17 Burst results for "Pennsylvania Railroad"

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

01:51 min | Last month

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"He wrote during his presidency helped win the civil war by projecting presidential power and unprecedented fashion. The federal government had been slow to adopt The Telegraph after Samuel Morse's first successful test message in 18 44 prior to the Civil War federal employees who had to send a telegram from the nation's capital How to wait in line with the rest of the public at the city's Central Telegraph office days after the book Bartman of Fort Sumpter. Andrew Carnegie, the future industrialist who at the time was superintendent of the Pittsburgh Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad, sent the following order to the railroad superintendent of Telegraphs sent four of your best operators to Washington at once prepared to enter Government Telegraph Service for war. Those four men would be the first of the 1500 called into service in the newly created US military Telegraph core using wire coils for on the backs of mules. Core undertook the dangerous worker crossing battlefields to lay more than 15,000, miles of telegraph wires on poles, fences and bushes. That allowed news from the front lines to be transmitted nearly instantaneously to a telegraph office that had been established inside the old Library of the War department building adjacent to the White House. In March. 18 62 Blinken, who had a keen interest in technology and remains the only American president with the patent, spent more of his presidency in the War department's Telegraph office than anywhere else outside of the White House. As the president who craved knowledge, he tried a well worn path across the executive mansion's lawn to the war department to monitor the latest intelligence arriving in dots and dashes. David Homer Bates, one of the four original members of the U. S. Military, Telegraph Core,.

Samuel Morse Andrew Carnegie David Homer Bates 18 44 Blinken Washington one four men more than 15,000, miles four Civil War Pittsburgh Division of the Pen civil war American U. S. Military, Telegraph Core March. 18 62 first successful test message first four original members Bartman
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:37 min | 10 months ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"It was originally broadcast Sunday September first nineteen, fifty seven in the newspapers events Sunday sixty, three years ago. These were some of the headlines. In a face to face encounter governor Goodwin J Knight yesterday warned Senator William F. Nolan he would face a hard fought contest. If he entered California's one, thousand, nine, hundred fifty Republican race for governor. The Senate Minority Leader home from Congress or an extensive state wide speaking tour sidestep the virtual challenge and replied in effect that intimidation would get night nowhere the first meeting eight months between two of the most important Republicans in. California took place thirty first annual host breakfast of the State Chamber, of Commerce. Death stock the nation's highways faster than expected yesterday, and before the first twenty, four hours of the seventy. Eight Hour Labor Day weekend, we're over traffic fatalities had ridden above the one hundred mark. The. Miami Daily News said last night a US intercontinental ballistic missile was fired about twenty four hundred miles over the Atlantic probably two months before Russia claimed it had developed to weapon firing from the air. Force. Missile Test. Center on Florida's Cape Canaveral. Shoving black shirted followers of Italian dictator. Benito Mussolini nearly rioted yesterday at a funeral mass being held for their assassinated it'll do. Armed police had to hold back the saluting, screaming fascist outside the church when they tried to attack photographers crying, leave us alone with our duty police stood guard both inside and outside the tiny chapel at San Cassano cemetery as a priest offered directly a master, the simple company containing the broken body of the dictator. There's five Boris Morals foresees the fall of Soviet Communist Party boss Nikita Khrushchev within the next eight months he predicts that the successor will be a military dictatorship headed by Marshall Georgy Zucca. Dr and Mrs Henry Spits Fatty denied yesterday acusations they were Russian espionage agents the accusations made yesterday in Washington I congressman Walter the Democrat of Pennsylvania said, the couples were identified as spies by the House UNAMERICAN activities committee chairman said the Spitzer's had been members of the Soviet espionage apparatus recently exposed by FBI counter spy Boris Morals. President Eisenhower kept his word to me one hundred percent on passage of the civil rights bill that from representative Adam, Clayton Powell. The Democrat of New, York and Negro in a table to his office from Germany. He said the president promised in last October. He would ask Congress to pass a civil rights bill would have Attorney General Brownell, presper consideration, and urged congressional leaders to fight for his passage Powell announced he. Will travel to the South this fall. Urging Negros to register as voters he will work with the Reverend Martin Luther King of Montgomery a Negro who led that cities Negroes in boycotting buses POW broke with the Democrats last year to campaign for Eisenhower's reelection meanwhile, President Eisenhower urged by twenty two organizations last night to appoint immediately assistant attorney general and six civil rights commissioners genuinely devoted to the advancement of civil rights. Civil rights advocates yesterday set their sights on a change in the Senate filibuster rule as their next major objective. But they can see that they may have to wait until January nineteen fifty nine to get it Senator Douglas Democrat Bill Annoy who headed five Democratic senators pledging maximum efforts to alter the president rule says he doubts have much success in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Fifty, eight holding frankly I think the passage of the civil rights bill in the session that just ended is going to make it more difficult to change the rules. But Senator Thurmond the Democrat of south. Carolina certainly helped our cause by talking twenty four hours just delaying tactic. Brides train pulled by a locomotive the best man, the Conductor Win June hand and Thomas Lecarr Mary yesterday from South and boy New Jersey for years that thirty seven year old miss hand and the sixty two year old pair road the Pennsylvania Railroad's post-midnight altogether together from Newark to the north. Jersey shore one night, a railroad engineer introduce them the courtship was on nothing could sidetrack it. So when the two were married to have their job done. On the OWL, there was a special car for the bridal party streamers and white paper bells adorned as it came down from new. York passengers, blue horns, and tossed rice, and when the train reached the.

President Eisenhower Senator William F. Nolan president Congress US Clayton Powell York Senator Thurmond California Soviet Communist Party Benito Mussolini Nikita Khrushchev New Jersey Bill Annoy Pennsylvania Railroad Goodwin J Knight Miami Daily News Cape Canaveral
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

05:03 min | 11 months ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Us a sense of something far greater. What is a major American city? It's basically the mosaic off all the activities of millions of people, great and small. But in a way at some point kind of like that. What? What Steinbeck and he and the others. We would talk about Fitzgerald on all that. At some point, America gets down to crushing you two. You have to resist that. What in what it takes to try to survive that type of a crucible. As glorious as it is, It's always trying to erode you. So you have to fight. You get that sense of pushing and pulling. On an individual level. When you look at these landscapes, and I'm looking a blue morning from 19 9 that's also in the National Gallery of Art is to see that all the time when I worked there, you see an open pit in the ground and you have a building that's about to go up on 19 7 was the year that they broke ground for the when the great architectural marvels in New York ever And that was Pennsylvania Station, the original Pennsylvania station designed and built by Stanford White. That was torn down. I think what, 1960 19 sometime in the Earth, maybe 60 to 63. People are still crying about that. It's like that. It's like the bridges. The Germans blew up in Florence, and people are still crying about that, even though they have rebuilt them, of course. They still cry about the demolition of those bridges at the end of World War two. Likewise, the demolition of our Pennsylvania station in New York what a monument of American design and engineering that wass what an amalgam of what had come from Europe and then been Americanized here in architecture for that Great Cathedral for commerce. For the Pennsylvania Railroad terminus, Uh, incredible building and we see it being broken ground happening in 19 7 So there was a lot going on along with all the immigration coming into the city at that time. George Bellows might as well have been, You know, a newspaper man he might as well have been a photojournalist, capturing New York in one of its most dynamic decades ever, from 19 7 to 1917. I mentioned the bridge. Blackwells Island. Take a look at that one. And any number of Hollywood films that you've seen, you know, can you know, come to mind. Even the movie that was made about 10 years ago with Jennifer Colony Dark water, which is basically a thriller horror movie, The photography the way that it was used, the palate looks just like George Bellows. And you're going over from Manhattan over to Roosevelt Island and what it's like to live cramped on that little island in high rises. It's almost like looking into George Bellows pain from 80 years before 90 years before. Uh, so some other ones. Let me see. Um, a day in June 1913. That's in our own backyard at the D A. And I've got a nice reproduction of that right here. In my hands on here. You see again, nicely dressed people in Central Park. Gorgeous greenery everywhere you've got sort of like lemon meringue type palette of the dresses of the parasols, the inside green of one of the parasols making us think of Manet's painting of Camille, his wife, the inside at the National Gallery, the color of the inside of her parasol, a similar green. However, this has kind of like that, that sickly kind of green that I've been talking about. Remember this is an urban scene. This isn't some You know a country Pastorello, right? This is taking place in Central Park, and we're reminded of that when we look beyond the canopy of the trees up above. What dominate. Is this Olympus off a hotel building? So that dominates everything. You've got The beauty of Central Park. You have the people losing themselves in this elysium in this idyllic environment, But then we're reminded. You know what? We're not outside the city were in the heart of the city and again, the city dominates. Nature is dominated by that hotel that high rise rising in the in the far distance, which even cuts off the top of the painting, so basically there is no sky. There's canopy to the trees. There's the building. There's the people down below the dark green hunter green really of the lawn on then I say, said, the costumes of the people walking blowing about Lying on the grass. It's a happy scene, but it's not again. It's got this hour with sweet, which is what George Bellows was so good at, and we talked about George Bellows last week as I introduced them talking about him today way know him. I say, Ask most people about George Bellows will think of his boxing pains, and the National Gallery has a couple of them Both members of this club and I explained what that meant was because prizefighting You know, boxing for money was illegal in New York at that time asked was cockfighting and other things also said there'd be a police raid and so you had your mums the word you go to these places really seedy places. Look at a gym where they're they're having a boxing.

