35 Burst results for "Penn"

Big Ten Football Will Begin in 2020, Reversing Earlier Decision

The Nat Coombs Show

01:38 min | Last week

Big Ten Football Will Begin in 2020, Reversing Earlier Decision

"The big ten season starting officially October. Twenty. That mass. Guessing a little bit of a small base Ga- I mean, the big thing is the daily testing. What will it mean for plays you've declared early and you have an agent though because some some players who realized that you know if you're at Ohio state and you're not gonNA play, you might get your agent get ready for the draft, and now in theory if you've ever signed with an agent, you can never play college football again right so hopefully, something can be worked out because this is an exceptional. That, surely, well, currently there isn't, but obviously, we're in uncharted territory. We've never had never to deal with this situation before. So the NC Double A.'s can have to think on its feet. The big ten will felt pressure from parents, players and other leagues but make no mistake they wanted to play football they. Awesome. There's been talk as if the OH, they don't. They don't care they. You know they don't take football seriously anyone think likes if Michigan Penn State doesn't care about playing football. It's worth so much money to all of. Them it's great that coming back. We'll see if the PAC twelve can do. It's I I remember speaking to a couple of months ago and you asked me how confident I was the NFL season stall on time as normal and whether college football would and I was a hundred percent positive the NFL week one would start as normal. Absolutely note faith that college football would be able to see college football is still in a state of flux. It's a much more complicated situation than the NFL you can just keep these thirty teams. Following the same sort of. Glad to see the big ten back. But it's going to be hard for any of those teams to make the national championship because don't get to play as many games as the other conferences.

Football NFL GA PAC Ohio Michigan
Hurricane Sally unleashes "catastrophic and life-threatening" flooding

KYW 24 Hour News

00:59 min | Last week

Hurricane Sally unleashes "catastrophic and life-threatening" flooding

"Sally, now tropical storm but still battering the Gulf coast with massive amounts of rain. This storm is unleashing catastrophic and life threatening flooding along parts of southern Alabama and the Florida Panhandle. Sally made landfall this morning is a category two hurricane with sustained winds of over 100 miles an hour. W. R. K G TV's Daniel Smithson and hard hit Pensacola. It looks like the roof of this building is starting to peel off due to those winds. These winds have caused significant damage here in downtown Pensacola police there and in parts of Alabama had to rescue people trapped in flooded homes. Mike would with the Pensacola Police Department had one call where a tree went to AA. House and officers went into a wall to get a person to rescue them. We just had another call of a 100 year old lady that's needing help getting out of her home that is flooding. Now. Forecasters say the slow pace of the storm could beat up to 3 Ft. Of rain in some places and tornadoes. I mean, a possibility. Penn State and

Pensacola Sally Pensacola Police Department Alabama Daniel Smithson Penn State Panhandle Mike Florida W. R. K G Tv
The Big Ten Conference Adopts Stringent Medical Protocols; Football Season to Resume October 23-24, 2020

KYW 24 Hour News

00:57 sec | Last week

The Big Ten Conference Adopts Stringent Medical Protocols; Football Season to Resume October 23-24, 2020

"10 football is coming back. What W's Dave you're AM reports A big 10 announced this morning that it's Council of presidents and chancellors, adopted thorough medical protocols and voted unanimously. To resume football starting the weekend of October. 23rd 24th. The protocol includes a lot of testing players, coaches, trainers and others that are on the field for practices and games. Need to go through daily auntie gin testing, with results being recorded before either a gamer practice. Take place. Any athlete who test positive we'll need to go through cardiac testing and be cleared by a cardiologists. An athlete who test positive cannot play a game any sooner than 21. Days after the diagnosis. Daily testing will start by September. 30th. Penn State head football coach James Franklin, releasing a statement this morning on Twitter that said, in part quote, we are excited for our guys to have the opportunity to get backto action safely on October 24th

Football Head Football Coach Penn State Twitter Dave James Franklin
The Dignity of Work

Accelerate Your Business Growth

04:57 min | Last week

The Dignity of Work

"Guest today is Audie pen audience the principal owner of Audie Penn Consulting. He's been working in consulting for thirty years providing different services to several fortune fifty companies in diverse industries and organizations. Is Approach is a lean transformation by applying coaching. Training and project facilitation with local teams securing solid. Foundation. Audie has been most notable as a global consultant where he combines tactical leadership skills with pro processed focused improvements. Some of his clients are Caterpillar John. Deere. Martin Marietta and Han thanks so much for joining me today Audie. Thanks for having me Diane I'm looking forward to our conversation today. I am as well and we're GONNA be talking about culture in in business you know the impact that it has in. Most likely. Spending some significant amount of time talking about the current situation we were in an I had said in the introduction These episodes are evergreen and they are I think no matter when people listen to them. They're gonNA valuable information and We are recording this. I would love to say like toward the end but I'm not quite sure where we are with the whole covid nineteen pandemic and. So while there are things that leaders are going through and employees are going through therefore, companies right now I'm pretty confident that we're going to be talking about. Translates. No matter what the environment is that company finds itself. Absolutely Yep. Okay. So to start if we could. With you providing us with. A description of. Talking about the impact of organizational culture on business performance. The idea that comes to mind there is is a recent discovery of my own and I'll. I'll frame it in this language often I find. Organizations. Are Struggling with their lean or operational excellence deployments and there's a statistic that gets kicked around quite often that seventy to ninety percent of operational excellence. ORLEAN deployments end up in failure. and. My initial response to that was well, they're doing it incorrectly I need to understand why they're doing it incorrectly but I think, I've I've actually adjusted that language to not incorrectly but incompletely in, there's the connection to your question. And for me, the connection is we can do process improvement very well. But. If the rest of the organization is disconnected, the sponsors of the leadership level or the management level of process owners, then we can't sustain or continue to find ways to improve those processes in it seemed like we just continue to solve the same problems over and over again. That is so interesting. Okay. So, if I inherit you right. company decided they want to go through process improvement some area of the business, but they don't necessarily have. Complete buy in from everyone involved. So they go through the process and then everyone walks away. They go back to the way things were. Yes. Okay. So that feels to me like. The in has to start at the very top and then has to be pushed down is that A fair assessment. I would say, yes, there's there's one word though that mutiny short that is pushed because. When those sponsors and it's language that I use to refer to leaders when when leaders actually show up? and. They're clear what their organizations about what's important It's easy for organizations to align to that and questions that I ask often is how many of you came to work today to fail And no one answers the question. Yes. So I always say, well, if that's true of us, don't you think that's true of everyone in our organization we fail them by not being clear about talking about what's important.

Audie Audie Penn Consulting Deere Principal Martin Marietta Consultant Diane HAN
Do Americans Trust Scientists

After The Fact

04:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Do Americans Trust Scientists

"So much of the public focuses on discovery and they. Scientists going to influence their life scientists. Of course, love the search does that explain maybe just a little bit of the dichotomy I use I think sometimes feel between scientists in the public. View that actually people are quite fascinated by. Approach that scientists take in they're quite curious about it I i. think many of the of the television shows, for example, in books about science or or very very attracted to people and can help bring them in to science and even become scientists themselves. I don't really take a do view of things concerning trust I think trust house to start with the scientists themselves they have to really be. Truthful about their exploration about what they discovered they have to try to be bias free and politically in free free politics and free of self-aggrandizement and just want to pursue the tree. We were President of one of the best engineering schools in the country and have been involved in education but your role at the national science. Foundation. And now your role with the science philanthropy alliance a little little. Bit More of a cheerleader with FBI. Correct way of saying some of this in terms of trying to let people understand the need and support for basic science and our society. Yeah I think you always go back to your roots in at high school. I was cheer. So I think there are definitely a large group of people who liked cheer and that's a very, very important to do, and of course, it demands a different kind of skill set but there's a step beyond cheering. That is just incredibly important to do what I call move the needle to really make things change at sociologically culturally there are many many disparities that abound and they affect science as well as every other field of endeavor and Jake. It's important for institutions like the National Science Foundation's to. All sorts of approaches to to blossom into encourage them scientific discovery come through many many different approaches. And by the way I've Kurd a number of times that Isaac Newton did his greatest most prevalent work during a pandemic. So crisis can also bring about the environment for making a great discovery. You were the chief scientist at NASA. That's pretty cool. What did you take from that role and how did that guy your thinking in the broader scientific community? I really want to be a researcher and that's it. I wanted to explore science deep league. In particular attracted to the cosmos. And Mike Goodness on. There's just some mysteries that it offers and so I was very very focused on that I didn't want anything to take me away from that and so when I was giving the invitation invitation to join NASA as its cheat scientists asked various close friends and colleagues. If it was a good idea, all my department heads around the country who knew me? said, what about idea will take you out of your research because they knew empower engaged wasn't that but then I talked to some of my female colleagues like a colleague who headed the history of science? Department. At Penn State University and my mother who obviously knew me well, if people like that said, well, you can't talk about how important it is that women. and. Underrepresented minorities go into science, and then not take the opportunity to do something about out to have a platform where you can be a role model for that when you can actually affect changes in that.

President Trump National Science Foundation Mike Goodness Nasa FBI Isaac Newton Penn State University Jake Researcher Scientist
The story of Trevor Lawrence's life-changing summer

ESPN Daily

09:03 min | 2 weeks ago

The story of Trevor Lawrence's life-changing summer

"So we just discussed how Trevor Lawrence is influence has been growing this off season I taking on issues of public health and racial inequality. But last month. The very thing that gives Trevor Lawrence his enormous Megaphone College football was put in jeopardy as players in conferences. Having. These discussions about canceling the season. What role in those discussions did Trevor Lawrence play. It was a Sunday night early August enduring. Trevor. Together again. There at travers fiancee's apartment and rumours are starting to pick up steam that some of the biggest most powerful conferences in college football the Big Ten PAC twelve that they're seriously considering, postponing their fall season, and this is coming at the end of a week. When of PAC twelve players have released a statement on the Players Tribune using the Hashtag we are united. And they've threatened to out fall CAM even opt out of games unless the conference mixed their demands for fair treatment and safety regulations and less the conference addresses concerns over racial justice, and meanwhile on a nearly parallel track, you have players the cost, the country, trevor, and fluted tweeting the Hashtag. We want to wait to express their desire to keep the seasonal live. So, in the Sunday night when it feels like college ball is teetering, it's actually dairying who decides to reach out to Dylan bowls. One of the players the Pactel's we are United Movement because endearing mine Houston gain. If we all join together the players in the we are united movement and the players in the we want to play movement that would be undeniably powerful for players who don't have concrete power who don't have a real seat at the table at least not yet their collective voice with the really hard to ignore because truly. So many of these fires want the same thing they want to play football this fall, they just want to do it in a safe responsible way. Dylan Daring, trevor they get on a three way facetime called a hash all this out to make sure they're all on the same page and that very quickly evolves into a zoom call with a dozen or so some of the biggest names in college football right Justin fields chew behind nausea. Harris And matter of thirty minutes, they agree to roll out a list of demands from this new fused Mecca Movement. It was amazing. How quickly we all got on the same page put something together I feel like the majority was getting spoken for. And we were like, Hey, we WANNA play. We want it to be safe but we do to take a watt mandated and universal safety procedures for Covid nineteen and they want to form players association. And it pretty much the stroke of midnight. These players, Tweeden Unison. But it's trevor naturally whose tweet is hurt the loudest he's re tweeted some fifteen thousand times including one quote tweet from President Donald Trump, and it's just a few days later actually that someone from the White House reaches out to Amanda Lawrence Trevor Lines mom letting her know that the president would like to get in touch with trevor. So hold on. So he has the president of the United States listening to him. Now let alone all of his peers across college football. What was that conversation with Donald Trump? Like? You know I would have loved to be a fly on whatever wall in whichever room that phone call took place the president has said really that trevor just reiterated his desire to play this season but trevor for his part hasn't divulged too much about that phone call. Conversation it was good I mean we just talked about kind of the whole we talked about that. We WanNA play like how's it going? How's it looking for the season and? president trump was just saying, yeah, I think our country needs college football and. then. Some small talk. Yes. We a little bit about what was going on in my life and vice versa. So that was pretty much the conversation though trevor is twenty years old the president of the United States wanted to speak to him. That is remarkable crazy. No matter which way you cut it. So. Let's recap here Halley Grossman because since March Trevor, Lawrence Age Twenty has faced pressure to help mitigate a global pandemic fight racism save the College football season display a level of political savvy and or gamesmanship that is obviously well beyond his years. So what else can you possibly be asked to do at this point? I mean look putting your stamp of approval which he's done on a list of demands that includes creating players. Association is a big deal. That's a radical way to reimagined that amateurism model that governs. College football right now but I think what this summer has shown is that trevor doesn't plan to quiet down you just a few days ago a whole lot of guys that original zoom call we talked about reconvened because they revealing again from a police shooting of a black man again, and so in the days after Jacob, Blake was shot. Trevor and Darien and Dylan, and a whole host of others talked once again to hammer out ways to help to draw attention to the issue and hopefully bring change. Trevor Lawrence football season is starting tomorrow and if all goes according to plan. He's GonNa win the heisman before becoming the first overall pick in next year's NFL draft teams have been salivating over his talent. There have been rumors that teams might even want to tank for Trevor Lawrence this season. So the question really that is, why is he even putting himself out there like this? Why even play the season? I mean that is the question, right? We have seen plenty a high profile opt-outs this season jomar chase at Lsu. Mike Parsons at Penn State today. Oregon. These are first round top ten NFL draft guys but no one literally nobody has less to lose by not playing the twenty twenty football season than Trevor Lawrence. are in a player having a job borough like. Or I don't know an asteroid hitting the earth, his Cossacks to go number one overall are safe, and at the same time, no one has less to gain by paddling the status quo or shaking up the current system than trevor does this system works just fine for him? He is a young white man. He's a young white quarterback, and so I asked Amanda, his mother that seems washing. Why? Why do all this? I put himself out there and she said something interesting she said look. there. are players out there who do need to even if trevor doesn't and there are people out there for whom the status quo and the current system don't work even if it works for him and he understands that now probably better than he ever has and he just wants to help. That's really it know told me one of his goals for the senior only meeting because he wanted everyone to understand that unless everyone is good no one is good and trevor, his best friend took that to heart. Of the day, there's so much division in our country. Just word of some people that WanNa see people together, WanNa see people love each other and I think that's where a lot of the things I do. It stems from that just wanted to see people happy together not divided. With all this pressure now from all of these different places in our country. Landing Atop. Trevor Lawrence's shoulders. What are you personally expect from him when the season starts? Because of the ways in which Trevor Lawrence has stepped onto center stage this summer it's almost easy to forget what it is. That gives him that stage in the first place, he is extremely good at his job. Term Lawrence is an excellent quarterback. Making predictions in two, thousand, twenty, hundred, probably a fools errand. But tomorrow, there's football comes we'll pay wake forest, and if clemson continues to play if they and the ACC and the big twelve and sec are able to play a full season, don't be surprised to see Trevor Lawrence back on the national championship stage. Don't be surprised to see Trevor Lifting the national championship trophy and along the way don't be surprised to see trevor continuing to speak out and perhaps that's one of the safest predictions you can make in twenty twenty. Life to be reflection of what I say and what I believe I've been thinking about everything that's going on and I think there has been some some moments where I had to say some things because it's just the right thing to do and it's time really is just how I live my life I want it to reflect what I say. I. Would always be the same person I want to be consisted. Eliot Grossman. Thank you for jumping on stage with. US. Thank you so much for having me. Pablo.

