told myself I'm going to make my way to Paris. That whole trip was so exhilarating because I was able to have the opportunity to connect with myself in a way that I never had a chance to connect with and Boston because. By myself. For Brenda that trip was a game changer I tend to be very serious planner where I used to plan much like to the minute, and this was something that I learned I needed to not do and learn to be more flexible with others and learn to be flexible with myself. So in parallel from Twain Sixteen, I was start looking for cheap flights whenever I could. So, coming from parents who are immigrants from Vietnam, I'm first generation American I had never visited Southeast Asia or Vietnam and I think that as I am. Getting older, it was really important for me to make my way to Vietnam at some point. And in late twenty, nineteen when a friend got married in Malaysia Brenda took advantage of a chance to visit the place her family came from. It was something that. was truly an emotional experience for me. So when I came back, it was the first week of December and this is when I. Started thinking about this lot more where I told myself I'm ready to leave and the idea. Honestly live rent free in my head for the entire month of December and it was. It was an echoing voice in my head saying you need to leave you need to leave. So she sent her resume to some company is based in San, Francisco? So my interviews actually all aligned with the week that everything shut down for Cova head. And that was a very. Very. Crazy reality because now I was. Torn between. Do I. Continue to pursue these. Jobs to move out of Boston when we don't know what that means right now Brenda and getting that job, and after a few months of working remotely, she just decided I might as well pack up and move. I had always planned on taking a road trip cross country fi during pandemic. That means that there's way too many stop points. Way Too many opportunities to interact with people. The other option would be taking a plane and I'm watching these videos on social media people on their planes and it really didn't seem like planes consistently distancing. And One of my friends said, well, have you considered taking a train And this is when I started seeing. The. Trains have private bedrooms and private showers and the bedrooms two so. Knowing that I was I, saw that. This this is probably the best opportunity because I would be in. You know limiting my exposure points getting to my destination and also seeing the views that I wanted to see along the way. So it seemed like a win win all around. Once, she arrived Brenda had to settle into a new home town at a time when none of us are supposed to go out and meet New People I think that from traveling solo, it really helped me identify that I can do things alone without feeling lonely. It's like we got journal wash face may coffee, and at night that I'm also washing my face early to and those are two things that I make sure that I do you know and It's really important because it's adding a new sense of normalcy back in our days. What I've been noticing is that I am experience just a lot more. I think between the shifts and transitions just a lot of stress is ironic. It's likely that any blemishes that are occurring is from stress some feeling and it just happens to be about the blemishes and just only add on more stress to quite honestly I'm still exploring my skin care routine and I am hoping that I can find what works for me based on what I've been researching. You know just happy happy

Brenda Boston Florence Vietnam Blemishes Paris Europe Southeast Asia Florence Italy Italy Twain Cova Francisco SAN
How GM Built A Car For The Moon

Past Gas

04:00 min | 1 d ago

How GM Built A Car For The Moon

"Before mankind got so much as a sputnik into space, we were already dreaming of what cars would look like on the moon and other planets and the one thousand nine, hundred, fifty s Collier's magazine profiled german-born American rocket scientists, Verner von Braun full name and Verner Magnus. Maximilian Freiherr von Braun. and his Astro Utopian Masterplans for America to explore and colonize the galaxy. The articles were here in one thousand, nine, hundred, fifty style hype with scenes featuring the swaggering title man will conquer space soon. So soon, one of the articles imagined moon exploration that made use of free surface vehicles quote tank like cars equipped with Caterpillar Treads for mobility over the Moon's rough surface power is provided by an enclosed turbine driven by a combustion of hydrogen peroxide and fuel. Oil The vehicle was twenty five miles an hour on flat ground. Since gravity on the moon was only one eighth of that on Earth von Braun poetically pictured the space cars would be followed by a quote spray of dust, which settles almost immediately like a bow wave on a motorboat. That's pretty that's cool image that's visual to imagine the tractors. Each weighing ten tons would drag three trailers, a piece of gear and personnel in preparation for a six-week expiration involving fifty crew members. Crazy I love this sort of like blue sky kind of speculation. Yeah that's why Popular Science was one of my favorite magazines as a kid 'cause they always had like crazy tack on the cover and like all this speculation as to what it would be able to do and I don't think much of that has come to fruition. Maybe maybe less impressive but equally important ways. I. There is a shift in what we focused on and now much of the focus of technologies just collecting our data. So we can. That's a fair point. He sold things. It's like we're not focused on like space cars or. Travel are like we don't have like a passenger jet that breaks the speed of sound anymore but. They know what adds to give me and they know how how often I leave my house? Yeah. I keep getting served ads for crocs. I've been looking at them. I would I. I love him. I love mine. I had served that I really agree with because I was a hold out for a long time and I was like crops are dumb and then once I finally gave in to crocs, it was one of the best days. So yeah, there's a the the six week exploration involving crew members. That's a lot of dudes. Like like. I've mentioned going to space before and like like it's always three people you know. Let's what it feels like. It'll be sick to be up in space with fifty people. That'd be more. More, fun. I think there's a lot of that like there's like a a segment of sci-fi where it's like there's only four people in the space craft in one of them is a killer. Yeah. But like I feel that scenario would be a lot harder to posit when there's fifty people. That isn't that the premise of Jason X. where he goes to space I it sounds like something that would do. Yeah. They'd. Like they're like. I think it's the guy with. Hockey masks. Eight foot tall. Can't be too sure. Don't want to jump to any conclusion. Anyway an article in the series entitled Can we get to Mars imagine a similar scenario with tank like space tractors that would drive the living quarters on the surface of Mars this time traveling from a pole of the planet, all the way to the equator. Pretty Fun in

Verner Von Braun Verner Magnus Maximilian Freiherr Collier Jason X. Von Braun. America Popular Science Hockey
Interview with Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

How I Built This

04:59 min | 1 d ago

Interview with Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

"It's possible. You've never heard of mcbride sisters wine and that you've never had one of their chardonnays or brute rose as or one of their blended reds and it's even possible. You don't drink wine at all. But I'm here to tell you none of this matters for the purposes of today's episode because even if all of the above applies to you, this story will change some of the things you might think about business about fate and destiny about overcoming incredible obstacles and mostly. About. Love. This story is so epic that we decided it needed to episodes. So this week you'll hear part one of how Sisters Andrea and Robin mcbryde built the McBride Sisters Wind Company, and next week you'll hear part to. I'll start with the basics. McBride sisters. Wine is now one of the largest black owned wind businesses in the world. There are roughly. Thousand winemakers in the US and McBride sisters wine is among the top two percent in terms of how much wine they produce per year you can find their wines at most major stores like target and Walmart. And they're also higher end. So about twenty bucks a bottle but still designed to be accessible especially, the people who might be intimidated by wine culture and this is the precise problem. Andrea and Robin said out to solve how to open up the sometimes intimidating world of wine appreciation to people normally shut out young people, people of Color women but also make the wine good enough to attract wine. Snobs. Robin Andrea actually founded their business in two thousand five. And they faced just about every barrier imaginable. They were young women of color with no immediate access to a winery no money no connections. But what they shared was a passion, a deep abiding passion for wine. Something else they shared. A bond that was forged in a unification. The two sisters were born nine years apart both have different mothers but share the same father and for most of their early lives neither sister new, the other even existed. But remarkably both women grew up in wine producing regions Andrea the younger sister grew up near Sauvignon Blanc vineyards in New Zealand well, almost seven thousand miles away for older sister robin was living in. Monterey California with her mom. My mom and our shared father a divorce when I was a baby and so it was only she is. So she never remarried. She didn't have any more children She really honestly didn't even very much. I was aware of anyway she hid it from me. I'm not sure and she didn't have a large family at all. She was an only child also so it was really just her and I together in the world you know we were really. Had a really strong bond and really quite dependent on each other and when you were growing up, you didn't have much contact with your dad right none at all. You know a little context. My mom wasn't thrilled with our father when they divorced and you know it was no accidents that they weren't in communication. It was something that she wasn't interested. In doing so for me from a really young age I was just always you know as a child who has a missing parents I was just always like you know where is he? What's going on? Why is it my dad or my life? You know I had a lot of questions from my mom And she was like, well, you know she always told me like you know he's probably noaa somewhere and she's like I don't want to have any communication with him. She's like. Grow Up and do your thing. Right. When you're eighteen, you know if you feel like you want to start a search to find him go ahead and do that, and so I'd always planned. It was always something that I wanted to do because I did want to figure out who this mysterious person was and hopefully have a chance to meet him. What kind of things were you interested in as a little girl? I was a really weird sort of child and I think part of that has to do with the fact that you know I didn't have like cousins around and we didn't have a larger family dynamics that was really kind of you know alone are little bit. But that had me outs exploring the world's a lot kind of on my own. So you know just really curious about nature and the environment and kind of more of that than people in socializing. Aspects of the world so kind of a little a little bit of a different

Robin Andrea United States Mcbride Mcbride Sisters Wind Company Robin Robin Mcbryde Monterey California Walmart Sauvignon Blanc New Zealand
Interview with Norman Wolfe

Breakfast Leadership

05:57 min | 1 d ago

Interview with Norman Wolfe

"Welcome back that Norman Wolf on the line. Norman how are you? Doing really good surly more. Time but we have to be on your show that glad to finally have gone here. I know we've been shedding for quite a long time so good to have you on the show. So you wrote a book while back called Living Organization and It's one of those timeless books. So it shows the audience a little bit about you in in the story behind this book. Be. Happy to Michael. Yes. I wrote the book back in Two Thousand and eleven which time I'd say that seems like, wow. So many years ago I wrote the book because of three reasons one is. The success rate of of organizations and people individually. Achieving the goals that the stated objectives, the strategic initiatives, whatever you WANNA call it is is pretty poor. This statistics say that they they succeed to. Fail other rate of seventy percent. So only less than thirty percent of those and I said individuals because. I was reading statistics recently that says New Year's resolutions. Success Rate is less than twenty percent so that feeling about eighty percent. So so I began to realize there's something about the way we go about life in in in businesses especially. That is missing something and the second reason the book is after being in business for well over forty years now. There's almost like a I hate to use the word pandemic these days. There's almost A. Pandemic of sadness people just ending engage they you know the the engagement factor against twenty three percent of people engaged in what they do. Not, a very high success rate. And so you know I. After working with so many companies I began to realize why is that in? Can we do about it and? The solution I realized is that we have. Kind of as a society of all the way of looking at life through a lens of you might call it Newtonian physics. It's a very mechanical approach to life. And at least off some Elise out all the stuff around relationships and and meaning and purpose in belief systems and assumptions that just says focused on what you WanNa do and just do it and boom. That's it and you know that just isn't good enough. So I wrote the book to explain how all that works and. In in how businesses themselves really are living entities. Like people they operate like people You look at the department, any leader who who really steps back and looks at the various departments they. They always can sense that the departments are Personalities like my sales department is going to have a fundamentally different personality than. Been My accounting department. And it's just like people different proclivities, different personalities, different belief systems. And and we think the only way to get them aligned and working together as through set of goals you know give as an they ignored this whole relationship piece in what I call context piece. The belief systems the sense of identity of who we are as an individual also applies to the sense of identity of who we are as a collective of individuals. And we have no all of that stuff. So I wrote a book to explain how all that happens being a scientist and engineer by training I have a very logical. Approach to things. So I created a SORTA engineering formula for how it all plays together. And that's really what I wrote about in the book. Like I said before it's a timeless book and when you said about how the people aren't engaged in. Monster Dot. com just released a study. That right now close to seventy percent of people are. Saying that they're they're really stressed or burned out about work and. So you take that percentage of seven out of ten people burned out. There's a percentage of those people that would be normally engaged in willing to go the extra mile to do whatever they can because they want things to be better enough only for themselves, but for their organization. But if they're too tired and fatigued, they're not even engaged anymore. So it has such a huge effect on the strength of an organization and. During, times like pandemic or any type of economic downturn if your organization isn't acting at its best, you're vulnerable and you might end up seeing a four lease sign in your office space because you won't be there anymore. And that's what we're seeing. You know one of the. The. Interesting I'll say byproducts of the pandemic is as talked to leaders around the world beginning to realize that. He has the way I say it we used to come to work for the purpose of getting work done by we went to the office because that's what you you did things. And a byproduct of that is. We build social connections. Really don't pay attention to that just sort of happened it unconsciously or as a byproduct. Of speaking with the c o the other day in in he said. You know he's he's closed as office space independent Macapa sent everybody home and asked him if he was going to. Go back as things are opening up and he said now we don't need to meet. Together to get the work done anymore.

Norman Wolf Living Organization Strategic Initiatives Macapa Michael Sales Department Elise Scientist Engineer
How to Build Your VCP on Zoom

The Official BNI Podcast

06:21 min | 6 d ago

How to Build Your VCP on Zoom

"I'm Priscilla rice and I'm coming to see you from Live Oak recording studio in Berkeley, California, and I'm joined on the phone today by the founder and the chief Visionary officer of being eye doctor Ivan misner. Hello, Ivan, How are you? And where are you? I love going back to the how are you and where are you personally? Thank you so much. And as I mentioned in last week's podcast, we're going back to it because you know, I am dead. Traveling. Yeah, it's virtual but I am traveling all over the world. And so we thought we would incorporate it back in by at least mentioning one of the places that I am Live this week. I am live in the United Kingdom for a large Regional event. I've done a lot of recorded visits around the world, but I'm doing a live event in the UK. So we have an interesting topic today out of build your vcp on zoom. And those of you who don't know V C P stands for visibility credibility profitability and we have someone as a guest who is now the reigning Champion for the number of guests visits on being a podcast. This is her eight visits is Tiffany Kellogg and Tiffany entered the entrepreneurial World in two thousand and three. She's enjoyed being able to help her class make money save time have fun. She spends her time traveling across the globe before covid-19 housings of entrepreneurs. Now, she probably does it virtually like I do and whether sharing her expertise wage, Southern Accent on referral marketing networking maximizing your time Tiffany will knock your socks off in with any audience with their fun and entertaining presentations. Now you have a you understand the Sox branding thing that happenes got go to episode number 489 about her colorful socks, you know, he was amazing socks and was funny about that is if you looked at my song it's all black all my socks. So she's very colorful. She's the author of several books and we have her back here today to talk about vcp. Welcome back Tiffany. Thank you so much I have and I'm supposed to be here. You're going to talk about three things how to be seen what to say what not to do. If we have time. We got a bonus round. So talk to us about that and how it fits in vcp job interesting thing where we've switched to Zim and we've been here six months or so now and I think we have to keep in mind that being on camera is now replacing us being in the meeting. So we want to make sure the game Doing everything we can to be moving up the referral confidence curve and down the referral confidence come out. And so the first thing to me is how do you want to be seen and when we only have a short time for a weekly presentation or our featured presentation just a couple of times a year. We want to make sure that we are using the most of the space that we have. So many people are watching the zoom meeting with you on gallery. So you're only a couple inches high. So you really want to think about bringing your energy. I think you have to be more energetic on Zoom than you actually do in person wage. Do you think doctor my eyes? Are you finding that? You have to kind of take it up a notch on camera Coney Island Tiffany? Yeah, I think so. And I think if I remember that like gestures and gestures, you tied my hands. I must be Italian somewhere because if you tied my hands you couldn't speak. I think it's really important to make sure that your hands are included in the camera so that you know when you're doing hand gestures Which means you need to tighten it up. You need to bring your hands in a little closer to show that excitement and to show you know, that visually show that you're you're making a point in that sense. Yes, and then I know we're all in like different with our camera is at so for me. I'm like, I would never talk in public with my hands up by my head, but you do want to have people see that girl. I think you want when you're being seen you want to thank can I use props either something visual that we can use. Yes great suggestion. Yeah, and then we also have the virtue backdrops versus the regular background. I think that your goal is you want to be professional dress professional with a professional background whether that's virtual that works for you or I have a zoom Courtney my office. I actually created this about three years ago to where I can easily do zoom and I know it always looks great behind me. Yeah, cuz if you I don't know if you've seen anybody I I've been with the dog. 30 piles of stuff in the background. Yes. It has it's not it's not pretty I don't know what they're thinking that cracks me up though. Have you seen the new jersey and I assume background that's got me standing off on the left. So I see them because people take screenshots and I'm tagged on Facebook page actually being in a photograph when it's just me as a backdrop, which is just cracks me up. That is hysterical. The last thing I want to say about being seen is make sure that you have your name spelled properly first and last name, maybe even your company name labeled with you and the zoom box. I was visiting a chapter and somebody was listed as dads iPhone off. Oh God. Okay. Yeah. That's that's a problem. You don't want the first thing we want to make sure is we want to be seen the second thing. I think it's very important for us is what time To say I think Matt now more than ever we have to make sure we're very concise with our message and we like to use the saying be specific to be terrific. So during your weekly and featured presentation you wanted to ask you definitely want to make sure that you are specific about that ideal referral or the ideal referral source, and I think that when were sharing if you can use success stories, that is so impactful. We like to say stories sell War facts just tell so anytime you can tell us successes that you created for your clients. It's makes it easy for your fellow chapter members to refer you. Can I add one thing to that but we're telling because I think it's really important don't retell a story relive a story The more you can relive life, you know, really think about your experience there and do your best to re limit as you tell that story. It makes for better storytelling