George Bellows New York Central Park National Gallery Pennsylvania Station Blackwells Island boxing Pennsylvania Railroad terminus Steinbeck Florence Fitzgerald Manhattan America Stanford White Olympus Hollywood Europe Great Cathedral
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Andrew would sweep the office in the morning before the telegraph operators arrived. And one morning he actually took a message that came through when no operators had yet begun their shift, and he did a good enough job that the operators started asking him to keep an eye on the telegraph when they needed to step away. She eventually learned to take messages by ear. So without the help of a running slip of paper to print the message out, he would just write it down as he heard it. A significant promotion followed when he subbed in for another operator on a two week trial because people realized he was actually quite good at this, and he was soon given the title of assistant operator and he was making $25 a month. Well working for the telegraph office, Andrew met a man named Thomas A. Scott. At the time. Scott was superintendent of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Scott noticed how diligent and driven the young Carnegie was and made him an offer to leave the telegraph office and become Scott's private secretary and also run his personal telegraph machine. Carnegie was offered $35 a month into him that seemed like a fortune. So he took this job and started learning about the railroad industry. Carnegie was once again doing really well because he carried that same work ethic into every position he had, and he was making a name for himself at the Pennsylvania Railroad, but his father, in the meantime, had not met with success in the United States. After struggling to make enough money through weaving jobs. William Carnegie Maeda Stabat entrepreneurship, and he tried manufacturing his own cloth and then selling it as a traveling salesman. But that really never took off. William died in 18 55 when Andrew was 20 and that left the eldest son as the primary breadwinner in the family. A year after William's death, Andrew started to expand out his business efforts He invested in the Woodruff sleeping car company with alone and it paid off Sunni, was making $5000 a year from his investment, which is so much more than he had been learning from his railroad income. It was also promoted to railroad superintendent in 18 59 and he used his increased income to move himself and his mother and Su a nicer home. There's an interesting thing that plays out over and over where he starts making more and more and more money on investments, But for quite a while, he actually still kept his much lower paying job, which is kind of interesting to me. When the civil War began. Thomas Scott, his boss was hired by the union to manage transportation of its troops was pretty natural since he ran a railroad that they were like, Hey, I know why don't you run a similar set set up for us? Carnegie was also hired. He was working alongside his boss is part of the war effort. And meanwhile, his earnings from that sleeping car company investment went toward a new business venture. He invested $11,000 in oil in 18 61 and he almost doubled his money in the first year. I think he took in something like $18,000. From there, he began diversifying his investments further and soon he was earning more than $40,000 a year from them. That was a massive sum in the 18 sixties. Andrew Carnegie was drafted in 18 64. But he didn't wind up serving as part of the draft terms. He had the option to pay a sum of $300 there find a replacement to serve in his stead. So he opted to pay another man $850 to feel to fill his slot. And by the time the war ended, Andrew Carnegie had come to the realization that the iron industry had great potential. And in a surprising move, he left the Pennsylvania Railroad, and he started a new company in 18 65. Called the Keystone Bridge Company, Keystones. Entire business was upgrading existing wooden bridges to start your iron structures, and this proved to be extremely lucrative. Just a few years into it. He had made himself wealthy. In 18 67 he started the Keystone Telegraph Company, which cut such a lucrative deal with the Pennsylvania Railroad. Two runs telegraph wire on the railroads, Poles. Rick Carnegie and his partners were able to flip the business and tripled their money in a very short period of time. Is estimated worth in 18 68 was $400,000. So caveat. It is always really tricky to convert historical worth into modern value. But a breath estimate is that this was about $5 million. He was only 33. Yeah, And I did want to point out that you know he was making these deals still with the Pennsylvania Railroad. So even though he had left, he really left on good terms and maintained business dealings with them for a long time that we're always quite positive. And riding high on his string of successes, Andrew Carnegie decided that he was only going to give business two more years before turning to a life of philanthropy. He wrote This plan out in a letter to himself in 18 68 and he had calculated out that he could live comfortably off the money he had made by allocating himself $50,000 each year. And then using the rest of the money to benefit causes that he believed in But in 18 70 he wasn't quite ready to say goodbye. It's all these various industries. That same year, he also met a young woman named Louise Whitfield through a mutual friend. And Andrew became social with the Whitfield family. Yeah, he was interested in Louise, but he was interested in a lot of women. It was pretty casual. But then, when Carnegie was almost 37 he learned about Henry best summers refining process that could convert large amounts of iron into steel, and he learned about that while he was visiting best summers plants in England. Carnegie believed so strongly in this process and the steel that it turned out that he invested all of his money plus alone, So that's a lot of money at that point to build a steel plant in Pittsburgh. The plant was completed in 18 75 and it was named the Edgar Thompson works after the head of the Pennsylvania Railroad. In 18 80 Andrew began a relationship with Louise Whitfield. And this courtship was a bit of a May December romance because Andrew was 45 at the time, and Louise was 23. But it appears to have stayed pretty innocent, in part because Andrew had promised his mother that he would never marry while she was still alive. Andrew when his mother were incredibly close, And as he became the primary breadwinner in the family, he had assured his mother that he would provide for the comforts that she had gone without when he was growing up. So they were together a great deal of the time and his mother, Margaret was even known to walk into business meetings along with her son. Yeah, I think he was trying to make up for the the Bad times they had had in the past, and so he really was a little bit indulgent of her, but he adored her. And while some people might have been chagrined at this kind of obstacle, Louise was actually in a unique position to understand Andrew Carnegie's prioritization of his mother. Louise was also very, very close to her mother who needed ongoing medical care. In 18 81 Andrew became business partners with Henry Clay Frick by purchasing a controlling interest in Freaks. Coke company. Coke was a coal based fuel. That same year, he took his mother Margaret, back to Scotland, and he asked Louise Whitfield to join them on the trip. His mother, those shut that idea completely down. Yeah, she was not.