Amanda Lawrence Trevor Lines Trevor Lawrence Football Trevor Lawrence. United States President Trump Dylan Daring NFL Halley Grossman Donald Trump Pactel Wanna Oregon Mike Parsons LSU Travers Covid Mecca Movement United Movement
Freight train derails in the Bronx, disrupting New York Amtrak service

Steve Scott

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Freight train derails in the Bronx, disrupting New York Amtrak service

"Is a freight train derailment. It is at 149 Street and Bruckner Boulevard. So not only is there work at street level there, but it is affecting Amtrak. Amtrak is now now suspended suspended of of both both ways ways between between New New York York Penn Penn Station Station and and New New Haven. Haven. Because Because of of this this s s O O again. again. No No Northeast Northeast Carter Carter service service That That is is the the on on ly. ly. Rail Rail service service passenger rail service that's affected. Otherwise, this is a section of track. That is just a just a freight train track, and that is what is primarily affected. But because of that work, no service on Amtrak's Northeast Carter from New York Pen up up through through through New New New New Haven. Haven. Haven. Haven. We've We've We've We've had had had had delays delays delays delays at at at at the the the the outbound outbound outbound outbound side side side side of of of of the the the the Holland Holland Holland Holland and and and and Lincoln. Lincoln. Lincoln. Lincoln. Down Down Down Down to to to to about about about about 15 15 15 15 minutes. minutes. minutes. minutes. I'm I'm I'm I'm Tom Tom Tom Tom Kaminski Kaminski Kaminski Kaminski in in in in the the the the WCBS WCBS WCBS WCBS traffic traffic traffic traffic center. center. center. center. We We We We get get get get a a a a

Tom Tom Tom Tom Kaminski Kamin New New Haven Holland Holland Holland Hollan Amtrak Lincoln New York York Carter Carter New York Penn Penn Station Station
Philadelphia back on a stable track for new COVID-19 cases as Temple outbreak appears to ease

KYW 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Philadelphia back on a stable track for new COVID-19 cases as Temple outbreak appears to ease

"Health officials say a covert outbreak in Temple University appears to be getting under control. So they worry about other college campus is here in our city Hall bureau chief Pat Lobe has the update. Health Commissioner Tom Farley says the number of new cases a temple is going down, as is the percent of positive results from testing, he adds. There's no evidence the virus spread into the community around Temple, but campuses have turned out to be hot spots across the country. And doctor Farley is asking all the cities college is to do what they can to keep students socially. Distant social gatherings appear to be the greatest risk. We continue to hear about parties. They were reported to us by number of students where there's at least one suit who tested positive. So far, the case numbers have been low. Elsewhere, 68 cases at Penn and about 20 each at Drexel in ST Joe's. Overall, the city is back on a stable track with just over 100 new cases a day for the second week. And 90% compliance with mask use in a survey of retail stores. Doctor Farley says he hopes for no spikes associated with indoor dining and he'll be studying the governor's new guidance before deciding if endure. Dining. Khun B. Expanded Pat

Doctor Farley Temple University Pat Lobe Temple Bureau Chief Khun B. Commissioner Penn
Eviction protest: 17 arrested after demonstration near Philadelphia City Hall

KYW 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Eviction protest: 17 arrested after demonstration near Philadelphia City Hall

"Who are blocking access to a Philadelphia courtroom on Thursday were arrested. Okay, y W. City Hall bureau chief Pat Lobe tells us they were demonstrating against the resumption of eviction hearings. Small group blocked the entrances at three Penn Square, which also happens to host the district attorney's office until about 12 30 when a large contingent of police Eating bicycle and counterterrorism officers surrounded them and lead them away. One by one till waiting, Policeman, Mayor Jim Kenney says he supports the right to protest. Indeed, he says he agrees no one should be evicted at this time, but says the group went beyond that blocking a courtroom. For people getting into getting out. It's not a party of First Amendment rights, you have to make sure that our institutions to do their business officials say the court won't be taking any new cases, though it was conducting hearings in the window between the expiration of the state eviction moratorium Tuesday and the big Think of the Centers for Disease Control mandated moratorium, the mayor notes. The city has also launched its eviction diversion program, which requires landlords to participate in mediation with tenants who are struggling to pay rent because of covert 19 mediation helps tenants avoid an eviction while also helping landlords avoid vacancies and unit. Turnover costs. At City Hall.

Mayor Jim Kenney W. City Hall City Hall Pat Lobe Centers For Disease Control Bureau Chief Philadelphia Penn Square
Penn State clarifies doctor's claim of one-third of Big Ten athletes with myocarditis

Mitch Albom

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Penn State clarifies doctor's claim of one-third of Big Ten athletes with myocarditis

"Doctor really assert that approximately one third of all big 10 athletes who have tested positive for covert 19 have myocarditis, potentially damaging or even deadly inflammation of the muscles around the heart. And his conclusion. Not exactly that very conclusion went viral Thursday after a story printed some off the doctor's comments this week. Now somewhere, and I'm reading verbatim from Dan Wetzel Sporting Dan Wetzel's article. He does a great job, Yahoo sports, he said Somewhere in the translation between zoom meeting and social media. Ah, lot of nuance and perspective was lost, and the doctor's comments had become a political football to be batted around. And that's exactly where we're at right now. Absolutely, positively is, the doctor explained, You could have quote you could have a very high level athlete who's got a very superior vo two max and cardiac output who gets infected with covert And he could drop his or her vo two max and cardio cardiac output just by 10%. And that could make them go from elite toe average status. We don't know yet. And I think that there's a

Dan Wetzel Yahoo
Penn State doctor says 30-35% of Big Ten athletes positive for COVID-19 had myocarditis symptoms

Tom Sullivan

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

Penn State doctor says 30-35% of Big Ten athletes positive for COVID-19 had myocarditis symptoms

"Word that Penn State's director of athletic medicine Says that memory scans revealed that about A third of the big 10 athletes who tested positive for covert 19. Appear to have my own card itis. A type of inflammation of the heart muscle.

Penn State Director
1-on-1: Mike Jordan talks about giving back as a coach in Philadelphia

KYW 24 Hour News

01:01 min | 3 weeks ago

1-on-1: Mike Jordan talks about giving back as a coach in Philadelphia

"Former University of Pennsylvania basketball star Mike Jordan is back in Philadelphia. He was recently hired as an assistant men's basketball coach at Trachsel. Cable. W's Matt Leon recently caught up with him after graduating from Penn, Jordan went overseas and enjoyed a very successful career is a pro player, spending time in many different countries. Prior to joining Drexel's coaching staff, he served as an assistant at Colgate. He talks about why he loves to coach I love basketball. Er, my experience of the coaches that I that I have had growing up. They're all very positive influences on my life. There are Father figures for me at a certain point in my life, so I wanted to coach because I wanted to be that for somebody else, you know, and I want to give back what was given to me. You can listen to the entire interview with Mike Jordan by checking out the latest episode of my Podcast, one on one with Matt Leon. Subscribe on the radio dot com APPLE Wherever you get your podcast Matley on K Y W News radio, the

Mike Jordan Matt Leon Basketball University Of Pennsylvania Drexel Philadelphia Colgate Apple Trachsel Penn
Philadelphia tells students not to attend social gatherings outside their households

KYW 24 Hour News

01:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Philadelphia tells students not to attend social gatherings outside their households

"With some college students back on campus for in person glasses. Okay, bye. W sense when that Lee tells us that Philadelphia's health commissioner is now offering new guidance when it comes to parties and other social gatherings. Initially, social gatherings were to be kept at no more than 25 people for inside and 50 people for outside now, Philadelphia health officials say university and college students should avoid all social gatherings with people outside of their household interviews with students who tested positive. Koven 19 revealed that some attended small gatherings with end illegal Lim Dr Tom Farley says this could be a trend in the statement, he said quote it does not require large social gatherings for this virus to spread any time. Two or more people are near each other without wearing a mask. There is a risk unquote, officials say. Interviews suggest the events are not organized by school officials, days after some students returned to campus at Penn State. Videos went viral of students in large crowds, Penn State's president responded. Britney to stand suit It's home. Philadelphia health officials recommend that if people cannot avoid coming into close contact with those outside their household, they should wear mask

Philadelphia Penn State Lim Dr Tom Farley Britney Commissioner LEE Koven President Trump
End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia

60-Second Science

02:19 min | Last month

End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia

"Thousand years ago the Sahara had extensive grasslands and was dotted with lakes and trees but some five thousand years ago that Green Sahara dried up to become the enormous desert. We know today and scientists. Now think that this climate shift had effects far away including causing a mega drought in South East, Asia Kathleen are Johnson a Paleo climatologist and geochemists at the University of California Irvine says the key to that discovery were Stalagmites collected in cave in northern Laos. So like my I really amazing archives of past climate variability people are often more familiar with things like tree rings, ice cores, or maybe ocean sediment cores while select nights work in a similar way in that, they are deposited over time Johnson's team analyzed trace elements and carbon and oxygen isotopes in the hardened caved drippings that information enables researchers to determine rainfall patterns over the Millennia and. Johnson and her colleagues discovered signs of a thousand year long drought in Laos which began around the same time. The Sahara dried up about five thousand years ago as for why the two events might be connected the researchers simulated the drying out of the Sahara using climate models and included a couple things we know happened including the subsequent disappearance of vegetation and a connected increase in airborne dust, and they found that those variables. Would have been capable of cooling down the Indian Ocean and so the Cooler Ocean temperatures basically led to less moisture being being brought by monsoon circulation during the summertime when that region gets most of its rainfall, the details are in the journal Nature Communications One of Johnson's co-authors is joyce white a consulting scholar at the Penn Museum. She studies the Human History of Southeast Asia and her reaction when she first heard about the drought. On my God that's the missing millennia the missing millennia because she says, archaeological data are scant in that part. Of Southeast. Asia from four to six thousand years ago white says it's a critical period in which hunter-gatherers gave way to farmers, and there are a lot of debates about how the two periods related to each other. But we lacked the evidence in the area. I'm most interested in which is the maycom valley. White says this study doesn't answer that question directly, but the mega drought is a tantalizing clue for archaeologists has they continue to investigate those missing millennia.