Tiffany Kellogg Ivan Misner United Kingdom Coney Island Tiffany Live Oak California Priscilla Rice Facebook SOX Berkeley ZIM Chief Visionary Officer Founder Matt Courtney
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

05:33 min | 10 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Than day start to see themselves sells you know and I really find ways of making sure that it's always something that we consider everywhere that I'm working everywhere that I'm involved in coop to really understand that diversity starts with openness and and setting the stage for inclusion and then the rest will come up because it's not about color is not about where we school is about Where we went to in all my circles I feel comfortable and Columbus has been an amazing place because Columbus has embraced that spirit of inclusion I and reaping the benefits of diversity here? I've never thought about it that way. So you know. In order to increase diversity I you change yourself off and and seek to be more open as an organization and then that diversity will actually find you because it feels comfortable and it it it connects with that that's correct. Yes so you can't. You can't throw oil on water. And I expect it to mix that's not GonNa Happen I find what you do Incredibly influencing and the first time I shall to you I'll tell you the fact that we wanted our T. shirts to be made by while tiger ts he's also knowing that because of restart ortganizations like yours will now now have an opportunity to not just give these young homeless people a basis a start in the business world as start with the job the skills but that we could build that path for them to follow because you know when they go through tuition and they see all the people. The resources says the community. That has rallied around them to give them a shot at life. Guess what when they get there. They're going to be the same ones reaching out and supporting the next generation of people who need someone who takes shot with them So true and that's why do and we see that we see people who have Gotten back on their feet from the Star House and they come back they help out. And there's there's so many people who struggle with that just sense of. Hey nobody's looking out for me and they don't realize what help is already there so being able to really connect them. I'm an show that hey no we are community we do help each other out that brings on lots of transformation before we wrap up. What what's the vision for restart the vision for us over? The next couple of years is to really take this message and to take what we're doing to mall companies companies empower them to be able to make a difference. Those an interesting piece of news this week that I. I'm not sure if you've heard of it's the the work requirement for State Medicaid Which means that now everybody who gets Medicaid or receives thieves that insurance benefit has to have A set number of hours that they're working and you can look at it if I'm from different in angles There are a lot of people who might lose their benefits. I know the state is working on different ways to help with that. But there's also an immense opportunity for the organizations the apartment complexes where these people on Medicaid live to step but and really understand that. There is a way that we can do this. And whether you're working with restart whether you're working to your own internal Oh Means whatever it is the really is a lot more to be done from the business angle as in the people whose businesses businesses our dependence on these people. You know to do more. And so that's one angle from healthcare perspective or from Tom Wherever they live. Our goal and vision is to partner with more companies to create opportunity and bill strongest cities and to be able to help people really connect with what they need the roles that they care about to do the things that they really would love to do. The mission is simple for is to help people find and grow carriers that they love. It doesn't get more complicated than that. That's awesome thank thank you very much I appreciate it. Thank you very much for the station too. I love how at Restarts Court is a belief that a career is about more than just having a job. It's an expression of purpose and the skills you developed. Put that purpose to work allowing you to afford the life you want. The whole purpose of this podcast is didn't fire your own pat in bill. You with ideas so I just love. The work that they're doing can find out more about come on join restart dot com more information and resources are also on the show notes on people helping people thought world and as always if you like this podcast podcast please subscribe or leave review. That helps a lot. Thank you so much for listening. And until next time.

Medicaid Columbus Star House partner
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

09:43 min | 10 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"People helping people the podcast inspire creator social change in the business world and give you ideas on how to take action action. I'm your host Atom Morris and today I'm talking with Sam. I do Cereal Social Entrepreneur. Who left behind the familiar hustle a building businesses and communities in in West Africa they become part of a new generation of change makers in the mid west of America right now? He is co-founder restart where he leads. A team of passionate people reinventing the way people find greer's the restart mission is simple helping people finding grow careers they will love. They support individuals with resume to help personal branding apprenticeship opportunities and resources develop their skills. But unlike other workforce development companies they have a unique and inspiring approach. So let's try straight into this SAM. Welcome on the PODCAST. Thank you very much chatter. Really appreciate your medication. Yeah I'm excited about this. Can we dive live in and could you give us just a quick overview of what restart is so restart is a social enterprise. First of all this part of the reason why we're here But it's also a workforce development company that is helping people find and grow better careers. Now what's unique about Audet. 'cause there's so many different ways that that can be done is where we find them and connect them with the help. We approach people and and connect them with the help that they need at the places where the spending the most of the money we do this with the businesses that they help help with that money. So if you think of the healthcare systems if you think of the residential real estate your apartment complex your mortgage company. The Bank van called the Financial Company. With whom you spend your money. We focus on reaching out to customers helping connect the customers the better career opportunities better the jobs and better employers so that they're able to better meet their financial obligations to these companies. Grow if you think of it. It's really about customer value and experience in today's world. Everybody really wants to know how the business where you spend. Your money is going beyond a simple transaction with you. Got It if you think of your healthcare system your hospital. They're helping you get better. They healing you taking care. Serve you as a person now. You want to know that. In addition to that you're just not a number with the figure attached a bill to send you WanNa know that they deeply care about how you're able to pay for that bill. How you afford the healthcare so imagining charging and think of going to any hospital system? Ohio health is a pretty good one and get a nod. They're getting out of surgery coming home and getting a letter from Ohio health saying Hey Adam we know that you just went through this experience but we want to make sure you're getting back on your feet. Then you have the resources to help you land on your feet. Well so we have a career development platform and resources to connect you with employers to to grow your career to make sure that your financially sound and this helps you but it also helps that hospital because a better patient at better met a pain. Patient helps them and helps you. That makes a Lotta sense for the company. It's in their best interest to make sure that the people that are using using their services are thriving you can say a better than that think of it in terms of yourself. How would you feel about going to live in a place? That wasn't just a community where you slept but it was also a community that was invested in you finding your next best opportunity your next career your next job interview and all you had to do was actually to live there. You know. That's the kind of value that the companies that we work with. Our sponsors are providing for their customers patients. Dear residents you know and that's what really matters because there's going back to what business was meant to be Helping people with value and then you coin as a result of that. That's a community unity. Where you'd you'd want to give back just because that community was given back to you nasty to you and if you think of all the things that while tiger t does does if you think of all the other great companies that you've had here are doing they're all finding not new ways entirely but but just different ways to do the same things that people used to? But in a way that elevates adds value and changes people's lives for the better because because a better community is a place that's better living people. Yeah that's cool so I just I really love your story and I'd love to kind of dive live in this isn't your first entrepreneurial venture. Can you tell me a little bit. How you got started how I got started? So maybe I'll give you a blue background into how I ended up here And then meeting my co-founder Chad in how we start Went on from there so par to you. The age of seventeen. I grew up in Ghana West Africa. I lived there went to boarding school and then I had a UN scholarship that took me me to Morocco where I live for five years And studying Arabic steady French and then went on to business school now. All there I became really interested stat in mom Eunice and what he was doing with Commune Bank model that he had sat and how businesses were changing today. A It's become a lot more common but back then a company like Kiva seemed out of this world you know and so I ended up using that as the basis of my thesis published in to Books as a result of that on how social entrepreneurship changes. Economics automates In developing countries. But not just there was seeing even much more developed economies in matters and as a result of that ended up going back to Ghana started Company heal the world with a group of our friends who had the same mission you know so we all got together there and we really wanted to empower people to build to create to build businesses that would empower others to follow the same suit. I moved on from that starting a second company which failed grocery delivery business but you learn and then my third Venture was consulting firm Porn. Dale was helping small businesses and startups skill beyond one one or two founders. That really was mission. Giving people the tools the knowledge and the strategy to be able to go beyond their core capabilities. I did that for two three years. And one of my clients Boating which is now a very successful ethical eyewear company in Canada. That really got me thinking with the work that we had done. And how much impact creating with the World Vision and the national moving. Hang on a whole production hub back to Ghana and that was starting to help me understand that those are much bigger place for what I was interested in which is starting companies that have a social mission at the very core of it so I ended up moving to the states After a couple of years going back and forth I got back into what I really loved joined on Empire Bas with as Leland Jerry. Doing wonderful job with changing the way people have access to transportation which is a very fundamental Part of going to workforce That led me to meeting my current CO founder. Chad who had on this other side of the world being transforming the world and with this idea of a debt collection company that could help consumers find jobs. That was ridiculous. You know if you think about it it and you think of any debt collection company. Nobody is ever going to say something. Good right from the bat but no you meet chatting. You hear what his opus has. Big Vision is and then you realize that you're not so crazy. There are people who want to help people and do things differently and we wanted to take this message of maybe business can be done differently to other companies. He's and that was how The kind edition of what restart is took hold so we started focusing on the businesses. We start I focusing on the people at the center of those businesses and we really got to the point where we realized that every single person no matter who you are. Dr Has Three very core relationships. A financial institution where the either borrowing money or keeping money a healthcare institution or. We're a healthcare system where they're getting healthcare when they get sick whether they can afford it or not in a place.

Ghana co-founder Chad Ohio West Africa Audet Atom Morris greer Financial Company Sam America UN Adam Dr Canada Morocco Kiva Eunice
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

02:45 min | 11 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Opportunity. Like this. And it wouldn't be squandered in general when you look back at history again back to the You policier public administration background when you start to study historical movements that have led to good social change and good efforts of renewal a lot of times young people at the root of that you know their their their passion their energy You can see it a little bit even in some of the climate change discussion. That's going going on and I can see a lot of young people really at the forefront I would pray that you know in terms of violence and school violence against similarly. The young voice needs to come out and be heard word and make a difference in it. I think it should be US carrying about lives and carrying about people and if we can get some of the solutions that would allow people to thrive instead that'd be unhealthy. If students aren't falling through the cracks and becoming isolated. Then they're going to be a lot less likely to be part of violence right if they're part community in their connected than we've we've not only avoided the bad but more life has come to them so coming together over something else you you realize we actually share a lot in common when we come together. Great things happen so we'd love to be bringing people together and getting to know people that we haven't event metaphor. Thank you very much for joining me today. And Sharon. What's going on with the conference? Thank you for your work. Thank you for what you're doing in the community. Thank you for wild tiger ts. Thank you for all the efforts to serve other people that you're doing it encourages and inspires me right back and I think we all need that because sometimes The diving into these harder issues gets tiring it gets. It gets hard. It's overwhelming overwhelming sometimes. Yeah but If we all bite off what we can't what we're called to do we can play a part in it and so thank you for playing your part. Thank you so much. You see the world from such a unique fresh perspective so often without the burdens of these perceived limitations that we carry. I love that David. And his team have created a movement through the O.. To Conference to help empower youth maker community thrive in new and exciting ways. You can find out more about the conference at O.. Two Conference Dot Org. If you're in town. The conference is on March. First Twenty twenty and the applications are open until January fifteenth twenty twenty so spread the word that people know about this find more about the elsie. Church visit you a LC DOT org. These resources are also on the show notes on people helping people that world and if you enjoy this podcast subscribe or leave a review. That helps a lot. Thanks so much for listening and until next time cheers..