Andrew Carnegie Pennsylvania Railroad Louise Whitfield William Carnegie Maeda Thomas A. Scott superintendent Keystone Telegraph Company Thomas Scott Henry Clay Frick Keystone Bridge Company Whitfield family Coke United States Margaret salesman Su secretary Woodruff
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

American Elections: Wicked Game

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

"In late. Eighteen sixty one as president. Lincoln fought against the confederacy he. He also faced another issue that threaten the solvency of the union bankruptcy the goods. The army needed to fight uniforms. And even the union flag itself or mostly flee made in Europe and European countries while refusing to aid the north were investing their gold in southern cotton production in purchasing good from Europe. The North North was unknowingly funding the south rebellion. Meanwhile corruption in the Union capital was rampant. Not only was the government filled with southern sympathizers who sought to undermine remind the war effort but there were countless speculators. Personally profiting off the war. Even Lincoln's own cabinet was caught up in a corruption scandal secretary of war Simon Cameron and had ties to the railroad industry. He gave the companies that he was close to lucrative government contracts and left their competitors open to confederate attack. His friends were making being money hand over fist and were even appointed to the government. The vice president of the Pennsylvania Railroad was Cameron's assistant secretary of war when the scandal broke in late. Eighteen sixty one lincoln asked for Cameron's resignation in January of eighteen sixty. Two Lincoln appointed a talented lawyer to replace Cameron. Former Attorney General Edwin M Stanton a Democrat. Stanton did not care for President Lincoln and over the years he had made his feelings well known he especially excoriated. Lincoln's weak response to the attacks. Tax On Fort Sumter though Stanton view the president as an inept buffoon. Lincoln saw potential in the famously stubborn and tenacious Edwin Stanton. The two had served on a a court case together. Many years ago and experienced left an indelible impression on the President Edwin Stanton was resolute stubborn and he got things done his way immediately absolutely after his appointment. Lincoln's God of war who he playfully nicknamed Mars went to work rooting out. Corruption in the government and in the Military Stanton also tackled the bankruptcy obse issue declaring that all military goods would be solely purchased in the north. This put American business back to work and staved off an economic downturn Stanton Manton also tested the reach of the federal government using wartime constitutional authority. Stanton sees the railroads and telegraph lines putting them to work for the war department. Even even shut down newspapers that shared military secrets or spread. Confederate lies or propaganda. All of these actions would serve their purpose and strengthening the Union's cause but they also tarnished Lincoln's presidency in the eyes of his enemies southern sympathizers known as copperheads began to call Lincoln a tyrant. The copperheads were peace. Democrats a faction in the north view the south outrage as legitimate and the use of federal forced to stop secession as unconstitutional throughout the war. They push for piece even if that meant recognizing the legitimacy of the confederacy or allowing the south back into the union with new guarantees of slavery. The term copperhead was a pejorative Georgia created by Republicans to invoke venomous snakes but peace. Democrats embraced the nickname. These copperheads wore badges with the image of lady. Liberty cut from copper copper liberty head coins. They've you'd Lincoln's wartime actions with deep suspicion. Nothing would enrage the copperheads more than Lincoln's decision to suspend Habeas Atheist Corpus from the very beginning of the civil war Washington. DC was in peril because of its geographical graphical location DC was surrounded by Maryland a slave state filled with southern sympathizers who often resorted to access addition if Maryland were to secede the capital would be lost to the South so Lincoln and Stanton took a hard stance against sedition to maintain order. The president suspended Habeas Corpus. The right which protect techs citizens against arbitrary arrest and imprisonment Lincoln gave federal marshalls the authority to imprison any person engaged by any act of speech or writing in discouraging volunteer enlistment or in any way giving aid and comfort to the enemy among those arrested. Were the mayor of Baltimore and nine members of the Maryland legislature. Even the famous actor John Wilkes booth was arrested briefly in Saint Louis for making anti-government remarks throughout the war. Some eighteen thousand citizens were arrested. The number of military arrests for desertion and corruption will reach a staggering. Two hundred thousand. But for Lincoln and Stanton this was a necessary evil for the copperheads it's it was a rallying cry as the spring of eighteen sixty to pass. The North was losing the war in the West. The Union Navy won a victory in New Orleans and the army had a hard won victory at the battle of Shiloh Tennessee by lesser known general ulysses s grant but the eastern theatre had been a disaster under General McClellan clown the army of the Potomac had been stuck in a stalemate McClellan had failed to take richmond and suffered a string of humiliating defeats which only bolstered the copperheads calls for piece. The war weighed heavy Lincoln throughout his presidency. Lincoln battled fits of melancholy which many modern historians and psychologists have labeled a major depressive disorder. Nothing however hit Lincoln spirits harder than the death of his eleven year old son on February twentieth. Eighteen sixty two Willie Lincoln died from typhoid. Hi Ford like illness. Historians blame the contaminated water in the White House. The same issue that likely killed presidents Harrison. Halt and Taylor. Lincoln was traumatized. I Mary Todd. Lincoln was inconsolable and wore nothing but black for a year but Lincoln's personal tragedy and one unexpected consequence in the summer of eighteen. Sixty two. It's solidified a bond between the president and his war secretary and Stanton who had lost his own son. Stanton and Lincoln would soon unite in the common purpose around a controversial issue. Lincoln's embrace of emancipation would redefine the landscape of the war. Unite the north and put the rebels on on their heels..

President Lincoln President Edwin Stanton president Attorney General Edwin M Stant Military Stanton Stanton Manton North North Simon Cameron confederacy Europe army Union Maryland vice president secretary copperheads Mary Todd Union Navy Pennsylvania Railroad
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