Green Sahara Johnson Joyce White Laos Southeast Asia Indian Ocean Asia Kathleen Asia Maycom Valley Penn Museum University Of California South East
Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei-Kuffour

The Official Watchmen Podcast

05:36 min | Last month

Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei-Kuffour

"Lombok is a TV writer who's been on the leftovers Manhattan and Castlerock, and she is credited with Damon on episode one. Oh, three, she was killed by space junk. Hello, Leela Crystal Henry is a police officer turned TV writer and has written on shows like the Chicago Code and a PB. She's also credited with them in on episode one, Zero Four. If you didn't like my story, right, your own I n Stacey Oh say for is a playwright and had one TV credit penn fifteen under her belt before. Watchmen. She since written on hunters and run, and she is credited with Clare Kiesel on episode one seven and almost religious. Awe around there. We Look Crystal Stacey. Welcome. Thank you for having us. I'm kind of a fan of what you all did and because I'm primarily writer, this is a conversation I've been looking forward to for a long time. I want to start with a question about how the room actually function because this show appropriately enough is kind of like a Swiss watch, there are a billion spinning plates. As collaborators, how did you pull this off? How did you manage to do all of these things separately and together and make it seem so seemless Will I have two kids? I've given birth twice and I think there's sort of an analogy to to being on the other side of giving birth where you look back and you're like I literally have no idea how my body did what it did and I have no memory of what happened I kind of feel that way about looking back on the almost two years we spent writing this show I'm like Holy Shit. How did that happen? I don't know what do you guys? Do you guys think well, you know what? For me I had never been in a room this diverse before and it wasn't just the ratio of. The journalists there were playwrights and I wasn't necessarily used to that like I come from primarily the procedural world and to come to a room where everything was approached by character, and there was just a different way of breaking story and worked in network. Before it's the machine, it moves at a pretty rapid pace. It would wash one of the wonderful things about it is that we actually had time to develop a chemistry with each other. Stacey. For me, it was my second show that I had worked on I did the TV show happy for watchmen but really didn't talk much in that Roman. So Pretty Green and being able to be a part of the show and seeing all of the mechanics seeing people that were so incredible at hitching. So intelligence. So in love with watchmen. Had really ever heard of the comic book but I, was talking to David about how he made the decision in terms of which people he chose for the writer's room and he was saying he really likes people who ran hot and I feel like everybody cared so much about. Not only making the show truthful but like racial aspects of it, we all just cared so much. I think because we all run hot, it's reflected in show maybe it is that part of why this all worked is because it's not like you all knew that you were writing something that was going to be sort of profoundly impactful on the environment you were working on a show in and of itself, and that's all that mattered and you didn't have the weight of expectation there necessarily. But what you did have was a very fearless approach to topics that a lot of people are just uncomfortable dealing with although obviously the show is very much centered on race. You're also tackling the persistence of white supremacy in law enforcement. The role that the media including television shows plays in perpetuating racist thought. Generational trauma and the way inherited pain damages the people who come after. And you're even tackling the kind of inherent nationalism of the Superman of the hero itself. And you did it all it seems to me on my side of the TV without fear or blinking or compromise. But I'm kind of curious because you all work together in the room how you navigated that space together to be free enough to screw up. But not being so free that you end up hurting each other. I, think the show for me. It just happened to come at a time where there has been such a major shift and America's perception of race and policing and I think that police lean and to a larger extent the criminal justice system has always been a tool of white supremacy. And being former officer, I can say that you know I'm a witness to it but I think the response to racism feels different. One of the things that really attracted me to watch men when I had the meeting with Damon. was that he was like, okay. One of the things that we definitely WANNA tackle is racism and policing and the idea of masking gain, and all of that was very attractive to me because all I kept thinking about, what would a world where police wear masks look like? Because knowing how the system works now and how it oppresses communities of color and how it negatively impacts people of color while they're showing their face. So imagine what that would be like if the police were mass,

Writer Crystal Stacey Leela Crystal Henry Damon Officer David Penn Clare Kiesel Chicago Castlerock America Manhattan
Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei Kuffour

The Official Watchmen Podcast

05:36 min | Last month

Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei Kuffour

"Lombok is a TV writer who's been on the leftovers Manhattan and Castlerock, and she is credited with Damon on episode one. Oh, three, she was killed by space junk. Hello, Leela Crystal Henry is a police officer turned TV writer and has written on shows like the Chicago Code and a PB. She's also credited with them in on episode one, Zero Four. If you didn't like my story, right, your own I n Stacey Oh say for is a playwright and had one TV credit penn fifteen under her belt before. Watchmen. She since written on hunters and run, and she is credited with Clare Kiesel on episode one seven and almost religious. Awe around there. We Look Crystal Stacey. Welcome. Thank you for having us. I'm kind of a fan of what you all did and because I'm primarily writer, this is a conversation I've been looking forward to for a long time. I want to start with a question about how the room actually function because this show appropriately enough is kind of like a Swiss watch, there are a billion spinning plates. As collaborators, how did you pull this off? How did you manage to do all of these things separately and together and make it seem so seemless Will I have two kids? I've given birth twice and I think there's sort of an analogy to to being on the other side of giving birth where you look back and you're like I literally have no idea how my body did what it did and I have no memory of what happened I kind of feel that way about looking back on the almost two years we spent writing this show I'm like Holy Shit. How did that happen? I don't know what do you guys? Do you guys think well, you know what? For me I had never been in a room this diverse before and it wasn't just the ratio of. The journalists there were playwrights and I wasn't necessarily used to that like I come from primarily the procedural world and to come to a room where everything was approached by character, and there was just a different way of breaking story and worked in network. Before it's the machine, it moves at a pretty rapid pace. It would wash one of the wonderful things about it is that we actually had time to develop a chemistry with each other. Stacey. For me, it was my second show that I had worked on I did the TV show happy for watchmen but really didn't talk much in that Roman. So Pretty Green and being able to be a part of the show and seeing all of the mechanics seeing people that were so incredible at hitching. So intelligence. So in love with watchmen. Had really ever heard of the comic book but I, was talking to David about how he made the decision in terms of which people he chose for the writer's room and he was saying he really likes people who ran hot and I feel like everybody cared so much about. Not only making the show truthful but like racial aspects of it, we all just cared so much. I think because we all run hot, it's reflected in show maybe it is that part of why this all worked is because it's not like you all knew that you were writing something that was going to be sort of profoundly impactful on the environment you were working on a show in and of itself, and that's all that mattered and you didn't have the weight of expectation there necessarily. But what you did have was a very fearless approach to topics that a lot of people are just uncomfortable dealing with although obviously the show is very much centered on race. You're also tackling the persistence of white supremacy in law enforcement. The role that the media including television shows plays in perpetuating racist thought. Generational trauma and the way inherited pain damages the people who come after. And you're even tackling the kind of inherent nationalism of the Superman of the hero itself. And you did it all it seems to me on my side of the TV without fear or blinking or compromise. But I'm kind of curious because you all work together in the room how you navigated that space together to be free enough to screw up. But not being so free that you end up hurting each other. I, think the show for me. It just happened to come at a time where there has been such a major shift and America's perception of race and policing and I think that police lean and to a larger extent the criminal justice system has always been a tool of white supremacy. And being former officer, I can say that you know I'm a witness to it but I think the response to racism feels different. One of the things that really attracted me to watch men when I had the meeting with Damon. was that he was like, okay. One of the things that we definitely WANNA tackle is racism and policing and the idea of masking gain, and all of that was very attractive to me because all I kept thinking about, what would a world where police wear masks look like? Because knowing how the system works now and how it oppresses communities of color and how it negatively impacts people of color while they're showing their face. So imagine what that would be like if the police were mass,

Writer Crystal Stacey Leela Crystal Henry Damon Officer David Penn Clare Kiesel Chicago Castlerock America Manhattan
How She Crafted a Career Where Passion and Profit Intersect

The Goal Digger Podcast

06:24 min | Last month

How She Crafted a Career Where Passion and Profit Intersect

"Are just it is due time that you are on the gold digger podcast. So welcome to the show I had stop our early intro chatting because like we need to hit record on this this. So welcome to the PODCAST. So happy to be here. Finally, I I feel like we've been like in each other's DM's just for the last year being when when, when, and honestly there's never been a better time than this. So I am so I like divine. Niagara Oh. Okay. So I wanNa know like, tell me because I actually don't know this about you wear and when did all of this start telling me about the early days of your career before you were consulting for these massive brands and changing the world as we know it, how did this all begin for you? You know like all good stories, it began a little bit by accident I've been an entrepreneur for twenty five years I have never ever worked for anybody else. We'll wait that's not true. I worked for I worked for Clothing Company for four days. Would it? Out of college but I, I went to college at Penn state I loved feeder and performing. Arts and I thought that you know that's all I wanted to do was perform, write, and produce and direct, and then I got there and liberal arts education blew my mind and I got a degree in women's studies and a degree in classics. So now I have three degrees at gaming to make no money in. At least back then that was the thinking and so honestly, at twenty one years old I I had been so educated at Penn State, but at twenty one I'm out of college now and I take another community college class on grant writing, and this is where it started for me. I started my own company at twenty. One I learned how to write a grant to get money from businesses and my first grant that I got was five thousand. Dollars it was from an insurance company and I wanted to talk about eating disorders and body image and social issues that were affecting women at the time has always been a passion point for me and this company gave me five thousand dollars to produce my plays and take them to school and and that's how I started I literally had no idea how to pay people pay people, eleven, dollars a week because I thought it sounded better than ten. It was crazy back in back in the day like I was just ambitious in Hungary and naive and and committed and I just you know I started this company was twenty one I ran out for six for six years, and then I sold it and kind of came out here to to California trying to find my place in the media landscape and you know I was twenty seven years old landed out here. I didn't know anybody in California I. Didn't know. How I was going to parlay all of this incredible experience. I had on the road talking to students for six years, but then I wanted to move into a completely different medium and I had no training in that I just had a curiosity and that's always been a guiding force for me I love that do that five thousand dollars feel like a million dollars was probably the most essential money you've ever earned while yeah. That time if I could even just place. Our listeners Eric I'm in my mid forties, and so this is a while ago and I paid a hundred and seventy five dollars a month for rent and I you know at the time my first. So I took that five thousand dollars. That's I think why paid everybody like eleven bucks a week for people but like you know like everybody was happy to perform and get paid and and I just stretch that money as much as I could until I learned. that. I could get matching grants and I could fundraise more and so I built that business when I you know even at the time when I sold that business, I was twenty four years twenty, five years old I was making twenty five, thirty, thousand dollars year and I was living high life. I was like paid off my dad and I was living at a time even a little bit beneath my amusement gave me money to save to come out to California but. When you're new at this and I didn't know that I was really an entrepreneur I. didn't call myself that I just was trying to make the most of all this education I had gotten. Yeah. So walk me through what happens. So you get to California you WANNA, enter this media scene. You have these big visions than ideas and what I'm thinking of is nowadays, we can talk about all of these things body image and inclusivity and eating disorders and and it doesn't necessarily feel like a dirty word or something wrong or shameful back then it was very different. So walk me through what happened next yeah I felt very kind. Of alone in out there in my field of choice, you know it was a hybrid of women's issues, social issues self-help empowerment, and I was a young you know as a young woman who was trying to kind of chart my own course, and so I got out to California drove out to that quintessential road trip with friend got out to California and my Geo Prizm stayed at a hotel by the airport the extended stay America I lived there for three months and couldn't find a place to live in La like didn't have a lot of friends out here but I just have always had this dogged determination that's part of. My DNA it's part of my type A personality, and so you know I called everybody I knew I did a lot of cold calling and I did have to factors that I think helped when I got out here when I was in college I did a show for MTV news at the time where I I was able to share some of the work that I was doing on college campuses around sexual assault and sexual harassment and MTV picked up that story. So this summer I graduated I had a lot of press coverage and I had some you know offers to speak places and so I started following that path and. That helped kind of learn how to pitch myself how to talk about myself how to par lay the press that I had into the next opportunity, and so you know when I was out here, I knocked on every door I could, and eventually what I did was I went entered myself into this pitch contest at this big television production conference called Nat P. It's the National Association of television programming exacts and it was like everywhere you went like when you wanted to be Oprah Right Oprah soldier show and everybody's like selling their TV shows into syndication and I signed myself up as a solo person and I bought the wrong badge. Bought a badge that was a promoter like a sponsor bad and so I was asked to come into everybody's sweet and everybody was being so nice to me and I thought Oh my God this is. Like everybody is so welcoming when I realize at the end of the day, they thought I

California MTV Hungary Nat P. It Clothing Company Eric I Niagara National Association Of Televi Geo Prizm Oprah LA Assault Harassment
"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:25 min | Last month

"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Bilbao? Why won't it's inconvenient for everyone I'm sure it scares everyone sure you and Kristin were scared and you know I feel guilty about that was not unlike when you we had Stran- you said, you know as a little selfish people care about you that you have this hobby and I think jinx me. Jinx me but. I feel. I know you didn't expand all. If you're right on the track long enough you're going to go down I. Don't want you to feel guilty that people care about you people are allowed to care about you and. If you feel guilty that makes us feel guilty. You feel guilty. So. Bad. Cycle and people care about you and that's allowed will here's why feel guilty it's not like I was sitting in a stop light. And someone rear ended me and I got hurt you know as actively doing something dangerous. Yeah I think because it's a a reckless hobby. I feel guilty that people have to have the emotional concern about me. You know I think it's okay to feel a little guilty about it. No you now. All right I'll stop doing that part. Guilty. Yeah. What about the motorcycle part? We'll get back to that well man I don't think I'm gonNA quit but I think I might be willing to quit for the remainder of twenty twenty. CAIN Were you for something a little while. But okay, we'll circle back. We'll circle back. We'll. We'll your market. Yeah, and then we just have talked about Sean Penn real quick what a tree, what a treat very very flat or do you want to do the show Sam and he loves it he authorised say that was mind blowing. I almost wasn't digesting it when it was over you go. You know, Sean Benja said you're a good actor and I was like. That is what happened. Right kind of felt like that happen I didn't. WanNa be. Crazy you have to take dot com. What a compliment from the best actor. I gotTa Tell Ya Pretty Darn Nice I'm glad you could take it in I two of a bad habit.