US Sharon Twenty twenty O David
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

11:47 min | 11 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Got To meet him in the process. I got to meet one of my neighbors. You know what I mean this stuff stuff that we just never have happened very grateful for that but looking broader looking long-term there's no certain solution about what. Aw Do next with this. We're just kind of doing it year by year and seeing where it leads next. But I could envision a future where we do maybe one of two things Since we're located in Hilliard. Oh you're for this event. I know that there are people on a different side of Columbus that may not easily participate in this event it just might be an obstacle to participation so I would very much be interested in partnering with some other people to launch a second site. We've got the event down now. We know how to run it. Well we know how to do the mentoring well. We know how to do the funding on our side of things. We might need to figure out how to do more funding for a second But those are good problems to have and and to launch a second location in central Columbus or East Columbus would be exciting We also try something in your one. That didn't work that we learned from that makes me think about the future as well and so what we learned is we originally tried to allow this event to be opened through. Sixth graders through young adults and the feedback. We got which may not be super conclusive but was pretty clear. The young adults didn't really want to be in competition with middle schoolers and the middle schoolers colors were intimidated or scared off by the fact that there might be young adults in the competition so a lot of people just didn't apply because of that hurdle. So what what would it look like for us to do. Maybe a two night event instead of a one night event. What if we were to do middle school and high school night and then the next night do a young adult only segment for maybe nineteen through twenty five year olds or something like that college college plus Let's allow that age group to have their opportunity to do something like this because they've got a lot of great ideas and I'm sure they would love to put them into action to so yes. People have responses or feedback for that. We'd we'd be interested to hear here it and know if if we're headed in the right direction or not cool now when you actually get to the event Sounds like you have a lot of diversity. In just who comes into that conference absolutely it really is a true melting pot of Columbus in that regard all different ages. I mean literally everybody from the fourth or fifth grader. Who's not quite quite old enough to be a part of the conference? But they heard about it and their parent realizes hey my kids got kind of a an entrepreneur spirit to them or they're just excited about making change in doing good things in the world. They they come in they sit together and they walk out together digesting the ideas. I mean after you've heard five or six awesome ideas that like this. You're you leave and we're just on cloud nine because your head is churning with okay. The those are great ideas can't happens with them but also starts to make you think about your own ideas of what's possible what's possible for me. Yeah and so across the board the people who come to the event and leave have said I just feel rejuvenated. I feel refreshed. I feel like I got a breath. Arthur fresh air. There's the O. Two so it's it's real though it's not some some fake thing they they've expressed this. Then you've also got the seventy and eighty year old in the room who come and get a new perspective on young people. Maybe they are interacting with middle schoolers highschoolers less just because because of their age demographic and I've heard universally from them I'm so encouraged about the future because I see that young people really do care about Columbus. They really do care about our country. They WanNa see good things happen just like I do. Wow this is great. That makes sense. It's easy to lose sight of all the great. The things that are going on if all you do is look at the news or something. That's just negative negative negative Actually realize that no ella. There is some great change going on and people are collaborating in new and exciting ways. A personal motivation for wanting to do this conference certainly is speaking into to a moment. In our country's history where we need more inspiring encouraging things around the forefront right in front of our face and if you come to the conference you'll you'll get a large dose of that and you'll feel encouraged. I am amazed at the mixing pot in terms of people coming from different backgrounds as well. So yeah the amount of Opportunities for people to meet to have dinner together in the midst of the conference to that is encouraged and you get to interact with people you've never met before. It's it's just exciting to know that there is an event where people can come across From wherever their usual group of people is in interact with a whole new group of people and and see that other people care about their their city. Just as much as you do tastic. Now you mentioned if people WANNA get involved. One way is if there in highschool to apply with their ideas yeah What about other people? What are different ways other people can get involved? Yeah I mean I mean. At this point our church funds the event we host the event and so we have our own volunteer base and are mentors and our money to do that But certainly people could donate nate further. If they'd like to see this expand or do more Maybe at some point we will change the way we we do this event. If it gets bigger we'll we'll we'll draw from a bigger volunteer base but because we are a large church. We we have the resources to do this. which is just again? I'm so grateful to ULC general that they're willing to be innovative and try things like this because it really is an experiment at the end of the day to see how we can interact with people well and put our faith in the action and then they can come in at ten as well they can attend in the event yes So that's the best way to participate is is to buy a ticket and student. Tickets are are cheap. They're seven dollars. Adult tickets are fifteen dollars. The adult tickets contribute five dollars right off the bat to the ideas if there are other Needs that people see in the community that we should hear about. I think that's it's really helpful to us too so that we tried to steer the conversation as best. We can't or things that will be profitable Sometimes there are people working on problems in our city that we just aren't aware of we'd love to know more about I guess in general just sharing about the conference with other people that our biggest struggle is that people don't know that this exists. We're still very very new. So if people who are listening to this would simply just text three friends and say hey go check out. Oh to conference dot Org and let your your students or your parents or your other people know about it. Your teachers your administrators I think people should feel confident. And after doing this for two years. Whoever you are whatever back on your coming from you can come be a part of this event and be welcome? It's refreshing. I think in this day and age also where people can simply just be who they are the makes sense. It feels unsafe at times to put yourself out there in ways. I don't know how to express very well but I know that it exists. I know that there's this feeling in a lot of young people especially or for a lot of older people too like everybody's is a little bit worried about offending somebody else and I think what we've shown so far after two years is that we can all be ourselves and connect on this event because the commonality thing the thing that we all have in common at this event is that we wanna see Columbus and the people within Columbus thriving and so if we have that in common then we can get to a new each other on the breakdown might have. Yeah not that is interesting because some conversations about this recently just you know the barriers that we put up you know in front of other people and how to break down those barriers because quite often you know even the people that you hang out with you don't share things that could help each other. Um Yeah I. I've just seen this from the work that we do in the Star House with the youth there in our work programme quite often like they're sharing Adia of. Here's where you can apply for a job. You know. Here's what you could do you know just amongst themselves which is fantastic and law some. Hey well do you always do this and Nope we never talked about that. And there's a sense of like you know they. They don't WanNa look weak or they don't want to perceived in a certain way and so almost these barriers that people have hold them back from connecting and creating change And it sounds like that's a bit of the magic and the conference is breaking that down and creating an environment which has Let's come together and work on this because we believe in the same thing. Beautifully said and Vulnerability is is is hard right. It's not Something that you just toss around because you have to know if the person you're sharing with can be trusted And here at Church we have these small groups where people get to know each other so well that they can actually share life together and then when something great happens and they can celebrate together or something hard happens that they can support each other. We want people to have that sense of community around here because we know how critical it is for us to be isolated or alone is just not how we're built and as a pastor. I have people visit me all the time and share with me really amazing stuff and really hard stuff and be able to say would just administer to them in their need or just to listen or to care for them actively in some way that is practical pray with them help them move through it emotionally. There's a million ways we can help each other right and I'm really grateful. Fold the even though. I didn't think I was going to be passed. I've had a chance to do that and and being people's lives in that way where they they trust me to do that and I'm very grateful for for people people here in this community that way. You didn't think you'd be a pastor. How did that come about? I was a public administration. Major at Miami University thought I was going to be a city manager or something of that sort of public servant where I would again be investing in in and public service. I always enjoyed the concept of being able to express my faith because Jesus serving people all the time I see him sacrificing asking himself for others. All the time and I wanted to embody that in some way But I thought that was my general. Gifting is in administration and leadership and I studied a a lot of policy and it was great. I learned a lot. I went to. DC My wife. And I got married and we had a chance to run run an educational center out there for four years and that was incredible. Work Getting to work with students and parents goal setting for their kids helping them work through issues and obstacles. Little did I know all that time. I was kind of being prepared to work with students in a different way and so forth. I really got a sense of. I'm supposed us to invest in in people getting a chance to examine examined faith and get an understanding of what's been laid out in the Bible and then Jesus and you know when you get a chance to do that. And let people wrestle with the big questions of life It has challenges but it has a lot of a lot of rewards adds to it. Because you're getting people people's foundation for the decisions they'll make as they grow into adults and then an opportunity came back in my hometown of Dayton Ohio to do that and and Then ten years later I was doing that whole whole thing. And now it's been fifteen years that have been investing in in young people and I've always seen that they're super capable will any challenge ever throughout the middle school or high school or nine times out of ten. They rose to the challenge. I would say cumulatively. Ten Years of Youth Work led me to the the conclusion that Young people could be entrusted with an.

Columbus Hilliard Dayton Ohio Star House Arthur Miami University nate ULC Church
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

11:48 min | 11 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"I'm your host at amores today. I'm talking with David. White a pastor at U. A. L. C. in Hilliard Ohio and founder of the O.. Two Conference it's a conference that is breathing life into Columbus through. The ideas of young people is about supporting youth and their ideas to make life better and more sustainable helping them create social change and well well making our communities thrive so David welcome on the podcast. Geoff bright in with a high level overview. What the OTA conferences about definitely? It's an event for sixth through twelfth graders who identify a need in their local community. It could be as local as their home or their school. But really it's intended to help Columbus thrive and that's a key word. For Word Thrive we WANNA see people in Columbus thriving and we want to see the city thriving and we believe that young people are super capable world changers. They don't need to be older to make a difference but they do need a lot of experiences and a lot of opportunities to do that and so the conference exists to give of sixty twelfth graders a platform to express their ideas that meet a need in Columbus and then for six months after the event they receive a mentor who who can walk them through how to bring their ideal life and we give a total of ten thousand dollars away or more depending on people give donations which is awesome. That's happened in years where we've actually given closer through eleven thousand dollars away. So they have both mentoring and funding for the opportunity to bring their idea to life. So the theme for this year is a Thriving Environment And the conference itself is on March. First Twenty twenty yeah okay. Location and deadline is January sixteenth for middle schoolers highschoolers to submit their ideas. We can review them. We select five to six each year in year. One Eight and that was awesome. But it was a bit ambitious to cover in one night and so we've realized that Five or six is a good a good point for us to work with God. It's to do you do a lot of prep work beforehand on getting people to submit ideas. Yeah we're really getting the word out right now all year long. Okay we try to let schools administrators straighter. Teachers know that this is one of those amazing opportunities that can allow your students to take stuff. You've been working on already in the classroom to that next step. I think it's very reasonable in any in any age group that Teachers run out of resources or time or the ability to take twenty students in their ideas further to actually letting them go out into the real world and try those ideas in some cases able to accomplish all of that but in other cases. What's GonNa come along those teachers and support their efforts and their dreams for their kids? Will this conference does exist in many ways to help people with senior capstone projects or maybe somebody WHO's in boy scouts girl scouts and has an effort like that Maybe it's just simply a J. Term Project and they're excited about solving an issue and they're trying to create some change in Columbus when the end of the term comes or the end of the semester project comes sometimes students will just stop right there right. We would like to be the platform where students say you know what. I was really intrigued by that. I was really inspired by that. I feel like I could actually be the one to to help that. Go further and then And then what like. What's the answer and this is where the mentors in the funding and this platform to even just learn how to express your you get to stand Dan in front of three hundred four hundred people who've just come to simply watch and be inspired and encouraged and want to encourage you as a student to go after this I mean we've had tremendous underst- response from the community just to come and watch this thing? They buy a ticket cost fifteen dollars to come but five dollars of that gets put into the ideas themselves and the people pitched the ideas when they come to the conference at the beginning. Or is this after at the end of the conference that they they pitch. Yes so there is some preparatory work that we do okay as you were asking a bunch of prep work to get to know the students better And we have an an a training session for them where they prepare to pitch at the actual conference they pitch for a period of time to the panel of mentors and all those who are present to watch then we have a dinner break. We hear a few more ideas and and then at the end of the the audience gets to vote for the idea that they love. And and since it's Oh to you get to vote guess what twice vote for two few winners and we actually start at five. Zero two PM goes five to eight. PM So cool. You know just a lot of fun quirks with this idea and I can. I can tell you more about oxygen here in a little bit but that happens and then after the vote. We hear from a keynote speaker. God and the keynote this this year is freedom. Allah Carts Executive Director Paula Hanes. We're thrilled to have her She will further inspire and just encourage people that there's a lot. What a great change that can be made here in Columbus to help our city thrive? She's got a great story to tell now she doesn't work in human trafficking and absolutely you. I love what she's building here in Columbus that's awesome. It really is incredible and after that the panel comes back into the room and they get a chance to share who they are now. Pairing up with the the mentors will decide who pair up with for the next six months. So that's a really on top of the fact that we're awarding them. A certain dollar amount cannot dollar amount could range from five hundred dollars up to four thousand dollars but the total pot of money is going to be divided amongst the five or six people usually need. So what what sort of ideas have have come in the past. Sure wide varieties which is kind of intentionally what we're wanting to do. We have not picked a really specific targeted theme lake AAC simply mental health. Although we love when people use that as a platform to pursue a solution to some of the mental health issues that students are facing these days we we did have an idea that address that and it was wonderful to hear fast forward and their idea about how they're going to help people fast forward through the stigma. That often comes with that. That feeling that you WANNA share with people what you're struggling with but you don't do it God and then you're isolated and you don't make progress but if you just fast forward through the stigma then maybe you could reach reach mental health in a new way right and so she created a student driven platform online where she could give students resources and interact with people and to see that idea. Actually come to alive and have this website bolstered and and Her develop that with more resources and start to reach out. That was an exciting movie. That's one of the ideas but our teams are broader. Because we want to hear as a church we are specifically saying. There's lot of things we could go. Try to pursue in terms of helping people thrive but what if we didn't immediately start picking things to solving going after them. What if we actually paused and listened and heard directly from the community? Not what they believe. The problems are and then we can just be aware of them better before we go go attempt to solve them. That's how you're not just running out trying to solve problems that don't exist. You're waiting for the people who have those problems to come in articulate them definitely cool yes. So there's been any range from that to Margaret Lease idea with the Hillard. Food Pantries in school Tell me a little bit about that. That was that has been an amazing Example of what can happen when all of these networks of people come together and work together and support a young person and their idea and their passion. What was the problem from that she identified? Yeah she noticed that people in her school were distracted in the classroom because they were hungry. She noticed that. There's a lot of stigma attached with Having to qualify for free or reduced launch or other things like that that were income level based type things she wanted to create a solution of these things where if people had a need whether it was hunger or maybe some basic school supplies or maybe some some personal products that can be available in a location at her school then they could simply come in grab what they needed. Ah just mark that. They took something so that she could see what was being used and restock it. Oh cool no need to qualify. Privacy is high very high there. You just there's bags or you can toss stuff in walkout with or you can just eat it in the classroom or wherever your teacher allows you to so amazing thing that she and her principal partners partnered on I mean props to her school to experiment and try and they found that it worked in. Its in its pilot and then her vision was say was to say. I want to give this gift to all hilliard middle schools and high schools so it went beyond her school so she applied to the conference at that point and said at this is my this is my vision but I you know it's going to take resources is going to take help. I can't do this all on my own. And so she started enlisting and sharing her vision with other people she had the platform at the conference to share it with three hundred people who were all encouraging her along and she walked thirty five hundred dollars she was the audience award winner one of the two audience award winners that night and she walked out with a great mentor. And so in the past Let's see we're about eight months out from the last conference. where she he participated she has since then launched five food pantries in five different schools in Hilliard? Oh fantastic she was featured on NBC. Four she's had a chance to experiment not no. She's had a chance to really be living out her passion her dreams and clearly. This is a stepping stone for her to do all kinds of cool things in the future too but it seems like that's a need that exists all around in Columbus in schools on. It's like here's a solution that works and doesn't take a ton of money To start one of these or to keep them running but it does take something and it takes a school partnership and I know there's other community organizations that have gotten behind her as well so props to the whole hilliard community for for getting behind that effort and making it come to life so it seems like there's this element of students who are in the community and they see prom. I'm are experiencing a problem and coming up with a solution for that. But it's the whole conferences about bringing people together to solve that and to give support to those ideas. Yeah one of the very first moves that we encourage our mentors to make after getting to work with the student is to consider their network of people got it because one mentor can't possibly Lamey all the needs of any entrepreneurial You might have the skill set. That's really helpful to that idea. For example one of our mentors last last year is a choir teacher in a middle school. Katie whiting and it happened to be that we already secured her as a mentor. And then the project application that came along was for the Crescendo. Project object which is to do a choir based where you can allow other people who don't have a lot of arts opportunities in their schools to come and get an opportunity like that and learn how to be a part of a team uh-huh and growth and health and well being in the process of all of that so that was just a coincidence. It was amazing. It was amazing and from a faith perspective I was like wow. This is really neat. How how from my perspective guide is leaving a lot of these things together and so I was encouraged by that and so they're going to host an event that has brought together multiple acquires? Here's to Allow this thing to to kind of happen for the first time they have all the passion in the world and energy in the world to change the world which is awesome. We want them to to pursue that And sometimes they've never taken on a project of this nature or this size and so when you have an idea and it's kind of formed or mostly formed uh-huh and then you start to put it into real life you start to realize. Oh they're here's an obstacle. I didn't anticipate here's something new. And and then the mentor is there to help.