12:14 min | 1 year ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

"Package maybe we we can convince them Medford's a good spot. So I became the token beer guy on this group that was going to basically try to convince Aaron Hill to come to Medford now we all know the end of the story. The opening of where he's really fun. Little pub you know Medford didn't look out there but I ended up having half a business plan for a brewery and at the same time now being laid off from Medford. It's one of those things where I could cash out part of my retirement. So now this weird little idea start sticking like what if we tried to do this downtown. There's a bunch of vacant spots. Then we find out Medford has an ordinance against all alcohol production. We get to fight with the town. WHO's now our best friend? But at the time it was there was touch and go. We actually leased space in two thousand. Fourteen didn't open till April of two thousand sixteen. So gives you the amount of journey and only about half of that was construction. But we are starring we stuck with it and it gradually became one of those things. Don't tell me I can't open a brewery dig my heels in and show you bastards and at some point it just worked and when it works It became a lot of fun at the same time. And I don't want to claim credit for it but I know we were part of it down starts reviving and then is more things happening and more people start coming to downtown and we start to have more fun with it and at some some point I worried less about the craft. Beer crowd like nothing wrong with the crappier crowd. But I'll show worried about it very beginning. I have to prove this perfect beer. I want to be okay. The next insert hyper here and people would come in and as we dialed in our healthy while he was on our heff horizon. That was the best selling beer for a while or we'd make these fruit beers with local farmers. They were bestselling beers. I'm like what if we just keep going local doing more and more local and that just has now kind have become our thing and along the way it fits still a firefighter. I now work for Princeton University. I don't know if I should Mitt that but that's what it's one of those things. No there are great great employer. But you know it's one of those things the wrong personal here and they'll be like he's on alcohol podcast talking about us but they are. They are wonderful people that that they're stuck with me until I retire unless I do. Something stupid I but Working bag you two points back year. Okay yeah that's true that's true. I have a little orange pin. You know a put that on real fast. But it's one one of those things that I work twenty four schedules so in between each of those shifts twenty four forty-eight Berry and it just kind of that's what my life's becoming its fit and then along. The lower forge became our way of celebrating local history. Talk about history. Lower forge was the nickname for ghost. Town warden stay far is called Washington's Ashington furnace now depending on how colorful I want to get with story. The joke used to be this where me and my wife back. When she was my girlfriend would sneak off my old beat up jeep and go make out sure but we also broke and it became one of those things? Let's go find goes down go geocaching. Let's do this. Let's I don't know goof off till the wheels fall off the jeep right so we'd go out with friends and we always ended up in this on this one road the quaker bridge lower Ford Road Medford's of quakertown. We're like Oh for naming a town we we can't really we. We we're naming a brewery can't really name a brewery. quaker bridge will probably piss off one of our friends so we'll name it after the other end lower forge. I looked at domain names available. Nobody owns the trademark. All that Eh sticks and then we come to find out after this now we going through all this going through. All the hubbub about opening will lower Fortune Hampton furnace the other furnish on the batch though river originally shipped all their bognar up to Medford. Because that's where the Pennsylvania Railroad railhead West. So now we're like this actually connects to Medford this all got shipped shipped up here and actually we have a big mural on the wall of the nineteen o six roared schedule shows the Philadelphia Medford Line where it used to come out and where it actually terminated in Medford is actually still there. It's a doctor's office so it's kind of cool. How it all came together? I'd love the Stanley but it was absolutely unintentional incident. asynchronous Erica Ourika and admittedly still being at Bir. A joke with people I firing up Rubio get the to invest jobs on the planet and actually still is a bit of a De stressor. So you know you worry about a lot. We worry about government. Regulations taxes will boy taxes all the time but in the end when I walk in there usually have a stupid idea and we can have a lot of fun with it so they still might de stressor from work like Wednesday up at work horrible shifts. Everything that could go wrong. It did go wrong and it wasn't even bad calls. It was just stupid stuff so but Thursday morning I get home and I'm like growling and then I remember I was like. Oh we're getting a bunch of new grains in it the berry time at the brewery. I'm thinking of about a dozen different ideas for beers we're going to produce next February march. I'm gonNA completely better mood. It's still mighty stressor. I just scaled up the hobby. Now Sean how did it become a family affair. So here's where I have to tell the the funny part of this so I start getting into this originally. It's kind of May talking to friends and I have like about half the money I think I need. I tell perspective brewery owners that for every barrel you think you want to open within your Brew House probably need one hundred grand. So where three barrel birdhouse. Roughly really I mean. This is a huge generalization. Three hundred grand probably scales up ten barrel million you know so and so forth so I was able to get kind of half way it to the finish line. I started talking to friends and of course at this point I had a couple of really decent homebrew recipe. So I'd have to come over. And you know an entire five or ten gallon batch it was gonna own if these guys. I was asking for a lot of money. Like hey you can own a bit of the brewery and you know here we go trust me with your money and we'll probably make a profit in three to five years and I couldn't keep up so my mom had a background. We'll say in other alcohol backgrounds She can make a me amine. Apple Jackets will leave it at that And she goes and she actually has a commercial a restaurant background. She's like well if you me recipe recipes I can I can put this together. I can cook and she ends up. She's got a very different brewing style. The May so it actually talking about working out I like to Osama cold clinical scientific broher where she's the one that caught her whispering to the yeast and I'd WanNa make a joke about it right now but frigging works create a stuck fermentation About a month back and all of a sudden she like it's almost like talking to the plants but wouldn't you know it wasn't stuck anymore like within a day so I'm like you can't knock it if it works. But she kinda got involved that she kind of filled in the blanks on a lot of stuff and also helped me. You realize that chasing the dream of I mean and I'm sure you've probably seen a lot of brewers early started everybody. Oh I wanna be that Berry that has lines out the door were and people are. There's a secondary market for my cans and all that but honestly there's a huge market for a brewer. That makes like this wet right here that I'm glad he gave me a little extra. You know that everyday craft beer that people are going to love that you're going to sell in spades. We somehow fell into that everyday craft. Beer the crowd you know. I'm not worried I may never get a gold medal for an IP or hobby beer. I drink but if one of my cranberry beers or blueberry beers or my half a wise and or something like that gets a little bit of a claim it wouldn't surprise me because that's where we kind of fell into the market and that is a lot of being tempered by having my mom is a Co broher. We I think we don't know but somebody from the oldest before we might be the only mother son brewing team like there are other family owned breweries but just how it is generation Lee we might be the only actual actual active production team. Now how does that work is the original recipe yours and your mom tweaks it. How does that work not really so probably? We are first couple of recipes remind but once things started getting fixed. We'll have a note pad where we'll go back and forth or like a shared document. You know Google Docs or whatever and By the time everything's done it is a huge mix of the two of us and even depending on how things get brewed. You know I got hurt as a firefighter last year. So people people are always always asked that question and after I got her people are saying something and they would try to be like all this this this is a really great. IPO You must now. I haven't brewed a beer here. In nine weeks because I was laid up from a head injury. So firefighter and people don't realize allies that there is no discerning between the two of us right now other than our two styles absolutely complement each other two and a Yin Yang thing with my hands right now but a really did it worked out and I don't think we could remotely succeed without it. which is the crazy part The really is no way to peel it apart. And See who's why who's who other than I probably make more decisions on purchasing grain than she does so maybe I'll claim one extra percent credit but I think that's more cheek. She she lets me get away with murder and then usually we'll correct it later on hillary down a rabbit hill farms. Like Sean forgot to order Munich. Can you fix this. I love her by the way he is awesome. We did a podcast. Yes with them in July if my mother my other podcast fear of craft beer planet on their Cyrus podcast network slug as its reciprocal. We do it all the time plugs up do you know. Why don't we have one of those beers? Which one do you think we should have? I brought me a nice collection which won't won't be leaving here. They're going to be hanging around down here show. Which one should we try first? So where do you in the mood for. Because I actually Love Beers I brought Only one IPA PA.. But now what's interesting about the IP is we're actually labeling it a specialty IPA. Because what we're trying to do. My best friend is lactose intolerant. And I didn't realize that and we had a customer at the brewery. Come down from Vermont and is a gift to us that family behind a berry. They gave us some Wael some hard to find beers and Some of them were amazing. But I didn't think about what happens if you give a new some some of these New England. IPA's that are just loaded to the gills with lactose to somebody's lactose intolerant. Without warning afterwards afterwards I kind of promised them. Well I'll try to figure out a way to brew something Adjunct Free So it was great. My fourth son Thai who's now l.. Two months old today was being born. We always name a beer after a family member and at the same time I was L- I was talking with a Irish craft brewer because they have some restrictions on what they can do about something he was doing what he called the American inspired hazy. Ip and we actually brewed the same way so think of I'm trying to think now we don't do it with our horizon. But think if you're pulling a grant or even not not even as a decoction mash or something like that but pulling a little bit of that award out bringing it back in later you know some of the suspended proteins and things. You're going to get out of that. We did a little miniature version because we grew our our finished product product. It's about three barrels. One hundred gallon by the way Richard. That's decoction was mentioned in two of the last three podcasts Just to let channel that. You should make a cigarette word. We did that we. Actually we did do that once in someone one. We did that on the show where we had had Oliveria and sons. Oh right decoction was the secret word really yes. That was the secret word that we did because when backward flag makes they are half of is and they do they wasn't yeah and their system enables them to do that. See only in the beginning of that episode. I told you guys that earlier today I have to get caught up in. That might be on the way home..

Medford Berry Sean Princeton University Aaron Hill quaker bridge Philadelphia Medford Line quakertown Pennsylvania Railroad gold medal Ashington furnace Mitt Vermont Erica Ourika Apple Rubio Brew House Fortune Hampton Washington
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