Stran Sean Penn Sam Kristin Sean Benja CAIN
"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:50 min | Last month

"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So the rest of my life you gotta be fucking Fire last question, did you go to California city after you read under the banner Yeah I had been there a few times before it was while we were shooting into the wild we we were in in Colorado City Yeah Yeah Yeah. We we actually went in you know on our scout trips a couple of times and watched as they put a couple of SUV's behind his following us. I. Think Jeff's was still on the run at that time there there there it's a very interesting community you know and you see the scientology also in in the sense of the brokering of religious rights and so on in kind of debunked fraud. Yeah it's really some. Yeah. My wife and I read that at the same time as the last time we read a book together and we put it down and I was like. You want to go to Colorado City right now and she's like, yeah, let's go and we drove straight there got followed like you said for an hour went to the little cafe. They had had a piece of Pyo certainly poisoned us with because everyone was on high alert that we were there. They were not on high alert because they knew who either of. US were they certainly had no clue wasn't that it was very surreal like children of the corn fucking yeah and you know it's almost like inherent parameters because within one hundred miles of Colorado city, almost everything that's built is built by their construction contracts. So rise sitting in a diner chatting about Oh we're on our way to Colorado city somebody's here in the. Do It's wild. It's wild. Okay I have a thousand more questions but I'm Gonna I'm GonNa let you go such a pleasure talking to you I'm so glad this happened. Talked to both of you, you've our love to Layla and congrats I will. Help to meet in person soon. Yeah. Let's get as soon as we get this beast disarmed right get on a helicopter. All right. And now my favorite part of the show the fact check with my soul mate Monica Pacman. Wow. Wow. Wow. Wow. Wow, we're being tested right now there's no lights in the attic. It's it's a above one, hundred degrees in here. It's nine PM. So dark it's dark it's hot as Haiti's YEP but here we are how could we not come in here and chat about? Sean Penn we had to it's a must but do tell people what happened or do not want to tell people? Well, let me tell you I'm a little conflicted about it. I will I will, but I gotta say. I do not want to get in the habit of getting attention for being injured. You know what I'm saying they're not I love attention I'm an attention who were yeah in approval junkie. So I just I hesitate and getting attention for being hurt because I think it's a bad pattern to being I. Don't think you're at risk of exploiting injuries. Okay. I've never experienced that from you. So I think you can tell people what happened if you want okay I was passing six guys at Sonoma raceway. Hotter cycle on a motorcycle and I was breaking very, very hard hard enough that the back wheel was off the ground for a good guess hundred yards and then someone turned in as they had the right to I was totally at blame I thought I would be able to slide between but someone turned in and I was already under full breaking I couldn't go anywhere I clipped their bumper and then I went over the handlebars. And landed pretty hard and I have been on the track. It was a little demoralizing. It was a bummer..

Colorado City Sean Penn Sonoma raceway scientology California Colorado Haiti fraud Jeff Monica Pacman Layla Pyo
"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:24 min | Last month

"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"It's Susan it's Dr Seuss for adults there's a playfulness and there's a Dr Seuss nece right And then that led me to there's a hunter S. Thompson EST to it. You know. So I got to say on the second go round I, felt like I clicked in to your Mojo. There's so much liberation. There's all this playful business going on because it's not linear in any way right grasping at what's going on a lot of the time, and then once again, I stopped trying to do that and just listen I found it very enjoyable and. I've found a lot of the commentary, the political commentary stuff I very much identify with and I guess I don't know if you do but part of me desires to be bob honey. I want to act without any fear of repercussion and I like you am in a position where when I act more than one person's watching. So I. Think a lot about how I act and I'm trying to act as genuinely as I can knowing there will be fallout I have to weigh how much fall out I'm willing to deal with over something. And I imagine you're in that position. Times. And was there some cathartic joy and creating a character that had zero regard for that aspect of life in two? Thousand Twenty? Yeah. Let me give you a break on one thing I had done inaudible on the first book on Bob. Hunting to just do stuff. I didn't like it at all and they agreed to take it off. It was one that I recorded myself and I thought I did a terrible job and never did do an audible on the first book. The second book, the one that you listen to seize Jimmy cracked corn. Is Easier to understand. Had you. Got The first one but yes, it was exactly what you're saying. It was kind of like the gloves were completely taken off. I kinda lavished in the idea that I was gonNA write this thing. So that if someone. And I would never expect someone to or not to. Dive in and look up the words because God knows you know because of the alliteration of it got his best reviews from great writers it got the worst reviews of every critic. Destroyed by By by critics which I came to be really exhilerated by, tell me how. This could be a great tip for anyone this was. Anybody who would assume to be annoyed by what they thought I was this would be fodder for. Sharon. They they could close off and make judgments on what is was and what the use of language was. I will tell you that it was a direct assault on the lack of use of language that I feel is coming from the so-called academic community in many cases are lying in the fact that we're both liberal progressives in a world. So nervous about the censorship that's happening in academia are we are we aligned in that? Oh. Yeah. Yeah. So we actually can't see what I can see it from here but I got a reviews like shut up Sean Penn just shut. Off. They just didn't want to have it whereas these really significant authors came into it with an openness to what it might be. The language is its own assault the Dr. seuss. This of it is its own assault. It's like stop rhyming at me stuff. that. Made me laugh and right right. Right. Right. If you don't kind of laugh at the torture of the style. Then, you're not GonNa get the style, it's going to squeeze you and so it it kind of was this character I could apply things some of which had direct experience with and just exaggerate or colored them anyway. I wanted and just ride this guy steady clear if not off mine. Let's try this hat on for a minute. Yeah..

assault Dr. seuss bob honey Sean Penn Susan S. Thompson Jimmy Sharon
"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:02 min | Last month

"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Expedient Guide into how to do the immediate disaster response and there was also a kind of code of compassion. I think in the whole three months that the the twenty two thousand troops were there and keeping in mind that the Haitian people you know this was the separation by one day they all lost somebody and with all of their resources gone their business numbers astronomical was one hundred and eighty thousand people died or something outrageous like around two, hundred fifty. Dollars on that were killed in a country at that time only ten million. So it's a, it's a huge. Calamity and. In the. Time you know with people's emotions being as raw as they were their desperation there needs. The United States military didn't put flex cuffs on one individual and you can imagine how they were sometimes treated, but they were also ordered to keep their weapons, shouldered their helmets off their glasses off to be a soft posture human presence, and to expect to at times be berated and over time there was an enormous amount of bonding that happened with the military and the Haitian people that we saw him. We thought well, we could work like that and then maybe grow it in some ways that the military is restricted from growing. And also, we'd be able to stay longer. So I guess in the reverse engineering, answer your question about how it all happened. The part I'm not really mentioning is I was drawn to people be in the military or in the NGO world. Who became mentors, and then we started moving out into the United States the Bahamas on hurricane response, a building it out rebranding the original organization into what is now core. And and with that, then we we went into the covert testing as well as maintaining our operations in all other regions Cova testing gut its own incredible shot in the arm initially by grants from the Rockefeller Foundation California, and then Jack Dorsey with his amazing in excess of a billion dollar commitment worldwide to fight covert and in many out of the box weighs and he came in cumulatively now with thirty million dollars and we haven't gotten any money from governments, the money we've. Gotten we're from very few private sector groups and then individuals and without without Dorsey there'd be no core. Where would people go if they wanted to personally donate? Is there like a website or something? Yeah. Correspondence Dot Org core response dot org. But by the way we got we got about a thousand Republicans and Democrats working these tarmac parking lots all over this country giving it their all and they need all of our support at great risk to let's add it's not without risk. And then on top of that, you WanNa make sure the people are getting clear messaging..

Jack Dorsey United States NGO Republicans Rockefeller Foundation Califor
"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:50 min | Last month

"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"And He Kinda growled my name to make sure it was me answering the phone. And I said Yup and he said, is your my last favorite actor. If that meant least favourite or if. He had no more time for favorite actors. Could mean so many things really quick. You get only have three favorite actors in you're number three also mean you're the least favorite actor of it it's up to you to decide. The case we struck up a friendship I started spending every Sunday down at his house for the next almost ten years in San Antonio in San Pedro originally in conversation about whether, we could you know pry this thing from Barbados hands or get Barbie onboard support. It 'cause this blood feud with Dennis Hopper was about twenty years old and really shouldn't anything at that point but he remained determined I guess it got out there that I was interested in doing this project and so Mickey Rourke chimed up and said to bar Bay Hey, I'll do it. Would you? So they went and did it and then my relationship with Hank continued separate apart from that you must have read. Hollywood. I was there for someone. Yeah. Yeah, and then you even you offer to do the moving for a dollar wasn't that kind of famous story around it yeah. I think you said I'll take two dollars and I'll do it with you to our. He got got to deal. So. Okay. Would you attempt to isolate what is appealing? About. Bukowski I think no matter what you look like you feel like the guy with boils I don't know I felt like the guy with boils that he was in there was some beauty to his rejection of society and that he was just honest about the fuck up he was and that there was some beauty to that and and I, think would appeal to me as a young man was. Oh you can do that right. You can go their society's norms and I'm going this way and I don't give a fuck as long as I'm honest it'll come out in the wash was any of that enticing to you? Yeah. I think very much on point one of the things I remember asking him because very rarely would he extended look in the is an animal thing He could be talking very gently about something very tender or something aggressive, but he would be off-island many times. And I asked him on. So said, you know you don't you don't really connect in the is too much. and. He very quickly. You know there was no affectation to it. He said I don't like is, and you know when you think about the things that we value. The, what we attach value to the connection is people toast they gonNA, is or the symmetry of a face or the color of the ocean in all of these things you know it's it's what's the real value what's the real value of success of what does it mean? What does the word really mean and he was off the page on all of that. So you had the poem amid a genius where he talks about see it's not a beautiful. You know we imagine somebody who's been in a horrible accident doesn't have is, is there not beauty to see them? We'll, of course, there is, and so there was something. For everybody and yet most people founded that which was for all of us frightening intimidating. Everything that he wasn't it just because he spoke a kind of a pure language and a more honest one, the more universal one which I think is why he was so. Universally. Read around the world. Yeah..