Columbus David Hilliard Ohio amores Geoff bright hilliard middle schools Hilliard Twenty twenty U. A. L. C. O founder Katie whiting Dan Executive Director NBC Paula Hanes Margaret Lease principal Hillard
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

08:36 min | 11 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"You eliminate the trash in single use plastic in your life so toothbrushes Reasonable face towels or Keratin pads different. Things like that. I've seen a lot more of these companies popping up that are about upcycle there or or kind of products being reused What do you see happening in that space because that seems like something that's starting to almost exploded in a new way? Yeah so with the idea that people are taking something that some people will call trash and turning them into products or items I think that that is definitely growing. I think that it goes along side of the really. Oh you re reduce reuse recycle. which is you right now? You know people are really getting on that which is awesome of not only creating less ways by purchasing secondhand. I know that this kind of the original eco-friendly environmentally friendly conscious shopping. That people did that. We didn't even really think about. I grew up shopping secondhand and I didn't really realize allies impacted actually had until way later in life But I definitely see that an hope let that area grows. I hope that we see more business like that. I know that there's a lot of jewelry. Businesses seem to be huge right now with that of taking. You know either Ole jewelry that would have been thrown away or recycled metal recycled anything like that and reforming coming into this awesome jewelry. That people get to US And then I also see a little bit Sometimes scandal companies will do it sometimes Even if it's just not their whole product but it's a small aspect of their product the containers that they make the candles in or the specific part of what they're doing. You know. Hey this was recycled. This was reused this which is awesome. I think quite often people don't realize that even with recycled goods like there's a huge energy costs to taking the material L. processing it and getting it ready to be reformed so when companies actually take consider essentially trash and reuse them. One A lot of energy that goes into that manufacturing goes away because you re using it. You're not recreating products cuts down on a lot of waste east. So what you get with. These kind of upside cycle products is something which is saving you from buying something else and clogging up the manufacturing system with waste. Yeah definitely getting more life out of the stuff that we already have. Yeah definitely that's cool. So what's your vision for Consciously bus over the next couple of years yes so the biggest thing that we obviously want to stand for ongoing is businesses just doing good and small businesses doing good And again connecting those consumers to those businesses connecting those businesses to each other down the road. I think that we will do a little bit more consulting businesses a little bit more hands on with them and sharing Ideas again like we discussed earlier about how they can do. Better And again mm simple methods. It's nothing that's going to be breaking the bank or this big huge turnaround or anything like that And then of course we would love to do our blog and possibly down the road open somewhat of a conscious market where people can continuously come to the website and there's a spot on there with specific businesses in the area. That are doing good. So when they're thinking. Oh Hey I wanNA shop for my friend to super socially conscious they can help on our website go to the market page and everything would there and then they can pick their gift from there because right now for me. I am purchasing Christmas gifts for people but I luckily have my pool of resources right now but bye. I love to keep everything socially conscious and if I didn't have conscious Columbus I would be googling day in day out conscious business near me how to do conscious. Christmas is all that kind of fun stuff off. So I'm trying to kind of ease that for people and not only that but I'm also trying to turn around and make it look like. Hey this is the way to go like you. Don't need to purchase all this stuff from Walmart or Amazon. Even though I love Amazon you compared from you can get a candle. That is socially conscious you can get a zero waste kit that socially conscious inches. You can get clothing. You can get jewelry you can get anything socially conscious Even just gift cards to coffee. Shops bakeries or restaurants in general there's so many farm-to-table able restaurants in Columbus different places. There's yeah there's it's a growing community I would say a couple a couple of popped up here now and in you know there's more but they are difficult to find. It's usually when I'm there already eating. I discover it versus me googling for an hour farm-to-table restaurants near me 'cause that doesn't always work out but usually Just hearing about them or meeting people and also played it as one of them that I recently got to try skill. Gila is another one. That's really good. Yeah they're really cool and usually again. They're supporting local farmers. There a lot of organic products there A lot of their alcohol if they have the bar is locally sourced have a lot of ideas in mind four conscious Columbus and one of them is a conscious or sustainable restaurant. Spread hopefully down the road So we'll we'll keep you in the loop on that if we get that up and running in posted on instagram and hopefully our blog so one. What's the best way for people to find you? The best way right now is to get on instagram and search conscious CIBA's that is our handle That's the way to find us right. Now follow us on instagram. Or we are on facebook as well We'll post on both of those when it is live and give you that active linked to go to facebook facebook it would be just conscious Columbus spot out. I believe I think our short name is consciously bus on there as well so if people are interested in their conscious gift guide they can find that on on your your website which we will put in the show notes and please go on. Check that out and hopefully get inspired with some cool ideas which you've never heard of That will make a huge difference just for and local businesses here in the community. But you'll also be making an impact with the gifts that you do and quite often. These guys are very call their different Their unique because they're made by it local artisans so yeah I see some of the best. And then if you're looking for further resources also please check out the marketplace on the social ventures website website They list a hundred social entrepreneurs here in Columbus They're not all product-based. They have different businesses. But it's a great A directory to go to just to see what is available here in Columbus for companies that are specifically designed around making a social impact. What other words of wisdom behalf create less waste shop social enterprises than small businesses? Doing good and I think the biggest thing would it really comes down onto is just thinking about your purchases just kind of realizing respecting what went into that and what who may have you know. Oh possibly suffered because of it or what may have possibly suffered because of it. I think that that's really the biggest thing that it comes down to is purchasing clothing. And you just think like you see the Tagore Gore was made and you just know like this. This is not good. This is not made ethically and so. That's a big deal for me so I try to think about my purchases before making them you know. Do I need this. Is it necessary or you know. Does it have a purpose and then thinking further than that you know who is impacted by this and how how and making sure that it was a positive impact in not a negative impact. I think that's that's really what it comes down to. I think once we start our heads around that mindset that will all transition towards making purchases that have greater impact instead of just buying what's convenient or quick or easy or doing.

Columbus facebook US Ole jewelry Tagore Gore instagram Amazon Gila CIBA Walmart
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

10:44 min | 11 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Unusually cold foods fresh. thyme there's a couple of smaller ones Incumbents that also offer spices and bulk You know even salt. I've seen him book before which is really cool to think about that. You can get that much in bulk But that eliminates a lot of the plastic and a Lotta trash and then simply just bringing your own cup to is a huge thing. That's that's what. I'm a huge advocate for. It's again super easy to do. And a creates a three or four or five less pieces of trash. They're going to be thrown away if you think about the straw draw the lid the COP. Sometimes there's asleep sometimes. There's you know you get a Napkin with the or if you put sugar in your coffee all that extra trash that can be eliminated. That's that's one of the most Big forward basing problems. I think that just day in day out everybody can contribute to and it doesn't cost a whole lot it doesn't make it's not as huge hassle. It's just just a simple bringing your own cup with you somewhere really cool So that's one of the biggest ones. I think that my next one not necessarily addresses specific problem but I think the entire idea that several things that you would buy on a daily basis or you would do. Do you know social activities. You can do them in a way that you're impacting others positively and that's kind of where conscious Columbus comes into play with you you know. Hey you wanna go for a cup of coffee with a friend. Here are five socially-conscious coffee shops in Columbus Ohio. That you can do that at and Your Cup of coffee in your time with if your friend is going to have this much greater impact than it would if you just went to McDonalds or to Martin's so places like the Roosevelt Coffeehouse House bottoms up coffee There are a couple even outside of Columbus That also have positive impacts but we the always posted on our page of course but even if you just google them or if you look in you know social ventures Just asking too when you do get to a place you know asking asking. Hey do you guys do anything. Socially conscious do you guys have an impact anyhow in just making your your day to day life and your activities have a bigger a greater raider impacts crosses the mind for a lot of people have. Hey when I go out I can find out if the companies I'm doing business with are are doing good in the community So that's very interesting. Just ask and say. Hey what are you doing and yeah because I think when people are doing something they looked to talk about it. Yes definitely yeah definitely and I will say if you ask them and they're not doing anything please point them in our direction and we will help them do something cool. We love that we love helping people be more conscious and especially businesses and working with them and everybody just having a greater impact so if a business came to you and they were like. Hey we wanna make a better impact tenor Jenner community. What what what type of work would you do with them? So it'd be several different avenues. Obviously there's really simple once again going back to trash Asia and less waste. That's just always. The simplest swap people can make So I the first thing that I would honestly encourage for instance. We'll use the coffee shop example since we've been talking coffee shops A lot of times in Columbus. It's not as big of an issue but elsewhere they offer mugs. They will offer you know in house equipment to use if you're sitting there I know starbucks is kind of a fight them on that. Sometimes is you know I know I just wanted them up. I don't WanNa pay anything So you you know. Making small swaps like that would always be encouraged. Hopefully ideally maybe pairing them up with nonprofits could be another opportunity. They're saying hey whether hi there. It's once a month. Your whole team goes in volunteers. Or you donate a certain percentage of your profits to them or you even just have food driver diaper driver clothing dry for them. There's so many different small opportunities that really don't cost anyone anything in the long run because people typically already have those things there But just kind of making that stands in standing up and making that impact and pushing things further Um Soobee a little bit of both of those and then obviously the more if they have specific ideas this we'd love to chat specific ideas and kind of go further into that aspect as needed score. Because I think quite often one of the big barriers that people have is they just don't know what's possible right so you know just sitting down and saying. Hey here's what you can do and if it doesn't cost you money in it. It's something better than what they're doing doing. People will generally do it unless it's a lot of effort or really complicated because people do want of a better communities living in so definitely. I think when you make that easy for people and find out exactly what they can do they make that choice. Yeah Tall Yup. And that's what we love to try to make it easy. Both for the consumer and the businesses of just connecting them together and making sure that everybody knows that they have that option and that that choice of having their purchase at a greater impact. Now I'd love to move on and talk a little bit about some of the great things that you've seen in Columbus what people people are doing either productwise or our mission lies because he took a lot of stuff in. Yes I do. I love exploring learn. Columbus Encompasses a great place to find those socially-conscious enterprises businesses and individuals in general Some of the biggest just one. I think that I constantly going back to Roosevelt Coffee House. Of Course Milo bottoms up coffee house. There's a lot of even smaller. You're not smaller. But I guess different businesses that are also having greater impact Cova Co working is a new one co working space. They have a really positive impact in what they're doing. Um and they're really have a program down the road that will be focusing on social enterprises and helping them get up and running and continuing the work that they're doing so it's kind of a cool idea that it's your heard working with a business. Whose further working with more businesses? Who have all those long term impact on everything And it's really cool to think about that. There's other additional resources. Well well I'm conscious. Capitalism is one. I recently went to an event of theirs and got to learn about what they're doing that to me again like minded people doing over there so conscious. Capitalism them is focusing on kind of similar to what we're doing but on a larger scale they really focus on businesses that operate with conscious means so again. Go back to that idea that you can operate or you can operate and have a greater impact in the cool part about them that they pointed out a lot of really big companies. That we're doing this at. I didn't even know about Ben and Jerry was one of them but it was just really cool to hear like hey. They're socially conscious I had no idea by. A bunch of Benadryl various cream. Yeah and and they don't. I don't think that they really brag about it. Which is fine but I definitely didn't know and actually that's very interesting too because they they did a lot of work? There was a bakery called the greystone bakery which had a model of hiring people will who had barriers to entry so a lot of people have been incarcerated or head issues with drugs and originally they Ben and Jerry's bought Brownies from them to sell along with her ice cream. But when they received the boundaries they're all clumped together And there there's no way for them to separate and actually sell them. And that's how the double Brownie chocolate ice about. What are we going to do with these bounds? They put them in there and I think they've been working percents. That's so cool. When Jodi Lhasa's looking for for a model of a company that he could start up he modeled hot chicken take over at least Justin Bakery so it's very interesting how successful social enterprises inspire other social entreprises? Yes yes it definitely is. I mean I'm inspired by all of them to be honest so I love. I love taking notes and I've had the opportunity to talk with the owners of a couple of them too and kind of just take notes about you. Know How I'm going to do my own some day okay and get to learn from there But yeah bakeries. He made me think about that. There's a lot of socially-conscious bakeries in the area. I think Freedom Kamala car is one of them that socially conscious and then for the hiring clean turn does that third way cafe does that I believe A couple of other organizations around around them there's so many so many businesses in Columbus and once you start to look you kinda feel like sometimes you hit the Jackpot. 'cause you find one and then you find five fantastic attack like I have to go visit all of these as soon as possible and so it's really cool to to really get to explore them and find out what they're doing that's cool now for the holidays you've put together a guide for conscious shopping. Yes correct so he'd conscious Holiday Guide is a guide. kind of your one stop shop for learning about conscious businesses in the area and giving you the opportunity to patronize them. I'm for your holiday shopping. Our focus is a little bit more small-scale with it there's a lot of really small businesses in the area that are doing good but aren't you know as is big as some of the other. You know huge companies I will say eleven. Candle Co isn't it and they're pretty big company. We've got a lot of smaller ones of A couple of zero waist one such as re-use revolution full circle so a couple really cool even smaller scale businesses. That not only. Are you supporting a good cause but you are supporting. Somebody is small little dream that they're working on in their kitchen they're working on in their studio And trying to help them you know take it a little bit further over. Can you tell me a little bit. About what some of these companies are doing yes so eleven. Candle Co is a candle company. They fight human trafficking with their operations. which is awesome They I have several other candles. I Love Them. Yes I do. Love their candidate candles. When I'm editing? The podcast Yeah Yeah. There's a couple of different conscious candle companies he's in Columbus but they all kind of have their own thing which is really cool that way. They're not competing really against each other. They're kind of with each other on it A couple of the other ones that we have are the ice cream. One for instance. They do Vegan ice cream and they have less waste operations and you can currently purchase coaches their items I think out of the Bexley market which is cool because they're still pretty new full circle and we're used Lucien are both them all about zero waste or less with lifestyle so they provide products. They provide resources that help..