"Yes kit. So my mother doesn't realize Barbara Cornelius, is yet, I'm going to show her the picture as soon as she sees a picture. She's going to realize that I've mentioned this before the picture going to show my mother right now. And again, I'll put it on the social media. Once I get that all done. It's a New York City department of records. Mom, do you recognize this photo? It's a very famous photo that I've seen once before and. Yeah. If I remember correctly, something about a murder suicide. Correct. Okay. So I showed this picture to my mother for the first time a couple of weeks ago again recap by went to funeral school graduated with a degree in mortuary science. So I've known about this picture for about twenty years and could never figure out the back story to it. And somehow I came across it about two months ago, and I was like, oh, good. God damn we have to do this. So little bit of a again. Hallways. Have to do this apparently. But again, I will prerecord it. I haven't done it yet. Sorry. Everybody warning coarse language fuck. Yeah. There's always going to be on this podcast to we're going to be talking about death and murder. So it's not gonna be good times in the sense of. We're not going to be happy. Happy joy, joy about it. We enjoy what we're gonna talk about, but it's not a fun topic in the sense of it's very depressing. So we're gonna add some comedy to everybody. Never never talking badly about the victims for the most part, there happened to be a few cases where the victims will be should heads. But for the majority always looking to the person committing the crime is the asshole, so shield my mother, this picture two weeks ago, and just to give you a little description of what it is. It is there a multiple shots of the crime scene. But it is a long view from the end of the bed towards the foot of the bed. There is a Cy. Shot of the bed, and then there is in upper view. I don't know how the hell they got this shot. But it's awesome. And I'll post them all again from New York City department of records, and it is a man in the woman on the bed and appears to be a murder, but it's not it's a murder suicides. Talk about it. Your mom? Here's a picture of MRs Barbara Cornelius when she was alive. So you're not just looking at a picture of her dead body, covered in blood. I mean it's also like a. I guess a picture, but it's not, you know how pictures were back in the day when they put him in the newspaper. It's not the greatest quality. But you can tell what she looked like it looks almost like a funniest may sound like a postcard. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Like one of those trading cards now now. Oh, that's what she looked like okay. So we're talking about nineteen fifteen here June nineteen fifteen going back, and this is what I find in. Only have a few newspaper articles on it, but they're few of them are pretty lengthy. So just to give you a synopsis Logan's port pharaohs reporter, June seventeenth nineteen fifty mysterious is the double shooting. Mysterious double tragedy is the. Good Lord, a mysterious double tragedy in the select residential district of Brooklyn claimed the lives of a young woman and a man earlier today. This is Barbara Cornelius. Twenty two years old. Nope. Not true. Twenty five years old. I checked in a bunch of other news articles, they correct that it's twenty five. She is the wife of Carmen Cornelius. Carman spelled. C A. R M, A, N A, a produce merchant. She was murdered as she lay in bed by youth, who is believed to have been a burglar after firing four bullets into the woman's body. The young man turned the weapon upon himself. The man was not identified. But the police found letters in his pockets, which they believed what I would make densification comparatively easy. He was fashionably dressed in expensive clothes. Wore a button of the order of the knights of Columbus, according to Cornelius, he was aroused by the noises of a man, climbing through the window as he leapt from his bed to grapple with the intruder to bullets were fired at MRs Cornelius, as the frightened and distracted husband dashed into the hallway to summon to some aid from neighbors. Two more shots were fired at his wife, then the insurer fired a bullet into his own brain, this body falling across the corpse of MRs Cornelius welter in its own blood, which if you look at the picture, which I'm gonna post for you guys on social media yet. I mean, literally underneath the bed is soaked, with blood later. The man who shot and killed MRs Cornelie said her Brooklyn home earlier today, and then committed suicide was identified this afternoon as George f and I hope I'm pronouncing this, right? I'm sorry, make aga-. It's. M. C. A. G. H. Macaque of Jersey City assistant yard master of the Pennsylvania railroad. So what in the hell is going on? Why is this guy in her house? Oh, that sounds. So sketchy, so, so sketchy. Doesn't it though? Yes. It does. Okay. So. June seventeenth the headline states bride slate in her home by stranger to husband, slayer, commit suicide, MRs Cornelius killed in Brooklyn by man identified as George McKesson seeing this in this one. They don't spell his name the same way, husbands, find, but husband finds bodies had run for help when intruder climbed through a window, so that's the headline and then here comes into little more detail. Sorry about the background noise people, I have neighbors a man climbed into the ground floor bedroom of Carmen, Cornelius at number ninety Hopkinson street at a little after one o'clock in the morning, Cornelius was waked, by the screams of his young and beautiful wife Barbara while he was upstairs seeking help MRs Cornelius at a man whom Cornelius could not recognize found shot to death in the room. One puzzling mystery followed? Oh my God. Only one mystery just just one one. Puzzling mystery followed another as the police in coroner, tried to get light into matter late this afternoon. The dead man was identified by William J Morris. Assistant freight manager in the Pennsylvania railroad yards in Jersey City, as George mcalinden, an assistant yard master of the railroad, make cabinets friends were shocked when they learned of the shooting. They describe him as a devoted father to six children. No, not six four. That was a mistake in the newspaper all the other places. I find a four. They were left motherless a year ago. Again, I don't think that's correct. I found something that says, it's multiple years like two or three actually since his wife's death. His sister has been his housekeeper according to Morris the identification followed the discovery of a label in the man's well-cut coat of Jersey City, retail clothing store. I love it that they used to be able to like go to the so many less people. Right. So, like you had your clothes you would go to the store, and like it had the label of the store, that made it, so the cops or anybody could kinda like if they were looking for you that still happens to this day, but you have to be filthy, rich, right? Like you're not gonna be fucking wearing a shirt from WalMart and they're gonna find your based off of that. I'm talking about like you. They find it in the bowler hat or in these are nowadays. It's high end high end close anybody's to tailor seamstress. And you know what? I'm talking about feel free to Email. Me. H-. You know what I'm saying? There's other cases that I found where they figured out who like the people were through the clothes, you know where they were like, just bones shit. So and we'll come to those stories later but any going back to this. So. Macaque man's name was no more recognized by Cornelius and the dead woman's relatives in Brooklyn than the man's features. So nobody knows who the fuck. This dude is in this girl's house. Her family doesn't know I guess, more to the point what he was doing there. Right. It's not even a question of burglar, his is Nick, what? I don't think he was a. Oh shit. Just me. I've never heard this story. But I don't think he was. It was a well, guess what mom postcards founding? The Cornelius home were taken by acting captain Dwayne and tended Kerry of the homicide bureau is indications that the dead man who had signet ring and a scarf pin bearing the initials. G had no MRs Cornelius, more or less intimately. Well, I wonder. Yeah. Acton, captain Dwayne and the tenant Kerry, while searching the apartment for clues found several postcards signed g one of the initials on the signet ring worn by the murderer MRs Cornelius was known to her intimates as Bessie, two of the postcards, which four no stamps and probably had been mailed. Envelopes red deer Bessie wishing you many happy returns to one who loves you that you made joy the present Christmas tied g the second the second little postcard red deer Bessie wishes wishes of season. Dash a self made man if all were like Lincoln, what a grand world, this would be g those little postcards. They find in her place. Right. Okay. The man's shinbone is scraped. This is a quote from the corner. The man's shinbone is scraped freshly as though by the edge of the window frame, neither of the two ledge keys in his pockets, which contained besides only seventeen cents fit the door of the Cornelius apartment, clearly motherfucker doesn't live there. So. Cornelius told the coroner that he was wakened by his wife scream. He knew that there was someone in the room, but he could see nothing. He ran upstairs for help. Okay. So until recently, Cornelius would leave his house at about one o'clock in the morning. He was a butcher apparently in injured hand had kept him at home several days. Right. So. It's skies like in their house in this guy has no clue like the man of the house has the guy owns this place has no fucking clue who this guy is in all this time. He's thinking is a burglar third my ass. Yeah. He's Berlin, something your wife's JJ, Burling anyway. So again, headline young wife is murdered by burglar while her husband's summons help guilty intruder kills himself Rx, if you burglar, why in God's name would you kill yourself? You try to give. After firing four bullets into the woman's body, the man turned the weapon on himself. I'm like fast forwarding over should have already told you. So he's wearing these knights of Columbus pins in buttons and stuff. But it turns out this guy, George, the murder is not a member of the knights of Columbus. So the husband says, and I quote, I was unarmed and thought it was best to summon helped helped declared Cornelia. So I ran up the stairs to the apartment of Robert Jones and an actor. They call him Bob drop Jones neighbor. They call them up shouting up for God's sake. Let me just as Bob Jones. His brother Lester and myself started downstairs. We heard three shots a second man is reported to have been seen running away from the Cornelius home during the shooting. Robert Jones told the police that burglars had broken into the basement of the house, not long ago, stealing about two hundred dollars worth of goods. So you see where the some chins of the husband and the neighbors, they're saying sauce, second dude running away, is true. Next headline, I find from June eighteenth, which is the next day. The headline reads. Now it's been twenty four.