Dennis Hopper Mickey Rourke San Antonio Hank Bukowski Barbados Hollywood San Pedro
Mark's Cougar Conundrum

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

05:59 min | Last month

Mark's Cougar Conundrum

"Welcome to the is on conservation podcast. I'm Gregory. Hatanaka and today for this is on conservation. We have none other than the one the only serene assignments, how you doing Serena I'm great. I also really appreciate the way that introduce people on the show I appreciated the last introduction that you did. So Nice. So. Nice of you. I really appreciate that well I just want to do the best I can to make sure that everybody knows who the real experts are which is. No secret. Not Me so. No you're one of them for sure. Did Watts Oh. Yeah. Oh Yeah. I even know that L. No no I'm just I'm just an enthusiastic cheerleader that's really what it is and the feeling is mutual. Absolutely absolutely mutual. I'm really excited to jump into this interview that you did with Mark L. Brock. Why don't you tell listeners who this is what we're going to be listening to? Yeah mark is amazing and he the the one thing that I really appreciate about mark is he's so articulate. It's it's it's kind of crazy. It's sort of like he knows how to talk to the public and talk to stakeholders all the things that we're GonNa talk about in the interview he's really good at communicating people and communicating all his efforts and his research and and. I don't just from a management perspective as someone who is a wildlife manager everything that he said made a lot of sense and I think it would make a lot of sense to people that don't know a lot about the subject So I was really impressed with him. Mark is a researcher focuses on mountain lions or Pumas cougars whatever you WANNA, call him, and he has been working in this field for. A really long time. So he's really gotten to know the species their behavior and a lot of the conflicts that come with them and living alongside large carnivore like mountain lion. So he wrote an he's written several books but his most recent book is called the Cougar Conundrum and the Cougar conundrum kind of outlines these bigger picture and with great examples, case studies and examples of basically the history of our. You know what he calls a conundrum, which I think is the best word to use this huge problem. That we have been experiencing north, America, surrounding these animals for for hundreds of years. So it's it's really it was great getting to talk to him and I learned a lot You know not just reading the book, but also just talking him and again he has a way with the way that he speaks that it just makes sense and he's very measured and I can just really tell that he he has invested a lot of time. You know working trying to problem solve, but you have to he he's he's the perfect person because he is so measured and listens and I I just think he's he's the best possible person to do what he does. So I'm really excited to have you guys listen to our conversation. That's awesome. Yeah. He's very well spoken and this book if I'm not mistaken, you had a sneak peek at it should be coming out the day after this episode airs Yes. So I, got a sneak peek at it and I got to read it ahead of its release which will be released on August thirteenth. So yeah, the day after this episode gets. and it will be available at any bookseller He mentioned that it would be great. If you know you WANNA contact your local bookshop see if you can get a couple of copies into the store, but it's also available online and wherever you normally get your books. Well, that sounds amazing and let's just jump right into this interview. Why don't we start by you just introducing yourself your name and a little bit about your background. Sure. My Name's Markelle Brooke. I'm a father. And a working biologist and I live in western Washington on the Olympic peninsula where I am part of a massive collaboration with five tribal nations to study mountain lions on the peninsula and how they crossed the interstate five corridor. I also worked for Penn. Thera. I'm the director of the PA- Program Outline programme, whichever were you prefer? and. So I help sort of create new projects identify need identified the conservation issues for mountain lions across their entire range. So we have projects ranging from up here in Washington State all the way down to the southern tip of South America. Wow. So it's a huge I know panther is a huge. Organization it's a global organization. I mean and I know you probably get this a lot. But how did you? How did you get involved with Panther and how did you get involved with mountain lions? Indeed it's You know it's all dumb luck. Great. panthers a as he said, it's a global organization. We work to conserve wildcats and they're landscapes around the world. You know it's How ends up doing what I do is. Is Sort of a circuitous journey. One never really has plans or at least if you do they tend to go out the window and and life happens. So I tell folks because I get asked this a lot. You know you must have always planned to be outlined biologist, and now here you are. Say absolutely not you know you. Have a plan. In the field of wildlife, you may have a goal and what generally happens is an opportunity comes up and you decide to take it or you don't so

Mark L. Brock Hatanaka Serena Washington Watts Markelle Brooke America South America Researcher Penn Director PA
"penn" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

11:41 min | 8 months ago

"penn" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"One of the original behind is was was a woman named Tara She unveiled herself over. One hundred men as a declaration of you know this principle and she was like tens of thousands of Bahamas in Persian and Ottoman Empire's Executed wound for her beliefs. But the last thing she said you may kill me as soon as you like but would you will never stop the emancipation of women. Talk is the namesake of the of the organization that I have done this this immigration. That's where you see. Oh yeah the relationship. The reason I have a friendship with founder of that organization's because she also was behind. Okay Yeah and we met actually at her sister in laws Memorial Service How Berry how do they generally interested? Yeah so So far as I understand the ordinances it's like You know within hours travel distance of where the where the body die where the life and In a wooden box. No no one bombing for the sake of Decomposition natural decomposition. It's interesting 'cause you know another Persian religion Zoroastrian Astor's another other profit. We totally record. I mean we recognized every major world religion the and and by the way so many others that we wouldn't call a religion but like spiritual truths remain and new. You know like are seen in their cultures essentially every culture. It's my understanding from the Baha'i writings that every culture has flourished as a result of the teachings of a given as we say again manifestation we call them divine educators physicians. What have you you know am a how did the more modern like even mormonism mormonism probably came about this around the same time you know? What's interesting is that in eighteen forty four which was the year the face is originated was the year that was recognized actually Jewish Christian and Muslim clerics and scholars alike as the year? They were waiting waiting for the return of their chosen. One no kidding actually so along comes the bub. No one really more or less you know. The world ignores his message also his name name is Bob so it's Ab okay. I'm not an all offended at far too small to be you're like Elaine. What are you talking about small name? It's just a bob talking but it's also around the same time origin of species was written in so eight hundred. Five I think is when he takes the voyage of the Beagle and all that. But the point is like there was a seismic Huge Science Dude. You know what's funny is that is that leading up to eighteen. Eighteen forty four actually the. US Patent Office was considering closing because they believe they had discovered everything no let alone so may may twenty thirty forty. I four was the night of the Bob declared his station to one other person who is pursued. One other person who was pursuing spiritual actual truth is name was Mel Hussain. He was a young religious student. They were both like he was mother. Hussein was twenty four the Bob Twenty five it all began. I think what's Nice is that is that the the beginning inning of this of this religion began with a single meaningful. Conversation is all that is more or less at the beginning of all action is a conversation maybe religion will spring from this. Would you want to call it. I don't know the rest of this episode was just workshop names for our new. That's interesting and it's really interesting about eighteen forty four. Yeah but what I wanted to say. Is that the night after In America First Telegraph was sent. Oh my God and and the message of all messages was what Hath God wrought. It has message. Wow that's guide that's just fascinates you consider all the things that were invented after oh goodness man vibrator vibrator that flabby. Yeah I mean I could just check okay. We got to hurry up shoot. I didn't know that Penn.. That's that's really fascinating it's you know. Do you have a specific idea of the afterlife. Well nobody could possibly have specific idea. There are certain qualities that they're important to recognize in this life like for instance that that the life of the soul's eternal okay it's more specific and a lot of people. Yeah it's also inconceivable right which is the nature of this life the same way that this world is inconceivable to the child in the womb while the child is developing the capacity to be in this world but but has no has no used for the expression of his is his ears his lungs is I mean the child needs nothing. What is being grown in the womb? True life true spirituality reality seems to be the stuff that is immaterial that we are so we are developing the capacity in this boom world For the next and these these these spiritual attributes are like I said before things like forgiveness justice mercy truth you know determination or what have you. The good ones the infinite the virtues. We're so limited right now in this materialistic age that it's hard to even think of these kinds of virtue consumed by materialism and limited by language. You too that's a profound Okay Shit ship how'd you. How'd you get the name dancing around the elephant when you get out of here is actually how now? Yeah so the. The pen pen was. I lived in Virginia. Yeah for time we you were like an affluent upper middle class. Well there was a there was a country club. My Dad was gripping repent tennis ball all the time and my mom's at the time of conception yes they never really got along through this. What are your siblings? I have a half sister half-sister what is does she have a different name Dunlop. No no no her name is Jenny. Jenny Wow so that's how I in your your mom went along with the pen. Yes she went along with. That was that was probably one of the few things that could ever agree joke. They like to try to make. And you're not very funny to me not one bit so I have to live with it every day. what is your most commonly used Emoji. Would you say and often it. I used to be the I think it was everybody's when it first came out that newish one that is like the half Smiley. It's really it's really really wasn't it's like it's got the half curl smile here and the rest of it's a frown. It just looks like it's been hit by the train. It could be like a hangover phase. It is it's like and I feel like it's it's to me it's like it's just being alive now is quite an anxious time for people to me like what it does is it says like I make it they work doing my best ogling juggling it all incentive joy in the heart through it yeah. I like that. I've been using that one if you I've also been using using this one a lot with the full teeth revealed. I use that a lot like all right all right if you could be a professional athlete. What sport did you play? Soccer now. Unquestionably if you could have one snack food. You're handling an apple apple. If you know what I I. Love Love Persimmons but but they are often not great so when they are perfect perfect perfect persimmon. I feel that way a little bit about Papaya. Once I had when I was in in Central America I had with the when you have fresh fruit of any kind of Asian pears. I love What's the other one mango is? It's crazy but it's very hard to trying to think of something else. I've had that experience with blueberries wild blueberries. It's hard to go back now egg. Do Grapes grow. Have you ever had like a like a good grade right off the tastes they taste like the the real version of the great flavor. You know as a kid so fragrant past the diamond I remember like I sometimes fake being so I could get DIMETAPP Do you smoke. No no nothing to you ever. I went to a very early. Oh Oh yeah very very early I came to La Man. I was exposed to smoke years ago. Probably anxious after I I mean I started but at twelve which then for anybody. By the time I was seventeen I basically was obviously I was never much of a consumer. If you had to live somewhere else where would it be. You know. I think it's a matter of how you live. Not where you live but where you live. It's a very high answer I know I know I do love mountains. I love him more than beaches. More than DOC. I love like foresty mountains. Mountainous store maybe even back where you grew up. I mean somewhere in in Washington and Oregon. Yeah I do love Washington. Yeah if if I could do everything that I do and being in the northwest except I gotta say it is very rainy. uh-huh I mean no places perfect. What's your favorite movie of all time? I'm not a good actor for this kind of question when I when I had a shame for asking Alec Baldwin this they can answer. That's unfair to actually mimic voice. That way he he he talks and so many other ways I know. But that's a pretty consistent. MAZING mazing Gabby started Yeah I don't think they're racist computers if you have dinner with three people dead or alive whom you've never met whom I've never met also difficult. Lightning Love de Ngelo WHO's a an incredible position? He's he's he's the artist who's influenced me most I don't know what that means. I WanNa have dinner with him though. I don't I don't WanNa Week gushy. Being a person who has been you know objectified some degree all this stuff I I don't I don't mostly by my brother's girlfriend mostly you by Matty's remember only mega thirstier sandwich. I feel like in fact it's really important to value the thing that people make as opposed to look. I mean we see more and more icons falling because of their because of their imperfect behaviors or or much worse than than talking. Oh Martin Short. Oh come on in character as going. Yeah Hey I would. I would do that. It'd be great do that. Maybe you could do glick and Marcus your deal do it. I don't think so I can't believe I have ever forgotten about. I mean Jimmy Glucose sort of one of the most incredible promises ever of of of any modern recorded. You know. Yeah come on. Yeah who's your favorite muppet. I don't know them that well is Gonzo on you. Sure okay. Yeah if you have one superpower what would it be to be able to speak speak every in any language like a native. Oh yeah thought about that. Oh that'd be cool. I've never heard that one as a that'd be great if you could when age for the rest of your life physically. What would it be physically? Yeah I mean twenty four is Kinda though. Yeah I really wanted to look and seem and be older than I do appreciate age. I don't WanNa go backwards at all. I'm I'm down with age. I like it but for you to say you're what thirty three three three. Yeah but but I but I have to say that in terms of like you know now if I want to play sports if I WANNA I wanNA basically do anything when my physical body like. Yeah Yeah but that says nothing about wisdom that says nothing about intelligent..