Columbus Candle Co Columbus Ohio Roosevelt Coffee House Ben starbucks Jerry Jenner community McDonalds Asia Um Soobee google Roosevelt Coffeehouse House Cova Co Lucien Jodi Lhasa Freedom Kamala Justin Bakery
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

10:30 min | 11 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"You ideas on how to take action. I'm your host a Morris today. I'm talking with Heidi Rumble. It conscious business activists here in Columbus Ohio. She's passionate about reducing waste and making in purchasing decisions that have an impact and she's also has plans for own social enterprise. She's just released her holiday guide to help you. Purchase conscious gifts chiefs and I'm very excited to have her on the podcast. Talk about easy ways that you can make an impact while you do your holiday shopping so without further Ado Heidi welcome on the podcast. Thank you nice to be here. You have quite a social impact mission that you're developing in your life as if we could just start and talk about some of the projects that are you working on absolutely so again start with Conscious Columbus since that's my kind of most recent and most active one I started at conscious Columbus to really connect consumers merge with conscious businesses in Columbus Ohio. So kind of a little bit of everything social enterprise nonprofits Even those small non-classified businesses that actually are giving back with their business in some way or another so started that on social media just an instagram page. Really to get with people meet new people and connect everybody together. I'm always say I'm not necessarily creative. One behind the scenes doing arts and crafts but I am a loudspeaker and I'm very passionate so I can really amplify their voice and their existence So sort of that and just started posting starting to meet people doing a lot of networking with it and then going from there We are slowly transitioning into a full blog and a couple of other little fun things that are coming along this holiday season to really highlight those businesses and those people and individuals doing good in Columbus. Very cool you have big dreams as well with plans to open a coffee shop down the road correct. Yes yes I have a social entreprise of my own Called the solar being cafe and currently were seeking a home in a small village outside of Zanesville Ohio it's an an impoverished village with a lot of social issues going on right now and they're looking to revamp it so we are really looking to hopefully find a home there and be a late in the community and operate again with those same social impact mindset of giving back to the community. You know hiring troubled use hiring people who've been through and really just trying to help the community in every way that we can and be a business that's more than just profit. Cool what kind of experience have you had ed with risk youth so with at risk youth I have done a little bit of volunteering on my own and then I actually worked for the Star House in here in Columbus Ohio for about about a year. I was a youth advocate so I was on the floor with them constantly talking with them helping them And I was very again with my personality ended up being very loud. They're very very optimistic very jumpy but I really loved helping them with their resumes. I really loved helping them. Just sit and talk with them. Even I sometimes would sit with one youth for an hour our and have a really long discussion. And you find out that there's a person behind that homeless youth are at risk youth. You find that there's somebody there. And they have the story. And then in my mind I just start formulating. How can I help them? Here's the story but let me help you so that I would be like we'll all these places are hiring and there's this other resource center and there's this and you should read this book and really just trying to help them in any way that I could which I'm sure a lot of them thought I was crazy but I love doing it. I love that now I talk about. It's our house a lot on the PODCASTS. Because I'm a huge fan but for anybody who does not know. Can you give us a description of the star houses. Yeah so star. House is a drop in center for Homeless Youth for at risk youth in Columbus Ohio It is open twenty four hours a day you can come in. They can get necessary resources to just have a eh basic lifestyle so there showers laundry. There's clothing there's things like toothbrush toothpaste all those kind of day-to-day items. That we all sometimes take for granted they can go in and receive counseling. And then there's a youth advocate such as what I was that they can discuss with oftentimes are there to help. Always there to help. It often times they will help them with their resumes. Such as I did or help them with the basic skills of like. Hey let's figure out how to go online and find jobs. Let's figure out how to cook something So it's just a really all encompassing place and kind of kind of a home for a lot of them in a way because because they don't have one so it's a place for them to stop and kind of reset and rest and and then be ready to go back now. I have a lot of misconceptions when when I first went to the Star House. I'm just curious from your point like what you learned about. The people that came in was different from people might expect. Yeah I think the biggest biggest thing that I really learned was that there are people behind that idea of a homeless youth and we often don't think about homeless people being youth sir. How serves the ages up to twenty five years old so their under twenty five years old making me in there and a lot lot of times? They have kids themselves so then. It's not only this single youth that you're serving by their our youth beneath that that are also being impacted by this so I think that it was really the realization tonight. They're all humans and they'll have their own story and they all have something somewhere in their life and they can pinpoint you know. This is exactly what happened in a lot of times. They're like I don't know what happened. I'm just here and I know it and And I myself have been in a position where I have been bouncing between people's couches or you're just not having a solid place to live. I had a car thankfully in half my hanging in my car but so I had just a little bit of an idea of how it can be to be all right. Let's find somewhere to go. Let's make sure we've got this leads. You know go call my siblings call family members call my friends and be like hey. Can I stay here tonight. Which is definitely a lot better than a lot of them had but it was Really just eye opening to meet a lot of them and then here about you know. Where did you sleep last night? Okay and where that was and it's like Oh my gosh is really shoe and real people. Here they really need our help. That's always surprised me like when we go in for our work work programme with wild. Tiger ts Everybody is really different. And I'm always amazed that people are very articulate about their situation. They typically know l. what they're going through but from one person to the next like what they struggle with varies a lot and and so it's really working with people one on one. They're not that different from you. Know how how Iowa when I was twenty you know this kind of trying to figure things out and complicated. They're betsy and for them. It's just more complicated and messy. I think the big thing that I realized is that I've had my struggles but I've always had someone there. I thought family I community. I've had friends a lot of them. You know they don't have family or their family has turned on them and all the friends in the same situation as them so star house can kind of be that buffer that bouncer for them. It's like hey you can come here and you can talk with other people. We can also talk with people they had counselors and stuff on staff so I think that was another thing too is realizing like even if I I lost everything I had today like. I have people there that are going to help me. And they didn't and they don't often and that's that's the kind of the harsh about it. That's really rough part about it. It is really tough. No I definitely developed a huge appreciation for everything. My parents did when I was growing. I don't think I realized it at the time until he. Yeah until much until you realize that. Hey when people don't have this this is what you know. They're facing has working at the Star House shaped a bit. What you WANNA do in your own career? It has a little bit so I have always been a little bit of I. Guess an oddball when it comes to to my passions and wanting to help people I yes I did very young age I really loved writing and I really loved drawing maps maps and images and graphics and things like that And I just started kind of formulating all these ideas. How to help people? When I was older and a lot of times it had something having to do with you know? I'm going to build the community. I'm GonNa Build House for people I'm going to have a place. People can come and stay. Do all this really fun stuff. And of course I was young at the time nine ten eleven years old. They can't really do a whole lot at that age In so from there on how. It's just been a simply a matter of. How can I get this final goal? Where am helping people in what I do? And I've taken a lot of different paths to get there and start houses definitely one of those where it gave me insight on what they were doing themselves nonprofits in Columbus just just meeting other like minded people and working in a place where other people have similar mindsets of. We want to help people and that's why we're here so it's definitely a big part of. It's very long journey of getting to a place where day in and day out. I am just simply living to help other people and make an improvement on where I'm at in my community and my world and so on and so forth and I it seems like you've dug really deep into the community in Columbus and you have a really good understanding standing of some of the things that are going on here and I was just wondering if I could pick your brain on what you've seen are some of the big problems that are outstanding People could jump in and address. Yeah definitely definitely so one of the biggest problems I think the automatically comes to my mind when I think of Columbus or any really big city is trash rush and I think that everybody kind of has that similar mindset If you go to any festival and he gets the other and gathering even on the street and stuff and the trash cans they're just overflowing with trash and I think there was one of the first things that I started doing when I kind of move towards his conscious lifestyle is realizing that. Hey I don't have to make as much trash as as I am So simple quick changes that I made. were no more grocery bags using reasonable straws bringing my own containers when possible Bulk Food shopping thing. That can be a hassle but it is very rewarding and the end and if you get your system up and running than it really works out for you Chopping Book Food Shopping. So uh-huh buying simple things like oatmeal popcorn grains nuts and seeds like your dry staples you can purchase in bulk..

Columbus Star House Columbus Ohio Ohio Heidi Rumble instagram Morris Zanesville House betsy Iowa
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

08:58 min | 11 months ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Took a long scary. I still struggle with that. It's been kind of like really big marketing experiment for me as all shiner figure out what works and what doesn't work and the strategy behind it is really fun and something that I have never done before and it's building a brand and also having having something that's just mine that if I have an idea and no one can say no to has been really fun school now. Do you have a favorite episode of somebody you've talk to. Oh Gosh so I have a couple. I interviewed my boss. Madison and About point and how she started a and she has a really incredible story and a really great speaker and then I also interviewed Eh one other people who started the random acts of kindness foundation so that was pretty amazing and I wanted to talk to her all day and then I also talked to this guy from Kenya. who started like a crowd sharing platform for tractors? I A lot of people in sub Saharan Africa. Don't have the money to pay for their own like massive farm equipment and it wouldn't be profitable for a company to buy the equipment and then rent it out so like Uber but for agriculture which has been really awesome. I also talked to this woman who works at a recycling company in my original goal was to talk to her about like technical recycling stuff but the way the conversation went was amazing. She told me about how it's important to be socially minded as well as like environmentally minded minded. She had a really great quote. And I'm not going to get it perfect but she said like if you're struggling to put food on the table like you're not going to care about the planet and so it's really really important to work on both on both like social justice issues and environmental issues so I really like the content of that one but I think my favorite episode was one of my very first and I interviewed the state representatives who formed a coalition called the Ohio women lead. It was so fun. The Policy Junkie in me was just fan growing so hard and all three of them came and when we did it in person and I was just super excited to be in the presence of these amazing powerful women and they talked about you know not politics but being a woman in politics and how difficult it is but also how hard they're working to change that and how they're they're just lifting other women up in politics not just in central Ohio by all over Ohio and all over the country in the world and just talked about being a woman and diversity in politics. It was incredible and I cried. I was done because I was so excited about it. Ah that is really cool. Now do you have a vision for where you'd like the world to go the world the world. Wow You WANNA hear hear my plan for when I'm in the world and making every view could make a huge one change in the world that would totally altered the direction. Like what would you do. That's a good question. Okay so this. I don't talk talk about mental health. Allot on sees the gut. But one big thing that I think would make a huge difference for for every one is therapy and I feel like if If everyone or more people would have the chance to go to therapy. Dan Talk with a therapist and learn good like social emotional skills and relationships skills and just kind of vent about their problems and and and feel validated and realize that their emotions are okay a normal and literally every single human whether you're like the poorest this person on the planet or the richest person on the planet has the exact same emotions and those emotions are okay to have and they're normal and natural and you should be feeling or emotions than I think everyone would be happier and probably understanding each the author of it better and understand themselves and just be able to be be happier and better humans. That answer kind of surprised me because I I think if I had a longer time to think about like one big thing I would I would do in the world I would think for a long time and probably make some kind of like institutional institutional change around policy or like racial injustice or classes or something like that but that was just the first thing that came to my head. That's actually really cool because I think quite often change starts with within the quotes from Ghana. AP The change that you see in the world but that idea of work on yourself. I I and I think that changing stigma around mental illness is really important in something. I care a lot about but I think that therapy is not just for people who have mental illness. But it's for literally everyone because we all are dealing with the exact same things and and it's so important to learn like how to like cope with bad feelings and also feel validated. That your feelings are okay and you should be having them everyone. Everyone like. That's very consistent across the board. I think people are really successful on. You realize wait a minute. They're struggling with the same thing is so crazy to me like like. I know that a lot of people have a problem with this phrase and it's not just me but when people are like Oh like when you're sad like think about all the things that you have to be grateful for are like yeah practicing mine fully being thankful for positive for the things that you have are really important but by like you. You can't be sad ever. You can't be disappointed. You can't be heartbroken. Those are natural human emotions. Everyone when is going to have no matter like how much money you have or like how healthy you are or whatever like everyone's going to have those motions that makes sense. It's super crazy. So what would you change in the World Vision for the world you know. I think if people were focused on being more kind that a lot of good stuff what happened you know just saying hey wait a minute. It's not all about me. We're all in this together Just shifting two very in a similar way just recognizing that we're all struggling in life's not easy so let's make it easier for everyone and and pitch in told a little bit more kindness in the world. I love that and that's kind of like similar answers that we had. We're both very like social impact like social business. It's like all of these like important changes. That's the answer. So chats probably get rid of corporate lobbying that might be I love that but cool. So how does he people find out about ceased good so seasick at dot org at sees. I used to get podcast on instagram. Very cool super excited and anything else that you'd like to share before we go subscribe and Lake to people well helping people Give it five stars because it's awesome and Adam never says that at least in the episodes doesn't set so I'm saying for him. It's awesome very much and things are having you on the podcast so much I love. Thanks let me just say that was so much fun. I just loved Stephanie's overflowing enthusiasm so please go check out her podcast on sees the good dot org for more inspiration. Also thank you Stephanie. For pointing out that. If you like this podcast please subscribe or leave a five star review. That does help a lot and as always check out the show notes on people helping people dot world for war resources. Thanks so much for listening and until next time cheers..

Ohio Stephanie Dan Talk Saharan Africa Madison Ghana Kenya. Adam
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