MRs Barbara Cornelius murder Cornelius MRs Cornelius welter Brooklyn Jersey City Columbus William J Morris New York MRs Cornelie Bessie New York City Pennsylvania railroad Pennsylvania Robert Jones Bob drop Jones Bob Jones
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

12:15 min | 2 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Busy NewsRadio ten thirty. And what a studio this is really amazing. I've been here, of course, for several months, but not in this particular talk studio, it's delightful. It's the USS enterprise the Excelsior which was what stands signed his letters Excelsior Stanley. We're talking about that and related issues. Let's go to Jack in Boston, Jack. Thank you. You're on nightside. Dan ratio. Jordan, filling in Jordan where have you been? We make sure on on Friday and Saturday night. Well, I've been sleeping. That's why. Join my forty winks on those nights. But it's great to be better. Thank you. It's good to. Hey, avoid. She will always a gentleman own. On your own show. And has been Ray is also I think fans a bit too polite to the to the crazy people that call them. Call a picks correctly. The leftist. But anyway, that's beside the point because I know when you're on your show, you talk much politics. Well, I'm happy to talk about whatever you want. And I think you wanted to go with something I just brought up hopefully, something in that realm. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Well, you know, Bill was a person that said a couple of months ago that he hopes the American economy takes because you hate Trump so much he hopes the people lose their jobs and everything to get rid of Trump. And that's such a disgusting thing to say such a such a drag thing to say that it shows you where the guys coming from the guy made his living as a stand up comedian. That's how we became I became famous. We criticized some people that like karma to like comedy, whatever the guy the guy in my opinion is low class moron. And he's lucky to be where he is. He should have been fired. After what he said about having the economy tanked, you know, I know you don't want to turn this a grab political statement. But how come people like him and other people on the left never get by? But people on the right like Roseanne or other people in the right? Get fight all the time. I can't understand it Jordan. It's just a sad commentary that the major networks are controlled by the leftist, totally controlled. And as you know, every day on CNN on MSNBC all day long, twenty four seven all there was bash Trump as as Bill Maher had bring in talking about the comics. Stand that just died. He had Italian Trump with that. Then what statement they make about about Trump? He said something to the effect that that explains why Trump was elected because there are so many people reading comic books. It's on unbelievable. Absolutely unbelievable that everything anything and everything these leftist Pap to blame crop or bring Trump's name and as a derogatory manner. It's really sad. It's really sad that Kirsten powers who was on Fox News for years. She was on a Riley. She was on Hannity said over the weekend that all white woman who voted for Trump a racist. What is happening with this world? Joe Jordan since you left. Not that long ago. The world has changed in the past two years. I'll be honest with you. I have not missed being on doing any kind of political stuff because of the nature of the discourse. It's it's it's because it's a no win scenario for most people. I mean when I'm out with friends or social occasions and so forth. I dump me up. I don't talk. I don't wanna talk politics 'cause you can't win either way right left. It just a mess. And I think it's not gonna get any better anytime soon. Never seen it so bad. I get high blood pressure. Watching the news. I really do. Well, you should comic books more. So than than you would your blood pressure would go right back down again. Commerce tonight. Thank I think comic poetry great for adults. You know, something with and you some good point way too serious. What all this political acrimony going on way too serious? Well, thank rate. We're we're too serious. And I don't think people have learned that the humor is still an effective tool. I think people are so uptight anymore. About everything. Was you're right remand it at work in office an insurance company or your reprimanded at work on almost lost her job because he sat through a coworker, a female co worker you look good today. What the hell we come to? You. Can't you can't tell a female that you look good today. I wish a female would say that to me once in a while you look good. I mean, we're getting through serious you. Remember the Dean, Martin roast. Oh my gosh. I loved them. I still watch them Jordan. You could never put those on TV today. Well, never told racial jokes. They told gay jokes. But it was all in all we've watched the the ability to laugh at south. We can't tell any jokes about any ethnic group anymore. Unbelievable. It really is. Don, Rickles is not coming through that door. Is that what you're saying? Yes, he's not unfortunately, just passed away at ninety two. Yeah. Anyway, Jack, I gotta run, but thanks for your calls and comments. Appreciate it. Thank you. Daycare Jordan Jackson, little little hotter to the caller about some things, and I don't necessarily disagree that we've lost our sense of balance in terms of humor. And that's why I don't think Bill Maher should be fired. I don't think I think very few people who who say outrageous things should lose their jobs necessarily. Can they be? Called out on the carpet. Absolutely. And I think the the Saturday Night Live experience a few weeks ago with the congressman. Veteran who had been wounded in the war coming on with Pete Davidson that was a brilliant move on his part and Saturday night lives part. Showing that you can solve the problem and sorta sue the problem with humor. All right enough of that. Let's go to John in Pennsylvania. John welcome. You're on nightside with Jordan filling in for Dan. Hey, how you night? Hey, just fine. Thank you. Good. You touched on several of my favorite subjects earlier, namely model trains and Star Wars. Without the little kid. I started building model train layout around the Christmas tree. And I just kept working up there. Down the box on equipment and really went to it. And then Star Wars. Well. I got a degree in engineering and they're working on NASA projects and ballistic missiles. Riddick fence department. And so. Carried out some interest there. And so you you had done you've done in your adult life, some stuff that might have been inspired by some of the nice things that you loved when you were a kid. All right. Yeah. And that's that's what I'm saying. I mean, Bill Maher's comment. Is is kind of typical Bill Maher just kind of throws it out there. But I mean, there's so many things that we do as adults. Where we have to play adult all day long that it's important and healthy to remember that a lot of our inspiration comes from stuff when we're kids. You know, a lot about that rail system. Probably stay with rail system in New England is the Boston and Maine. Oh, yes. Yeah. Right. You're in your John. You're in Pennsylvania. Right. Right. Okay. So there's some good real railways down there too. Of course, here we had the. Pennsylvania railroad. A New York central. All those. Timelines and the president freight lines with Amtrak and freight lines are still follow those tax. You know? Well, you haven't lost your your twinkle in the eye. That's good for you. John very very proud of you. All right. You take care, man. Nice to talk to you six one seven two five four ten thirty open line six one seven two five four ten thirty. Okay. Glenn from Brighton as a live and breathe here. He is. And here I am. Yeah. The last time you on the air here with poor and you had Eric Weinberg on. And I was talking about Burger King. Hotdogs, I said they asked me to describe them. And I said they sound like a weapon taste like the hot dog. And that was in twenty six hundred Sunday morning. It was in two thousand sixteen. Do you have you that you never fail to amaze me with your eyed acting memory, congratulations? It's still intact. You remember every date every jot and tittle good for you. Yeah. I used to have fun when when ice crossed he would ask me, the temperature of something, and he'd look it up, and he goes home my God. He's right. He couldn't believe that. He actually I would actually right every time. Well, I I've got to tell you when I was driving in today. And by the way, it's a longer drive than the old days. I kept thinking what our what moment. What minute will Glenn hit the airwaves 'cause I haven't talked to him on air for two years, right? Yeah. I know. And I I didn't want to be I was going to be a I call. But everybody knows that I've been a strong proponent of. Legalizing pot since the October the Saturday night massacre Tober Seventy-three a winter seventy four to stay up all night and watch the Watergate hearings toned. So that's basic knowledge. So I figured I'd let other people do you have any thoughts on the the comment? Okay. Go ahead. I'm very sad because up to this week, and I've been a fan of Bill Maher. But I like picking out to me first of all picking on Stanley. That's like hating Fanta quest. How can you pick one third of all the people most people, I know that our Comecon fans, they're all Democrats that I care. I don't know what Trump a one have to deal with the other. I I'm probably the only Trump supporter, I know that was into the big bang theory. But Stanley was on a few years ago. That was that episode with a shelving. He wanted to have still gelato with STAN lane couldn't because he was in court fighting traffic violation. So he shows up. Anyway, saying goes, you thought you could just come in and say, hey, I'm going to watch the ball game with you. Very funny. Stan was a ham. There's no question he appeared in all those movies isn't cameos in all the marvel movies and twenty of them. I think for over twenty years. He was he was oh, I remember the interview we did with Terry gross on fresh air ninety one. I didn't where he was talking about. I tried everything. Intech man mosquito man, I went down the west when I hit spider, man. That's what I like. She was asking about the amazing. Do do, you know how many it's incredible? How many characters he created not all of them were hits. Right. But I mean the characters list in the hundreds and he was not the artist. He was the creator. He was the writer and one of the things that Stanley did. And you probably know this. But others might is that he really focused on social issues, for instance, the X men, which is about mutants correct is really the people who are different whether they. Or be different raised different ethnicity. And he was really a social activist in his own, right? Right. Yeah. Exactly. Yes. He was very sympathetic to the plight of people who were different. You also is Jewish and he was very sympathetic and his characters were were more frail and faulted, for instance, daredevil, which is by the way, a great show on Netflix out standing daredevil has this blind, and you would associate with this. He's a blind lawyer who has extrasensory talents in terms of what he can hear and touch and taste..