Bob Jenny Wow Washington Zoroastrian Astor Tara She founder Mel Hussain Berry US Patent Office apple tennis Virginia America Alec Baldwin Elaine Soccer Hussein foresty mountains Penn
"penn" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

10:09 min | 8 months ago

"penn" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"And John Stewart establish something that didn't exist before and so I grew up with that as a teenager and then and then it was the first first time I think two thousand fourteen when that was happening was the first time that as an adult I felt like. There's there's a legitimate resource here like I don't I don't go to news for truth. The right so it's winter actually really was that from social media really was that I really really did love engaging with it in that way you die and that was in two thousand fourteen when and that was after way after gossip girl away after yeah I mean it ended in two thousand twelve. Wow that's how you were using it as a tool to reach the masses and like a social tool yeah and today like remote good things sure are and I will admit that that is always like there's so much danger inherent in that as that which I'm sure you relate as a public figure you know to stage do. Do we really believe that public figures. Who have their as? You're saying the pulse on where I know I've been. I've really tried to be more conscientious. She anxious as much as have. I and I've noticed that your like a quick search on your instagram today is you have seemed to have harnessed this. This social whatever social concerns that you had in two thousand fourteen. They seem to have been harnessed into very specific immigration policy Somehow that has that that is the way it is currently manifesto. Yeah true and that is you know what's amazing about that. That is the result of a friendship with the person. Who does this work? That's who you keep you referenced. Rent some videos and the reason I keep doing that is because I am no authority and it's sort of like not even from my own personal benefit but just to be transparent about this source. It's it's to me. There's safety in that because if we am never I'm never going to be any kind of authority in the matter. I'm just trying to learn and then like kind of a portal quarter to for other amplifying a really important thing and I think that's so admirable next year. I also did something admirable. Recently I went. There's that group called. This is about humanity which I think you not I've not heard would really A link up with them but they they take trips across the border and they bring bring supplies. You know. We did one right before Christmas. We toys and stuff to these kids. Who are stuck in these They're stuck in this limbo state at the border but they are having a hard time. That's actually the danger. I mean because like migrants are uniquely vulnerable. Actually because the the situation has been created. And you know I'll I'll try. I'll try and step very carefully carefully as I choose words and we're neither of US are no neither of US thirty but if there's anything valuable here let's try. Yeah so and it's true first and foremost that there's no country in the world that can actually just accept all people for any and all reasons seeking asylum perfectly perfect legal process. And that is what has been so misconstrued whenever whenever I've said maybe before trying to attempt to because also in these conversations precision some thinking of unity. Yeah sure you don't want to buy. I mean you don't divide that now that that's what we try on the show to avoid it at all costs. I mean in this case though it strikes me that when I took this trip with this is about humanity the Republicans there were conservative. There a lot of people on all sides of the what we call the. I'll yeah I mean it. It struck me that this should this is a human. It is human issue. I don't I don't understand how it got who flooded with Right versus left dude. I mean because increasingly what else is there. What other contact we I mean the? What's really unfortunate is that we don't even understand and how to affect change outside of the realm of politics is inherently divisive? Well and that's come to find out a lot of these judges who aren't allowing these cases simple cases to be processed which I think it's how Paso Paso Ninety nine percent of cases gets wilder dismissed by the judge won't even They can't even present their cases in in a fair way. So that's when it becomes like okay. Well there's clearly institutional racism. I mean no doubt but it's but it is complicated it's complex I was in one of these courtrooms actually for a hearing was able to go to a different a couple of different spaces and it doesn't look like a white person. Denying a brown person actually eighty percent of the of the he like administrative staff in these kinds of these like detention centers. Or these were these. Were like yeah you know I mean like they they they. They can all speak the same language in Spanish button. But they're but they're speaking in English because it's a it's an American court. Meanwhile there's a translator who is often not fully equipped for I mean. There's there's no no doubt that it is. I mean here's a term that that that we sort of coined together down there when we were witnessing this and there were other people who were very informed. Were telling us is their best understanding of the processes that and forgive me if this sounds in some ways flippant but we we. We were thinking that it seems to be in terms of WHO's cases is denied. WHO's detained? Who is maybe you know forced to remain in Mexico where they are subject to kidnapping? WHO's you know? There's there's a number of ways that this can go Over people but it seems to be racist persecution form of duck duck goose like there's no clear rhyme or reason to and beyond that I don't know the I don't know that it's helpful helpful to say anything here that you're I mean you're still using the shoot you have a huge platform You had mentioned gossip girl That it was on Netflix. Had It'd probably done so well that that's one of the components of the. That's probably what Netflix looked at. You Know Yeah Yeah but I noticed that sometimes on Leighton Miester somebody I follow and I noticed sometimes Ossie like a comment and it's you know she'll post something out to see. The comments are all off Casa. Blair you know I mean really. It's it's it's it seems as though the fans are completely unfazed by any other thing you know but but that's also social media social media and it's Netflix and the fact that they can access excessive anytime they want. What then does that do to your day to day? Like what does that do to U. Penn in the world like how how many EH vista rates my fence around. WHO's filming you? I mean I have to say that it is a yeah. It's a a unique experience. Especially right right now right right now I bet for Ed with you these podcasts but like you know the show the the second season has just come out. Yeah sounds like you know this about me. I've always been introspective reflective. I know that's like a dushi sound. I don't WanNa put you make you say something like that but I can confirm that like that's who you. That's yeah I mean just an hour and due to a fault because like I in the past have been I mean understanding understanding. This is a safe. Space is really nice because in the past if somebody asks me a question I'm GonNa try to think about it an answer it I try to be you honest and and forthcoming and transparent because maybe that is some inherent respect for like the shared humanity between two people having the conversation but the problem with most interviews that they're not actually conversation. They're actually both to people doing a job right. The person who's interviewing you actually most of the time doesn't really want to be there. It's more like a dance. Yeah right and so to find an eighth grade dance. It's exactly I mean. That's that's a perfect metaphor. For what have you gotten into trouble. Have you said things that like you say something in the moment and they are out of context quoted. You from like this is something. I saw like instagram popular page. which I don't know what that says about it but I just thought it was so interesting in the it it? This is an example of like how it can be now. It's like a touchstone for a conversation we can have about this but has there been the opposite of that has to have there been quotes of yours years that I mean. Yeah they'd like taken out of context and one of the first interviews. I ever did after getting gossip girl some the person. I don't remember what it was four but the person asked me about the narration. And to be honest. If you're asking something about the way this show is conceived. You shouldn't be asking the active. Exactly yeah that should be talking to the writers. But but frankly you're only I'm interested in soundbites from quasi famous people so you know so so I'm quasi but isn't always pseudo I know. Does this person asked me something about the narration. And frankly me I'm I'm not a viewer of gossip girl. I'm an actor on it and it's just not the kind of show it ever watch nothing wrong with that. You know I I can value. It'd be right well you can but the thing I have said that before and I think I think I knew that I remember you telling me that you didn't really watch the show and you know when you've done over one hundred the episodes yeah then it becomes like okay. Yeah I did say in this interview. I I didn't understand I think then particularly I really didn't understand why the concept would be your could Successful because it's a I'm not a writer. I'm not the reader I'm not. That's not the way my brain was working in the time. Probably not even now and so I said something like yeah I mean you know the voice over over to me like I don't really get it. Maybe in time the voice over will sort of phase out because to me. It doesn't seem so essential now that's actually objectively stupid. Because is it is a pillar of the show and a key element of it all right. So behold like a twenty year old is maybe we not going to have the best understanding of the cultural phenomenon their heart of life so like I was asked that question Said something where I was demonstrating eating my incapacity to like understand the the the device and I was like. Yeah maybe it will. Maybe it won't like I. It's my least favorite part about the show. It's just it's just takes up all this space and time and so then. The headline boy was why Penn.. Badgley hate Scott's surprise. It's also like the tone of that. It's like just one thing to say like yeah..

Netflix writer US instagram John Stewart Paso Paso American court Penn Leighton Miester kidnapping Blair U. Penn Ed Mexico Badgley Ossie Scott
"penn" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

14:03 min | 1 year ago

"penn" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Who writes for Your Geeky board gaming listeners I run a youtube channel called Dibs on blue or I do board game tutorials and play throughs in American sign language but the videos are also voiced for hearing being people board gaming is becoming more accessible to all types of gamers. I'd love to get the word out and dibs on blue. Is there so more people can benefit from the channel and get into board gaming excellent work. Stephanie Jessop also Diva Carpenter Rights. You're always encouraging folks to do a thing so I did a thing done. A talk show where we talked to children's author so kids can see and hear from people right there books. It's called the van show. It's on Youtube and done through Austin Public Library okay so there's never a fee kids get to see that offers a real people and be inspired to write their own stories also fantastic work demo carpenter and they did. I think what you can do is email events ide- ten dot com just to let us know what you do and hopefully we can get the word out for you this episode of Sean Penn.. WHO's promoting the book doc Bob Honey Singh's. Jimmy cracked corn. We got to go to his house in Malibu and sat down with him and he was really kind and gracious and we don't really really wonderful chat and he has the sweetest dog in the world kind of like a maybe a golden lab but it just hung now with us the whole time and got snuggles and hugs and I just I just have to say. I hope it's not weird that I made just need to go from time to time. Just knock on Sean Penn's door. It'd be like can I just come in and dog and I want to get in the way hug. Your dog and I'm leaving. Just GonNa drive back into the city. Just maybe once a month from time to time so here's the attentive podcast number ten twenty one with Mr Sean Penn initiating the Coffee v seeps into the bloodstream slowly bringing back.

Mr Sean Penn Jimmy Youtube Bob Honey Singh Stephanie Jessop Austin Public Library Malibu
"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Oh god i just wanna go by the number eight. Microcosm is number eight or sunny side. Which is my new show yeah. My character's name is garrett. Mody modena's my real last name yeah mood and you're getting to use it which you normally yeah and i also thought my the parents would be pleased and my dad was a fire worries. Snap people will be confused like nobody's going to be confused. Dad look mindy uses. Her first name like people use their first names is on shows. Rheinfelden seinfeld used his last name. Yeah you're not seinfeld. Mike okay fine so very good point but still so the reason i named him garrett and i think we're probably gonna find sound like the last episode of the first season. The back story is that when his and his sister's name is mallory. You've <hes> you find out that when his parents moved to america <hes> they loved watching television. They loved the facts of life. They thought that mrs garrett was such a hard working woman and as an immigrant they're like this. Mrs garrod is the reason we watched the facts excellent life then they started watching different strokes and mrs garrett is also on different strokes and they were like mind blown this the artist working american yeah our first burns son has to be named cleaning half of america's house yes and then mallory because of family ties that followed 'cause mallory was also very studious and hardworking and so i wanted to like i mean now i'm talking about. It's not quite so quiet but like i wanted to do a quiet hat tip to that conversation that has no right answer sir well. I bet by giving them both the everyone will be mad. I don't you could think of it as a hack. It's like it's both and i remembered this. This all goes back to the selo comment that went back to u._c._l._a. I don't often read my act. Mentions on twitter grants pass not somebody did slide into my calling me a sell out because i'm playing a guy named garrett in a new n._b._c. Show made me think of these. The indian kids at u._c._l._a. And i was like i mean i laughed. I sent it to my co-creator. <hes> matt murray and i was like hey man is totally took the bait <hes> ah on that show moses also and loved him on the so happy to see that he he's hilarious. He does this crazy easy thing on the carpet where he's posing. I think it was his first. T._c._i.'s it's such a weird pose coach yeah during those like riding the today found on getty images that you can buy a photo of the weird pose for five hundred dollars five hundred dollars and i hope somebody buys we identify. What network is that n._b._c. n._b._c. Okay mike mike. Mike sure is involved with what is the premise of it. Premise is <hes> i play a guy named gary moody <hes> disgraced new york city councilman who who is kicked out of city council because he is wasted and tries to bribe a cop pukes on a cop car in the new york city and realizes he gets kicked out of office that he has no other job skills else. He was the youngest ever elected new york city. Councilman doesn't know what to do. Puts an ad on airbnb experiences for fifty bucks an hour. I'll do whatever you want oh. This group of immigrants hires him for a day to help them study for the citizenship test. Oh <hes> obviously they know way more about what it means to be american and that he he does because citizens tasked. I've seen are ninety eight percent of a matinee born americans yeah i mean i don't know much but so essentially it's a group of friends right. It's it's like the shows. I grew up loving watching like fresh princeton seinfeld and friends in a class back in the day right. We're going for like that kind of vibe so it's about a group of friends and with that being the backdrop open and honest on this show. I will say that auditioned for it. Oh you remember yes so the variant and it is so funny it is it is it's going to be great. Were you auditioning to play cal's system. Okay yeah i can see that the mallory family ties murari and yeah so you know. It's funny is about the whole thing. Monica is expressively will never do the accent claims time she can't do the accent and i'm like well. You could learn the accent they'll do for money. Learn it. You could learn to you but the real like the sophie's choice really happened for her. Which was mindy was doing a show and accent required. It's about people that are newly emigrated yeah and so i said to monaco. I'm like god what is fucking with you right now. It's it's the most tempting opportunity and it's like. I'll teach you. I know it from without a paddle. Ah the double double will somebody and somebody would find look. She sounds exactly with a paddle. Some it's like she has an indian accent and michigan acts. Yes seeing thing but it's called sunnyside. It's on what day on n._b._c. thursday nights at nine thirty but i just want to say i can't leave here without saying that you know kind of at the height of your superpower's. You're you know you're midway through doing the franchise of harold and kumar in your house which by the way is the only medical show i ever loved his show. I watched. I loved it. You're great on the show and then you bounce yeah you go to work at the white house <hes> <hes> tell me how you got to that point. It sounds super random. It's far less random him then. I think it sounds in two thousand seven when i was on house. There was a writers strike so the w._g. A had a labor dispute and we couldn't shoot anymore episodes after the ones that were written were gone and right around that time was when all of the primaries were kicking off iowa caucus kick off the primary season. I had read. I think obama had one book out at the time. I don't think the second dropped but i liked his book. I did not like politicians and i had no interest in actually working for one <hes> <music>. <hes> an olivia wilde knocked on my trailer door one day before we wrap for the strike and she said hey. I've got a plus one to an obama like event that he's doing. Do you wanna come like well. What is it i saw two thousand and four speech thought it was awesome. I would love to appear in but i like what's the catch so it's for about fifty artists and he's basically going to make an ask to see who can help him in the lead up to the iowa caucus because he's running for president is again honor. I don't have an interest in that sick. Why not you were against the iraq. Doc war like yeah. Both parties got us into the iraq war but obama was against the iraq war. I'm like okay but he wasn't a sitting senator at the time so this went back and fourth. I'll alternately went with her. <hes> let me back up. A guy named peter blake who is one of our writers on house said hey. If you're going to go to this event you might be interested in going to a fundraiser for obama's mosaic descent people get roped into shit. I am not fan of your your. I'm a nerd. I am going with olivia wilde and she's my co worker does yeah but you you know he's gonna make an ask. Why don't you see what actually like in front of his donors. There's this breakfast of and he's doing in malibu. It's only two thousand five hundred bucks a plate by only leads. One of them are not going to happen because i can get you in for twenty five bucks as long as you don't eat any of the food i have immigrant parents who used to me right deal common yeah yeah that's definitely a fucking good meal if it's worth twenty four hundred seventy five dollar ever seen such breakfast all of which only made me cynical and i was like well of course this guy is just like everybody else and he's gonna be rich people breakfasts but at that breakfast he started talking about climate change and clearly clearly went off remarks and was calling people out for driving hummers two very popular at the time you know people seemed a little uncomfortable and i thought there you know there. There's no press here. <hes> this dude is clearly going off remarks. This is not what my polycyclic said people do right. You don't do this in front of your donors donors. Yeah that was morning. Event of you invited me to in the evening during the day. I you know i got my tacos and i read a bunch of nerdy policy stuff about climate change on his website site is policy papers and stuff it just a few weeks prior i had read an article about ethanol in foreign affairs magazine and it talked about how so ethanol can be made from all sorts of things but this talk about corn based ethanol and how if you use corn to create fuel it will drive up the price of corn in developing countries and people won't be able to feed themselves if they rely lie on corn as a staple so i was prepared. I was like i have read these articles. I am going to ask him a question. Oh we're going to be in a room full of actors and i'm gonna be the smart guy. This'll be awesome and i go to this event and it was very nice. He didn't make any speeches he just sort of worked the room and getting to know people and i i said the senator guy. I've got a question for you. I was at your thing this morning thinking about the hummers. That was very funny. <hes> sound like a reporter things morning. No i did not like uh-huh thing was fully avenue and i said <hes> and you know they say that your plan your policy planning talks about investing ethanol but you know <hes> corn based death-knell drives up the price of food for people in developing countries so at is your plan account for that and he looks at me and goes <hes> yeah i read that article in foreign affairs to mclane mclane is based on cellulosic ethanol so that you can use things like grass clippings and leaves to me as well lou rich a bridge to cellulosic ethanol was like oh <music> embarrassed check mate motherfucker yet. He is obviously you run on. Get us some white castle. Nasa even knew the article i read that wasn't on his campaigns website but i thought it was an interesting interaction then he'd said some things about the role that artists play in america and sort of said you know you guys give people an escape and i would love your help in making people's lives better substantively and he was asking for can you help me in a weekend of campaigning in iowa so myself olivia and an actually she's fantastic name <hes> meddling chicken walkway my favorite person she's also. I love mangla angling. She's so dope yeah. Kristen was on a show with her. She's the most she's so cool yeah so the three of us were non political surrogates a surrogate of somebody who speaks on behalf of a candidate candidate so that they can do a rally you can be in another state or another place in.