16:35 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"I'm excited to share some of the history and social entrepreneurship on this podcast. And how the challenges that nonprofits have have changed over the years as well as to hear hear about route strikes new workshop hopeless fearless so dave. Welcome on the PODCAST. Oh thank you appreciate being here. What got you into social entrepreneurship in the beginning? Well I was born in nineteen sixty six. Wow so I was a entrepreneur and The first ten years of my career was sort of in business in the for profit world and nonprofit sector was not on my radar screen in the least when I wrote a check every now and again but I couldn't have articulated in any meaningful way. What the role of a nonprofit profit organization is and I was a part of a technology startup a founding partner and while the the business was doing okay the partnership was really kind of fractured t to the point that it was extraordinarily stressful for me and I wanted out? A local nonprofit local here in Columbus was looking for someone to be on a committee that was charged with exploring boring how we can generate more of their own revenue and asked me be a part of that committee and I said No. I don't have any time for that and They came back and said well. Actually we want to pay you to help us think differently and I said well I've got the time for that and so it it really viewed it as something of just a bridge to get out of what I was doing and I i. Within weeks was fully fully engaged in captivated by the Double Bottom Line Challenge at nonprofit organizations have of course they have their mission obligation there Michigan imperative to pursue mission outcomes and results was but they have to resource it and and so you know that challenge of managing both of those and I also discovered in myself that that's really what I enjoy about innovation. Entrepreneurship is the the figuring out a way where there doesn't seem to be away or a straightforward way and so that was late late nineties. What was the nonprofit profit central? How Diabetes Association? Wow I worked with them For a few years there now a part of life care alliance so this late nineties. They were going through an eighteen months process that was led by by an organization called the National Center for Social Entrepreneurs based out of Minneapolis. And this is back. When Bank one was was a here in Columbus? There was such a thing as bank. One and Brian Gallagher. WHO's now the head of the United Way? Worldwide was the head of the United way here in Columbus Columbus those Best Best Bugles at the time. Renamed now Beth Kramer. She headed up the bank one community giving area in those two I think were the galvanizing force to bring on other funders the city was engaged. Limited Limited Huntington all put in a little bit of money to bring the National Center in Columbus so they could in an organized fashion systematically declare look at where there might be opportunity so I was just a small attachment to one of the twelve organizations that went through it But because I was captivated captivated by it I went to Beth bubus at the time. It said I I want to do this. You know I wanna I WANNA make a goal of helping organizations in this and she She was delighted that there was some energy here in Columbus even if it was just an individual that would sort of via continue and helping organizations Columbus after the National Center left and so it was a good start there. Never just some some serendipity in that and eventually became more closely affiliated with the National Center for Social Entrepreneurs and had the great fortune of being being there leading the Organization for three years like two thousand one to two thousand four and helped them shift their model all to one that was more distributed instead of the consultant flying in from somewhere else to work with organizations. How do we build the capacity and the community? Because there's lots of good talent knowledge in the community to help the community do more for themselves now. Why some of the obstacles that people are facing at the time in organizations or yeah so so in in you know back in the turn of the century I feel so old they determine? Now you know to me. The idea of social entrepreneurship is still relatively new. At that point it is and and and of course of course social being entrepreneurial to address common good challenges has been around forever. I think about I in fact I think You read a white paper. I think I wrote recently. I did write recently. I think you've read it. I highlight a an individual Nannie. Helen burroughs who In the Early Twentieth Century Tree stood up an organization for Young Adult Women. It really I think is a great case example of social entrepreneurship. She did so many amazing things without any resources in the face of tremendous headwinds which is an African American woman. Couldn't vote at the time stood up an organization in one of the ways. They resource or stem cells was during the they sold the equivalent of box lunches on Wall Street. They and the the girls and young ladies were involved in the operation of that and they learn skills data sell. They learned how to do customer service on all those things and this was during the depression. Her sort of mantra. Was We specialize in the whole impossible. Here's an individual. That was being very very very creative and without any resources and figuring out a way For these these young women to grow as individuals and be contributing members to society on their terms and so when I think about that in the early twentieth the essentially all of the all of the forces that that would have flown in her face and so I always push back a little bit this notion of how long social social enterprise and social entrepreneurship like anything else. There does eventually become some organization around the movement and so the National Center was formed in the early eighties. Nineteen eighty-three I think. One of the Founding Board chair at a guy named Bob Price who I had the tremendous good good fortune of having him be mentor to me. at the time he was CEO of a Fortune Two hundred company controlled Native Corp and he was on the Board of the the Minneapolis Twin cities united way. And you he in some other of his peer business folks. I sort of like you know. We're able to make money in some markets that are otherwise you wouldn't think their potential moneymakers honey makers and so they actually stood up. This organization in the original intent was to invest in nonprofit initiatives that were intended generate excess revenue time. I don't know that the term social enterprise had been used or social entrepreneurship for that matter. And what they found was Well variety of things. But they came around the fact that these organizations don't know how to sort of evaluate opportunity So different mindset for different different mindset and it was without going too far into the weeds kind of shifted. The MODEL said well. Why don't we help them? figure out a way to help them. Understand potential value that they can provide to markets that can pay and they were I think one of like four or five organizations that ultimately stood up the social enterprise alliance which started as the National Gathering for social entrepreneurs. So they're kind of forefather of of the movement at the time with you and I were talking about social enterprise or social entrepreneurship. We wouldn't be talking about. I think what we think of it now we think of it as a as a standalone Novo startup which you know. Oh maybe you're a social entrepreneur. You stood up an organization that organizes an LLC it's an LLC and you're just as an as an individual enterprising individual you've done that At the time that I was engaged in the late nineties here in Columbus purpose with. We're having this conversation. It would have been much more. Focus on a nonprofit an existing nonprofit that is he's probably starting something new within their organization. That's not separate from the organization but we might even think of it as a program that is strategically intentionally were trying to generate excess revenue There really wasn't so much talk about true net revenue so But it was if we're able to recoup some of the cost Or lose less say on a program because were were generating generating some fees than the donor. Dollar goes farther and so some of our target audience are beneficiary group. They're able to pay something something in fact based on a researchers dignity in that and we'd like to contribute something to that we feel better about it and say it's only dollar or say it's two dollars so that's almost like true net revenue it's almost like a donation to the organization and so it really started there you know. How do we think differently about our particular beneficiary client customer? However you want phrase it but we're reporting to provide value value? And how do we understand value all the way our across the stakeholder group and so that's what the conversation we were having Columbus. Let's start something brand new if I think back to the nineties like today we're sitting in compuserve's offices. This was kind of a heyday for for competence. So yeah it's interesting. Exactly I mean again. You're making me feel old but data but it it really. In that particular process. The National Center process was eighteen months. Wow so now. We have accelerators accelerators APP. Which is fine to some extent? I mean we could get into the weeds on this but I why do you not to go too far field but just as a very high level I think just society in general. We're going to fast and we kind of feel we're always in a hurry up mode and we don't take the time to choose sit and sort of contemplate on things in let our minds do some work While we're focused on something else and and W- we lose something there. I was joking the other day that we almost need a decelerated accelerator You know looking at doing longitudinal analysis and some of those organizations that the national center was engaged in when they had the more immersive long process They had some real tremendous outcomes. Were you could say there's a preponderance of evidence that they were stronger organizations because of that engagement. I don't know that we can say the same thing about some of these social enterprises houses that are lifted up out of a nonprofit context. We want stronger organizations that are able to flourish on their own terms. Self direct does much as possible and to be thinking big and come up with bold ideas and be willing to in the spirit of Nannie. Helen burroughs figure stuff out wrote and feel confident that they can figure stuff out In that that has new as creative imagination Marmara ability to be Your human ingenuity and we all have it so social enterprises kind of secondary to that it may be may be manifest in a social enterprise but I think too often social enterprise becomes the endgame. What is a prerequisite for being successful in a social enterprise? Is You have an agility the creative imagination. How has that changed from when you started to today like the issues that nonprofits are facing when it comes to the looking at social entrepreneurship? It's changed on on one level on a more tangible level in terms of like let's let's take Columbus for for example. There are a number of initiatives here in Columbus that are in play in the representative of what I see in other communities immunities to and we can just tick them off. I know you're a big fan of giveback hack And I think Columbus Soup is somewhere in that sort of beginning stages and then moving along. You've got things like Sea Change which is an accelerator? My former company. 'cause impact has has the Innovation Catalyst. I think they're calling it now and they've got five or six groups maybe right now going through it which is a little bit more of a deeper dive into to an examination of the opportunity. Well of course I help stand up Allen proctor. Social Ventures which originally was center for Social Enterprise Development and then philanthropy pitch out of Austin's coming into there's a lot of good energy energy and of course it all gets blurry I think most of the sea change cohort this year were four prophets and so it it. It really is a fun fun fun time and it was fun then but I think there's much more if we think of on the one end of the spectrum term. We have the five hundred thousand nonprofit primarily resource by traditional philanthropy and over on the far polar opposite. You have the Milton Freeman for profit. Money is what we're doing in there. Those are these are good things. And they're having you know they. It's Nice it's not. It's not placing judgement on. I mean you can. You can make a very credible argument that the business of business to make money in by making money you Employ folks the high taxes. Those folks are able to spend money in their communities. They're able to realize their own. Dreams are able all to support the charities and causes that are closest to them. They're able to shop with a purpose if they so choose news. And so say having that clarity and focus is a good thing but as we get closer to the.

Columbus National Center for Social Ent National Center Columbus Columbus Minneapolis Helen burroughs founding partner Social Enterprise Development Michigan Social Ventures Brian Gallagher Beth Kramer compuserve Diabetes Association Early Twentieth Century Tree National Gathering Milton Freeman Beth bubus
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"About presented to understand why this is such a big deal is that you know an put another can imagine it's a bunch of tough dudes and and tough guys you know you know don't hug don't cry still showing motion the motions weakness and and so the can you get them one on one on smaller groups things can break down in front of the bigger peers they have to pull that that toughness the second important piece in prison is that audience like what they had done to pull that off they fall into each other's arms into the spontaneous embrace I turn around and see the director of mental health with tears streaming down her face because of just the incredible incredible testaments of the safety that had that had been created in the room that day and honestly depicted credit on our team throughout the entire process that made it that these guys could break against you know prison culture and prison politics and do so even with those beyond the sphere recommend that could come later on the yard it's huge yeah and then just a cold off on on one of the things popping in my mind it's like that no shows kind of the transmission that happened within the prison residents and again I have so many stories about about that to happen individual collective levels but even people on the outside you know I'm I'm blessed receipt stories on a regular basis of people telling me how that one day that you know people can talk first or second events were whichever events and how about one day has changed the way they live and after taxes Ted the a survey to measure what they call the net promoter score and simply put some not medicine not everyone knows that promote score ah measures a a customer satisfaction with the.

director Ted one day
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

15:59 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Cool now could we just up can you tell us a little bit about how brilliant since I've got started things tend to start because I had the question that we can help me understand the heck you've got here and the reason that I guess you know some of your awesome and noticed that the reason why I get that question often is because I may very tradit- Schnelle business corporate person At least I was up until a few years ago Oh and and what happens four years ago a little over four years ago I was meditating one morning like I do most morning things and with absolutely no reason that my my conscious mind correct around afterwards I heard three words in that meditation that day and those three words were go to prison and I'm like I know and just a sense to me why would I do that and yet there's a part of me that just continued to be you know pulled in that John direction continue to just feel attracted by that and so with continuous nagging I I ended up staying okay yes final figure out how do I get to prison it came out of nowhere absolutely nowhere there's there's no instigating story there's no family or friends or relations if they got involved with the justice system there's no you know sauce something on the news or or or movies or all those stories that we often hear that you know people like some something makes it personal to them and suddenly they feel like there's something they want to do here none of that to me it literally was sitting and I'm looking at my Christian right now sitting cushion meditating and and you know and hearing those words go to prison wow yeah so it took a little bit of a journeying and courage at five months later I was stepping into the gates of Donovan State Prison which is a state prison here in San Diego for the very first time and that was in December two thousand fifteen so how the first time you went in what we are you doing struggled a little bit to find my way and now I bring people in on a weekly basis but but I having no connection and no idea how this is mark I struggled a little bit to find my way in my way in became prison ministry and so the first time I went in for Prison Ministry and I remember walking into this maximum thirty yards and and just being absolutely taken aback mesmerized blown away by the sense of freedom and enjoy I felt from the prison residents and walking off that yard that very first time the person that was with interviews like this cannot be your first time in prison then like Oh yes it is and he's like you're not acting like it is I'm like I know I can tell I don't know why and that day that Saturday Saturday December fifth two thousand fifteen I went I went and again the next day and then again at that polling Thursday and from that very first week I started going in three times a week driving off an hour and a half to get Donovan after work or on the weekends and just you know it was absolutely enthralled in intrigued and incredibly curious about the world and the culture discovered in there so much so that go weeks turned to months I am I thought maybe other people might curious about what happens on these walls that it turns out you know nothing about and that's what led me to go to administration and propose that we organize a text x event inside prison and my guess is they'll come back to that saw right now skip over that just to say that the only thing I'll say right now is that in my mom my important point I wanted to do was that this tax event was not going to be organized by a group of people on the outside that we're going to bring it in it was going to be organized residents themselves and so we recruited and selected a core team as we call them residents that organize events and then of months there is movement that was so wildly successful and everyone standards from the residents who attended the outside community members that came in the prison administration and it was that moment in particular this moment the happened in our closing circle that is an a photo on our on our website that made me realize there's something more to do here and that's when I put aside my professional ambitions and focused and founded brilliant since died to really transform prison from being strictly a container violence to creator of peace and then that expanded thanks to that residents action say that extended overtime to being that healing society cycle of violence that you mentioned at the top when you went into the prison for the first time like one way some of the so you actually saw that were different from what you expected expect anything so everything was different for expected nothing was expected whichever way you wanna see that because I didn't expect anything you know but I'll tell you one of the things that really took me by surprise nice was when we had walked into the double gates that can put you into the into the institution we're not yet on the yard right but we're in the institution I had I'm getting shivers just from thinking back about it I had this sense of peace that's for me I was crazy sounds I felt at home and again I had that moment of like this is not exactly like why am I feeling so at home in a space I've never set foot in I don't know I have no connection to I don't know a thing about and and you know that was my experience from the beginning is is very different than what people to clean pockets the people don't usually say yeah I went to prison I thought really at home I can't explain these things they are my troops and Oh yeah I just I accept them and but yeah that was that was the credit particularly interesting and and I said you know when I met the residency you know it's it's it's absolutely a truth and truth that needs to be you know continue to you know knowledge that some of these guys have done some really attrition these things and well my talk about the the residents I talk about you know it's not all of them is a surprisingly high percentage of prison population that are category that I described but let's also knowledge that they're still people that are stuck in a destructive dark lifestyle and and I I don't engage with those as much thank as with the ones that have made the commitment to change some some drastic things in our life and and so here's guys who again are on high you know high in maximum security yards and they are lights and bright and the people I know on this planet and I've been blessed to be around a lot of incredible people in my life and I really truly sent by that and you know to to get prison ministry to here at these residents thing amazing grace when you talk about and they sing the line like no you know to be and now I'm found in a wrench like me or the song beamed there's something so unbelievably powerful because they understand and they walked through the journey on Tuesday biblical references he walk through the Valley of Darkness and and they've come out the other side and and and I would argue it's because of that this is my tally when it's because of walking through their pain and they're hurting their trauma that's they come out the other side beings incredible beings of lights when against they're still human Malaysia they still they are in different places on the journey of of of letting go of their darkness they they can have such expressions of lights and I go to put a saying this is why they are my teachers they have taught me so much on my own journey of healing my own journey of owning my life my own journey stepping into what I call my brilliance and and that's what brilliant inside is all about is creating that safe space that's based on container each of us not just in blue the guys in prison in California where blue so we call them the can come to the people in blue and so the not just in blue all of us to you know to uncover are are brilliance so that we can share it with the world which is what I believe we're supposed to do that divine spark that we're all I truly believe everyone of us was born with that's beautiful can you tell us a little bit about tax yeah I mean brilliant fighting this today because of Paddocks I want I want to at that protects organizers a year and a half ago and I told the Executive Director of tax at Ted thing this is all your fault and So so like I said I was I would say corporate employees at this point and and but I had didn't really touched by what I had experienced inside those walls and and and really just got maybe others might be curious about this yes and and and I I've always for longest time been a very strong junkie at that point I was literally looking watching at least one day had participated in the bunch of tax advantage sponsored actually through my company tax events and so so that was a natural like next step for me and and so again there's some amazingly beautiful stories of of how that that could be but basically we you know when when we went to the prison ministration and they they agreed with this idea we we recruit voted and selected a a group of that we call the core team and the intent was that the courtroom was going to organize the events we were just the royal and the machine they were going to be really truly the decision makers and that was something that was really important to me and I had to Carthage with the administration about it was like can we agree read the guys are making the decisions and and they have and they've tested let me tell you they have tested their decision making incapabilities and where the boundaries are and the most powerful ways because the own that so deeply now and and so so we started with this group of men and and in five months we had gone from having no idea what we were doing to putting on this event and and so the core team did everything from a select the theme that was actually ultimately voted on by prison wide vote all the men on the yard where lots of vote to pick up steam which began we're always about that engagement with the residents themselves you know the they selected the insight speakers where off application and then the insect speakers coming interviewed and then ten what we call speakers and training were selected in front of ten then went through coaching we finally selected the five that we're actually that actually spoke on stage they also selected the outside speakers which needs a little bit more logistic exp because they can't actually engage with people on the outside so but but they are the ones that actually like the outside speakers they did all the experiences that they ran the whole event even the food that we're going to have even though they can't pay it beforehand and everything they coordinated and then of course we outside cordell thing they can't do like security and and you know the conversations with the speakers and things like that and and and not only was our core team conniving and our speakers and training going through the coaching but on top of that all the roles all the volunteer roles at a tax typically uses and on top of is that we created for the special experience in prison were were done by the residence also so we actually had a team of about eight core team and ten speakers and training that and then another seventy to eighty residents that AH had different rules along you know throughout the process and on event day we had two hundred people from the outside Cutie members people like you and me who came in and went through security and we're escorted onto the yard and then and spent the entire day side by side with one hundred residents the morning engaging sitting down in the audience side by side to listen to text talks how the talks were given by residents on the inside the market and by by committee members again that that split was selected by the residence I'll tell you grew to pick something else we wanted something else but they that's the split act and and then after the tax talks over lunch and the afternoon we had the afternoon of conversation that we call it expression and Ted expressions a series of experiences where the kind of conversations I get less structured as the day goes on and the day with the big two hundred fifty person coding circle and where people are invited to share the insights that they gathered throughout the day where we acknowledge different pe- that participants and particularly the core team because the school time the speakers have been visible but the court scene the guys had actually run the events an invisible because we've been behind the scenes running the events and and so that was when this was the moment that that to me transformed everything for me was at was one point I I called according to the center of the closing circle so that they could be recognized and acknowledged and there's two things you have this persona of toughness that they have to uphold that they believe that they uphold and and especially in front of their peers this is the greatest divide and crossing over that line can get people seriously hurt and even killed in in some situations and and so here was this multi racial group of tough guys as in our core team and they come together at the center of the circle and suddenly I'm telling the.

tradit- Schnelle five months four years thirty yards one day
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

12:51 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Change in the business world and give you ideas on how to take action after there are break building up our own social enterprise wild tiger ts. I'm excited to return to the podcast explore new ideas but today I'm here talking to a company that was founded in nineteen in eighty eight is mission driven lender you'll stay consultant and developer that helps communities thrive they're unique in that they lead specifically to nonprofits and provide bite them wraparound real estate services that generally outside the nonprofits core mission their rapidly growing here in Ohio helping great causes to succeed in their own nations so so I am just ecstatic to have the chance to sit with the CEO Joe nearly and senior lender of Columbus Office Omar El Hajj Moosa so welcome on the podcast. Let's dive straight in. Thank you thank you and.