Bill Maher Trump Joe Jordan Excelsior Stanley Jack John Boston Dan ratio Pennsylvania Glenn NewsRadio Ray Pennsylvania railroad Jordan Jackson NASA Terry gross Netflix STAN lane
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Think it was camp Roberts. And got off the ship. I started at a statue liberty for the full time came down off the ship. And the first thing we got was a carton of milk. Our first milk from time. We left the states and. Then we got on a train. And we got the camp. And after we got settled in our little bit. They took us Ramesh mess. Hong gave us a big steak dinner. The captain who is charging escape a speech wishes in I civilian life. And then I went from from. Roberts. I went to. I want to Indian town gap near Philadelphia. And I spent a couple of days town gap. And. Got my discharge papers next. Stop cleveland. My wife had be along. She wouldn't. She said I didn't want any family that what you came home. Is for anybody would hurt to add? She met Pennsylvania railroad station and fifty fifth street. And we got. Taxi. Aunt came home. And she had big signs all over welcome home. We looked upstairs in a. Double.

camp Roberts Pennsylvania railroad station Ramesh Philadelphia Hong a. Double cleveland milk fifty fifth
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:50 min | 3 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Four hour newsroom I'm Jennifer Jones Lee Will feed man Have you ever To be. My theme song I was a wealthy man Man I think I was Topol and he's off on that song Okay Good for you handle Jewish musicals. Point is that fit or? What The big stories that we're covering this. Morning is the big one is a wreath of, Franklin has. Died she died overnight at. The age of seventy six John Brennan security clearance has been. Revoked Paul Manafort the jury. In deliberations just a lot going on. So let's talk about money Why because I happen to like talking about money obviously and most of us do and. This is a success from scratch segment I wanna, share with. You brought to you by. Lift teak you can look years younger without facelift surgery go. To lift teak dot com Now a few weeks ago story broke that Jeff Bezos has become the richest man whoever was rich the richest man whoever were right no. Not really not really so I'm going to tell you about I'm gonna, tell you a story. About. The man who I think legitimately, was the, richest man and we go back into history and it's a man by the name of Andrew Carnegie heard that name before of course you have Andrew Carnegie was the richest man in world history not. In sheer numbers no he had sold his. Steel company Carnegie, steel JP Morgan Saint people that you know more j. p. Morgan up for four hundred and eighty million dollars in. Nineteen nine one and his personal pique wealth was about three hundred. And eighty million dollars now this is one, thousand nine hundred one so let's Figure out real numbers because I think you have to, adjust for inflation in. Terms. Of comparison so Jeff Bezos at, one hundred, ten hundred and twenty billion dollars then you have Warren Buffett Bill Gates put all of them to gather and it doesn't combined it doesn't come up to the figure of win Andrew Carnegie was worth. Today's standards he was worth three hundred nine. Billion dollars One guy self made I mean dirt poor His parents came from Scotland. He was Scottish with a deep. Scottish accent he had the, brogue they. Sold they were starving and Scotland sold everything they had an came to. America when Andrew Carnegie. Was thirteen years old. They settled in Pittsburgh Living in two rooms above a weaving shop his relatives ran. The shop, and his dad. Eventually took over the business failed so Carnegie had to go to another place to work and. He started working as a. Bobbin boy in a cotton mill little boys. That would run around and fix. The bobbins I mean just, crazy stuff. He worked very long hours and earned the municipal munificence psalm of a. Dollar twenty a week The following year he. Works as a messenger for a telegraph company and he. Taught himself to use the equipment so with those skills he lands a job with the Pennsylvania railroad railroad and it helped. Him learn, all about the. Railroad industry and based on that kind of mind that he had he could identify smart investments Even if he didn't have the money. To make those investments, so his boss at Pennsylvania railroad told him that, the Adams express company intended to sell ten shares and he wanted to buy those so he goes to his, mom they mortgaged their house And gets five hundred dollars needed, to buy the shares After that now he owns five hundred dollars worth of shares after that one of his mentors One of his employers? Approach him with the idea of sleeping train cars said hey what do you think of this because he had a. Good reputation of a good mine and offered. Him a share in the Woodruff. Sleeping car company so he, goes to the Bank tomorrow money this time he is well respected, he's a solid young guy and so he gets, a Bank loan and. Two years after investing he starts getting returns a five thousand. Dollars annually. Five grand a year you know what that was. Back then, in the eighteen hundreds Serious money. So during the civil war Pittsburgh where he. Lives becomes a very important place. Of production gunboats cannons industry, member Pittsburgh was steel center of the United States and he was, right in the middle of it so as he, is getting more money. He then invest in an oil well olives vestments were spectacular And the oil well now, yields more than a million dollars in cash and. Then he starts working on creating a steel rolling mill and this is just when. The technology for steel starts going crazy after the war he focuses on the steel he invests in the keystone bridge works in I union iron works he, uses all of his connections he's now making to. The Pennsylvania railroad company management and he, starts securing contracts and he starts. Building, tracks, across the state As his wealth grew in this is where Carnegie. Is such a very very special person he began the principle of giving that would. Define his later career he. Felt from early days that there was a responsibility to wealth it's. Not just getting money it's getting, money to give away to become a philanthropist and. When he was thirty three, years old he wrote a letter to himself And I'll, share that letter it's a very famous piece of writing. And I'll share that when we come back,.

Andrew Carnegie Pittsburgh Jeff Bezos Pennsylvania railroad railroad Carnegie Pennsylvania railroad Scotland Topol Jennifer Jones Lee Pennsylvania Paul Manafort John Brennan Franklin Adams express company Morgan America Warren Buffett Woodruff Bill Gates
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"I have from my father's estate if hugh stacks of thousand or so i think pennsylvania railroad cancel tickets with signatures from the thirties i had no idea what to do with these signature collectors question mark well first of all jim forget the signature collectors the the real values is the railroad collectors particularly the pennsylvania collectors and again this is why i like to know where people are from because if you're in wisconsin the tickets at one value and if you're reading pennsylvania or more altoona or whatever they have a totally different value because the bulk of the pennsylvania railroad collectors are centered in the mid atlantic states i sent an email back jim asking if he could send me a few examples and not quite sure what you have jim that's the other thing too when you do send me an email the more descriptive you can be like size markings the biggest south of all of course is jay peg imagery if you could send me a j pig image that's it even bigger nope i i'm not sure why if someone was writing the pennsylvania railroad in the thirties they would have to sign there they did i i mean i just got done writing the roles in germany and now today you get your ticket off the internet and the gets punched a that's about the extent of it i don't think anybody is going to be collecting punch sheets of paper which are real tickets in the future will probably be careful what i say because people collect everything but the point of the matter is the only thing i could have thought of but they wouldn't they wouldn't have survived in the thousands is one of the more interesting collecting things in terms of railroad iyana is what i would call a railroad passes if you worked for a railroad or you were an official with a railroad company you gotta pass to ride the rails of that company free and in many cases these passes were honored by other railroads and over the years when i went to rural indiana shows and other things i thought boy that's one of the neatest little paper collectibles i've seen it those railroad passes but most of those seem to date from the end of the night well at the end of the.