mrs garrett olivia wilde obama mike mike mallory iraq america iowa mindy u._c._l._a new york senator Rheinfelden seinfeld Mody modena airbnb twitter Mrs garrod mclane mclane
"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

12:33 min | 1 year ago

"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Drag as you said. There were a couple people saw of day say descent dan on t._v. In you gonna be lucky enough to be one of them but now you've got evaluate. The entire implications of that seems like a lot to put on a twenty three year old actor. It's also superfluid right. You're by the way that that episode of buster. Non reads like a documentary to me like a real of stories of kashmir actors and <hes> and it's funny that people ask about the twenty four episode a lot because that was one of those where i'm like just psyched to play a character whose such an adult human being you know this because the comedy space sort of our thing like you're playing a likable nice guy so often like give me an asshole. I wanna play a despicable human being yeah but that conversation about whether to do accent with ira barbara was actually very helpful to me at the first movie did did this movie. Van wilder with ryan reynolds right first movie. I did a couple of years after college so you know andrew panay yeah. There's one of my yet miss it. I i had a blast making that movie. <hes> laura barbara caymans assists. It called me a lot that we were playing. This added the same agent so we'll be both unaware married to kristen bell. We're one step away from that so laura called me and said hey. I've got this amazing audition for you. I'm so excited headed. It's the supporting lead in a movie. You have to come to the office. I need to talk to you about the script and you know this office. In traffic from westwood is like a two hour scenario dario each way so i said why don't you just leave it at the dropbox and i'll pick it up tonight. Tell me what the character is at. I'm reading for just emailed me some of the sides and she doesn't. I want to talk to you about it. I'm i'm so excited. It is supporting lead in a teen comedy now. I'm excited semi some of the sides. What's the name of the character does just please just come in. Just just come in this went back and forth and i was like i promise you i will come in. Just tell me the name the character and send me some sites 'cause okay. <hes> the name of the character is taj mahal and she called me back and she goes honey. I figured you might do that yeah. I i study theater nor move out here to u._c._l._a. To play a guy named taj mahal fake the opportunity knocking and she he said i really need you understand that. This is a big deal. This is a supporting lead in studio comedy with ryan reynolds. Who's on two guys a girl and a pizza place. <hes> <music> will one day be dead pool and tara reid. Who's in american pie and you need to audition for this movie because if you get it then i'll be able to pitch you for a different caliber of projects that i currently cannot pitching for because you don't have those credits on your resume yeah and she said please just read the script so i read the script and yes it was phenomenally stereotypical who had a you know sort of exaggerated accent and lusting lusting after white girls who he couldn't get sort of every stirred up in the book also interestingly every stereotype of just being an eighteen year old male <hes> oversexed oversexed can't think things with dick like stereotype of that right yeah then i start realizing that the plot doesn't advance absent this character character so this question this goes back to sort of the accident conversation wealth times think it's kind of reductionist but so i'm not gonna play a cabdriver. I don't wanna play store clerk right well. Then you get into this weird territory of are we just saying that because they're working class jobs or do you actually mean that there's something one dimensional about the portrayal the historic portrayal of these roles or that they don't advance the plot of the film or the character doesn't have an arc. There's nothing for them to do right so i called laura back when we had this conversation with her and with barbara about like well this is really interesting because as i remember it being less about me being personally offended at these stereotypes ryan and more about me feeling incredibly bored by them shar right and there wasn't a ton of comedy for you to do. It was lazy comedy. Yes that's interesting. Yeah you could have been more offended by the the cheapness of the joke as opposed to the racial implications locations exactly right it was both and i remember calling one of the casting exact shoes v._p._n. N._b._c. this twenty years ago now. This woman named sewn unicor. She she happened to be indian-american and happened to be in the castle department at n._b._c. and i had had a general meeting with her a few hours prior and she said you know if you ever have any questions feel free to give me a call and i thought i am very conscious. Ships that to your point about african american actors. You're always being told you have to choose something based on an entire group of people <hes> and i thought maybe she would have some insight insight into this this role and so i called her and said there's a script and i told her everything that that taj mahal you call back so look doc. Barbara is absolutely right with everything she said businesswise. If you get a role like this one hundred percent she can pitch you for things that she just can't get you in the room for right now pilots and it's no secret secret that any woman any any performer of color has to have ten times more credits on the resume just out yeah so yeah so yes. She's being honest with you about that. How many things in the script offended offended you or did you find cringe-worthy like i don't know like thirty off the road number to start with anything in the script actually funny and i was like oh yeah like there's a thomas stuff like this back. It's lit on fire kind of phone this woman superintendent but he screws it up but it like goes beyond its very animal house esque in that regard okay so that part of it excites. You took out yeah like if his name was phil and he was from des moines and i could go out for this. That'd be super excited yeah yeah so she goes okay. Here's what you do pick ten of the thirty things and if you get that part sit down with the writers and the director and talk to them about those ten do things but in order to do that you have to come up with ten things that are funnier than what the writers came. You gotta replace it. Yeah you got. That was the first time that anybody nobody told me that. I had any agency in these conversations on all right because up until that point it was just a fight about. I don't wanna do this accent. You have to do the accent you know the horrible experience on sabrina the teenage witch. I remember a high or so mean and so like you're doing that accent. That's hard to do but i love your show. Ooh didn't matter so went through the audition process. The last audition i remember i walked into the waiting or minute was another guy. I was like all right. I wonder if this dude got the same aim feelings as i do if like see his stage name like his deal does he feel comfortable with all this and i walk into the waiting room and it was a white dude and brown face. Was it me it was not law but i was not shocked so wants wants his. I had seen it a ton in auditions before that and i've seen it a ton since that right again. Not interrupt your flow but i when when i say that you were a part of a different error. This is really the minimally. That's not how dare i never seen bill time. I have seen it happen was just over a decade ago slightly over a decade ago where i saw on a show. I was working. Okay which is five minutes ago looks at yes so the reason i say that as we like to think these things are leaps and bounds separated from mud even look even some of our friends have done them on counsels. There are screwing just admit that embarrassingly in two thousand three when we filmed it which came out in two thousand four. There's a scene in without a paddle where someone's gotta laser the scope and then i get up and they're like you've doubt on your forehead in. I immediately indian accent in the script and i did it. I thought that was i was proud of myself that i thought i did a good. Yes azure yes because i had heard it on this totally. Obviously it wouldn't do that today and obviously embarrassed. The bad happened but it happened. I was twenty eight in fuck. I did it and that was my first movie and i would have shifted my hands and eating on camera if they were to let me take your perfectly teeing up it was about to say which was my beef if was not with the guy in the waiting room is never with the other actor. At least this is what i believe. I was mostly fascinated. This brother who had at home did he drive. I have to audition with if so hold over three did did he do it in the bathroom. Did he come early. Go to all of the three casting sessions before in brown did his agent tell them to do. It didn't come up with the ear it so we're just having a conversation it's even using is that standard may salaam and learn really nice guy but i told myself when i saw that that he was not allowed to get that part right any of the conversations that are had with myself about the thirty thirty things or the conversation with sony about ten funny things that i could come up with or feeling like i hate that. I need to have those conversations at all because i just want to be funny all went out the window via. When i saw this dude embrace it was like no you are not allowed to have this and so i'm like i am going to do whatever i have to get this part. You don't get that credit on your resume. I want that credit monitoring addition pilots next year because i did this movie right and in addition like ryan is an incredibly funny guy. Oh oh yeah andrew was awesome. Director walt becker was really fun. It was a great improvisational room where we had fun and look. I think for a a younger generation of performers of color who are listening to this. They are cringing and rolling the ri- going. You're such an old man apologised <hes> a movie like that i get it out of that position and i am not going to fight you on it. Yes but i'm sharing my experience which was at that time. This is something that was was a a real thing that you need a credit on your resume to get work rate so when when harold in galway castle came around i was at a birthday party for a mutual friend john. It's an hayden schlossberg or the two guys who created the franchise and roll three movies and are hilarious. <hes> of mutual friend introduced us and jon hurwitz came up to me and said whoa you don't have an indian indian accent and it was the most off-putting thing right. You're at a buddy's birthday party in l._a. Yes i'm deuce bag is like in indian accent and i remember saying something like while you you do sound like an asshole yeah and what it meant was your so hilarious and van wilder. I'm a screenwriter. I wrote this movie called herald and corn go to white castle but the one of the leads is kit from new jersey..

ryan reynolds ira barbara laura barbara caymans andrew panay director taj mahal brown kristen bell Van wilder tara reid hayden schlossberg jon hurwitz walt becker van wilder ri white castle westwood des moines l._a
"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