Omar El Hajj Moosa senior lender CEO Columbus Joe consultant Ohio developer
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

13:55 min | 1 year ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Change in the business world and give you ideas on how to take action this week. I sit down with Lamar People's the outreach coordinator at our house a drop in Center for Youth Experiencing homelessness here in Central Ohio the Mar- has spent his career on the ground reaching out to people and he's put a lot of effort into something that has long been a mystery to me. Politics generally political news drives me nuts but I've always wondered how politics actually works and how people make a difference through government. The Mara has such a unique. I Tan Perspective on this. I'm so excited to sit down with them so lamar welcome on the podcast. Thank you for having me Adam cool and now you have very interesting background. You started off in politics. Yeah yeah well for me. I I grew up here in Columbus Ohio and I- driven driven past and walked past and even visited the State House you know Columbus is the capital of Ohio and so we have our State House here grownups net place. I'd never really knew it was four. I just remember briefly growing up going there on a a field trip in seeing you know sorta the delights in paint chambers and people walking around in suits and in in professionals and I always wonder would that was all about so it wasn't until I was around twenty years old that I had the great the opportunity of going to one of President Obama's reelection campaign speeches. I'll call was that Schuller Park and German village village. The speech was September twentieth and they went around asking people if they were interested in signing up to help out and and so I signed up in about a week later I got a call saying hey you wanna come and help us out and at that point I was living on the west side of Columbus so I went to one of the field offices and swear I got introduced to like grassroots door knocking and things of that sort and so from there there you know what was amazing is like September. Twenty eighth is when I started and then October eighth of that same year I got a call from lladro winds ler who was the field director said Hey Lemar. How's it going. I'm like I'm married. We you know Oh you need me to do a shift tomorrow. He's like that and how would you like to meet the President Holy so that that I was like a sure. Yeah Yeah of course wanted to get off the phone. Side can really digest mentally with that was going to look like and so I found myself as telling everybody I'm going to meet the press is going to lead the president and so our Tober knife of Twenty Twelfth Health President Obama was on his way here to speak at the oval at the Ohio State University and met him on the tarmac and got to watch him come off the plane you know and he shook my hand and just thanked me for helping him and I was in shock so I didn't say much but I had this huge grin on my face in that picture was captured so of a memento to remember that occasion and the election ended. He got re elected and it was kind of like well. What do you do now. You know I had got this. I guess the political bug they say where you know now. You're so so you know growing up. I remember we would do the kids vote at school and at this time around the time George Bush was running for reelection. I was a liked George Bush for some reason. I don't know why I think his name and some other I don't know but I remember from my dad saying no you don't like George Bush Democrats and so come to find out you know when you think about political socialization and how people begin to develop their thinking around politics family is like the number one influence ser so from that day on I I was a Democrat and so I found that after the re election of President Obama I went to the Democratic Party and say what can I do and so I ultimately became the Super Volunteer you know helping out from state races to local races and some federal congressional races and I just learned a lot you begin to see what people really care about and what motivates go get up and vote and it's issues like they want clean air and they want to have a livable wage job and they wanna make sure that their grandkids Sir GonNa have a quality education and families want to send their kids to decent and affordable healthcare and they wanna be able to take time time off if they need to and all these things that you begin to learn about like would people really want and this is just from going door to door knocking and talk in the just grassroots canvassing you really begin to get a snapshot for what people want and so became Imboden by that and I saw politics politics as a means to really help people and so through connections are made at the party one of the guys there had got a job in the State House and I just couldn't shake it at that point I would go and hang out at statehouse just kind of hang out and I found myself talking to Republicans and Democrats and really start to see that at the end of the day we all share a common threat and ah that's that we just want safe communities access the livable wage jobs and to raise our family and make sure that we leave something for the next generation in so he was like I saw him. He was walking somewhere and he said Hey Lemar Wooley doing here and I'm like I'm just Tang out. We'll use like well what about an internship stolid gap up you know because now in the amend the thick of it and so what I learned in that internship and ultimately ended up doing three five month internships out your house or representatives. Is You begin to learn about your state so if we know the Ohio House of Representatives is made up ninety nine members and they represent various regions of the state some even five or ten counties deep there representing Appalachia and rural communities and suburban areas but you really got to see some of the differences but also some of those common threads people in Ohio. You want clean water. They want better transportation public transportation systems new realize how not having those things impacts they'll speak from my own experience being here in central. Ohio our transportation system is not that great and so when you have jobs out in Polaris Laris or Westerville these suburban areas and you have people living in the inner city they don't have access to these great jobs that exists because as we don't have the infrastructure were interning in with a the House of Representatives like are they as divided as what you see on TV in terms of like the federal government where it's like. Democrats and Republicans and they you know are one against the other so that's a great question you would see a Republican and Democrat crack go at it on the House floor but then you would go up to their offices in neom laughing and joking and share pitchers about their little nephew a few or niece or you know getting lunch to be honest politics addict they show up for the camera. They actually on camera. They're trying to keep their base in check in and what you find though is when you're in the space where there's ninety nine of you you have to get along and so I think in the inside they're getting along. They're laughing and joking but when it comes time to stand on that floor and cameras cameras on you you show out so I think that's what's happening interesting so after that what happened. Yes yes so so I was interned in house but working like this customer service job and so I start saying to myself you know you go and you in turn in the House of Representatives and then you come to this minimum wage job providing customer service and not that anything wrong with those jobs the economy would run without having customer service even though they could pay him we'll more but so I start figuring out well. What can I do to sort of level out. Well you know where I'm an intern and also doing good work as well in the community and what's interesting is I had become become a volunteer at Cosi when I was sixteen years old for people not in Columbus what is house I is. It's stands for the the center of Science and Industry so it's huge museum basically where you learn about water and you learn about gravity and you just learn about all these different things yes this hands on Sorta Museum. They have this huge thing called the extreme screen which which was my favorite part of being a volunteer side all these great movies and that's that's where. I really became you know where I got my first exposure to nonprofits and sort of how that works but it wasn't until my last internship ended in May of Twenty fifteen that I was at that time living in the town niece area right by the American Red Cross and so I was like okay I wanNA keep this going. You know my resume has has a couple of internships in the Ohio House. What's next how do I deal and so did some research and was going to be just become a volunteer interior at the American Red Cross doing disaster outreach but they had an opportunity for you to become an Americorps member. Ah signed up for that and ended up becoming an a community disaster educator within a year we spoke to about five thousand people from from pre-schoolers in nursery school age kids all the way up to senior citizens about the importance of home fire fire preparedness and emergency preparedness and how to properly wash your hands and some of the germs that you get just by not washing in your hands and how you can prevent common colds and other illnesses and sicknesses by just washing your hands and so I thought why you've got a hand sanitizer sanitizer on your desk yeah for sure and I and in my current role Rove doing outreach in Gwynedd into community shake hands all the time a make sure I wash my hands insistently and keep and sanitizer so that whole experience was amazing. I mean you get an office and you have to keep a calendar and you have to develop new programming and all this good stuff and so that's where I really found that I love the nonprofit sector because you you'd find this mission and you get to help facilitate it. One of the major things that still sticks with me is there would it'd be fires that would happen and they would send a disaster team out and these people would lost everything and in in the Red Cross would be there to give you food and give you a card with money on it so you could get a hotel room for the night a. and then provide you with a case manager so that you could work through getting a new home and then finding furniture and mitigating some of the losses this is and things of that sort and so. I really found this passion for the nonprofit sector but I remain very involved in politics. I mean still knock endorse. Still we'll be in at present still you know working with politicians in talking about policy and things of that sort and decided you know wasn't going to get a job. I had asked around what he was hiring in the political sector so I went ahead had an extended term with Americorps to go to the habitat for humanity which was in the community that I grew up in and so here again displays. I've always driven by but never really knew what they did and so I became an outreach coordinator there. My role was to basically go out and tell people about the awesome opportunity. The HABITAT provides them you can literally choose a style of home that you want and.

president Columbus Obama State House House of Representatives Ohio outreach coordinator George Bush American Red Cross Ohio House of Representatives Ohio House lamar Central Ohio Ohio State University Mara Columbus Ohio HABITAT Lemar Wooley Center for Youth Schuller Park
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

13:10 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"Corp status for those reasons. It's the wrong reasons so you know we really really went for the B. Corp certification because it's who we were and it fit our culture I think that in the time of being before what it has done the most for us is attract like minded people who want to work for us not with us. I I find find that at least in this you know in the Midwest year. Not a lot of people have an understanding of what it is so It's not like a big selling point got it like he can put it up on your window and people come driving by looking for the hand. We be on her door people. Just I don't understand necessarily what it is and I think it's one of those things that if you're doing good work you're doing great work or you have a great product and you're selling a great product. It's more of a of an Easter egg to find out about a company then to be like you know beating people over the head with it unless you're a really large company. I mean had a Gonja Nya one of the founding companies and B. Corp and you don't see that all over their stuff but you know they're doing good. I think they're one of the shining examples you can you know about because you know they shall open and it's consistent in what they do and there's on the Corp side to I mentioned Social Enterprise Alliance Alliance. There's social enterprise alliance. There's conscious capitalist. There's be Corp and there's the social venture network. They're kind of like all different denominations nations of a similar religion yeah. No I mean I've seen this as a sliding scale of like you might have nonprofits at one and in for profits at the other end and next a for profit companies kind of the corpse and then you move into this murky area of social enterprise now you have to be a for profit company to be now now so whereas the social enterprise applied to both nonprofits and for profits but we've explored social enterprise a lot on the podcast and one consistent team has been with any mission based company. You still have to deliver quality product. You know that you're not going anywhere if you don't have a solid solid solid business in anything that you do that. Mission really never seems to carry anybody forward. Solely based on jam packed that you're making I agree. I think that the companies who would one hundred percent lead with the all the good. We're doing probably have a better reputation than they do. Sales so where you see things heading in the future. Do you see B. Corp continuing to grow I do. CB Corp continuing to grow it would be nice if it caught on more more within our state. There are some folks in Cincinnati that are really kind of pushing forward and have done some great things. They're they're called engage partners or more like. It consultants which you wouldn't think it consulting like be court but they started a secondary business called thrive. Oh that is creating a new workforce so you know they're educating people and training them with the skills and pre-qualifying them and placing them into businesses businesses that are giving people jobs in education that wouldn't have otherwise and I know the owners Kelly and Michael or pretty involved in trying to see something happened in the state as well. That's what else is happening down in Cincinnati. There's like three three because I think there might be more now okay but really engaged partners. slash thrive have been the ones that have pushed the most okay that's neat. How do you see this playing in with the rise of social entrepreneurship in Columbus well. I I hope that social entrepreneurship and be corpse and everything is not just something that eventually becomes like the social washing equivalent of greenwashing and business saying their environmental but I think that just working with an seeing like each new generation. Shen of students people that are coming out into the workforce people seem to care more about making sure that something they're doing is going. GonNa have some kind of a meaning so I could see it continuing. I actually just saw news this past week that Danone which is is a more of a multinational corporation just became the biggest be court how in the world and I saw them speaking speaking at a conference in Philadelphia a little over a year ago that they were going through the assessments and they were seeing how many of their holdings could become and they they've just officially become the biggest and I believe they were going to buy like Silk Right now. It seems like there is more of infrastructure around building a social enterprise I'd say if you look at Columbus. There's like a backpack where people kind of go on get exposed to it but there's also O. Sea Change and and the nonprofit catalyst where they're helping different people develop their companies and launch them so there's seems like there's a lot of support court in Columbus itself or developing mission based companies out there there has been and I would like to see it. See it rise you. You said one thing that you do was working with your supply chain management to make sure that you're working with companies which have more of an impact right one of the biggest things look at his apprentice. You really have to print this. I mean before you would print anything but you know like in the past we've worked with the Nature Conservancy and it was on print work but all of their work is printed by paper. That's managed by the forestry sensation of like you have to use sad if you're willing to work with them anyway so they are also helping to push and make sure that they're lessening their impact. Jenny's was the second incorp in Columbus and a business like that would have a lot more in the supply chain to look at considering packaging and is it biodegradable. Is it composed Wear your ingredients coming from a how are you shipping. How much oil how much carbon are you burning producing in your shipping or other ways to do this more efficiently. We just were different because we're a service business for the most part. Our waste is just what was being produced in the office. You got off easy less. B. Corp changed their assessments. The first couple of times that we did the assessment we we didn't score enough and I thought that was interesting because it's like we work with all you know half clients or nonprofits the prophets a couple of people ride their bikes here day like businesses always been this way it was geared more towards a towards a product based business and and they worked on the assessment over the years to alter it so the service based businesses could have a better chance and and it was our clientele that scored so what's next for fulcrum creative. It's a good question. I'm not completely sure. Fokker has still been doing awesome consulting work and working with for good clients and we'll just have to see where it goes. Sixteen years has been a long time so the ultimate goal is to just continue to good. Is there anything personally near life. That actually drop you to do this. I came to almost good AC- sadie and when I was in college I really thought I was going to go into advertising and I thought that I would like it. In the time that I was in college. I started getting into a couple of philosophy classes that were mixed a little more on like the purpose of art and and I was kind of applying that concept over to design and advertising creative as well and thinking you know what's the real point or purpose of doing doing this and often came down to making money for someone and I just didn't see that as being the most valuable place to put put time mean is a creative artist when you work on something you're putting you're putting your blood your soul in it and if it's not not got a greater purpose than just making shareholders somewhere money just seemed like a place. I wanted to put my time so I also in that time. came across the first issue of Ad Busters. Anybody knows what Ad Buster's is. I'm now what does that. Busters at busters was a magazine gene that was started by guy named cow Lanson they were out of uncover who vancouver you could argue already a little more ahead and thinking of things having purpose it was a General Anti Advertising magazine and it was part of the one of the things he's a cop is when it first started they republished the first things first manifesto which was a manifesto written by designers. Were saying that they were GONNA use their skills for for good yeah. I just Kinda Kinda got into reading that looking at everything and it furthered my belief that I didn't necessarily trust all advertising so I thought I'd do is start in advertising agency and do it a little bit different so did you start the agency right out of no when I left. CCD The first place I went was HMS Partners Anybody Remembers. That was a pretty big agency. They had an office here and they had an office in Milwaukee. They had worked with Carnival cruise that kind of stuff. I was only there for about six months and was like I don't WanNa work in a large agency and I don't want to do this kind of work so I left there and started working with a print shop that was great because I learned a lot but wasn't as creative as I wanted it to be so so I was freelancing and met my next employer who came in as a designer and ended up being director. There was just a small shop about Oh five people and found that I just really liked the really small atmosphere because you got to do a bit of work on everything as opposed to one thing. He's got to be a part of more so after that job when I left there was when I started volume now. He said spoken started sixteen ago now at that time because didn't exist exist yet. social enterprise was not a term which anybody spoke of. I'm just curious. What you're thinking was at the time because it seems like there's a lot more attention contention now and more choices and more discussion? What was the atmosphere like well. We were definitely the first ones around here thinking along these lines as creatives and designers. There's but I'd mentioned my previous employer. it was Jason Jonoski. He runs a place called attache now. It's actually where I I met a gentleman named Dave Parker who you know Erin Dave Dave introduced me to the term social enterprise probably ably eighteen ish twenty years ago or when I first started working with Jason and met him so you know already having my background and anti advertising anarchy magazines and then having someone introduced this term to me was like wait. What's this so that's really where where I got the information from. Originally this has always been a crash on my mind because you know there's advertising is very broad but there is some aspect of advertising which seems to sell not based on the Gazeta being sold but on whatever social values which you know they're speaking to whether that is your image in your body type to your social relationships and friendships sacks all these different things which sometimes seems seems a little bit off to me from almost manipulative or something like that. I'm just curious like what your thoughts are on on on that kind of element element of advertising there is quite a bit going on within the world of advertising on body image and how people see themselves and what an the ideal of beauty or fitnesses that really only exist in the movies and advertising. Yes there are people who actually look like that but not all the time and there's very few that's that's one of the things that kind of turned me off on the overall advertising industry is somewhat promotes a false image of us and what happiness actually is you only by so how many things in yes and ad might introduce you to something you never knew about that. He thought he didn't need but now you need it and then you get it and you think things are going to be great but it's all still the same afterwards afterwards in which case shift by something else and.