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"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"And by the time the war ended andrew carnegie had come to the realization that the iron industry had great potential and in a surprising move he left the pennsylvania railroad and he started a new company in eighteen sixty five called the keystone bridge company keystones entire business was upgrading existing wooden bridges to start sturdier iron structures and this proved to be extremely lucrative just a few years into it he had made himself wealthy in eighteen sixty seven he started the keystone telegraph company which cuts such a lucrative deal with the pennsylvania railroad to run telegraph wire on the railroads polls that carnegie and his partners were able to flip the business and triple their money in a very short period of time has estimated worth in eighteen sixty eight was four hundred thousand dollars so caveat it is always really tricky to convert historical worth into modern value but a rough estimate is that this was about five million dollars he was only thirty three yeah and i did want to point out that you know he was making these deals still with the pennsylvania railroad so even though he had left he really left on good terms and maintained business dealings with them for a long time that were always quite positive and riding high on his string of successes andrew carnegie decided that he was only going to give business two more years before turning to a life of philanthropy he wrote this plan out in a letter to himself in eighteen sixty eight and he had calculated out that he could live comfortably off the money he had made by allocating himself fifty thousand dollars each year and then using the rest of the money to benefit causes that he believed in but in eighteen seventy he wasn't quite ready to say goodbye it's all these various industries that same year he also met a young woman named louise whitfield through a mutual friend andrew became social with the whitfield family.

andrew carnegie louise whitfield whitfield family pennsylvania keystone bridge company four hundred thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars five million dollars
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"As a messenger andrew would sweep the office in the morning before the telegraph operators arrived and one morning he actually took a message that came through when no operators had yet begun their shift and he did a good enough job that the operators started asking him to keep an eye on the telegraph when they needed to step away he eventually learned to take messages by ear so without the help of a running slip of paper to print the message out he would just write it down as he heard it a significant promotion followed when he subbed in for another operator on a two week trial because people realize he was actually quite good at this and he was soon given the title of assistant operator and he was making twenty five dollars a month while working for the telegraph office andrew meta man named thomas a scott at the time scott was superintendent of the pennsylvania railroad scott noticed how diligent and driven the young carnegie was made him an offer to leave the telegraph office and become scott's private secretary and also run his personal telegraph machine carnegie was offered thirty five dollars a month into him that seemed like a fortune so he took this job and started learning about the railroad industry kernigan he was once again doing really well because he carried that same work ethic into every position he had and he was making a name for himself at the pennsylvania railroad but his father in the meantime had not met with success in the united states after struggling to make enough money through weaving jobs william carnegie made a stab at entrepreneurship and he tried manufacturing his own cloth and then selling it as a traveling salesman but that really never took off william died in eighteen fifty five when andrew was twenty in that left the eldest son as the primary breadwinner in the family a year after william's death andrew started to expand out his business efforts he invested in the woodruff sleeping car company with a loan and it paid off sooner.

scott superintendent carnegie secretary pennsylvania railroad united states salesman andrew woodruff thomas william carnegie thirty five dollars twenty five dollars two week
"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Every human has this ability just not every human makes the effort and the commitments you know to totem animals or working with the spirit animal nobody should take it lightly like a weekend workshop havi because when you call an animal by spirit to come to you or an elder on the other side or deceased loved one these are really events that are happening and even if you have a little trouble believing it trust me your intention of calling them to aid or to help them is a very serious commitment and we should take it seriously and fulfill the commitments we make that was all i wanted to say so cynthia what about go ahead oh you were saying about the i my father was with farming brother's circus that wasn't his only job he would bring animals in through pennsylvania railroad and they would either be abused or sick or something they came out of a country and then they got here and got sick and my dad was at these animals and he would heal them and then he would never let them go back say either they go back to the country they are here or we're going to bring their countries here and a lot of animals he held zoos reformulate i worked at the cleveland zoo as volunteer and never got paid working for animals that are always kind of seemed like it was crazy to do that for me i'm very but i worked at cedar point with jungle larry on going way back seaworld trying to get them to be vs wales back in the ocean i i really liked the animals back in their nature but there's just some animals they can't go back i could never turn these these buffalo's back into with another hurt because they've been to domesticated and so they would their instinct would be to walk up the people and somebody might get scared and kill them when my dad the first animal i worked with with the hippopotamus and then a giraffe and zebras i i've worked with a lot of different the only animal that i won't work with is the crock i almost got injured by crock and so i kind of those animals i work with a lot of birds the eagles the hawks the owls a lot al's love als and dubs robbins and all kinds of different birds that were brought home but they would.

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"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The station the bad news for these almost 600000 commuters if you think it's bad now it could get much worse didn't leonard wrote about his journey deep into the tunnels under the hudson river and he joins us now so just stop by explaining the route that trains take under the hudson river into penn station in new york how important is this so the lifeblood of the economy in new york in particular well i mean i think everybody knows penn station semesters too many trains and to meet people too many trains but what's underneath the station is even more worrisome there's 3rd there too tubes that's good one tunnel tubes but that go into the hudson river and they basically back to nineteen then and literally falling apart in part because they were flooded during hurricane sandy but if they fail basically the whole sort of northeast quarters shuts down and that's going to cost a hundred 100million a day there's all sorts of economic statistics about why that's a problem that's just from new york but the whole the entire country step back i've gone to washington i've got to boston i've done it and when you go into the tunnels it gets black and you're like in a whole i don't know where i am but users some numbers out there 45000 travellers every week day in penn station it's more than the guardia jfk and newark airports combined another 150000 use the subway in penn station i mean this is a crazy busy station 650000 people a day the that's and it's it's about it's not with the things with design for about about a 3rd of their that many people when it essentially we we deal with a system there th the number of tracks the tunnels all that dates back to 1910 when the pennsylvania railroad go this thing in the first place the only thing that's really changed and says that they knocked down that beautiful states note that was above crime imagine square garden on top of that but everybody else the system was designed for you for different time different for travellers and now now sister to mess what lies beneath because she talked about the darkness and not being you see but you actually went down that have a look at the.

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"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Telegraph so for instance the this is an interesting part of it that you see andhra carnegie is one of the first people it's called down at the very opening days of the civil war and andrew carnegie is a superintendent at the pennsylvania railroad in charge of telegraph of operations and he's young is i think you know in his late 20s early thirties he just gets dispatched uh he's in his twenties and it gets dispatched down to start taking the telegraph and start developing at four warfare for moving soldiers for move coordinating operations and you see the next big things always shapes warfare so airplanes for the first time tanks motorized warfare in world war one and then airplanes much more so on world war two and we saw that the civil wars well of course of north head a lot more technology and and it was more industrialized in the south it it it was more industrialized insult but you know one of the things did you can look at the uh you can look at railroads for instance of were about thirty thousand miles of railroad track in the united states in nineteen in eighteen 60 and on a proposed in a benign thousand medals miles were in the south and if you look at if you created by population that's that maps the population quite well so i don't think the south was completely deindustrialized i just don't think with the mississippi river they quite needed the railroads a most of the wars actually led to economic booms they have they have certainly and but they've also believe that change would the vietnam war well i i think in terms of the vietnam war was not as big as the other one civil war not civil war hundreds of thousands of american lives um we're lost during the civil war same thing in world war one of his closed one hundred thousand living you know give or take fewthousand and in world war two of several hundred thousand again it's i think and.

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"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:18 min | 4 years ago

"pennsylvania railroad" Discussed on WCTC

"Of the company which is always loved radio shack and it'll be good to know that when unita you're a beeper you can still go back to them earlier or other stuff it's like why why would i want i don't know they they they they just didn't think ahead they should have they should win would best buyers that's acres don't like online stuff like keno nadyr amazon there are so many cases in business and i was talking to somebody about this in how would say you know somebody like polaroid you know you know technology force them out of business and me in the commune remember the days of uh of foetal matt and all the hat it's it's so different now but so many times businesses like for instance the great example cows example remember and this is perfect of the old railroads pennsylvania railroad benieno railroad and so so on you know the ones you see on the monopoly board room they're gone why because they didn't know would business they were in they thought they were in the railroad business they didn't realize they were in the community and after knocked me unser are the transportation business shoulder never became a renting airlines reading automobile and so on the new ever expanded so as result they went by and that's the thing people i don't know how we got on this tangent but i just an interesting thing the they didn't think ahead and technology just past them by uh let's see other thing i'll this again in another case serve people in a hurricane hurricanes things like this they bring out the best in people and of course sometimes the worth and people like the looters you know i mean there is no excuse for that this is isn't a matter of in a rage over a political thing not that that's justifying it but this is just a matter of you know hey they're vulnerable of stores closed its is a disaster let's luke no no no they should i mean hopefully maxwell silver hammer comes down on their head bigger than as big as the law can allow now how about this one earlier about this 100 and 85 manara winds unleashing devastation across the tropical islands and it was horrible because the you know the.

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