13:33 min | 1 year ago

"penn" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Talking love it. I don't from it at all good. Yeah i really really i mean you have such an amazing time. It's nice to hear that it's like legitimately well a real hobby he is. We're not doing it here. We are on the patio at my house. Monica and i are debating some hot button topic. That's it. I'm into motorcycles and chatting yup yeah. What's the hottest button <music> recently. That's a dangerous question assets i mean i think we both know generally what it is well. I don't actually hottest. I most rocco's let's yes tiro hukou sitting it should be it should be right. We haven't even ventured into the tobacco bullets start by saying the reason they become hot. Button topics is that we both love each other so much and we would love to have the same point of view on things so when we don't it's got an elevated weight to it yeah and but this reminds me of a very good friend who i worked with in d._c. She's brilliant me is an environmental environmental lawyer and found out recently over drinks that she's not entirely sure about climate science and all oh you talking about well what do you how is the and i thought she was joking for the longest time. I don't understand where we we you. This can't be true right right and then and i was like is this like. Are you one of these people who doesn't think we went to the moon either. That's ridiculous. Of course we went to the moon. Well you know what i i'm glad you're defending all of these policies as an environmental lawyer. I think we're just gonna have to let this one be by itself so we talk about tacos thousand well but look. I say fuck that whole debate. It's a relevant. Why would we be using a resource. We knows finite why what our daily activity be figuring out which one on his infinite one of my favorite conversations that i had when i used to work in in d._c. Was with young evangelicals who didn't agree with the guy i was working working for on like any issue <hes> but they believed that they were put on god's green earth to take care of it and so whether they agreed with the science or not was irrelevant because they thought why are we a using finite resources reason and dirty polluting. Why don't we just be good about it. Let's have fucking solar everything and wind everything because it's just the wise smart the thing to do when you're finding with a wife or something and you're you're fighting about the silverware drawer. That's not the issue generally talk. No we know you professionally is kalpana yeah but that name is what we would call a stage yes but interestingly it is also your own. How do i say your birth name. Calpe norrkoping kalpana culprit gulping is like actually pronounce it. This is like a hassan hussin hustle yeah exactly these meetings. I need to know that there are two acceptable pronunciation of a word like there's only dax to my knowledge but yeah but the right comparison i always get in trouble so gulping is a it's a good drought the word or i think the if not sunscreen hindi but it means the object of the dreamer the person who dreamed about okay so because it's not an english word obviously we speak english is our first language and so you're gonna take turns into captain sure <hes> that's not wrong wrong. Necessarily i mean it's not right but it's not like it's it's more like saying that advertisement versus advertisement was right or wrong. No one is that in england and one who says here yeah. I know i know monica's like the runaway origin of where it's from where advertisement advertisement or advertisement started but whoever it started is probably the correct. I think let me be more clear so is obviously the real porno. Kalpa is fine. I feel fine about <hes> but yeah no. It's a it's a screen name a stage name and when i first moved to l._a. In nineteen ninety five to go to u._c._l._a. u._c._l._a. To brother we both graduated in two thousand. I don't think that anyone there. I didn't know you i didn't i know you're a forty thousand people but you're you're sociology and film. Yes and i was anthropolgy yeah so i think we are on the same end of the campus right yeah and maybe even had sociology 'cause it's very likely we have crossed paths numerous. It's likely we have the same class at the same time. Yes that is possible four hundred person lectures. What kind of student were you because i think we shared this that i was here to be a comedian. I went to college. Get my mom to pay my rent and to make her happy so i didn't live on campus. I wasn't like like fully immerse. Ideas was their learning taking tests and splitting. Were you having the college experience. Yes i so i moved from new jersey to u._c._l._a. So i moved out there. When i was was eighteen i was in a triple in reaper which was awful. I loved the dorms but i was in triple room which meant new. It's you know the size of originally crafted for one human seattle with these weird bunk beds but i loved it. I loved being at u._c._l._a. I ultimately decided to go there because i knew i wanted to get into film and tv. I grew up in new jersey right outside of new york city and i loved theater but i thought if i get into an l. a. school that's going to be my opportunity to go out there early and yeah and to get an education and i liked actually that u._c._l._a. Had a diversity of your education experience it was a huge school it all these experts teaching random classes but if you wanted to do your own thing you could and you could kind of pick and choose also huge nerd so i took for example there are i tried to take ellis to this premed life sciences class as an elective ah <hes> and failed it and had to drop but i remember being in class and you know not understanding something the professor said and asking the kid next to me in the door look at my paper. I was like <music>. I'm a theater major buddy. This is an elective. I'm not competing for mid school with you yeah yeah but there was intense. Shit like that like oh. This is like as much as i'm here to be an actor like you guys are legit doctors yet doctors in training now phrase e side note unrelated monica. Watch this documentary on white nationalist us and one of the things that came out. I think you'll have the same shock i did. Which is when i got to u._c._l._a. I was like okay. I think at the time it was like forty forty two percent asian thirty nine percent caucasian just the most multicultural place i'd ever been my life so when we watch this white nationals documentary his guy started tracking people that had been at charlottesville and then found them at other rallies and then found out who they weren't kind of exposed their identity. One of them was a medical student at u._c._l._a. l._a. With a government clearance at a weapons manufacturing facility out here in california in of all the things of all the fairy tales. I made up about my classmates while sitting in class. I would never have thought there was a white nationalist there. It seems like why would you go there. You know you can choose everything yeah yeah. Yeah you're coming to one of the most diverse schools planet in your white. Nationalist is this i. I was just like oh. I guess you really don't know anybody. He became a white nationalist after that that experience because he had some bad interaction. We couldn't think it's possible maybe he had the wrong triple room and rebirth <hes> yeah you get the wrong. Two guys might set you on a bad bad actually out so i was an r._a. My third year ahead resident who came to me and they teach you this in your r._a. Training any kind of role using this would never happen but there's this training scenario. Where what would you do. If one of your residents comes to you and says my roommate drew. A swastika left it on his desk. Oh aw what how old is this training. I grew up in new york. City date was a fairly diverse community middle school. You go to a bar mitzvah buckets every weekend like the idea that somebody would hold. These views was so old to me. Yes my third year when i was an r._a. Had a resident who came to me and he was very upset and he said my roommate left a swastika on his desk and i don't know what and i couldn't believe that so i mean it is shocking but take back. I'm like wow that that happens. Is there any way this person was scribbling absent mindedly or this seems very i'm amount on a dangerous limb well. When you started. I was going to make a joke about the old son's crypt. They're hindu symbol the we've covered that but then you kept going allies. This is not a joking time no he. He is what he meant by it and the whole intervention in what was done. I can't remember entirely. I think they obviously reassigned the room because it's one of those the racist kids right to express himself is also something that's a thing of of course but also i mean come on. That's not the kind of thing that you mediate on your own when you're right. You have to kick that up to oh. That's supervisor but i remember telling my supervisor. I'm like you. No i remember sometimes when when beef happened with my residents like somebody using a word that the other person finds offensive and and tell the kid who's using the offensive word like back you know always they go well. That's my right i have. I have a right to use outward. You can't tell me that i can't you like dude total. You absolutely have a right to use that word. Do you have to be an asshole right now. Have the right to be an asshole like. Where did you grow up that you feel the need like somebody's taking something away from you. If you also have have a right to shit on your dining room table every day that is a right people in america half that doesn't mean one should defend that right to shit on their dining room table slippery slippery slope. It is <hes> u._c._l._a. Yeah just have to give this shutout because that's where you asked about the screen name <hes> that's that's where it sort of came together many a late night in the dorms like sitting in these stairwells and talking about nothing with people that become your best friends. I think it was my into in my second year and we were talking about. I was trying to get auditions and i would every wednesday. I would go down to this new stint on gayley avenue and get backstage west. Oh oh yeah which is now. I think only online right yeah. I always felt like i was participating in. Someone's murder plot when i was submitting. I've i've met people in one bedroom. Apartments roles one hundred percent..

Monica d._c new york supervisor rocco u._c._l._a. u._c._l._a seattle hassan hussin england Kalpa murder america u._c._l._a. l._a california l. a. school charlottesville ellis professor forty forty two percent one hundred percent
"penn" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"penn" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"Author author sean penn north author but with sean penn actor sean penn writer sean penn producer director and what we're in good fellow yeah i don't know if he would agree with that i've got asked him she thinks of himself as a good fellow will lead off with that when you get you wait a minute and it gets as there he is he's hearing in the door to that crowd my god carryon sean hello mr pin julia very well welcome so we were just talking about you and wondering whether because i had caused spoken to view as a good fellow one year if you think of yourself as a good fellow i think my my goto consolation when things are difficult is that worse things have happened to better people and so so i'm thinking i'm going to hold onto that for the time being that's good i who is there anybody on the face of the earth that could say that that couldn't say worse things that happened to better pay true it's a good go grace auditor yet really true but i think the question about do you think yourself is a good fellow do you think of yourself as good fellow normally yeah yeah yeah i mean i wish to be hoped to be tried to be i mean i don't you know i'm sure there are people have problems with me though lots of them are listening now yeah i think those guys are things it's always a good idea to be able to win one doubts themselves to two zero out and be just a little bit better the next day and you know it's it's it's hard to know sometimes how to be a good fella sometimes the best intentions go very wrong and one can wrestle with themselves about decisions that they made and so on and and way that in the balanced but yes the answer is i think i'm a pretty good fellow i see it in the eyes of my kids.

director julia auditor sean penn writer producer one year
"penn" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"penn" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Sean welcome to my office thank you very much this is a real pleasure and honor the book is an one holding it up as if there's a camera but i will for your benfit bob honey who who just do stuff i enjoyed it it's a wild ride and yeah i mean i i my first thought or question for you is whenever you have new project whether it's a book or film i think you know this by now you're a divisive figure mr sean penn people seem to for whatever reason go to polar extremes when your name is brought up is that something that you've reconciled at this point is that something that you remember time before that happened i'm just curious of sort of like how you absorb the extreme way people react to you well i think you know reconciliation with it certainly is is a piece of my life and yet there's the part of it outs as a person among a world of people where i think we all should be considering ways in which we discourage divisiveness right and this book bob hunter who just is stuff while i'm sure for for the the reckless reader may seem again divisive it the the hope and the the offering is that there is a humor in the division right and that where there's humor perhaps there's less division right it's it's honey because i was thinking that when i was reading the book.

bob hunter mr sean penn
"penn" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"penn" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"A fair amount you know we cover some of his notable collaborations terrence malick and woody allen brian depalma the list goes on and on and also talk to sean penn is the talk to somebody that's kind of a kind of a custodian kind of a a the latest in a lineage of great actors and he has deep connections with some of the the past generations he was very good friends with marlon brando he's very good friends with jack nicholson to this day so some really fascinating interesting anecdotes including sean penn's marlon brando impression i don't know if i've ever heard that this might be a an exclusive so he's he's a fascinating guy i know i know he's divisive to some count me in the camp that that admires sean penn as an actor as an activist as an iconic last he's a sees a smart intimidating dude and i was thrilled to welcome him to the office and to have this very fascinating to say the least chat so i'm gonna leave it at that and let you guys enjoy this conversation remember to enjoy his new book bob honey who just do stuff it is out in bookstores if a bookstore still exists near you or amazon and all those other kind of fun places you can bite online and of course remember to spread the good word of the podcast remember to review rate and subscribe on itunes spread the good word of happy second fused it means a lot to me so thanks advance here it is sean.

terrence malick brian depalma marlon brando jack nicholson sean penn bob honey woody allen
"penn" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"penn" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Today on happy say confused sean penn on his debut novel giving up acting just being sean fucking goes hey everybody i'm josh horowitz welcome to another edition of happy sad confused i'm sorry for the profanity right off the bat but sean penn guys sean effing penn flying solo for the podcast intro today sammy's otherwise occupied sad to say because i need someone to talk to about this i sean penn just left my office we had a wildly chat i was nervous about this one last time i was this nervous was was jane fonda movie tomlin and you know similar to those two you know i cons and they are i cons sean penn is an icon and needed intimidating dude i've never spoken to him before we cover a lot of this conversation his new book is called bob honey who just do stuff at as outright now it's a quick read it's a fun bizarre read it almost a fis description it's it's a novel about a septic tank salesman slash assassin it deals with very topical issues touches a little bit on meet to and are crazy commander in chief perhaps and and it's out there it's like sean penn i think you're going to other love this thing or it's just not going to be for you but if you do want to sit and in luxury it's in in sean penn's brain for a few hours this is the best way to do it besides listening to this podcast of course it's the go out and buy bob honey who just do stuff sean is very passionate about this new project and we talk about that and what why he is focusing on writing right now and of course we talk about where he is in his acting career and if you may have heard that he is talking very seriously about giving up acting he's talked about this in the past to be fair and maybe this won't last forever but he is serious about kind of falling out of love with acting and he details the reasons why in this conversation but just because he's non love with with acting and film doesn't mean i couldn't let this go by and not talk about some of his genius work as an actor and we cover.

sean penn josh horowitz sammy tomlin bob honey salesman jane fonda
"penn" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"penn" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Penn ratte all with the route no momma thous one may everybody's done common nobody wants to be alone because man without a woman i share slacking longrange and listen tired of most pen smc and why great the braille two that is you know in all they want no no back upon range then through paul waves range of things birth dan death three.

paul waves Penn
"penn" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"penn" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Penn provided tale some one great two two if you now well i wanna know no right and then through the world all waves range is dan yes three one nobody wants to be awhile optus and on and on and on and on down me me the range agent as then through dan.

Penn optus