B. Corp Columbus Social Enterprise Alliance All Cincinnati Midwest Gonja Nya Jason Jonoski CB Corp Nature Conservancy first things first Philadelphia HMS Partners Fokker Dave Parker Kelly Jenny
"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

13:59 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"I and I didn't know a ton of people I didn't know a lot about Columbus and so I just google volunteering in Columbus in Columbus goes back popped up and and just through going to the different events like the YMCA or to all these different places. You just get to know what people are doing what impact they're having an what. I can specifically specifically do more to help that impact so yes learning about homelessness has been something that I've now grown passionate about and you know wanting to learn more hi and specifically helped and I think that's that's what a lot of our volunteers appreciate too because everyone has their own passions and their own things that they get excited about. Don't not specifically work with companies to organize projects for them but companies can do projects through you. We have a pretty loose criteria for who can can volunteer. Basically it's someone who is twenty one years or older and that's about it so if you do happen to have a group for a company we do encourage urge people to sign up. We do focus on individual sign ups but if a group wants to sign up for an event together that's perfectly fine. We don't go out and organize them. You know specifically for a company company but you know we'll take anyone. That's the cool thing about Komo's goes back as you don't have to be affiliated with a certain religion or certain group. You know anything it's just us. Hey you WANNA volunteer great. We have this opportunity. You don't have to have a certain background to really connect to it though you do not specifically organize is events for any group of any kind we do get questions about how people in their groups can volunteer whether it's a student group or whether it's a corporate group and because we have so many non-profit connections we still can facilitate people connection and hopefully meaningful experience. Dan For that corporate group or that school group whatever organization you are part of that then benefits the non profit partners that we do have since joined in two thousand fourteen. Have you seen any changes in Columbus. My favorite conversations that I have with people at our events are about how long they've been in Columbus and there are plenty of lifers out there. I am one of them but there are so many people who responded I. I just moved three months ago four months ago or six months ago or I just moved here two weeks ago and I want to get involved and I don't want to say that. This was is in the case for years ago. Everybody knows that Columbus is is a hot city right. Now we are we are moving in talented educated people in large quantities. Thanks to a great educational environment a lot of great companies attracting acting talent the arts and everything is booming. The brewery scene which is back is very much a fond of their fond of us to it's a two way relationship so it's not a surprise to hear more and more stories of people coming here and immediately being part of the community there there are plenty of ways you can meet people and there are organizations and events out there where you can meet people in those will always be there we offer that you get it to meet people at every event that you volunteer with but just that is not enough for the people that are moving Columbus. They want something more. They want something meaningful. They don't WanNa meet somebody but they want to. You want to be a part part of the community that they're in and we offer that in the population that's looking for that is out there and it is it is growing. That's cool. How many unique silence have you had this year or two hundred. I don't have the exact number I think we're actually creeping closer to three hundred mark in the near future which is awesome awesome because we're only a few months into the year so it's probably at least a thousand unique people by the end of the year. We probably Surrey excited about. I'm curious just a little bit back on trend saw like I explore a lot of different social issues of what's what's going on there. Any problems that you see. Columbus has which you're taking active steps towards solving oh I would say absolutely there are definitely gaps in divides that still need to be bridged in this community. I would call two things one that is still a good thing for Columbus kissed back in that's tourism it is alive and well there are people who wanNA volunteer socially or to get something out of it for themselves and that is okay. There is nothing wrong with that at all. All we will take those people every time they sign up because they're still hoping having meaningful experience. They're still going to make an impact their body that a nonprofit didn't have as well but there are a lot of people who are I'd say involved in not engaged and that's something that I do see a lot and it's something that we can get in the routine routine of for some of the events that we do. We don't really get down with the nonprofit and they're still divides on whereas an infrastructure in place for people to make Akkad difference in Columbus is better primed to serve certain communities and others. We are very much interested in is getting into the places that people people don't know about most of the organizations if you listed nonprofits that you heard of we probably work with them and trying to dig deeper get across the city. Get to more places cases in south side gets more places on the southwest side talking like value hilltop beyond getting into some of the places where it's not just an experience but it's an eye opening experience as well and we can do that and we still make it fun and we still make it where there are connections between the volunteers and the nonprofits fits but there is a lot more Tacoma's that people don't know everybody knows. Gentrification is alive and well. We have plenty of examples of that here in the city. Those will always be challenges. Oranges we face but those challenges are aligned to our mission so well that we can we can do that. Columbus gives back now. One thing I have been exploring exploring a lot on this podcast is social entrepreneurship have you guys had any involvement with different social entrepreneurs that are starting companies to make the social impact in other great thing about Columbus Columbus and I could talk about how much I love Columbus for decades but when you start getting involved in this city in there are so many easy ways for you to get involved and so many opportunities for people to get involved when you do you start seeing a lot of the same people over and over again and that's great rate because we're not too big of a city for you not to know what's going on or not too small of a city for your impact to not be tremendous and ends. We see a lot of social entrepreneurs at a lot of the events we go to you. You brought up soup earlier. There are a lot of people that are are involved with soup or have a connection to soup that our social entrepreneurs and because a suit we have a relationship with some of those folks as well. We have several that actually volunteer with us. We all have fairly similar mission. We know that there is an opportunity out there. Where you have people on both sides you have a need and you the people that are prime to fill that need because something that they want as well and we do that every two questions one is? What's your vision for biscuits. Back is going and what are some of the challenges that you faced so right. Now I think our main focus as a board there's seven of us who meet monthly just to talk about what we're doing and where we wanna go and I would say the word growth right now would be top of our list okay so really just letting organizations know that we're here in available the and letting people who are new to Columbus or who have been here for a while no that this opportunity exists because I know once I heard about it I was one hundred percent on board and I just think it it just takes getting the word out there to let people know these opportunities exist because I've been asked why target young professionals who were recruiting volunteer on tier and it's because a lot of people are starting off earlier in their career on they don't have a ton of money to donate tallies organizations but they really WanNa make a difference and end so time is can be just as valuable so we're offering them a place to use their time to make a difference in the community so that's why we're really focusing on on growth because the more people we have to give their time the bigger of an impact we can make. Do you ever see going beyond Columbus. In starting similar programs in other cities taught is definitely in our mind. I think we definitely still want to focus on Columbus for the next couple of years but growth growth looks like a lot of things two. I touch on your point. There are similar organizations in other cities. Obviously were were different but the mission of engaging and connecting engage in community and connecting people to each other exists in in other cities but for the growth on we've been very intentional attentional in the seven member board that Amanda Reference. We've got people who are focused on all different types of growth. We have somebody WHO's trying to attract doc new volunteers and build new relationships. We have somebody WHO's building out. What does an opportunity with Columbus gives back like introducing social events for good or maybe instead of registering people at an event actually participated in or attending event in in that engagement a piece can look like so many different things and instead of just being a volunteer group to become more engaged in. How do we be a part of the nonprofit community. We have somebody who's just etiquette of doing that kind of stuff. We have somebody WHO's dedicated. How do we communicate our mission and our impact. We somebody who's WHO's telling the story to nonprofits and somebody who's telling the story to young professionals. We have somebody WHO's working on just about every aspect of growth synonymous. Are we going to just add more numbers but we're gonNA add more meaning and we're going to create a really good on coveting type of suite of opportunities to engage people in Columbus Office and yes growth geographically nearby counties is definitely part of the vision but we really love Columbus just a little bit about what your history had you guys volunteered a lot for coming to Columbus gives back so just from my background growing up. I did a lot of missions trips and and different opportunities so just kind of had that base that you know volunteering and giving my time with something that was important to me so that's why when I moved here I specifically looked for volunteer opportunities to make my social circle and to use my time for so that's kind of why I'm so passionate about comex gives back because it's always been important to me and so it just this is a great way to use that background. I would say yes. Volunteering has always been something that I've done when I went to someone I went to high state. Go Bucks and I WANNA leave this city growing up. I thought Komatsu's just the star that the bigger stories were elsewhere and got really involved involved in service and community engagement at Ohio state or you're doing their the organization change in so many different ways is at its. It's pay it forward today so anybody that's a student Ohio. State can look it up or you can see the the kind of work that they do and it's really the universities cities community engagement volunteer arm ends. Obviously the universities well connected to this city and state as a whole and end got to be a part of so many different nonprofit experiences got to be a part of the leadership group in volunteers across the city through events. It's like Munich movement or Mlk of service and that's where I started making a lot of these connections and once making these connections and seeing that you can really get a feel feel for the pulse of the city the pulse in need for the city the people who are movers and shakers in the making an impact is a lot easier than I think we tends hens to originally believe it to be he had to see it to believe it and once I saw it I believed it and I didn't WanNa leave and got the a phone. Call said hey come check out. Oklahoma skews bag and I'll never leave Columbus. I am sure did you do you ever work with always you or students from Wallace issue. We've had some different fraternities and sororities involved. You know they'll just come to our events. They find out about us. We have a lot of Grad students who participate in our events and help spread the word I went to School Baltimore and I was President of Our Circle K. Chapter which is the division of quantities but it basically we were organizing service projects. We had about two hundred people in our our club and we were running about five projects week and love that going out there. They're serving with other people from my own experience. When you're out there actually being involved in the community in some way you develop a better understanding of what's actually going on and what people are facing uh-huh. I think that gives you just more compassion for what issues are happening and more awareness of of what's going on and I think that helps you to talk about it and to share with other people. Hey you know this is happening over here. This is what the situation looks like which in turn gets more people involved yeah and I I just want to mention so we definitely have so many opportunities each month to actually do the voluntary giving back by we also have something called our monthly happy hours where you know if someone isn't sure how involved they're ready to be in Columbus or they're not sure what kind of opportunities we offer. It's a great place to start just where you can come meet. Some of the event leaders we always pick a different charity each month where.

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"people" Discussed on People Helping People

People Helping People

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"people" Discussed on People Helping People

"And all the Rhodes scholars all those folks the I think they're all kind of anything along those line definitely there there may be a secret sauce in what all those organizations do is where they find and I mean there's an in a very loving way they find very naive. well accomplished college graduates or soon to be college graduates who believe they can go and change the world autry. I stick and want the opportunity to do it immediately. and they join a organization like teach for America where they get to see firsthand how how deep and how challenging the changing the world really is and when they go through that that challenge and they face it head on and and they face all the difficulties in and come out the other end they realize says how much more work they have to do and that gives them that much more fuel and that much more drive in I think of the folks I did teach for America alongside with and what they're doing today. I mean it's been ten years for for me. Since I first joined the started with the core and where these where we've all gone in the nonprofits that people have started the social enterprises if you're over the schools of their leading or whatever it might be in his like it's all started together being an classroom serving the community community and seeing the reality of how how challenging trying to change the world and make the world better place really is yeah. I think it knocks you on your ass. I don't care what you've experienced in your life. If you've lived a privileged life and you were somebody who volunteered in highschool out of food shelter or were you volunteered at a senior living and I'm talking about myself here right that you don't know what it's like until you are in front none of it on a daily basis when you have a kid who even if you shot fireworks at your fingertips was not gonna learn that day because he didn't eat and you had an abscessed assist tooth or he didn't have glasses you know like there's something that like just humbles you and I remember my very first week. I called called my mom and my dad and I just I stopped and I'm not a big crier but I- sobbed because I understood in that moment what my parents did ed by moving us out of the inner city of Youngstown and taking us to a a community where we were the only other like there were no black kids kids. There were no other Latinos it was my brother and my sister and I have Asian Indian kid like there was very little diversity but my parents cared so so much about our education and they couldn't pay for it so they got us the best public school education we could and I know how that has changed my life so I think when you get that again when you get knocked on your ass and you realize like how privileged you are and and you you realize how much there is to do to Jerry's point and that's I think forces you to get entrepreneurial forces. You just hustle so it forces you to realize okay. This is a problem that doesn't just get solved in two years and it's something that's going to be a lifetime commitment and and there's a lot of different ways to try to interested whether whether it be continuing to teach in the classroom or leading a school or or starting a social enterprise called empower us now now. Do you have any advice or any other social entrepreneurs who are starting out yeah. That's great question. I mean surprised so many learnings apprentice tastes actually that we would love to share about If I had to recap and really think a one main piece it would probably be for my Si- like what I remember is like the validation allegation process of going through and truly figuring out what is it that the community or the the Consumer Sumer or whatever it is that you're trying to build if you don't properly go through that validation process and then do it again and again to truly make sure you validated validated it. The idea may be the most amazing thing in the world but it's never going to be used and then your impact isn't there right because in order to have the impact that you gotTa make sure you're truly addressing something so talk to people get them using it. Yeah talked to people before you build anything really truly talked to him and when you talk to someone you really truly talk awesome. That's actually really what it means. You really listening yeah from my perspective because I have started a startup that failed one of the things I think that is is critical critical anybody listening get the right partner. I'm in a place in a space where I'm very privileged to be doing this with Jerry. and I had a great partner in my other start-up it just it wasn't the right fit at the right time for both of our lives. Personal Ursula Professional and I feel like I am very privileged to be with a partner who has more drive than me and I feel like I'm very driven. but man. Jerry puts me to shame and I think other things too like little practical. Things like get a bookkeeper..

Jerry partner America Youngstown Ursula Professional ten years two years